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Frankenstein

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Obsessed with natural philosophy, young Victor Frankenstein succeeds in creating life from its basic elements - and abandons the newborn monstrosity in terror when he cannot bear to look at it. The rejected creature vanishes, and Victor attempts to forget what he has done... But the monster survives. It learns. Deprived of everything, fated to forever be alone, it has nothi Obsessed with natural philosophy, young Victor Frankenstein succeeds in creating life from its basic elements - and abandons the newborn monstrosity in terror when he cannot bear to look at it. The rejected creature vanishes, and Victor attempts to forget what he has done... But the monster survives. It learns. Deprived of everything, fated to forever be alone, it has nothing left but revenge. Manga Classics® proudly present a frightening new manga adaptation of Mary Shelley's Frankenstein - a classic tale of creation and destruction!


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Obsessed with natural philosophy, young Victor Frankenstein succeeds in creating life from its basic elements - and abandons the newborn monstrosity in terror when he cannot bear to look at it. The rejected creature vanishes, and Victor attempts to forget what he has done... But the monster survives. It learns. Deprived of everything, fated to forever be alone, it has nothi Obsessed with natural philosophy, young Victor Frankenstein succeeds in creating life from its basic elements - and abandons the newborn monstrosity in terror when he cannot bear to look at it. The rejected creature vanishes, and Victor attempts to forget what he has done... But the monster survives. It learns. Deprived of everything, fated to forever be alone, it has nothing left but revenge. Manga Classics® proudly present a frightening new manga adaptation of Mary Shelley's Frankenstein - a classic tale of creation and destruction!

30 review for Frankenstein

  1. 4 out of 5

    Melissa ♥ Dog/Wolf Lover ♥ Martin

    4.5 Stars ⭐️ This cover is everything! I was thrilled when I saw this Manga and Anne of Green Gables on preorder. Naturally I had to get them and I have not been let down thus far! Mel 🖤🐶🐺🐾

  2. 4 out of 5

    Bernie Gourley

    This is Mary Shelly’s story adapted into a manga-style graphic novel. It’s the story of an ambitious young scientist, Victor Frankenstein, who races to create a human-like living being, but faced with the horror of seeing the creature alive and in the flesh, Victor flees, abandoning his “monster” to its own resources. Shelly’s story is considered one of the first (if not The first) science fiction novel and is also one of the great works of horror. But it’s not just a piece of cross-genre pop fi This is Mary Shelly’s story adapted into a manga-style graphic novel. It’s the story of an ambitious young scientist, Victor Frankenstein, who races to create a human-like living being, but faced with the horror of seeing the creature alive and in the flesh, Victor flees, abandoning his “monster” to its own resources. Shelly’s story is considered one of the first (if not The first) science fiction novel and is also one of the great works of horror. But it’s not just a piece of cross-genre pop fiction. Because it artfully deals with a number of issues central to the human experience, such as the potential for monstrosity in ambition and question of whether evil is made or birthed, the book is frequently studied as literary fiction and is one of the preeminent works of the Romantic movement. The manga adaptation follows the beats of Shelly’s story. The story opens in media res with a Captain Walton seeing Victor out on the ice. Victor is giving chase to his creature. Walton brings the haggard scientist aboard. Thus, the tale is told through this device of a story within a story. The manga adaptation even begins with an epistolary (told through letters) entry and revisits that form briefly at the end. However, the story is largely conveyed as a shipboard Victor introduces flashbacks by directly speaking to the Captain. Shelly wrote the novel in epistolary form, which was popular in those days, but it isn’t the most conducive to a graphic vehicle. The epistolary dialogue bubbles are given their own distinct font, and so it’s not hard to distinguish them. The major points of the story will be familiar to many, even if one hasn’t read the book. [While the most famous of the movies are quite different and less philosophical, elements of the story appear throughout various pop culture media.] In a nutshell, Victor Frankenstein goes off to university, learns to animate a pile of stitched up animal and human parts, and goes deadbeat dad when his creature comes to life. A while later, Victor returns to his home to find that his young brother William has been murdered, and that a beloved family servant, Justine, is to be tried for the killing. Nobody in the family believes Justine is responsible, and Victor (in particular) has reason to believe his sins have come back to haunt him. (However, Victor’s ongoing lack of capacity to truly see what his sins are and to address them is the source of virtually all the suffering in the book – not only his own. While the creature does the killing, Victor often comes off more monstrously. Conversely, the creature explains himself in a way that invites empathy in the reader.) The monster appears to Victor and tells him the whole story of what happened after Victor fled. The creature wandered off and prodigiously learned how to be human [including how to speak and read classic literature,] largely by watching the De Lacey family from a distance. In his loneliness, the creature introduces himself to the blind old man De Lacey, and the meeting is going swimmingly until De Lacey’s [sighted] children come home and freak out upon seeing the monstrous (if articulate) being before them. This is when, twice spurned, the monster goes to Victor’s home, kills William, and frames Justine. The monster offers Victor a deal, if Victor will build the creature a companion, it will stop its deadly rampage. Victor travels to England and Scotland, mostly with a friend Clerval, but leaves solo to a remote island to construct and animate the creature’s companion. The creature follows him. With Frankenstein’s bride stitched together, Victor has a change of heart and destroys it as the creature watches. Instead of killing Victor as the self-obsessed scientist expects it to, the creature retreats after delivering an ominous threat. A pair of dire tragedies follow. It is the second of these that results in Victor’s chase of the monster toward the Arctic pole. Soon, we are back to the point that Victor is on the ship. The crew are petitioning Captain Walton to return toward home even though Victor has already begged the Captain to assume the scientist’s obligation to kill the creature [if the beaten-down scientist is unable to.] Ultimately, Walton agrees to turn back because he is at risk of getting his crew killed. Victor is in poor shape. We see the creature once more, when he comes to ask forgiveness of his creator. The creature explains to Walton that it isn’t the only monster, nor is it the one whose actions really created the tragedy. I thought the art, which was drawn and shaded in monochrome, was well-done. The artist took efforts to capture the descriptions conveyed in the book. They chose to stick with the convention of reading as one would a Japanese manga (right to left, not left to right,) but there is a handy explainer page up front to make this clear from the start. Also, there are visual cues to help remind one as one reads, e.g. how the bubbles are positioned and angled, etc., and so I can’t say I had any problem reading it that way. It just seemed a bit odd, but I don’t know whether there is a Japanese edition. If there isn’t, it seems like it would have been just as easy to put it together in the manner of an English language comic book, but – like I say – it was no great reading challenge. I thought this adaptation was well done. I think one gets a very good sense of the story through the combination of selected text and graphics, as well as the varied styles of text and thought bubbles used to suggest who is speaking or thinking. I’d highly recommend this book for those wishing to revisit the story in a compact and / or visual form, or even for those who have trouble following the writing style of early 19th century epistolary novels, which can be a bit formal.

  3. 5 out of 5

    Carol Flores

    Another favorite from the Manga Classics collection! Frankenstein has been my favorite classic since I read it a few years ago and one of my goals was to read its different editions, so, as soon as I knew it was going to be adapted in the Manga Classics collection, I just couldn’t wait to have my hands on it! With that being said, I love that the manga format gave us the chance to see the multiple layers of both Victor and his Creature. Most of people often misunderstood Frankenstein as the monste Another favorite from the Manga Classics collection! Frankenstein has been my favorite classic since I read it a few years ago and one of my goals was to read its different editions, so, as soon as I knew it was going to be adapted in the Manga Classics collection, I just couldn’t wait to have my hands on it! With that being said, I love that the manga format gave us the chance to see the multiple layers of both Victor and his Creature. Most of people often misunderstood Frankenstein as the monster, when it’s actually the last name of the young and brilliant scientist. The Creature, often seen as “the monster”, merely wanted something we all crave and long for: a companion, friends and/or family, to feel worthy of love and respect. He wanted to feel the warmth of a home, as well as cherished and ultimately, he craved to belong to something bigger than himself. He loved nature and the simple things life brings such as the sunshine on his skin, music in his ears or a well-written book in his hands. He had passions just as do we all, but he had a terrible fate, you see? Therefore, he swore to take his revenge on the world. The Creature learns to communicate and he finds his creator after a couple of years since he was abandoned, only to make a request: to have a companion, someone just like him, so they could live afar from the world and its prejudices. Victor, perhaps out of pity, starts to work again, to give him what he asks so eagerly. Yet, the young man realizes that he will create another “monster” and perhaps an ugly, malicious new race. A moment later, he destroys this new being, therefore we see the Creature swear his revenge on him. Eventually, people in Victor’s circle begin to die, one by one, until he has no one left alive, except himself. Cursed, broken and unbound to all the living things, they chase each other, until one of them ceases to exist. Now, what I have always loved about this classic is that it portrays humanity in its different shades of gray. That emotional range along with the complexity and yet wonderful aspects of life, are my favorite thing in the world, and it will always have a special place in my heart. I think this adaptation makes a wonderful job telling the story of both Victor and his Creature. I would highly recommend you to check this out if you haven’t had the chance to read the original work. I received an e-book ARC in exchange for an honest review via Diamond Comic Distributors. PREVIOUS REVIEWS FROM THE MANGA CLASSICS COLLECTION: Great Expectations | Jane Eyre | The Count of Monte Cristo | The Adventures of Huckleberry Finn

  4. 5 out of 5

    Kailey (Luminous Libro)

    Dr. Frankenstein becomes obsessed with the idea of infusing life into a created being, but when he succeeds, he is horrified at what he has done and runs from his creation, leaving it to fend for itself. Frankenstein's monster roams the country, searching for his creator and finding only hatred and fear in everyone he meets. He vows to get revenge on the man who made him, and goes on a killing spree. I thought the artwork did a wonderful job of showing the gothic melodrama and darkness of the sto Dr. Frankenstein becomes obsessed with the idea of infusing life into a created being, but when he succeeds, he is horrified at what he has done and runs from his creation, leaving it to fend for itself. Frankenstein's monster roams the country, searching for his creator and finding only hatred and fear in everyone he meets. He vows to get revenge on the man who made him, and goes on a killing spree. I thought the artwork did a wonderful job of showing the gothic melodrama and darkness of the story. There are many scenes that use shadows to show the tension in the characters. The art makes their intense emotions explode onto the page. Dr. Frankenstein is a wild character. He is a genius, and his mind goes skittering in all different directions. Like many highly intelligent people, he can be ridiculously stupid and obtuse about certain things. He is a chaotic person, and he just doesn't know how to handle the responsibility of what he has done. I loved the way that the side characters are developed, and how their influence on young Frankenstein is explored. The monster is also highly intelligent, but he uses his intelligence for evil. He thinks he is justified in murdering and getting revenge, since he has also been wronged. At first I sympathize with him, but when he starts murdering people, I end up hating him. It's really incredible character development to see the way he descends into violence. I have read many of the other Manga Classics, and really loved them. So I came into this with high expectations, and I was not disappointed! It can be difficult to organize a classic into a graphic medium, but the story flows along wonderfully with most of the original dialogue from the original book. I really enjoyed revisiting this classic in graphic novel form! Disclaimer: I received a copy of this book from the publisher in exchange for a free and honest review. All the opinions stated here are my own true thoughts, and are not influenced by anyone.

  5. 4 out of 5

    Matthew Noe

    I love Frankenstein and this adaptation captured the agony perfectly

  6. 4 out of 5

    Liz (Quirky Cat)

    I received a copy of Manga Classics: Frankenstein in exchange for a fair and honest review. Yes! It's another manga adaptation of a classic, and this time around, it's Frankenstein! I couldn't be happier about the news, or about the entire experience. Manga Classics: Frankenstein was created by M. Chandler and Linus Liu, not to mention the original author, Mary Shelly. As with the rest of this collection, one of the biggest points is to make as many of the classics as possible accessible for I received a copy of Manga Classics: Frankenstein in exchange for a fair and honest review. Yes! It's another manga adaptation of a classic, and this time around, it's Frankenstein! I couldn't be happier about the news, or about the entire experience. Manga Classics: Frankenstein was created by M. Chandler and Linus Liu, not to mention the original author, Mary Shelly. As with the rest of this collection, one of the biggest points is to make as many of the classics as possible accessible for all readers. How many times have you looked towards a classic novel, only to be intimidated by the sheer volume of it? Well, Manga Classics not only changes the format, but it typically condenses the story as well (as a requirement of the medium). It probably goes without saying that I am a huge fan of Frankenstein, and thus I screamed just a little bit when I saw this latest adaptation. Obviously, that meant I had high expectations going into it. So, that raises the question, did it hold up? Absolutely! M. Chandler and Linus Liu did a fantastic job of bringing Mary Shelly's story to life on these pages. Everything from the decisions made about the adaptation, to the art style itself was really well done. Speaking of the art, I really do feel like it was the perfect fit. The cover should give potential readers a good idea of what I'm talking about. It's the right blend of that classic Frankenstein style, and the style inherent to manga. In short: Manga Classics: Frankenstein was pure perfection, and I highly recommend it to anyone and everyone. It doesn't matter if you've read the story a hundred times, or not a single time. Either way, it is an experience worth diving into. Check out more of my reviews over at Quirky Cat's Fat Stacks

  7. 4 out of 5

    April Gray

    This is the first of the Manga Classics series I've read, and I quite enjoyed it! I haven't read the original version yet (in this case, the author of the adaption used the original 1818 edition of the book), but it's in the line up, y'all know how that TBR pile is. I can't say for sure how close this gets to the source material, but it seems like it's close based on what I've read about Frankenstein. What a story, peeps, a jerk scientist who refuses to take responsibility for his actions create This is the first of the Manga Classics series I've read, and I quite enjoyed it! I haven't read the original version yet (in this case, the author of the adaption used the original 1818 edition of the book), but it's in the line up, y'all know how that TBR pile is. I can't say for sure how close this gets to the source material, but it seems like it's close based on what I've read about Frankenstein. What a story, peeps, a jerk scientist who refuses to take responsibility for his actions creates a man by sewing together a bunch of body parts, human and animal, then gets all petulant when his creation isn't beautiful. Dude, you saw that body before you sparked it up, did you think there was going to be a Magical Monster Transformation Sequence and he'd turn pretty if you gave him some juice? So Victor runs away, leaving poor monster guy alone, not knowing what was going on. He goes out into the world, gets hated on, hides in the shed by a cottage and stalker watches some family, learns how to speak, reads books, gets smart, tries to make friends, and gets run off again. Guy goes looking for his maker, and bunches of stuff happens I'm not gonna totally spoil this), and the end is just messed up. Great story, but it's not a happy one. The art really works with the text, the artist captures the feels of the story, gives us clues to what's going on that isn't included in the text, and makes us feel the madness of Victor Frankenstein.

  8. 5 out of 5

    Melissa

    Frankenstein is a well-known story that has been regularly classified as both horror and a cautionary tale, earning both of those titles thoroughly with a plot that is as intriguing as it is unsettling. Liu's illustrations accompany Chandler's adapted story and text with deft line work and panels full of emotion. The art quickly establishes changes in scenery with sweeping landscapes and just as easily depicts the quick changes in emotions for the large cast of characters. This latter skill is we Frankenstein is a well-known story that has been regularly classified as both horror and a cautionary tale, earning both of those titles thoroughly with a plot that is as intriguing as it is unsettling. Liu's illustrations accompany Chandler's adapted story and text with deft line work and panels full of emotion. The art quickly establishes changes in scenery with sweeping landscapes and just as easily depicts the quick changes in emotions for the large cast of characters. This latter skill is well matched to the story as Frankenstein's descent into madness (or drive to atone for his actions, depending on how you perceive his character) and the creature's desire for love are key themes. Just as in the original, the manga has multiple narrators and this is done by altering the shape and color of the text boxes to assist readers in remembering who is telling their story at that point.  The abridged text, which contains Shelley's original words, is thus very easy to follow.  Chandler's selection of elements and pivotal plot points is fairly well done but some scenes feel repetitive as five years of events from the original are pushed into a smaller page count. Most notably is Victor's reactions to the creature's presence; he is immobilized with grief or madness a total of four times, which begins to feel excessive in a graphic novel a little over 300 pages.

  9. 4 out of 5

    Soobie's scared

    I love Manga Classics. They offer the best adaptation out there, and I'm always eager when I have a new volume. I studied Frankenstein in high school during our classes of English Literature. We read an excerpt, and we probably watched the movie with Robert De Niro, as well. I was intrigued by the original novel but I've never been brave enough to read it. So, I was happy when this came in the mail. I love the art, which is a bit different compared to the other Manga Classics books. It's dirtier a I love Manga Classics. They offer the best adaptation out there, and I'm always eager when I have a new volume. I studied Frankenstein in high school during our classes of English Literature. We read an excerpt, and we probably watched the movie with Robert De Niro, as well. I was intrigued by the original novel but I've never been brave enough to read it. So, I was happy when this came in the mail. I love the art, which is a bit different compared to the other Manga Classics books. It's dirtier and grittier but it fits the novel perfectly. I love the way the novel was adapted and it made me think about the creature differently. Manga Classics: The Scarlet Letter had the same effect on me. I hope they'll keep on adapting the great novels of literature because the Udon teams is doing such an excellent job.

  10. 5 out of 5

    Gretchen

    This review has been hidden because it contains spoilers. To view it, click here. A retelling of Mary Shelley's Frankenstein. I have not read the original full length book Frankenstein, but I still found this book enjoyable. Victor Frankenstein is fascinated by science, so much so that he wants to bring a creation to life. Once he succeeds, he is so disgusted by the creature he made that he flees from it and abandons it. The monster goes on to learn how to speak, but it is lonely. He resolves to force Frankenstein to make him a companion. Frankenstein initially agrees, but th A retelling of Mary Shelley's Frankenstein. I have not read the original full length book Frankenstein, but I still found this book enjoyable. Victor Frankenstein is fascinated by science, so much so that he wants to bring a creation to life. Once he succeeds, he is so disgusted by the creature he made that he flees from it and abandons it. The monster goes on to learn how to speak, but it is lonely. He resolves to force Frankenstein to make him a companion. Frankenstein initially agrees, but then changes his mind as he does not want to fill the world with monsters. The monster flies into a rage and says that he will kill everyone that Frankenstein loves which he does. Frankenstein dies while trying to pursue the monster. The monster expresses remorse and resolves to go to the southernmost point of the globe and die.

  11. 4 out of 5

    Emily Rainsford

    This was absolutely fantastic! I have not read the source material for this graphic adaptation and I found the story completely gripping. The adaptation was very well structured, it was always clear what was happening, and the art was incredible. A sense of atmosphere, of Frankenstein's torment, agony and madness, was very well evoked, as well as the morally grey nature of his monster - is he a base beast or just a misunderstood creature who craves connection? Both really, and I think that reall This was absolutely fantastic! I have not read the source material for this graphic adaptation and I found the story completely gripping. The adaptation was very well structured, it was always clear what was happening, and the art was incredible. A sense of atmosphere, of Frankenstein's torment, agony and madness, was very well evoked, as well as the morally grey nature of his monster - is he a base beast or just a misunderstood creature who craves connection? Both really, and I think that really came out well here. I loved the author's note in the back about the choices he made for the adaptation, and I love that he went with Shelley's original 1818 version of the novel, before it got changed for later versions. An unputdownable read for me. Thanks to Diamond Book Distributors for the digital review copy, my opinion is my own.

  12. 5 out of 5

    Martin Lukanov

    One of my earliest memories related to the classics of literature is watching the Japanese retellings of the Grimm Brother's fairytales, tat used to air every Saturday morning on the Bulgarian TV. Since then, contemporary retellings of famous pieces of literature and folklore have a special place in my heart. Why am I saying all of this? Because even with this soft spot for this the art of adaptation, together with a lifelong love of manga, I was unable to enjoy Manga Classics Frankenstein. Hell One of my earliest memories related to the classics of literature is watching the Japanese retellings of the Grimm Brother's fairytales, tat used to air every Saturday morning on the Bulgarian TV. Since then, contemporary retellings of famous pieces of literature and folklore have a special place in my heart. Why am I saying all of this? Because even with this soft spot for this the art of adaptation, together with a lifelong love of manga, I was unable to enjoy Manga Classics Frankenstein. Hell, I couldn't even finish it, it's that bad. From the uninspired drawing style to the shoddy writing, everything in this volume just screams half-assed work and lack of love towards the original.

  13. 5 out of 5

    Kelli

    This is a fairly enjoyable and pretty faithful manga adaptation of the classic story. I think the art conveys the complexity and horror of the narrative rather well. The monster is, especially, well articulated. Would definitely recommend~

  14. 4 out of 5

    Michele

    So many people think that this is just a book about a monster with bolts in his neck. This book is so much more! Very complex relationships. I took a class in college based on Mary Shelley and the writing of this book. It is really a very compelling read!

  15. 5 out of 5

    Adam Fisher

    Review submitted to Diamond Bookshelf for potential professional publication.

  16. 5 out of 5

    MoToEr

    As I see it, it's definitely a phenomenal book. As I see it, it's definitely a phenomenal book.

  17. 4 out of 5

    MJ

    This is perfection! I love everything about this ❤ And for anyone wondering- its the original 1818 edition that's been adapted, yay! : ) This is perfection! I love everything about this ❤ And for anyone wondering- its the original 1818 edition that's been adapted, yay! : )

  18. 4 out of 5

    Rebecca Walsh

  19. 4 out of 5

    Erik Ko

  20. 4 out of 5

    Sarah Smith

  21. 4 out of 5

    Kenan Banda

  22. 5 out of 5

    Kirstie

  23. 4 out of 5

    Paula

  24. 5 out of 5

    Ljiljana Krasic

  25. 5 out of 5

    Tanvi V

  26. 4 out of 5

    Haleigh

  27. 5 out of 5

    jacky

  28. 4 out of 5

    Rachel Castillo

  29. 4 out of 5

    JJ

  30. 5 out of 5

    Hage

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