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That Texas Blood, Vol. 1

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Sheriff Joe Bob Coates questions his effectiveness as the aging lawman of Ambrose County, Texas as chaos descends following an explosive highway confrontation and the mysterious death of local rogue Travis Terrill. Michael Lark (LAZARUS, Daredevil) calls the series "The best damn comic I've read in years." Sheriff Joe Bob Coates questions his effectiveness as the aging lawman of Ambrose County, Texas as chaos descends following an explosive highway confrontation and the mysterious death of local rogue Travis Terrill. Michael Lark (LAZARUS, Daredevil) calls the series "The best damn comic I've read in years."


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Sheriff Joe Bob Coates questions his effectiveness as the aging lawman of Ambrose County, Texas as chaos descends following an explosive highway confrontation and the mysterious death of local rogue Travis Terrill. Michael Lark (LAZARUS, Daredevil) calls the series "The best damn comic I've read in years." Sheriff Joe Bob Coates questions his effectiveness as the aging lawman of Ambrose County, Texas as chaos descends following an explosive highway confrontation and the mysterious death of local rogue Travis Terrill. Michael Lark (LAZARUS, Daredevil) calls the series "The best damn comic I've read in years."

30 review for That Texas Blood, Vol. 1

  1. 4 out of 5

    Sam Quixote

    Despite Ambrose County, Texas being a small town, it has more than its fair share of violence! And it seems violence only begets more violence, as a man returns to identify his estranged brother’s death, likely at the hands of some local mobsters, That Texas Blood stirs, and suddenly vengeance is on the cards! “Well…” … which is a phrase oft repeated in this book - that was surprising. Chris Condon and Jacob Phillips’ That Texas Blood, Volume 1 is one helluva debut! Like father, like son, Jacob Despite Ambrose County, Texas being a small town, it has more than its fair share of violence! And it seems violence only begets more violence, as a man returns to identify his estranged brother’s death, likely at the hands of some local mobsters, That Texas Blood stirs, and suddenly vengeance is on the cards! “Well…” … which is a phrase oft repeated in this book - that was surprising. Chris Condon and Jacob Phillips’ That Texas Blood, Volume 1 is one helluva debut! Like father, like son, Jacob Phillips, like his dad Sean, has found a great Ed Brubaker-esque partner in Chris Condon to produce what could easily be a new addition to the Criminal library. Except I don’t remember Brubaker being this good so early in his career. This doesn’t read like a newcomer comic at all - Condon’s storytelling is so damned confident and polished, from the fast-moving, exciting story, to the sharp characterisation and effortless dialogue, this reads like a veteran comics writer at the helm. It’s really impressive. Ditto Jacob Phillips. Prior to this I’ve only seen his colouring on Brubaker/Phillips’ books but damn this kid can draw every bit as good as his dad - and, again, still so young! The comic is well laid out with engaging and imaginative shots and expressive characters. Like the writing, it doesn’t seem possible that this is a first-timer’s effort but it looks like both Condon and Phillips are natural comics creators - or, more likely, have worked really hard at their craft to start this strong. There are some criticisms to be had, but no dealbreakers to stop this being a cracking comic. As skillful as Condon’s writing is, his clipped style can lead to some underwriting - Ray’s motivations in the opening story are unclear, as are the traumas of Randy’s childhood that haunt him so. The flipside is Joe Bob’s rambling dream story which is overlong, predictable and goes nowhere. Randy descends into his old self pretty darned quickly and decides to throw his new life away on nothing more than a hunch, which makes his revenge plan seem a little astoopid. I didn’t really understand his motivations either - if he hated his brother Travis so much, why go to such lengths to avenge him, particularly as it means his own future’s certain destruction? And the direction everything goes in this book is grim and gratuitously grimmer, which is the de facto direction of crime stories, and, while fine for the most part, still make the stories here less memorable because they’re such obvious choices. Well. Anyway. That Texas Blood, Volume 1 is still a terrific read and I enjoyed the hell out of it, blitzing through it in one sitting. Thank jeebus there’s more than one great creative team at Image capable of churning out quality crime comics! If you enjoy Brubaker/Phillips’ comics and/or Cormac McCarthy’s novels, you’ll definitely want to check this bad boy out. (Cowboy hat tip to L McCoy for the rec)

  2. 5 out of 5

    L. McCoy

    Holy fuck! This is the author’s first comic? Well, I’ll definitely be looking for more of his work. What’s it about? There’s this guy who’s brother dies. The main character goes back to his hometown in Texas and it turns out that this death leads to some pretty intense and complicated shit. Look guys, I’m trying not to spoil too much, read the book, okay? Why it gets 5-stars: The story is very intense and interesting. Waiting for the next issue each month like I did is how I imagine many feel waitin Holy fuck! This is the author’s first comic? Well, I’ll definitely be looking for more of his work. What’s it about? There’s this guy who’s brother dies. The main character goes back to his hometown in Texas and it turns out that this death leads to some pretty intense and complicated shit. Look guys, I’m trying not to spoil too much, read the book, okay? Why it gets 5-stars: The story is very intense and interesting. Waiting for the next issue each month like I did is how I imagine many feel waiting for the next episode of an award winning cable drama every week (I can’t fully say for sure though, I watch TV on streaming). This comic is a very compelling tale that keeps readers on the edge of their seats! The art is good. So it’s drawn by Jacob Phillips, who is the son of Sean Phillips. Having been a fan of Sean’s art for a while, it’s pretty obvious that while it is definitely different, Jacob was probably inspired by and learned a lot from his father. I think he’ll definitely be getting a lot of jobs in the family business and I look forward to seeing it. The characters are very well written and interesting throughout! This book, as I already said, is very intense throughout. This book has some twisty surprises. At first I was kinda thinking it was predictable but then the final half or so of the last issue in this arc completely shocked me. There’s a few comic relief moments that actually help the book in a way. Like, they feel like things that could happen or be said in this and it doesn’t take away from the seriousness of the story, it feels like a possible realistic thing to happen. Sorta similar to the comic relief bits in a lot of Stephen King stories. The ending is really good. It pretty much wraps everything up for this story (but supposedly there will be a second volume which I will definitely be reading). Mixed thoughts: Because the main character of the story is a writer there’s a prose story that’s meant to be something that the character wrote. So I don’t like when people mix comics and prose in one book and it is a rather slow story included but on the other hand it’s understandable in context of the comic’s story and it does get interesting so in the end, I think it works. I will note: having read this in single issues and waiting each month for the next one, that probably helped me not mind as much, I kinda hope Image puts this bit at the end of the book when it’s released as a full trade. I would have probably been more annoyed if it was at the end of each issue if I was just trying to get to the next part of the story I’m reading in a trade. Overall: This book is great! I’m no awards expert so can’t say for sure but with this level of greatness from new creators in comics, I would be surprised if these guys aren’t future Eisner award winners. This is a great story with well written characters, a very intense tone, some good twists at the end and nicely done artwork. Highly recommended! 5/5

  3. 4 out of 5

    Frédéric

    Good rural noir. Imperfections but I have great expectations for the next volume. After an excellent first issue that made me think of No country for old men all the way and which introduced laconic and elderly sheriff Joe Bob we plunge into a typical revenge story. It’s good, it’s violent, it’s noir but it’s not without flaws. Condon leaves much to the reader’s imagination. So much that some parts remain blurry. For starter Randy’s motivation to go back to Texas are very unclear considering he Good rural noir. Imperfections but I have great expectations for the next volume. After an excellent first issue that made me think of No country for old men all the way and which introduced laconic and elderly sheriff Joe Bob we plunge into a typical revenge story. It’s good, it’s violent, it’s noir but it’s not without flaws. Condon leaves much to the reader’s imagination. So much that some parts remain blurry. For starter Randy’s motivation to go back to Texas are very unclear considering he doesn’t seem to like his brother much. So why should he get sucked into such a spiral of violence. If one gets at once fond of Joe Bob-and Martha and Flores to an extent, Randy is way too underdeveloped for the reader to really care about him. Condon uses a very clipped text narration-third person, short sentences- quite opposed to Ed Brukaker’s (of course Brubaker would be cited somewhere, what did you expect?). It clearly doesn’t help "feeling" Randy. Oddly he doesnt do the same with Joe Bob. I understand that Joe Bob is somewhat the common thread of what Condon wants to develop but secondary main characters should be more focused on, if only to get the reader interested in them. Some ellipses are unclear and if the use of silent pages adds tension in the narration I feel like some of them could have been used to explain things better. Better still, it should have been 1 issue longer. Well. On the other hand Condon and Phillips really set up an excellent atmosphere. The pacing is oh so slow, splashed with sudden outbursts of violence. Again No country for old men comes to mind and I really liked book and mocie both. Jacob Phillips have been taught well and impressively stands out as a future worthy successor to his father. I’ll admit I’m not too fond of the way he colors for now but I’m pretty sure it’ll pass with time. I’m really looking forward to reading the next volume.

  4. 4 out of 5

    James DeSantis

    Obviously Chris grew up reading Brubaker's worth because...this is Brubaker-Lite. That's not a bad thing. In fact more comics that feature brutal crime stories is a good thing to me. When a brother comes into an old town to find out what happened, everyone begins betraying everyone. Deaths pile up quick, revenge is on everyone's mind. And here's the thing. I couldn't get invested in the characters at all. Everyone fell flat for me. The art? Amazing. The dialogue? Solid. But I didn't care to root Obviously Chris grew up reading Brubaker's worth because...this is Brubaker-Lite. That's not a bad thing. In fact more comics that feature brutal crime stories is a good thing to me. When a brother comes into an old town to find out what happened, everyone begins betraying everyone. Deaths pile up quick, revenge is on everyone's mind. And here's the thing. I couldn't get invested in the characters at all. Everyone fell flat for me. The art? Amazing. The dialogue? Solid. But I didn't care to root or like anyone. Also...and I know this was done on purpose (I believe so anyway) but if one more fucking person said "Well" I was going to fucking KILL SOMEONE!!!! Anyway, it was solid but I feel a little let down overall.

  5. 4 out of 5

    Kyle Dinges

    I came into this expecting I'd like it quite a bit. I didn't. It was okay. It's probably unfair to compare this to Criminal just because a member of the Phillips family is drawing, but it looks and feels like a Criminal story and that's what it seems like it wants to be. But the story part never really hits in the same way. Hell, the main character's narrative arc is nearly the same as Tracy Lawless. But the reason for Tracy's return and stay felt earned in a way it didn't here. (view spoiler)[I I came into this expecting I'd like it quite a bit. I didn't. It was okay. It's probably unfair to compare this to Criminal just because a member of the Phillips family is drawing, but it looks and feels like a Criminal story and that's what it seems like it wants to be. But the story part never really hits in the same way. Hell, the main character's narrative arc is nearly the same as Tracy Lawless. But the reason for Tracy's return and stay felt earned in a way it didn't here. (view spoiler)[I found it very hard to sympathize with Randy's motivations after the initial issue. Sure it makes sense you want to find out why and who murdered your estranged brother, but he just jumps to conclusions, disregards everything about the life he's built away from Texas, and fucks his entire life up in a span of 36 hours. I think I got whiplash from the freefall Randy experiences. It just left me wondering why he was such an idiot, not feeling bad about some romantic notion of Texas grit and family drawing him back in. It didn't feel earned. (hide spoiler)] It's Criminal lite.

  6. 5 out of 5

    Rory Wilding

    As the aging sheriff of Ambrose County, Texas, Joe Bob Coates questions his effectiveness in his lawful position following a highway confrontation involving a casserole dish and the mysterious death of local rogue Travis Terrill. When Los Angeles-based writer Randy Terrill finds out the news of his brother’s demise, he returns to his abandoned home to find out what really happened. Please click here for my full review. As the aging sheriff of Ambrose County, Texas, Joe Bob Coates questions his effectiveness in his lawful position following a highway confrontation involving a casserole dish and the mysterious death of local rogue Travis Terrill. When Los Angeles-based writer Randy Terrill finds out the news of his brother’s demise, he returns to his abandoned home to find out what really happened. Please click here for my full review.

  7. 4 out of 5

    Robert

    Bleak, lonely, and desolate, like the best of Cormac McCarthy.

  8. 4 out of 5

    Kaiulani

    A gritty and pulpy descent into madness that somehow feels very fresh. I loved it top to bottom.

  9. 4 out of 5

    Chris Thompson

    What an awesome story. This reads like a mix of Ed Brubaker and Cormac McCarthy, though less wordy than Brubaker. This is tightly written and highly engaging - it will suck you right in and won’t let go. I can’t wait to read what Condon has in store next.

  10. 5 out of 5

    Jake Nap

    A real page turner. I think it tries a bit too hard to emulate the feel of a Brubaker/Phillips book but it as a damn good copy. I think there’s merit to this beyond the obvious Brubaker/Phillips comparisons. Plot-wise it’s very similar but the characters feel a bit more animated (especially Joe Bob) than the typical self destructive Brubaker character (Though Randy is textbook Brubaker protagonist). The art and flow through the page is very unique as well. There are a ton of silent moments throu A real page turner. I think it tries a bit too hard to emulate the feel of a Brubaker/Phillips book but it as a damn good copy. I think there’s merit to this beyond the obvious Brubaker/Phillips comparisons. Plot-wise it’s very similar but the characters feel a bit more animated (especially Joe Bob) than the typical self destructive Brubaker character (Though Randy is textbook Brubaker protagonist). The art and flow through the page is very unique as well. There are a ton of silent moments throughout which is nice considering that Jacob Phillips has a real talent for composing a nice page. I really love the compositions for both the shots and pages. The book operates off a primarily 4 tier panel grid which allows for a lot of story to be told on one page. It never feels cluttered however and that’s because of the beautiful simplicity in Jacob’s work. There are also a lot of nice scenes where Jacob will use the same shot throughout a whole page or long string of panels allowing for movement to very easily be showcased. Overall great stuff. I think this will attract many Brubaker comparisons because of the plot and the art work but this has a ton of merit beyond that. Jacob Phillips and Chris Condon have their own flair for telling a story like this. Strong 7 out of 10

  11. 4 out of 5

    Shin

    i like what this book wanted to be and a lot of what it is. i guess it's the whole Texas cowboy white-trash people setup that i didn't enjoy so much. the art though is totally my style. Phillip's inky, gritty textured line and colorwork that doesnt try to be so smooth and perf... #ThatTexasBlood has a lot of that more-behind-what-it-shows air of mystery to it. i actually even thought there would be more supernatural affectations to it but that turns out to be some storytelling motif. i like Sher i like what this book wanted to be and a lot of what it is. i guess it's the whole Texas cowboy white-trash people setup that i didn't enjoy so much. the art though is totally my style. Phillip's inky, gritty textured line and colorwork that doesnt try to be so smooth and perf... #ThatTexasBlood has a lot of that more-behind-what-it-shows air of mystery to it. i actually even thought there would be more supernatural affectations to it but that turns out to be some storytelling motif. i like Sheriff Joe Bob and no one else. maybe that's another reason im not so wowed with this overall. the characters are mostly angry, unhappy people with issues i dont care for. especially the main dude this run was mostly about. Volume One told pretty much a complete story so maybe the second will be about entirely something else. if that's the case I'm totally signing up for it. i hope there will be more lovable characters. read this if you're into - horrible people committing crimes and dying - that cursed town Twin Peaks feel - actually sharp, thoughtful southern American dialogue.

  12. 5 out of 5

    Niall Philyaw

    Well. That was really good! Even with the sheriff’s overuse of “well,” I still found the word endearing. It had a different meaning each time! The dialogue in general felt unique even though I don’t have any familiarity with Texas speech patterns. I’ve never read anything by Chris Condon. Maybe this is his first comics work. I would seek out more work by him. It had the feeling of an Ed Brubaker crime story, which is a high compliment. The story is a familiar one with the brother returning to his Well. That was really good! Even with the sheriff’s overuse of “well,” I still found the word endearing. It had a different meaning each time! The dialogue in general felt unique even though I don’t have any familiarity with Texas speech patterns. I’ve never read anything by Chris Condon. Maybe this is his first comics work. I would seek out more work by him. It had the feeling of an Ed Brubaker crime story, which is a high compliment. The story is a familiar one with the brother returning to his small town roots in the wake of a tragedy. But it’s told in such a way that grips the reader. The art is also solid. Jacob Phillips is Sean Phillips son, so it makes sense that his art would be perfect for a gritty revenge story. He captures the actions and emotions of the Texas denizens very well. Well, I’d say if you like Ed Brubaker and Sean Phillips collaborations, you should try That Texas Blood.

  13. 5 out of 5

    Kevin Duvall

    I’d never heard of Chris Condon before I saw That Texas Blood previewed in an issue of Criminal. I had been loving Jacob Phillips’s pinups in Criminal, so the fact that he was doing the interior art for this series was enough for me to buy the first issue. It reminds me a lot of the Ed Brubaker/Sean Phillips collaborations (surprise!), but it has its own distinct flavor and I became invested in the characters pretty much instantly. I hope the creators get the breakout hit they deserve with this I’d never heard of Chris Condon before I saw That Texas Blood previewed in an issue of Criminal. I had been loving Jacob Phillips’s pinups in Criminal, so the fact that he was doing the interior art for this series was enough for me to buy the first issue. It reminds me a lot of the Ed Brubaker/Sean Phillips collaborations (surprise!), but it has its own distinct flavor and I became invested in the characters pretty much instantly. I hope the creators get the breakout hit they deserve with this book.

  14. 5 out of 5

    Paul Allard

    Usual small town USA violent fare - still well done. Murder and mayhem in a small town in the US in this comic series: not a particularly original concept but still well delivered with a good plot and detailed, clear artwork. The characters are quite well developed if not a bit stereotypical. It’s a modern Western. It’s good enough but there’s a lot of similar stuff about. . I received a copy of this series in exchange for an honest review.

  15. 4 out of 5

    Rubén Molina Herranz

    Chris Condon and Jacob Phillips, their first printed comic as a creative duo and it's pretty good. Noir story in Texas with the consequences that can bring into the story that Texas Blood. Very well written and drawn, Condon and Phillips, if they continue with this level and getting better, they could be the next Brubaker and Phillips. Chris Condon and Jacob Phillips, their first printed comic as a creative duo and it's pretty good. Noir story in Texas with the consequences that can bring into the story that Texas Blood. Very well written and drawn, Condon and Phillips, if they continue with this level and getting better, they could be the next Brubaker and Phillips.

  16. 5 out of 5

    Matt

    This had all the makings of a home run for me: a wizened sheriff a la No Country for Old Men, a small Texas town w/ violence worthy of a Jim Thompson book or Blood Simple, but the story floundered and listlessly shifted between characters, hoping its lifted grittiness and solid art were enough to keep it afloat, but it just didn't work for me. This had all the makings of a home run for me: a wizened sheriff a la No Country for Old Men, a small Texas town w/ violence worthy of a Jim Thompson book or Blood Simple, but the story floundered and listlessly shifted between characters, hoping its lifted grittiness and solid art were enough to keep it afloat, but it just didn't work for me.

  17. 4 out of 5

    Lukas Holmes

    Ehhhhh. In the span of a week I read a book that perfectly captured being a kid from Texas, and then one that seems a bit opposite of my experiences there. I mean. Things were rough in our little East Texas town, for sure. But I don't remember everyone killing each other. Maybe times changed? Ehhhhh. In the span of a week I read a book that perfectly captured being a kid from Texas, and then one that seems a bit opposite of my experiences there. I mean. Things were rough in our little East Texas town, for sure. But I don't remember everyone killing each other. Maybe times changed?

  18. 4 out of 5

    Ed

    Jacob Phillips is a very talented artist; he’s currently working in the style of his father and I’m curious to see where he takes that. The writing of this book was mostly a pile of cliches, but it was fun enough.

  19. 4 out of 5

    Daniel Vlasaty

    really dug this. great writing and great art. it was gritty and dark and mysterious. ending was a little soft, a little weak though

  20. 4 out of 5

    Chris

    Great art, simple and great story. Awesome and down to earth characters. Can easily be a tv series.

  21. 5 out of 5

    Andres Pasten

    Si te gusta la linea Criminal de Brubaker/Phillips este cómic es una grata mezcla con "No es país para viejos" de McCarthy. Bien narrada e ilustrada. Si te gusta la linea Criminal de Brubaker/Phillips este cómic es una grata mezcla con "No es país para viejos" de McCarthy. Bien narrada e ilustrada.

  22. 4 out of 5

    Ed Dougherty

    Kinda good but ultimately felt too slight to me

  23. 5 out of 5

    Nomad nimrod

    Pretty good.

  24. 5 out of 5

    Asher

    Amazing artwork though.

  25. 5 out of 5

    Sheikh Zaman

    Good book with a decent story.

  26. 5 out of 5

    AitziST

  27. 4 out of 5

    Tad

  28. 5 out of 5

    Ditrih

  29. 4 out of 5

    K. Thomas

  30. 5 out of 5

    Dave

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