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The Horde: How the Mongols Changed the World

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An epic history of the Mongols as we have never seen them―not just conquerors but also city builders, diplomats, and supple economic thinkers who constructed one of the most influential empires in history. The Mongols are widely known for one thing: conquest. In the first comprehensive history of the Horde, the western portion of the Mongol empire that arose after the death An epic history of the Mongols as we have never seen them―not just conquerors but also city builders, diplomats, and supple economic thinkers who constructed one of the most influential empires in history. The Mongols are widely known for one thing: conquest. In the first comprehensive history of the Horde, the western portion of the Mongol empire that arose after the death of Chinggis Khan, Marie Favereau shows that the accomplishments of the Mongols extended far beyond war. For three hundred years, the Horde was no less a force in global development than Rome had been. It left behind a profound legacy in Europe, Russia, Central Asia, and the Middle East, palpable to this day. Favereau takes us inside one of the most powerful sources of cross-border integration in world history. The Horde was the central node in the Eurasian commercial boom of the thirteenth and fourteenth centuries and was a conduit for exchanges across thousands of miles. Its unique political regime―a complex power-sharing arrangement among the khan and the nobility―rewarded skillful administrators and diplomats and fostered an economic order that was mobile, organized, and innovative. From its capital at Sarai on the lower Volga River, the Horde provided a governance model for Russia, influenced social practice and state structure across Islamic cultures, disseminated sophisticated theories about the natural world, and introduced novel ideas of religious tolerance. The Horde is the eloquent, ambitious, and definitive portrait of an empire little understood and too readily dismissed. Challenging conceptions of nomads as peripheral to history, Favereau makes clear that we live in a world inherited from the Mongol moment.


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An epic history of the Mongols as we have never seen them―not just conquerors but also city builders, diplomats, and supple economic thinkers who constructed one of the most influential empires in history. The Mongols are widely known for one thing: conquest. In the first comprehensive history of the Horde, the western portion of the Mongol empire that arose after the death An epic history of the Mongols as we have never seen them―not just conquerors but also city builders, diplomats, and supple economic thinkers who constructed one of the most influential empires in history. The Mongols are widely known for one thing: conquest. In the first comprehensive history of the Horde, the western portion of the Mongol empire that arose after the death of Chinggis Khan, Marie Favereau shows that the accomplishments of the Mongols extended far beyond war. For three hundred years, the Horde was no less a force in global development than Rome had been. It left behind a profound legacy in Europe, Russia, Central Asia, and the Middle East, palpable to this day. Favereau takes us inside one of the most powerful sources of cross-border integration in world history. The Horde was the central node in the Eurasian commercial boom of the thirteenth and fourteenth centuries and was a conduit for exchanges across thousands of miles. Its unique political regime―a complex power-sharing arrangement among the khan and the nobility―rewarded skillful administrators and diplomats and fostered an economic order that was mobile, organized, and innovative. From its capital at Sarai on the lower Volga River, the Horde provided a governance model for Russia, influenced social practice and state structure across Islamic cultures, disseminated sophisticated theories about the natural world, and introduced novel ideas of religious tolerance. The Horde is the eloquent, ambitious, and definitive portrait of an empire little understood and too readily dismissed. Challenging conceptions of nomads as peripheral to history, Favereau makes clear that we live in a world inherited from the Mongol moment.

39 review for The Horde: How the Mongols Changed the World

  1. 5 out of 5

    John W.

    Very interesting history of the Horde but gets bogged down in the details. The best part of the book is the introduction which summarizes the book and the rest of the book adds detailed history but does not add very much.

  2. 4 out of 5

    Katie

  3. 5 out of 5

    Wake Harper

  4. 5 out of 5

    G J

  5. 4 out of 5

    Margaret Burdette

  6. 4 out of 5

    Nicholas

  7. 5 out of 5

    Srinivas Panjala

  8. 5 out of 5

    Mauricio Santoro

  9. 5 out of 5

    Evan L Herring

  10. 5 out of 5

    Jerome

  11. 5 out of 5

    Ian

  12. 5 out of 5

    Xavier J Mejido

  13. 5 out of 5

    Michael

  14. 5 out of 5

    Bill Hall

  15. 5 out of 5

    C. S.

  16. 4 out of 5

    *Tau*

  17. 4 out of 5

    Carrie

  18. 5 out of 5

    Mary Soon Lee

  19. 5 out of 5

    Brooke

  20. 5 out of 5

    Sam Seitz

  21. 4 out of 5

    Ina Cawl

  22. 5 out of 5

    Kusaimamekirai

  23. 5 out of 5

    Salvador Medina

  24. 5 out of 5

    James Harrison

  25. 5 out of 5

    Alisha

  26. 5 out of 5

    Saji

  27. 5 out of 5

    Lawrence

  28. 5 out of 5

    Kyle

  29. 4 out of 5

    Nefertari

  30. 5 out of 5

    Kathleen Bianchi

  31. 5 out of 5

    Celestemcolon

  32. 5 out of 5

    TorRig

  33. 4 out of 5

    Jennifer

  34. 5 out of 5

    Zachery Barger

  35. 5 out of 5

    Lorraine

  36. 5 out of 5

    Adam777T

  37. 4 out of 5

    Claire Nicholson

  38. 4 out of 5

    Dianne

  39. 4 out of 5

    Keck Williams

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