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Indivisible

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A timely, moving debut novel about a teen's efforts to keep his family together as his parents face deportation. Mateo Garcia and his younger sister, Sophie, have been taught to fear one word for as long as they can remember: deportation. Over the past few years, however, the fear that their undocumented immigrant parents could be sent back to Mexico has started to fade. Ma A timely, moving debut novel about a teen's efforts to keep his family together as his parents face deportation. Mateo Garcia and his younger sister, Sophie, have been taught to fear one word for as long as they can remember: deportation. Over the past few years, however, the fear that their undocumented immigrant parents could be sent back to Mexico has started to fade. Ma and Pa have been in the United States for so long, they have American-born children, and they're hard workers and good neighbors. When Mateo returns from school one day to find that his parents have been taken by ICE, he realizes that his family's worst nightmare has become a reality. With his parents' fate and his own future hanging in the balance, Mateo must figure out who he is and what he is capable of, even as he's forced to question what it means to be an American. Daniel Aleman's Indivisible is a remarkable story -- both powerful in its explorations of immigration in America and deeply intimate in its portrait of a teen boy driven by his fierce, protective love for his parents and his sister.


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A timely, moving debut novel about a teen's efforts to keep his family together as his parents face deportation. Mateo Garcia and his younger sister, Sophie, have been taught to fear one word for as long as they can remember: deportation. Over the past few years, however, the fear that their undocumented immigrant parents could be sent back to Mexico has started to fade. Ma A timely, moving debut novel about a teen's efforts to keep his family together as his parents face deportation. Mateo Garcia and his younger sister, Sophie, have been taught to fear one word for as long as they can remember: deportation. Over the past few years, however, the fear that their undocumented immigrant parents could be sent back to Mexico has started to fade. Ma and Pa have been in the United States for so long, they have American-born children, and they're hard workers and good neighbors. When Mateo returns from school one day to find that his parents have been taken by ICE, he realizes that his family's worst nightmare has become a reality. With his parents' fate and his own future hanging in the balance, Mateo must figure out who he is and what he is capable of, even as he's forced to question what it means to be an American. Daniel Aleman's Indivisible is a remarkable story -- both powerful in its explorations of immigration in America and deeply intimate in its portrait of a teen boy driven by his fierce, protective love for his parents and his sister.

30 review for Indivisible

  1. 5 out of 5

    Thomas

    One of the top young-adult debuts of 2021 so far. Invisible by Daniel Aleman tells the heartbreaking story of Mateo Garcia, a sixteen-year-old who’s world gets shaken when ICE agents arrest his parents one day after he comes home from school. Mateo adopts the responsibility of caring for his younger sister, Sophie, and tries his best to stay afloat with schoolwork and friendships, all while anticipating whether his parents will get deported from the United States. Though Mateo has some support f One of the top young-adult debuts of 2021 so far. Invisible by Daniel Aleman tells the heartbreaking story of Mateo Garcia, a sixteen-year-old who’s world gets shaken when ICE agents arrest his parents one day after he comes home from school. Mateo adopts the responsibility of caring for his younger sister, Sophie, and tries his best to stay afloat with schoolwork and friendships, all while anticipating whether his parents will get deported from the United States. Though Mateo has some support from his uncle Jorge and his wife Amy, as well as his friends Kimmie and Adam, he still must confront the challenge of his parents’ nebulous futures as well as what his own life may look like without them. Aleman does an excellent job of portraying the effects of deportation and the resulting parental separation on Latinx youth. My heart ached and my eyes teared up reading about Mateo and Sophie’s struggles during the whole process. Aleman doesn’t sugarcoat the siblings’ pain which helped Indivisible feel emotionally significant and authentic. He also writes so well about the deep love between Mateo, Sophie, and their parents, giving their relationships real weight in contrast with media representations that often dehumanize undocumented immigrants. I also enjoyed the diversity within Indivisible, in particular how Mateo and Adam are both gay without their sexualities being the main point of the novel, the romance between Kimmie and Darryl, an Asian and a Black side character, and the depth of Mateo and Kimmie’s friendship. My only constructive critique of the novel was relationship between Mateo and Adam. I felt that Aleman introduced such a riveting, painful conflict in terms of Mateo recognizing how Kimmie and Adam are much more privileged than he is due to their and their families’ documented status. However, I felt that the resolution of that conflict, especially in the relationship between Mateo and Adam, came across as a bit simplistic and tied up in the mores of romance. Now more than ever I wonder how many YA authors feel compelled to include a romance in their books just to play the amatonormative market. Still, I enjoyed this strong debut novel and feel hopeful in its ability to evoke empathy in readers in regard to issues of xenophobia and immigration.

  2. 4 out of 5

    Marieke du Pré

    Loving, raw, political, harsh, hopeful. Sometimes I wonder why I read YA stories that hurt so much. And then I realize I read them because they’re so, so important. And I hope a lot of other people read those stories too, especially teens, and reflect on them. Books like Indivisible belong in school libraries and need to be discussed in class. Although this is a story about Mexican immigrants in the US, I believe it’s comparable to similar situations with refugees in other countries (at least in Loving, raw, political, harsh, hopeful. Sometimes I wonder why I read YA stories that hurt so much. And then I realize I read them because they’re so, so important. And I hope a lot of other people read those stories too, especially teens, and reflect on them. Books like Indivisible belong in school libraries and need to be discussed in class. Although this is a story about Mexican immigrants in the US, I believe it’s comparable to similar situations with refugees in other countries (at least in mine), and therefore a powerful and necessary book for youth all over the world. Even though we’d always had this fear in the back of our minds, I didn’t think it was actually going to come true. Deportation always seemed like something that happened to other people ... not us. While reading this story, I got goosebumps, shivers ran through my body, and I couldn’t believe what I read, even though I know this happens all the time. What do you do when your parents are arrested because they’re illegal? Maybe even getting deported to Mexico? How do you cope? What do you tell your friends? Who do you go to? I feel empty. It’s as if I’m barely even here, as though this is nothing but a strange dream and I’m going to wake up any second. I was pleasantly surprised when I started reading the book to find out that Matt is gay. It’s not a major storyline, Matt just is. Most of the story is about his relationship with his seven-year-old sister Sophie. I had a soft spot for her, such a little girl who suddenly missed her parents and who had to cope with friends who told her Mexicans are ‘dirty’. There will always be people who think someone is worth less than they are because of what they look like or where they’re from. Just because there are people who believe these things, it doesn’t make any of it true. I loved Indivisible immensely, and already added Daniel Aleman’s next book to my TBR. Thanks, Daniel, for writing such a powerful and relevant debut!

  3. 5 out of 5

    Daniel Aleman

    The cover is now live! I am so thrilled to finally be able to share it, and I could not be more excited for this story to be on shelves next spring.

  4. 5 out of 5

    jut

    wow! this book broke my heart, the story is so heartbreaking, but i think it's a must read to everybody out there! i absolutely loved this book, and how it had real life problems and dealt with them in a realistic way (not always life is easy or going to be as we want it to be). wow! this book broke my heart, the story is so heartbreaking, but i think it's a must read to everybody out there! i absolutely loved this book, and how it had real life problems and dealt with them in a realistic way (not always life is easy or going to be as we want it to be).

  5. 5 out of 5

    Nenia ✨ I yeet my books back and forth ✨ Campbell

    YAY!!!! Getting an ARC!

  6. 5 out of 5

    Ali

    Updating my review because I had a chance to read the newest version of the book and all I can say is: wow. This book will make waves. It is not only a timely, much needed novel about immigration. It is also a beautifully told story about reaching for our dreams, finding solace in the most unexpected of places, and allowing other people to lift us up when we're at our lowest points. Readers of all ages will be blown away by Indivisible, and I can't wait to watch where this book ends up. Original Updating my review because I had a chance to read the newest version of the book and all I can say is: wow. This book will make waves. It is not only a timely, much needed novel about immigration. It is also a beautifully told story about reaching for our dreams, finding solace in the most unexpected of places, and allowing other people to lift us up when we're at our lowest points. Readers of all ages will be blown away by Indivisible, and I can't wait to watch where this book ends up. Original Review: I had the opportunity to read an early draft of this book and it’s everything I hoped it would be and more. I’m so happy that this important, heartfelt story will be on shelves.

  7. 5 out of 5

    meep

    This made me tear up a few times. I was really hoping to see a bit of Matt’s life during senior year but I absolutely loved this book

  8. 5 out of 5

    Gabriela

    Indivisible by Daniel Aleman is as timely as it is emotional. A beautiful story about family, friendship and what it means to be American.

  9. 4 out of 5

    Bianca Lara✨

    It had been a long time since I hadn't cried at every chapter of a book. I think the right words to describe this book are: heartbreaking, painful, hopeful, loving, friendship, family. This is a book that everyone should read because it is very real and happens every day in the lives of many Latino immigrants who only come to the United States to have a much better life that their countries cannot give them because of many other factors. In each of the chapters my heart ached as I read the situa It had been a long time since I hadn't cried at every chapter of a book. I think the right words to describe this book are: heartbreaking, painful, hopeful, loving, friendship, family. This is a book that everyone should read because it is very real and happens every day in the lives of many Latino immigrants who only come to the United States to have a much better life that their countries cannot give them because of many other factors. In each of the chapters my heart ached as I read the situation Mateo and Sophie went through once their parents were deported. In each chapter I felt an anguish of what was going to happen to them, who was going to take care of them, what awaited them each day. Reading Sophie's desperation to want to see and be with her parents broke my soul, and reading how Mateo suffered because he couldn't see and make his little sister happy. I just wanted to hold them and protect them forever. There were chapters where I suffered a lot, but there were also three chapters that really made me happy. Two of those chapters are related to the friendship Mateo has with his best friends: Adam and Kimmie. They protected him and gave him the support to keep him going despite how bad Mateo was having it. And that final chapter was like that light at the end of a very dark tunnel, it was hopeful and warmed my heart after all the suffering. Family is very important in this book and it's something that really influenced me to really love this book. Without a doubt, my favorite character is Mateo. He did really well and changed a lot, but he was always there for his sister, always protected her, always cared for her and always loved her. Plus I was really surprised that Mateo was gay, that gave another extra point for me to love this book even more. This book will always be one of my favorites and I really loved it! I will read everything Daniel Aleman writes.

  10. 5 out of 5

    ☁️ priya ☁️

    CW: deportation, verbal racial insults (off page), homophobia associated with Catholic Church (off page), anxiety, panic attacks. Indivisible reminds me of The Hate You Give because I started crying near the beginning and didn’t stop the whole way. Daniel Aleman and Angie Thomas’ novels are obviously similar in more important ways. They both have teenaged main characters who directly experience racial injustice and suffer at the hands of the American carceral system. Mateo, the main character of CW: deportation, verbal racial insults (off page), homophobia associated with Catholic Church (off page), anxiety, panic attacks. Indivisible reminds me of The Hate You Give because I started crying near the beginning and didn’t stop the whole way. Daniel Aleman and Angie Thomas’ novels are obviously similar in more important ways. They both have teenaged main characters who directly experience racial injustice and suffer at the hands of the American carceral system. Mateo, the main character of Indivisible, is such a sweet and caring brother, friend and son who loves theatre. I loved reading about Mateo’s friends, Kimmie and Adam, and how genuine their friendship dynamic is(view spoiler)[, including break ups and make ups (hide spoiler)] . "The rest of the walk back to the bodega is mostly quiet. There doesn’t seem to be anything left to say, so neither of us tries to speak up. We just walk comfortably in silence, the way that only real friends can." The characters are actually diverse and the representation is great: Mateo is gay and Mexican, Adam is gay and Italian and Kimmie is Korean and white. Mateo’s relationship with Sophie, his seven year old sister, is super sweet and realistic in how he cares for her, gets annoyed at her and sacrifices his time and little money to make her happy. It’s incredibly unfair that Mateo has to step in as Sophie’s parent and friend when he’s only 15/16/17 (I’m permanently confused about American schooling ages). I really loved Mateo’s relationship with his parents. Aleman makes it obvious how much they both love him and always want the best for him and, I wish I didn’t have to mention this, accept that he’s gay. Mateo and Sophie being separated from their parents is so sad and infuriating and unjust. Having to live with the threat of deportation for over twenty years sounds unbearable, but when their fear comes true, Mateo’s family is heartbroken. "I hate this, I think to myself as I try to hold in the tears that are threatening to fall from my eyes. I just wish I could speak up. Maybe telling my family about this deep, dark feeling of sadness would help make it go away, but what’s the point of talking about these things, anyway? There’s nothing we can do." Some good news from real life America though: an ICE detention centre in Georgia was shut down on Friday. (view spoiler)[I have to say that I didn’t enjoy or understand the romance between Mateo and Adam. It felt a bit forced in my opinion, just because of the proximity of two gay people. Adam’s attraction to Mateo felt much more genuine than the other way around. (hide spoiler)] I recommend Indivisible if you want to read about racial issues in an imperialist society from a teenager’s perspective.

  11. 5 out of 5

    Celia McMahon

    Thank you the NOVL for the arc. It was back in 2019 when ICE arrested almost 700 people and left their children without anyone to take care of them. They came out of school, wondering where their parents were. I always wondered if they got somewhere safe; if someone they knew was taking care of them or if their parents were allowed out of detention to make sure their children were safe. I'm old enough to know the evil hides behind a human face. Those photographs of those poor children broke my he Thank you the NOVL for the arc. It was back in 2019 when ICE arrested almost 700 people and left their children without anyone to take care of them. They came out of school, wondering where their parents were. I always wondered if they got somewhere safe; if someone they knew was taking care of them or if their parents were allowed out of detention to make sure their children were safe. I'm old enough to know the evil hides behind a human face. Those photographs of those poor children broke my heart, and I tried and tried to understand why... INDIVISIBLE answers a lot of those nagging questions. Mateo, a Broadway enthusiast, and brother to Sophie, suddenly finds his life turned upside down when both of his parents are detained by ICE. At sixteen, he does not have the skills to take care of his little sister, cook, and clean, and work at his parent's bodega. While his friends fill his life with their positivity, he finds that he can't confide in them what's going, thus keeping all of his emotions bottled up inside. He turns to his uncle, but their living situation only fuels the fire burning inside of him. This is a story of heartbreak, fear, and hope that will have you questioning by things are the way they are. Daniel Aleman brings the topic of family separation into the YA world. I am pretty sure this book is going to make waves. It's such an important book for this day and age. Not only is it about the love of family, but also about friendship, and learning to find the strength to lean on others when things get too difficult. The writing is accessible; I devoured this book within a day and a half. There's a word readers often use. Unputdownable. This word fits here. I couldn't stop reading, however hard my stomach was clenching. Oh, and there are queer reps! Both Mateo and his best friend Adam are gay. Diversity! There are Asian and Italian reps, as well as Mexican, of course. This has to be my favorite read of February, if not of all of 2021. I know the year is young, but I have a feeling this book will not move an inch from its spot on my best reads of this year. Triggers for emotional distress, and some talk of sex and swears.

  12. 5 out of 5

    Benjamin

    I‘m gonna be honest. As soon as I found out that this book was written by a fellow Mexican, I couldn't contain my excitement. I might have screamed as I was walking down the street. I‘m gonna be honest. As soon as I found out that this book was written by a fellow Mexican, I couldn't contain my excitement. I might have screamed as I was walking down the street.

  13. 5 out of 5

    Ms. McKinney

    Mateo, the 16 year old protagonist, has his whole life upended when both of his parents are discovered and taken in by ICE (Immigration and Customs Enforcement). Now, Mateo has to balance school, work, and caring for his younger sister, Sophie. When this early thrust into adulthood proves to be too much too soon, Mateo finally accepts help from an adult family friend named Jorge. Mateo's little sister, Sophie, is having a hard time adjusting to the new normal; and, desperately wants to join her Mateo, the 16 year old protagonist, has his whole life upended when both of his parents are discovered and taken in by ICE (Immigration and Customs Enforcement). Now, Mateo has to balance school, work, and caring for his younger sister, Sophie. When this early thrust into adulthood proves to be too much too soon, Mateo finally accepts help from an adult family friend named Jorge. Mateo's little sister, Sophie, is having a hard time adjusting to the new normal; and, desperately wants to join her parents in Mexico. Will Mateo leave all his friends and acting aspirations to join Sophie and his parents in Mexico? This story was an emotionally intense look at migrant families in modern America; it offers an authentic look at the children of migrants who have been separated from their parents due to deportation. Aleman's narrative is a well-written and heart-wrenching piece that is sure to resonate with many readers.

  14. 4 out of 5

    Cassandra

    This was written with such love and I felt it on every single page. I need time to cry and process. This was haunting.

  15. 5 out of 5

    Nathan Bartos

    This is the read I needed after not enjoying my last read. The pacing was nerve-wracking in an excellent way, and I think the friendship, family, and other relationship bonds were explored so well. Aleman had such a clear viewpoint, and I think this book does a great job of showing how complicated the immigration and deportation processes are. It's heartbreaking to see a family ripped apart like this and having to see the impossible decisions they all have to make. Humans are not illegal. (view This is the read I needed after not enjoying my last read. The pacing was nerve-wracking in an excellent way, and I think the friendship, family, and other relationship bonds were explored so well. Aleman had such a clear viewpoint, and I think this book does a great job of showing how complicated the immigration and deportation processes are. It's heartbreaking to see a family ripped apart like this and having to see the impossible decisions they all have to make. Humans are not illegal. (view spoiler)[I loved the scene in the courtroom where Mateo stands up for himself and his family and says he takes issue with the word "illegal"; it was so powerful. (hide spoiler)] Read this book; it's sort of flying under the radar right now, and that's unacceptable.

  16. 4 out of 5

    Jade

    This book broke my heart. Partly because it’s my most frequent nightmare, but mostly because it’s so true to life and so many people can sadly relate to it. Indivisible is such a good book that I preordered a hard copy from my local book store before I was even 20% through the ARC. Mateo Garcia is a junior in high school, living in NYC with his parents and sister Sophia. This tight knit, hardworking, and happy family is ripped apart when ICE suddenly detains Mateo’s parents. Mateo is forced to m This book broke my heart. Partly because it’s my most frequent nightmare, but mostly because it’s so true to life and so many people can sadly relate to it. Indivisible is such a good book that I preordered a hard copy from my local book store before I was even 20% through the ARC. Mateo Garcia is a junior in high school, living in NYC with his parents and sister Sophia. This tight knit, hardworking, and happy family is ripped apart when ICE suddenly detains Mateo’s parents. Mateo is forced to make huge changes in his life that he doesn’t feel prepared for, and the future that he thought was laid out in front of him doesn’t seem so clear anymore. Daniel Aleman has written a beautiful, heartbreaking, and realistic novel on the realities of the US immigration system, how it targets families and rips them apart, and forces children and adults to make choices that they would not have to do if the policies were not based on exclusion but rather on inclusion. As someone who knows the system too well I feel like the author did a brilliant job of depicting it, and the long-ranging consequences of each ICE raid and interaction. I expect many people who don’t have to deal with the immigration don’t understand exactly how it works, and I really, really wish they would. Books like Indivisible portray a very realistic overview of life as an undocumented person or in a family where certain members are undocumented. Highly, highly recommended read. Thanks to Netgalley and the publisher for the advance copy in exchange for an honest review.

  17. 5 out of 5

    Tameka Woodard

    I found my heart fully with Mateo Garcia and his family as I read Indivisible by Daniel Aleman. Pulling the reader in from the beginning with the fear of immigration agents, Aleman also shows how complicated Mateo's life is while he tries to balance school, supporting his younger sister, and nurturing his dreams for his future. Aleman presents a strong, protective protagonist that you will root for until the very last word of the story. I found my heart fully with Mateo Garcia and his family as I read Indivisible by Daniel Aleman. Pulling the reader in from the beginning with the fear of immigration agents, Aleman also shows how complicated Mateo's life is while he tries to balance school, supporting his younger sister, and nurturing his dreams for his future. Aleman presents a strong, protective protagonist that you will root for until the very last word of the story.

  18. 5 out of 5

    Mikyla

    This is a very timely novel that I anticipate will make it big. It is an emotional journey that keeps you rooting for these characters until the last page. Mateo is one of the most complex and easily relatable characters I have ever read and the book brings to light challenging topics in a way that both young and mature readers can appreciate. I would highly recommend it!!

  19. 4 out of 5

    IE Latinx Book y Chisme Club

    Our second book of May 2021, Indivisible by Daniel Aleman, paints a vivid picture of the fears that immigrant families without documentation must live with as they try to build a life for themselves and their families. This story is shared through the eyes of protagonist Mateo Garcia, a teen living in New York City with his parents and younger sister. As a junior in high school, Mateo is just beginning to work towards achieving his dreams of getting into Tisch School of Art at NYU and working as Our second book of May 2021, Indivisible by Daniel Aleman, paints a vivid picture of the fears that immigrant families without documentation must live with as they try to build a life for themselves and their families. This story is shared through the eyes of protagonist Mateo Garcia, a teen living in New York City with his parents and younger sister. As a junior in high school, Mateo is just beginning to work towards achieving his dreams of getting into Tisch School of Art at NYU and working as an actor on Broadway, when the safety of his family is dismantled by ICE. Mateo must take on responsibilities well past his age as a child of 17 as he fights to keep his family whole. While he leans into the support of his community as much as possible, he finds that the foundations of his life continue to crumble, bringing the story to a pinnacle of emotion as he faces the terror of losing yet another family member. Our discussions covered sibling relationships, pediatric mental health, LGBTQIA+ orientation as one facet out of many for an adolescent when growing into their self-identity, the importance of compassion-centered teaching models in educational institutions, feeling different from non-immigrant families who did not learn survival strategies growing up, and broken systems. We agreed that Indivisible is authentic and moving. We absolutely recommend this book and voted 5+/5 stars. Review Written by: Teresa Luna, IE Latinx Book y Chisme Club Instagram: @ielatinxbookychismeclub | @lunadelareina

  20. 4 out of 5

    Kate

    Daniel Aleman's INDIVISIBLE is one of those books that you can't put down, but also one that you have to set aside periodically because you're afraid your heart might break if you turn the page. It's an important and timely story about immigration, but even more than that, it's a story about the very real and very painful experience of one family, and one teen, in particular. Mateo's heart is in every sentence, and his fear, his shame, and his determination to be there for his sister will bring Daniel Aleman's INDIVISIBLE is one of those books that you can't put down, but also one that you have to set aside periodically because you're afraid your heart might break if you turn the page. It's an important and timely story about immigration, but even more than that, it's a story about the very real and very painful experience of one family, and one teen, in particular. Mateo's heart is in every sentence, and his fear, his shame, and his determination to be there for his sister will bring you to tears. This story belongs on every shelf, in every library, and in every classroom. I'll be handing it to my own kids, and recommending it to everyone I know.

  21. 5 out of 5

    Tim Oldakowski

    I started this in a Barnes and Noble yesterday and today I blew off all responsibilities so that I could finish this. Imagine you are a teenager and you come home from school to find your parents have been taken by ICE and could be facing deportation. While I won’t give any spoilers I thought this was well crafted with dynamic characters. I related to Mateo in some ways and wish I could have read this when I was 16. The main story and the subplots are excellent. I can’t wait to teach this in my I started this in a Barnes and Noble yesterday and today I blew off all responsibilities so that I could finish this. Imagine you are a teenager and you come home from school to find your parents have been taken by ICE and could be facing deportation. While I won’t give any spoilers I thought this was well crafted with dynamic characters. I related to Mateo in some ways and wish I could have read this when I was 16. The main story and the subplots are excellent. I can’t wait to teach this in my YAL class next academic year.

  22. 4 out of 5

    Dilman

    Deportation. It’s a scary word. And an even scarier reality. I just finished Indivisible by Daniel Aleman and I cried. Not once, not twice, but three times. The whole time I kept thinking about my family and how difficult it is to deal with something like that. I’m Indian, my family immigrated from Punjab to California, and they did it legally, but I know countless people, good people, who are undocumented. My friends parents, uncles, cousins, and so many more. I know how it feels when someone g Deportation. It’s a scary word. And an even scarier reality. I just finished Indivisible by Daniel Aleman and I cried. Not once, not twice, but three times. The whole time I kept thinking about my family and how difficult it is to deal with something like that. I’m Indian, my family immigrated from Punjab to California, and they did it legally, but I know countless people, good people, who are undocumented. My friends parents, uncles, cousins, and so many more. I know how it feels when someone goes through this, I’ve been through it. That’s why my heart absolutely broke for Mateo and his family. Anyway, onto the book: Mateo is a 16-year-old-broadway-loving teenager. His dream is to go to Tisch and eventually end up on Broadway. His parents own a little corner shop, they live in an apartment and they’re happy. The only thing: his parents are undocumented immigrants. But things have been perfectly normal for 20+ years, so why would they change now? Like I said, I sobbed while reading this book. My heart broke over and over again, thinking about losing family and thinking that your whole life is over. I genuinely do not know what to say. This book is heart touching, heart breaking and honest. It’s not sugar coated, there’s no sunshine and rainbows everywhere: it shows you the truth. What actually happens and what families go through. My point is, if you haven’t read it, read it, and don’t forget to take a box of tissues with you.

  23. 4 out of 5

    Gina

    This audiobook was so good but entirely heartbreaking to read! The topic is absolutely necessary for today's literature. I think the storyline of having parents separated from their kids is a reality for some undocumented immigrants, especially during the past administration in the United States. It reminds me of the Party of Five series reboot, one of the few shows I really wish they hadn't canceled. This audiobook was so good but entirely heartbreaking to read! The topic is absolutely necessary for today's literature. I think the storyline of having parents separated from their kids is a reality for some undocumented immigrants, especially during the past administration in the United States. It reminds me of the Party of Five series reboot, one of the few shows I really wish they hadn't canceled.

  24. 5 out of 5

    Melanie

    Thank you to Netgalley and Hatchette Audio for the alc of this book. When ICE comes for Mateo's parents, his life is turned upside down. Instead of focusing on acting and high school and SATs, suddenly his focus has to turn to taking care of his younger sister and keep himself from falling apart. This book was absolutely heartbreaking. I loved every minute of it but it hurt my heart so much! Honestly I really felt so much empathy for Mateo and his sister and all their family and friends. I also re Thank you to Netgalley and Hatchette Audio for the alc of this book. When ICE comes for Mateo's parents, his life is turned upside down. Instead of focusing on acting and high school and SATs, suddenly his focus has to turn to taking care of his younger sister and keep himself from falling apart. This book was absolutely heartbreaking. I loved every minute of it but it hurt my heart so much! Honestly I really felt so much empathy for Mateo and his sister and all their family and friends. I also really loved the romance that ended up happening in this book! It was really sweet and natural and I also love the friends to lovers trope! I definitely recommend this book! Pub Date: May 4th, 2021 Content Warnings: Graphic: Racism, Xenophobia, and Mental illness deportation, prison

  25. 5 out of 5

    Nikole Clow

    Indivisible is one of those stories that is not only powerful and meaningful, but also full of raw, beautiful emotions and familial love. It’s a story with the power of hope at its center and strength imbedded within each moment. This all important story is one readers will not soon forget and one that they will eagerly pass on to their friends. I have no doubt that this debut is going to make waves in the YA community. Indivisible put into perspective what it’s like for America-born kids to exp Indivisible is one of those stories that is not only powerful and meaningful, but also full of raw, beautiful emotions and familial love. It’s a story with the power of hope at its center and strength imbedded within each moment. This all important story is one readers will not soon forget and one that they will eagerly pass on to their friends. I have no doubt that this debut is going to make waves in the YA community. Indivisible put into perspective what it’s like for America-born kids to experience their parents being taken away, being forced to give up everything they’ve built in America. It was so emotional, so heartbreaking, that at times I had to stop reading to take everything in and to give myself the chance to reflect on what Mateo and his sister were going through. It was heart wrenching to read this because I couldn’t possibly imagine going through something like this. And yet families do, and that breaks my heart. But that’s a reason why this book is so tremendously important in our current times – we need books like this in our lives. Mateo is, without a doubt, a strong character. He is too in-tuned to his emotions; his family says he feels too much and at times, throughout the book, he does. But most cases it’s warranted. I liked seeing a main character that wasn’t afraid of being too emotional, too vulnerable. Yes, he has to learn that it’s okay to lean on friends and family when strength and reassurance is needed. He has to learn that it’s okay to show vulnerability and that it’s okay to feel too much when days seem to be clouded in darkness. But even through all his internal battles, Mateo never once hesitates to take care of his sister, even when he feels like he’s drowning. He does whatever he can for his little sister, Sophie, including trying to keep everything as normal as possible. He keeps this big secret from his closest friends, which strains his relationship with them. Mateo has to navigate this new, unexpected part of his life, which proves to be extremely difficult on Mateo and Sophie. Aleman’s writing is, as many would say, a breath of fresh air. Aleman’s writing is fresh and realistic, a new voice in a world that is always looking for bright lights. And his voice is one that no one will forget anytime soon. Aleman brings this timely important story to life with memorable characters and emotionally scenes. There were moments that were full of clarity, yet full of trepidation and suspense. He did a marvelous job sprinkling moments of joy in chapters that needed a little breather – when Mateo needed a minute to forget what his reality is like, a moment to dream of what his life used to be like. Overall, I highly recommend Indivisible. This book is brimming with unfiltered emotions and a powerful story. The heart of this story is undeniably hope and love and the refusal to give up, even when everything seems like it’s caving in around you. It’s such an exceptional debut, and I cannot wait for Aleman’s next work. Trust me when I say you will be glad you picked up this book.

  26. 4 out of 5

    Chelsea Garcia

    ☆☆☆☆☆ - Absolutely loved phenomenal ☆☆☆☆ - Liked this book a lot ☆☆☆ - This book was OKAY ☆☆ - I didn't like this book/was bored ☆ - DNF'd TITLE OF BOOK: Indivisible QUICK REVIEW: I absolutely loved this book. This book had real life problems and dealt with them in a realistic way. Nothing here was exaggerated or unrealistic and I loved the added bits of Spanish into the text it made it feel like I was living this nightmare with them. Characters - ☆☆☆☆☆ Plot - ☆☆☆☆☆ Star rating- ☆☆☆☆☆ CONTENT WARNINGS ⚠ ☆☆☆☆☆ - Absolutely loved phenomenal ☆☆☆☆ - Liked this book a lot ☆☆☆ - This book was OKAY ☆☆ - I didn't like this book/was bored ☆ - DNF'd TITLE OF BOOK: Indivisible QUICK REVIEW: I absolutely loved this book. This book had real life problems and dealt with them in a realistic way. Nothing here was exaggerated or unrealistic and I loved the added bits of Spanish into the text it made it feel like I was living this nightmare with them. Characters - ☆☆☆☆☆ Plot - ☆☆☆☆☆ Star rating- ☆☆☆☆☆ CONTENT WARNINGS ⚠️ : deportation//ICE//missing children SYNOPSIS: Mateo and Sophie's world is turned upside down when their parents face deportation. Mateo is forced to deal with situations he never dreamed of and solve problems larger than he is ready for. PLOT: The plot is impeccable, everyone needs to read this book as ICE raids are something that POC unfortunately deal with and live in fear of deportation everyday. I havent read anything like this and I think that this book should be mandatory reading. CHARACTERS: The characters were meshed out and I absolutely loved Mateo and Jorge for different reasons. The characters each had their flaws and seemed like I was reading a memoir rather than a fictional book. CONCLUSION: Overall, I'd recommend this book to anyone and everyone and will be purchasing this book for my personal collection soon. I loved it so much.

  27. 4 out of 5

    Katie Collins

    THIS BOOK! I was able to get my hands on an ARC and I inhaled it. The main character is Mateo, who lives in New York City and dreams of becoming a Broadway star, but his life starts to unravel when he learns that ICE is looking for his dad. Needles to say, I was in tears by Chapter 3. Mateo's voice feels so real and authentic and his emotions jump off the page. This is one of those books where every character feels fully realized and the supporting cast is equally as exciting to read about as the THIS BOOK! I was able to get my hands on an ARC and I inhaled it. The main character is Mateo, who lives in New York City and dreams of becoming a Broadway star, but his life starts to unravel when he learns that ICE is looking for his dad. Needles to say, I was in tears by Chapter 3. Mateo's voice feels so real and authentic and his emotions jump off the page. This is one of those books where every character feels fully realized and the supporting cast is equally as exciting to read about as the main character. Mateo's parents are very loving and supportive, and his friends manage to be complex and likeable at the same time. My favorite is by far Sophie, his younger sister, and the relationship that she and Mateo have. This story felt grounded and important, but never didactic, which I feel is a hallmark of the best YA. This one is going to the top of my list of 2021 books to watch!

  28. 4 out of 5

    Briana

    very cool book!! i like that things didn't end up perfect because it made the story so much more exciting to read (plus it left room for possibility, which I always like) first of all, love the cover, it's beautiful and very symbolic secondly, mateo is such a good brother and son and person, and I really appreciate him. watching him balance the ups and downs of this period of his life was honestly so sad because you could feel how stressed and isolated he was through the pages. thirdly, I like how very cool book!! i like that things didn't end up perfect because it made the story so much more exciting to read (plus it left room for possibility, which I always like) first of all, love the cover, it's beautiful and very symbolic secondly, mateo is such a good brother and son and person, and I really appreciate him. watching him balance the ups and downs of this period of his life was honestly so sad because you could feel how stressed and isolated he was through the pages. thirdly, I like how we got to follow mateo's parents' journey indirectly and just the general strain that deportation caused on their family and those around them. it was also definitely informative on the whole deportation process and just the different situations people face, which was good to learn about! i have to say, though, that I wish mateo was more transparent with sophie (his little sister), because even though she's just a kid and she's dealing with all these emotions, it would have made things more bearable to have her hear the truth rather than dodging it. although, that's just a personal thought with the characters (the ending kind of made me go hmm (view spoiler)[ like sophie just up and left mateo without much emotional turmoil compared to when she couldn't leave for her parents and you know what it makes sense but like bro mateo has been busting his butt for you this entire time and like????? idk how to explain but yeah oh well (hide spoiler)] but that's okay) anyways, it's a really beautiful book and the familial aspect of it was definitely the standout for me :)

  29. 4 out of 5

    Desiree

    Indivisible is going to become one of those books that I obsess over and share with everyone I meet. I won this as a goodreads giveaway and I will be forever thankful I was chosen. Contemporary fiction isn't my usual go to, but I was interested in reading this, 1.) as a Hispanic from Texas and the shadow of ICE hangs heavy on my heart and 2.) as an educator always looking for books to recommend to my reluctant readers. I love this book. When I first started reading I was surprised how drawn in I Indivisible is going to become one of those books that I obsess over and share with everyone I meet. I won this as a goodreads giveaway and I will be forever thankful I was chosen. Contemporary fiction isn't my usual go to, but I was interested in reading this, 1.) as a Hispanic from Texas and the shadow of ICE hangs heavy on my heart and 2.) as an educator always looking for books to recommend to my reluctant readers. I love this book. When I first started reading I was surprised how drawn in I was, how I couldn't put it down, how I wanted to learn more about Mateo and his family and friends. A young LatinX who loves Broadway and hanging out with friends and went home to eat Ma's homemade, Mexican diners; the connection and love I had for him was almost palpable. And then ICE came through the bodegas door and I tensed; even though I knew it was coming, I tensed. His pain was real because I know it goes beyond fiction: the stress, the looking forward into a haze of too many what-ifs, the heaviness of guilt and shame that is absolutely undeserved. Mateo did his best in an awful situation and I'm so happy I was able to read of him following his family's advice, "sé fuerte y sé valiente." Daniel Aleman can bet on me to read his next work. I'm hooked and I can't wait to see how much he'll make me learn and feel the next time around.

  30. 4 out of 5

    Roman Nowak

    Where to even begin with such an incredible story? I could not put this book down. Finished it in 24 hours. Moments of joy, pain, sadness, anger, disappointment; moments where I wanted to throw the book across the room or sometimes give it a long comforting hug. This is an important story, an important journey. As a child of immigrants, I can see and feel the struggle of Mateo’s parents as they try to build a new life; the drive, the hardships, the pain in wanting to create a better life but feel Where to even begin with such an incredible story? I could not put this book down. Finished it in 24 hours. Moments of joy, pain, sadness, anger, disappointment; moments where I wanted to throw the book across the room or sometimes give it a long comforting hug. This is an important story, an important journey. As a child of immigrants, I can see and feel the struggle of Mateo’s parents as they try to build a new life; the drive, the hardships, the pain in wanting to create a better life but feeling like failures. As the child, I can empathize with the feeling of helplessness as you try to mend and fix without success. A story where so many voices who are often forgotten can clutch to, see themselves, and know that they are not alone. A definite recommendation for all youth and adults. Hear the story, honour the voices, be the difference in the lives of others. Thank you Daniel Aleman for sharing your heart. You are making a difference.

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