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Sunrise by the Sea

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New York Times bestselling author Jenny Colgan returns to the setting of her beloved Little Beach Street Bakery series for a timely and heartfelt novel set in a Cornish seaside village. Marisa Rosso can’t understand why everyone else is getting on with their lives as she still struggles to get over the death of her beloved grandfather, back home in Italy. Everyone loses New York Times bestselling author Jenny Colgan returns to the setting of her beloved Little Beach Street Bakery series for a timely and heartfelt novel set in a Cornish seaside village. Marisa Rosso can’t understand why everyone else is getting on with their lives as she still struggles to get over the death of her beloved grandfather, back home in Italy. Everyone loses grandparents, right? Why is she taking it so badly? Retreating further and further from normal life, she moves to the end of the earth—the remote tidal island of Mount Polbearne, at the foot of Cornwall, hoping for peace and solitude, whilst carrying on her job as a registrar, dealing with births, weddings, and deaths, even as she feels life is passing her by. Unfortunately—or fortunately?—the solitude she craves proves elusive. Between her noisy Russian piano-teaching neighbor, the bustle and community spirit of the tiny village struggling back to life after the quarantine, and the pressing need to help save the local bakery, can Marisa find her joy again at the end of the world?


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New York Times bestselling author Jenny Colgan returns to the setting of her beloved Little Beach Street Bakery series for a timely and heartfelt novel set in a Cornish seaside village. Marisa Rosso can’t understand why everyone else is getting on with their lives as she still struggles to get over the death of her beloved grandfather, back home in Italy. Everyone loses New York Times bestselling author Jenny Colgan returns to the setting of her beloved Little Beach Street Bakery series for a timely and heartfelt novel set in a Cornish seaside village. Marisa Rosso can’t understand why everyone else is getting on with their lives as she still struggles to get over the death of her beloved grandfather, back home in Italy. Everyone loses grandparents, right? Why is she taking it so badly? Retreating further and further from normal life, she moves to the end of the earth—the remote tidal island of Mount Polbearne, at the foot of Cornwall, hoping for peace and solitude, whilst carrying on her job as a registrar, dealing with births, weddings, and deaths, even as she feels life is passing her by. Unfortunately—or fortunately?—the solitude she craves proves elusive. Between her noisy Russian piano-teaching neighbor, the bustle and community spirit of the tiny village struggling back to life after the quarantine, and the pressing need to help save the local bakery, can Marisa find her joy again at the end of the world?

30 review for Sunrise by the Sea

  1. 5 out of 5

    Melissa (LifeFullyBooked)

    I was so happy to return to Mount Polbearne with Polly and Huckle and the rest of the gang. It's been a while since we visited them, and parenthood adds an extra layer of humor to the story. One thing Colgan does so incredibly well is with her voicing of the young characters. Avery and Daisy add some laughs to every page they appear on, providing levity sometimes when the story could otherwise be heavy. The main storyline here deals with Marisa, who is consumed with grief over the loss of her gra I was so happy to return to Mount Polbearne with Polly and Huckle and the rest of the gang. It's been a while since we visited them, and parenthood adds an extra layer of humor to the story. One thing Colgan does so incredibly well is with her voicing of the young characters. Avery and Daisy add some laughs to every page they appear on, providing levity sometimes when the story could otherwise be heavy. The main storyline here deals with Marisa, who is consumed with grief over the loss of her grandfather and cannot seem to move forward. It has manifested itself with extreme anxiety and agoraphobia, and she heads out of the big city and to a remote cottage in Cornwall for some peace and hopefully some healing. Unfortunately, her next-door neighbor (they share a wall) is Alexei, a Russian piano teacher with a penchant for playing at all hours of the day and night. This book contains Colgan's always-welcomed food descriptions, and my mouth watered throughout with the details of the delectable dishes cooked and consumed. I thought that Marisa's journey was heartfelt and realistic. Grief shows up in ways that we cannot always explain, and there are times when we just can't "shake it off." If you're looking for a comfort read this summer with familiar characters and a satisfying storyline, Sunrise by the Sea is one to choose. I would recommend reading the first three books in the series first in order to get the background of the recurring characters and their stories. I voluntarily reviewed a complimentary copy of this book, all opinions are my own.

  2. 4 out of 5

    Karen Barber

    A little slice of sunshine that will put a smile on your face. While we get to reacquaint ourselves with some familiar faces, we focus on some new characters this time round. Marisa is grieving after the death of her grandfather, and finds herself in a rented cottage off the coast as she tries to come to terms with things. Unable to leave the house, Marisa struggles to do anything. The huge Russian piano teacher who’s moved in next door doesn’t help matters, but he’s also grieving and - you know i A little slice of sunshine that will put a smile on your face. While we get to reacquaint ourselves with some familiar faces, we focus on some new characters this time round. Marisa is grieving after the death of her grandfather, and finds herself in a rented cottage off the coast as she tries to come to terms with things. Unable to leave the house, Marisa struggles to do anything. The huge Russian piano teacher who’s moved in next door doesn’t help matters, but he’s also grieving and - you know it’s coming - the book focuses on these two slowly adjusting, learning to deal with whatever is happening and finding themselves part of the world once more. A true bit of escapism. Though things are bad,there’s a,ways a sense that just round the corner will be a better time. Thanks to NetGalley for letting me get my summer feel-good factor in early.

  3. 4 out of 5

    Shelley Lawrence

    Sunrise By The Sea is the 4th book in the Little Beach Street Bakery series by Jenny Colgan and an utterly delightful story. I thoroughly enjoyed every page of it. It was gratifying to be able to return to the unique isle of Mount Polbearne and the quirky, but lovable cast of characters who are truly one-of-a-kind. This story follows Marisa Rosso who is struggling to get her life back on track after the death of her grandfather. The tragic event has thrown her life into a cycle of anxiety and is Sunrise By The Sea is the 4th book in the Little Beach Street Bakery series by Jenny Colgan and an utterly delightful story. I thoroughly enjoyed every page of it. It was gratifying to be able to return to the unique isle of Mount Polbearne and the quirky, but lovable cast of characters who are truly one-of-a-kind. This story follows Marisa Rosso who is struggling to get her life back on track after the death of her grandfather. The tragic event has thrown her life into a cycle of anxiety and isolation. She heads to some holiday cottages on the remote island of Mount Polbearne in order to find her bearings amidst the isolation, but instead discovers that her neighbor is a big, burly, loud, Russian who teaches and plays piano around the clock! Marisa’s new circumstances are anything but quiet and calming. The two form a love-hate relationship of sorts that may be just what they both need. Polly and Huckle also join the story, along with their two, hilarious young children, and the unforgettable, Neil the puffin. Friendships are formed, healing is hard-won, love is unearthed, and bakeries are saved. This story is charming, entertaining and absolutely heart-warming!

  4. 4 out of 5

    Andrea

    What a delight to read! This is by far the best in this series.

  5. 5 out of 5

    Wendy Robey

    It’s been lovely catching up with old friends in this series. Polly and Huckle are involved in the whole community as usual and it was wonderful seeing them in their new stage of life together. The introduction of Marissa and Alexei to the casting was brilliant and I loved Marissa from the very beginning. Jenny Colgan has handled the mental health issues sensitively and it was emotional seeing Marissa trying to handle the grief she was feeling following the loss of her grandfather.

  6. 5 out of 5

    Debrac2014

    Very good! I wasn't sure at first with Marisa and her problems but everything works! So good to see what Polly and her family are up to! Very good! I wasn't sure at first with Marisa and her problems but everything works! So good to see what Polly and her family are up to!

  7. 4 out of 5

    Laura

    I simply did not want this book to end. ☀️🧡

  8. 5 out of 5

    Elizabeth

    Maybe I’m just over Jenny Colgan’s books but this was kind of boring and not as uplifting as I was expecting it to be with all these lonely, depressed, anxious characters.

  9. 4 out of 5

    Mary Jo

    Always a pleasure to find a new Jenny Colgan book. And what fun to encounter Mount Polbearne and Neil the puffin again. A delightful addition to the Little Beach Street Bakery series.

  10. 4 out of 5

    Kelly

    A Jenny Colgan book in which pizza is the hero? A big yes for me.

  11. 4 out of 5

    Verity W

    *****Copy from NetGalley in return for an honest review***** So this is a weird one for me. I love Polly and her family and their lives, so that's good. But I really struggled with Marisa. I totally understand what Colgan is trying to do with her portrayal of her mental health issues, but it - combined with Polly's issues - made for a very downbeat book in a lot of ways. But the MH side of things did work out nicely - and although it was sad I liked the way that it was done. But all of this also *****Copy from NetGalley in return for an honest review***** So this is a weird one for me. I love Polly and her family and their lives, so that's good. But I really struggled with Marisa. I totally understand what Colgan is trying to do with her portrayal of her mental health issues, but it - combined with Polly's issues - made for a very downbeat book in a lot of ways. But the MH side of things did work out nicely - and although it was sad I liked the way that it was done. But all of this also mean that you didn't really have a lot of chance to get to know Marisa's love interest, so it was hard to see why they work together - or at least know that he's into her. So mixed for me - but I know it will work for other people - but it's just not as sunny and happy as the yellow cover would have you expect, and the blurb definitely downplays the sad side of things.

  12. 5 out of 5

    Agi

    Marisa is struggling with getting to terms with her beloved grandfather’s death, so much that her grief turns into anxiety and agoraphobia. And so she ends up on an island, far away from the world, staying in a new holiday cottage, only with a… piano teacher as a neighbour. It’s also the same island Polly, Huckle and ther twins are living on, right now struggling with their finances, as Huckle’s honey isn’t doing well and the bakery is their only source of income for them. They could ask Reuben, Marisa is struggling with getting to terms with her beloved grandfather’s death, so much that her grief turns into anxiety and agoraphobia. And so she ends up on an island, far away from the world, staying in a new holiday cottage, only with a… piano teacher as a neighbour. It’s also the same island Polly, Huckle and ther twins are living on, right now struggling with their finances, as Huckle’s honey isn’t doing well and the bakery is their only source of income for them. They could ask Reuben, the amazingly rich businessman and their friend for help, but that’s actually the last option. Marisa might be paralysed with fear when stepping out of her cottage, but she also has heart in the right place. She discovers Polly’s brilliant ovens in the bakery and a plan is formed. But then disaster happens – will they all be able to survive? To overcome their own tribulations and to climb their personal mountains? Jenny Colgan is an author of many series and they are all brilliant, but I always have to think hard which one the new book belongs to, because, as much as I love them and adore them and the characters are absolutely smashing, they start to blur. This time we’re back to Mount Polbearne, with Polly and Huckle and their hilarious twins and, of course, Neil the Puffin and I couldn’t be happier to be back with them. Even though it seems that everyday life and parenthood rebound heavily on Polly and Huckle. Nevertheless, this time, the story also deals with some new characters, Marisa and Alex. The characters are, as always, so brilliantly written, there is depth to them and they are all so real and honest. I warmed to those two newcomers immediately and I think that Marisa’s character was captured in a very heartfelt and realistic way. Consumed with grief after her beloved grandfather’s death, she had a feeling that everybody is moving forward and only she stays behind, which eventually turned into anxiety and agoraphobia. I like with how much feeling the author writes her stories and that she isn’t afraid of putting her characters into complicated and difficult situations, situations that often bring change to everyone. This time she writes about grief which, as we all should know, is not an easy feeling and yes, one might appear to have it all together, but under the surface they’re broken and struggle. I think she has tackled this issue with a gentle but also firm way, trying to make us realise that we are allowed to grieve just in the way we need it. I also love how, seamlessly and effortlessly and maybe unconsciously, showed us how important the help of friends and family is, that with their support there is really nothing impossible and that there is always something bright, something positive, even in the worst of times. Of course, there are some mouth – watering food descriptions in this book and with Marisa being Italian you can only imagine those lush dishes. What I wouldn’t give for her pizza! The writing style is magical, making you fall in love with the characters and the setting immediately. It’s full of heart and warmth and it’s absolutely engaging. „Sunrise by the Sea“ is a comfortable, charming read with characters that you’ve already grown to love and some new that will grow on you, with a nice storyline and beautiful setting. The author, again, has proved that she’s a brilliant observer of human characters and in capturing their personalities. She has handled all the heavier issues in the story with sensitivity, but also with humour, finding a happy medium. This book had it all – lovely, real and entertaining characters, picturesque setting, sadness and humour and this lovely bit of romance that will make you go „oooooh“. However, I didn’t feel as invested in this book as I am usually. While it was, again, a gorgeous, poignant and hilariously funny story, I had this overwhelming feeling of having been there, of seeing it all. Nevertheless, I truly liked this story and the fact that the author has drawn me into it immediately, from the very first word – and it’s a sign of a brilliant author, as it’s an ability that only few can show off – and she can be proud of this. Copy provided by the publisher in return for an honest review / Hardcover copy purchased

  13. 4 out of 5

    Gaele

    I’ve read this series from the beginning –and loved Polly, the little rock of Mount Polbearne, Neil the puffling (now full grown puffin) and the changes that everyone went through. We return some years later to find Polly and Huckle have twins – a boy and a girl, they are living in the lighthouse, Neil is still a pet and ensconced in the house, and while things have always been difficult, financially, they’re really pressed now. Huckle is traveling more and more to sell his honey, Polly is incre I’ve read this series from the beginning –and loved Polly, the little rock of Mount Polbearne, Neil the puffling (now full grown puffin) and the changes that everyone went through. We return some years later to find Polly and Huckle have twins – a boy and a girl, they are living in the lighthouse, Neil is still a pet and ensconced in the house, and while things have always been difficult, financially, they’re really pressed now. Huckle is traveling more and more to sell his honey, Polly is increasingly stressed trying to figure out new ways to make the bakery more profitable in the non-tourist season, their friends Kerensa and Reuben (along with their own child) have made major investments – but this has made everything else pricier for everyone. A new school is coming – and Reuben has placed the music teacher, Alexei – a large, bear-like Russian man into one of the homes, while his cousin has turfed out a roommate and arranged for her to have another house on the island. Marisa has been caught in a depression and anxiety after the death of her beloved grandfather in Italy. Retreating from society, never leaving her house and allowing the anxiety and loneliness and her own insecurities build. Getting to Cornwall was a trick: arriving at the house only to find it next to another that houses Alexi, his students, his piano and another person she may have to face is just one thing too far. Yet, in the manner of all Colgan books – we have gentle (and not so) moments that bring change to everyone – particularly those who need it most. The reinforcement of friendship, community and family as Marisa spent long hours on Skype with her grandmother in Italy, to the recognition (for Marisa) and a reminder for us all – that everyone who “appears to have it all together” just may have struggles and trials of their own, to the generosity of Reuben (even if it feels as though a catch is involved) and the joy of Polly’s children with Neil and without gives this a sense of ‘coming home’ - where nothing is ever REALLY too much to handle – not with the support of friends, family and community – and there are always bright moments even in the worst of circumstances. You will enjoy this story if you’ve never picked up a Colgan book before (how is that possible?) but to truly come to love and understand Mount Polbearne, Polly, the community and where Neil fits in (anywhere his chubby little body can fly – or walk) you’ll want to start at the beginning. A lovely return to wildness with a dash of civilization – all full of heart, love and hope, reminding me why it is a favorite series with this most important installment. I received an eArc copy of the title from the publisher via NetGalley for purpose of honest review. I was not compensated for this review: all conclusions are my own responsibility. Review first appeared at I am, Indeed As a side note, y'all - few things (or authors) make me happier than Jenny Colgan - which is why reviewing her books is far more difficult. I get lost in her stories, the places, the characters and even the cute-overload that ALWAYS happens .... so bear with me - grab the books, and just enjoy the ride!

  14. 5 out of 5

    Claire Mc Partlin

    Another very enjoyable return to the little Cornish island of Mount Polbearne, where we catch up with regulars and meet new additions, in this case Marisa and Alexei. Marisa is trying to get past the death of her beloved Italian grandfather but really struggling with it. She is very depressed and barely able to leave the house, which is why she ends up on the island, hiding from the world and afraid of nearly everything. She is staying in a new holiday cottage, and her next-door neighbour is the Another very enjoyable return to the little Cornish island of Mount Polbearne, where we catch up with regulars and meet new additions, in this case Marisa and Alexei. Marisa is trying to get past the death of her beloved Italian grandfather but really struggling with it. She is very depressed and barely able to leave the house, which is why she ends up on the island, hiding from the world and afraid of nearly everything. She is staying in a new holiday cottage, and her next-door neighbour is the new piano teacher on the island, Russian Alexei, who is also hiding out from a failed relationship. We also get to meet up again with Polly, Huckle, the twins, and the fabulous Neil the puffin again. Polly and Huckle are struggling with finances as Huckle's honey isn't doing well and the bakery is the only source of income for them. But help comes in the form of Marisa as, when there is a disaster and everyone pulls together, she forces herself out to help and during it gets talking to Polly about the fabulous ovens in her bakery, and a new cooking direction is taken helping everyone, Polly with the finances and Marisa with her self-esteem and courage. I loved the relationship Marisa formed with her grandmother over Skype, and the fact that they just left the connection on all the time and could see each other whenever they wanted! Her grandmother really helped Marisa, getting her back into her love of cooking. This book is all about people pulling together in times of need, and facing your fears and overcoming them in Marisa's case. As usual with Jenny Colgan, a really lovely read.

  15. 5 out of 5

    Cathy

    This is the 4th installment of The Little Beach Street Bakery series by Jenny Colgan and, breathe easy, it’s everything we have come to expect. It stays true to the Bookshop and Bakery formula and is the perfect summer read. This time, the main character, Marissa, is suffering greatly from agoraphobia after the death of her beloved grandfather. She has become such a shut in that her roommate decides he’s had enough and sets her up to stay in one of his relative’s cottages on Mount Polbearne in Co This is the 4th installment of The Little Beach Street Bakery series by Jenny Colgan and, breathe easy, it’s everything we have come to expect. It stays true to the Bookshop and Bakery formula and is the perfect summer read. This time, the main character, Marissa, is suffering greatly from agoraphobia after the death of her beloved grandfather. She has become such a shut in that her roommate decides he’s had enough and sets her up to stay in one of his relative’s cottages on Mount Polbearne in Cornwall. And, yes, we get to revisit Polly, Huckle, their twins and, of course, Neil, the puffin. This book was written during the Pandemic and, although it is never mentioned, I thought there were some interesting ties to life in quarantine. Marissa has such anxiety about getting out and talking to anyone that it reminded me of many of us during lockdown. She has become cut off from family and friends due to her inability to leave her room; she finally is set up with a therapist that she meets with online since she’s in far off Mount Polbearne and their meetings are constantly interrupted by the antics of her therapists kids; she gets her food delivered to her since she can’t venture out; and also keeps in touch with her grandmother or Nonna in Italy via Skype. It was only after finishing the novel that any of this occurred to me, that’s how “normal” the “abnormal” life under lockdown has become. Very clever, Ms Colgan! So, if you love her books as this hopeless romantic sap does, you’re sure to enjoy this and, if you’ve never read a Jenny Colgan book, well, what are you waiting for?

  16. 5 out of 5

    Amanda Larkman

    Oh, my God I love it when a Colgan comes out. I love everything she writes (thought not so keen on the Jenny T Colgan ones) and my heart leaps when I get a notification the next one is ready to buy. Despite writing so many novels Colgan has managed to keep me excited about her next book as she seems to have been able to keep to what makes her writing so enjoyable: rounded, sympathetic characters, descriptions of landscapes and food, funny animals, and absorbing plots. You know where you are with Oh, my God I love it when a Colgan comes out. I love everything she writes (thought not so keen on the Jenny T Colgan ones) and my heart leaps when I get a notification the next one is ready to buy. Despite writing so many novels Colgan has managed to keep me excited about her next book as she seems to have been able to keep to what makes her writing so enjoyable: rounded, sympathetic characters, descriptions of landscapes and food, funny animals, and absorbing plots. You know where you are with a Colgan! I think my heart truly belongs to the Island of Mure books, but the Little Beach Street Bakery series has much to recommend it including a portly puffin. In anticipation of this being released, I quickly reread the first three and it was good to remind myself of Polly and Huckle and their strange Cornish village on an island. This book, number 4, follows familiar characters but introduces two new ones who are the main focus of the story: Maris and Alexei (love Alexei). They are new arrivals to the island and the story traces how one becomes involved in the community of the island rather quickly, while the other - rendered a hermit due to grief - withdraws and hides away. My favourite bit was the skype link to Italy... Loved every minute - read it in about a day and a half - was like a gorgeous box of chocolates without the calories. (However the chocolate I ate while reading it, unfortunately, did) If you haven't read Jenny Colgan start with her very early lovely ones: Amanda's Wedding, Do you Remember the First Time, The Good the Bad and the Dumped, for example then grab a copy of A very Distant Shore (Mure no 0.5) and fill your boots with stories of the wonderful Scottish town of Mure.

  17. 5 out of 5

    Megan (Glitter and Plato)

    Marisa Rosso is struggling to return to life as normal after her grandfather's death in Italy, so her roommate suggests she move to Mount Polbearne, a tiny and remote island off the coast of Cornwall. Unfortunately, this tight-knit community does not give Marisa the solitude she desires. Between the children coming for piano lessons from her noisy Russian neighbor and the charming town bakery that everyone loves but somehow can't stay afloat - Marisa finds herself drawn to the lives of the peopl Marisa Rosso is struggling to return to life as normal after her grandfather's death in Italy, so her roommate suggests she move to Mount Polbearne, a tiny and remote island off the coast of Cornwall. Unfortunately, this tight-knit community does not give Marisa the solitude she desires. Between the children coming for piano lessons from her noisy Russian neighbor and the charming town bakery that everyone loves but somehow can't stay afloat - Marisa finds herself drawn to the lives of the people who surround her. Jenny Colgan has done it again! Little Beach Street Bakery is one of my favorites of hers, and this book lives up to the charm of the series! I love everything about this darling island town and every time I read one of these books, I want to pack up my life and go live there. (Regarding the series, while it would be helpful to know the characters from the earlier books, this story stands alone nicely.) Marisa is struggling with serious agoraphobia after the death of her grandfather, and the folks in Mount Polbearne are only too anxious to help. I thought the way people reached out to a stranger was heart-warming, and I especially liked how Marisa mended her relationship with her grandmother and mother. All in all, this is just such a cozy read and the experience of reading it felt like a warm hug. Thank you to William Morrow for my gifted copy of this book in exchange for a review.

  18. 4 out of 5

    Lynne Spreen

    Marissa is seriously depressed over the death of her grandfather. She's become agoraphobic, even. With no other options, she moves to a cottage on Mt. Polbearne island, right next door to a broken-hearted Russian piano teacher. As the village goes through various challenges, Marissa is drawn out, little by little, with the help of her therapist and her Italian grandmother, the widow, with whom she Skypes constantly. I give this book five stars because Colgan did an amazing job with Italian cookin Marissa is seriously depressed over the death of her grandfather. She's become agoraphobic, even. With no other options, she moves to a cottage on Mt. Polbearne island, right next door to a broken-hearted Russian piano teacher. As the village goes through various challenges, Marissa is drawn out, little by little, with the help of her therapist and her Italian grandmother, the widow, with whom she Skypes constantly. I give this book five stars because Colgan did an amazing job with Italian cooking, classical piano and the teaching of the art, and the refreshing use of the laptops and Skype, which played such an important role in Marissa's healing. A thoughtful, fun, rewarding read.

  19. 5 out of 5

    DemetraP

    I really liked the characters in this book. It was a cozy small town "finding yourself and finding love" book. There was humor and I laughed out loud a few times. I also cried reading this book at least twice. SPOIERL SPOILER S P O I LE R S ............................ The heroine's grandfather dies at the beginning of the book. The heroine's grandmother who she Skypes with every day in Italy, also dies. She also has severe anxiety and can't leave the house sometimes. I took off 1 star because after the s I really liked the characters in this book. It was a cozy small town "finding yourself and finding love" book. There was humor and I laughed out loud a few times. I also cried reading this book at least twice. SPOIERL SPOILER S P O I LE R S ............................ The heroine's grandfather dies at the beginning of the book. The heroine's grandmother who she Skypes with every day in Italy, also dies. She also has severe anxiety and can't leave the house sometimes. I took off 1 star because after the slow burn romance we don't get any love scenes. Everything happens off page.

  20. 5 out of 5

    Kate Olson

    Oh how sweet it is to return to one of my favorite Jenny Colgan series ❤️ These books have such a magical and unique setting with charming characters and places appearing at every turn. This newest edition in the series is no exception, and while Polly and Huck aren’t the main focus this time, they and their lighthouse home appear often enough to make loving readers feel at home. And Marisa’s Italian roots (and COOKING 😍) will charm you all over again. Such a delightful read for a busy weekend.

  21. 4 out of 5

    Pam (YA Escape)

    I really enjoy Jenny Colgan's books. I really enjoy Jenny Colgan's books.

  22. 5 out of 5

    Jessica - How Jessica Reads

    I like this series a lot better than the Mure series. Huckle is much less annoying than Joel. 😬 (It’s intriguing to me though that almost all of Colgan’s heroes are foreign!)

  23. 4 out of 5

    Lisa

    very good story,,, enjoyed reading....

  24. 5 out of 5

    Mary

    Loved to once again visit Beach Street Bakery and Polly and her family including Neil the Puffin. This was a charming story of a young woman enveloped in grief who finds life worth living and exploring again.

  25. 4 out of 5

    Denette Adams

    I was so glad to be back in this world again. This series never disappoints!

  26. 4 out of 5

    Dale

    Great book. Love these characters and glad to visit with Neil

  27. 4 out of 5

    Carrie

    The author never fails to create a heart warming story that makes me feel good all over. Perfect summer read. ❤️

  28. 5 out of 5

    Rebecca

    I've struggled with my feeling for my latest Jenny Colgan novel. I so look forward to reading her latest. I always love the settings and her relationships with food. However it took awhile to get her main character off to the Cornish seaside village, and I felt her struggles getting over her grandfather dragged on a bit too long for me. I loved her grandmother who helped her cope with her struggles, and cooked with her on Skype. Her Russian neighbor was interesting, but I wished she would have h I've struggled with my feeling for my latest Jenny Colgan novel. I so look forward to reading her latest. I always love the settings and her relationships with food. However it took awhile to get her main character off to the Cornish seaside village, and I felt her struggles getting over her grandfather dragged on a bit too long for me. I loved her grandmother who helped her cope with her struggles, and cooked with her on Skype. Her Russian neighbor was interesting, but I wished she would have had a relationship with one of the local residents. It all just seemed a bit too contrived for me. Even though everything turned out well in the end, I'm hoping Colgan's next book is not quite so depressing.

  29. 4 out of 5

    Emma Crowley

    If you want an entertaining read with picturesque settings, warm, loveable characters and a splash of romance than Jenny Colgan’s books are the ones for you. She never disappoints and has this unique ability of drawing you in from the very first page as the characters walk off the page to meet and embrace you and even when you have finished each wonderful story you are just longing for more. Sunrise by the Sea provided me with all the above traits and more and really took my mind off everything If you want an entertaining read with picturesque settings, warm, loveable characters and a splash of romance than Jenny Colgan’s books are the ones for you. She never disappoints and has this unique ability of drawing you in from the very first page as the characters walk off the page to meet and embrace you and even when you have finished each wonderful story you are just longing for more. Sunrise by the Sea provided me with all the above traits and more and really took my mind off everything going on in the world as once again I was whisked away to the tidal island of Mount Polbearne and back to characters that I had fallen in love with in the previous Little Beach Street Bakery series. This is book number four and honestly I thought given it’s five years since Jenny had written about this setting I didn’t think we’d ever get a book again featuring Polly and Huckle, not to mention Neil the puffin. Thankfully wishes do come true and this new story was a joy to read and I’m sad it’s over. Out of all four books in this series this really is the one that can be read as a standalone as, although Polly does feature, it’s a new character Marisa who has the dominant role. As I was reading I never thought that new readers would be confused or feel that they were missing out having not read the previous three books. That’s the sign of a really good author and I think having such a break between this book and the last meant that the author really approached this new story with fresh eyes and really was giving it her all. Marisa is one of the best written characters in a book that I have read in a long time. Whilst reading time and time again I found myself nodding along in agreement with how she was feeling, what she was experiencing and how she was coping with it. There was no shying away giving fleeting descriptions of her state of mind and as a character she was all the better for this. It meant that I could identify with her in so many ways. She is in a bad place both mentally and physically but perhaps the wonderful and special island that is Mount Polbearne and its supportive residents in particular Polly might be able to work their magic enabling Marisa to see light at the end of the tunnel. Since the death of her Italian grandfather Marisa has become a shell of her former self, she is truly and utterly heartbroken. Grief is holding her down like a ball and chain and her family and friends can’t understand why this death has affected her so much. In a way she can’t understand this herself either. She has always been quiet but now she has become more or less a recluse, taking leave from her job as a births, deaths and marriages registrar and staying locked in her room despite the best efforts of flatmate Caius to get her out. The layer upon layer of sadness that she feels just builds and builds. It’s growing too large for her and she has established a sturdy wall around herself. She lives in a world of fear where to step outside the door is next to impossible. Grief, anxiety, loneliness, anger and desperation eat away at her and erode any remaining shred of self confidence that she possess. Her wellbeing and mental health are at all time low and she views the world as a cold, noisy, hostile environment. Caius reaches a point where he can’t take it anymore and she needs to go. Thankfully his Uncle Reuben has holiday homes recently built on Mount Polbearne and no holiday makers can go there as the road has not been completed. Before she knows it Marisa has arrived on the island after a journey that does nothing to dissuade the way she is feeling. I loved the description of the holiday homes. It seemed like just the place that Marisa needed to be, hiding away from the world until she could begin to try and fix herself so to speak. I could visualise these little units high up at the top of the island, almost cut off in a way as no one really went there given Reuben didn’t get the road finished. It was an oasis for Marisa. OK she never left the house, taking a step outside just wasn’t happening for her but still she was cocooned and safe. By this point she has reduced her world to a tiny space which could not harm her. Grief and anxiety has made her selfish in a way but I think if you are so crippled by this illness she had (for that is what it was) then you see no way out of it and you do only think about yourself and can’t take on board the advice others are trying to give you. You do question whether there is more than her grandfather’s death that has made Marisa this way? What has made herself so scared and tying herself in endless knots? The inclusion of Marisa’s grandmother and their method of communication was just brilliant. It was a great way to bring strands of the story together in the most heart-warming and genuine of ways. Without it I don’t think the meaning/message that Jenny was trying to achieve would have been possible. It may seem like this book is all doom and gloom from what I have said about Marisa but it’s not at all and that’s thanks to the wonderful writing of the author. She brings so much light and shade to the story and infuses more serious moments with such fantastic humour that has you laughing out loud. Polly’s four year old twins, Daisy and Avery, were so expertly written. So blunt in what they said and they were like a tonic for Marisa and provided plenty of funny moments throughout the book. It’s unusual for me to really love both the main female and male characters in a story. It’s usually the female character I am more drawn too. Marisa was a fantastic character and thankfully a break from the norm in characters I have read about in this genre. But equally as good was her neighbour Alexei. Himself and Marisa are the only two to occupy the holiday homes and he is a big bear of a Russian man who teaches music to the local children. How refreshing to have a male character who is a bit different from the norm. One who is big and burly and to Marisa a complete pain as he plays and practices his music at all hours of the day and night with the sounds coming through the thin walls preventing her from finding any peace. But underneath his gruff exterior Alexei too was hurting. Perhaps in not as such and deep and destructive way as Marisa but yet there was pain beneath his kind eyes. He had such a wonderful relationship with the children he taught and would help in any situation. But Marisa and himself really misunderstand each other and it’s through lack of communication this happens. I just really loved these two characters and by the end you just wish that you too had an Alexei in your life. As always the community spirit and just all round warm feelings and goodness shine through from this series of books. It’s here in spades and that’s why I enjoy Jenny’s books so much. I loved how we still got a glimpse into how Polly was coping with running the bakery as it all started with her and she has come so far since we first met her. Times are tough for her and she sees no way out of the inevitable despite the best efforts of Huckle as well. She needed a light bulb moment to turn things around and maybe it could be found in the most unexpected of people? Also when the worst fate threatens to befall the island can everyone pull together? When push comes to shove can those that are needed most step up to the plate despite battling their own problems and uncertainties? Also Reuben is as exuberant and extravagant as ever and towards the end I just loved the over the top scenes with the party. It was like Jenny just let rip and let her imagination run riot with everything she could think of and it was just brilliant. Sunrise by the Sea is a book that you will easily lose yourself in. It provides comfort and escape and lots of humour too. It’s a book that you will want to re-read as you will want to with all of Jenny’s books and it’s not often I say that about an author. I’m already looking forward to The Christmas Bookshop which publishes in October.

  30. 4 out of 5

    Jeanine

    I received this book as a Goodreads giveaway, in exchange for an honest review. I truly loved reading this book & was sorry when I was finished. The only silver lining is that this was book #4 in a series, & now I can go back and begin with the first book. And even though I had not read the first 3 books, I was able to enjoy this as a stand-alone book, without feeling lost. The story takes places in a small Cornish island town of Mount Polbearne, and Marisa Rossi is a new resident. Apparently the I received this book as a Goodreads giveaway, in exchange for an honest review. I truly loved reading this book & was sorry when I was finished. The only silver lining is that this was book #4 in a series, & now I can go back and begin with the first book. And even though I had not read the first 3 books, I was able to enjoy this as a stand-alone book, without feeling lost. The story takes places in a small Cornish island town of Mount Polbearne, and Marisa Rossi is a new resident. Apparently there have been a few other people who moved to this town in the first 3 books. One of those people is Polly Miller née Waterford, who had moved here much earlier. Polly is married to Huckle, & they live in a lighthouse home, with their twin 5 year old children, Avery & Daisy, and Neil, a little puffin who befriended them & is now part of the family. Polly is running the local bakery, & her husband is trying to run a business selling honey, though they seem to struggle with money constantly. Polly’s best friend is Kerensa, whose husband, Reuben, is extremely wealthy. They are so happy to help friends, but Polly & Huckle don’t want to jeopardize their friendship, by accepting or borrowing money from their friends. Reuben is the uncle of an eccentric young man, Caius, who lives in Exeter. He rents a room to a young woman, Marisa Rossi, age 29. Marisa has been working as a Registrar to the Council; she keeps all the meticulous details of births, deaths, marriages, etc. Marisa has been enjoying this job, & her skill at lettering & record keeping has made her a valuable worker. Marisa also enjoys cooking, especially Italian food, & her roommate, Caius, has enjoyed her food. That is until Marisa’s beloved grandfather died…. Grieving the loss of Carlo, Marisa has sunk into chronic depression, coupled with increasing anxiety. Her general anxiety & social anxiety have changed Marisa into a veritable recluse, hardly ever leaving her room. Caius is becoming increasingly uncomfortable having this now strange woman in his home, & his friends’ comments about her make things worse. Yet, Caius is not a bad guy. He does want Marisa to move out, but he doesn’t simply kick her out. He has found a place for her, the perfect place for someone who pretty much wants to be invisible & disappear…. Caius’ Uncle Reuben had built a few small cottages, on the coast, & he will let Marisa live in one of them. She simply accepts this change, without giving it much thought, packing her bags & making the trip to Mount Polbearne. Marisa notices her house is yellow & that there is an identical house next to hers, in blue. Her new neighbor is a big bear of a man, a piano teacher for the nearby school & many of the area’s children, including little Daisy & Avery, Polly’s twins. Marisa does not appreciate the piano music, played all day & late into the night. Apparently, there was little to no insulation built into these cottages, so Marisa can hear everything that goes on in her neighbor’s home. What she first thought would be a peaceful place to hide away in has become a prison of noise, aggravating her anxiety to unbearable levels. She had, some time ago, switched to working from home, because of her mental health issues, but now she is trapped. Mount Polbearne is s small community, & the people of this community wonder about this young woman who almost never comes out of her home, not even to shop in the neighborhood stores. Marisa has most of her shopping done on computer, getting deliveries so she won’t have to go out. She is not an unfriendly person, but her mental illness has rendered her incapable of doing any socializing at all. She is lonely, but trapped by her own mind. But then she begins to chat a little with her grandmother, her Nonna, an intimidating older woman, so different from her friendly grandfather. Marisa & Nonna use Skype to talk, & Nonna’s straightforward way of speaking with Marisa becomes oddly comforting to her. Nonna’s solution to most things is food, & she does not push Marisa to go out, to socialize with anyone. Instead, she helps Marisa to begin to cook again, just a little bit, & Marisa starts to remember how much she enjoyed to cook…. There are a few aspects of the book that were fairly predictable, yet I didn’t mind. I felt the journey to get to the points I knew were coming was quite enjoyable. There is a lot of humor in this story, & the author handled the topic of mental illness very well, with compassion & understanding, while educating the reader as to what anxiety disorders actually are. The author brings the reader immediately into the story, & it’s a comfortable story to read, perfect for a weekend at the beach or a rainy day staying at home, curled up in a chair, with a hot cup of tea. And being part of a series makes it that much more enjoyable because the stories never truly end. So, if you want to “get away” for a bit, to a quaint seaside town, with a few new friends, this would be a good book to read. And even if you don’t want to commit to a new series, this book still is fine as a stand-alone book. I look forward to reading more books by Jenny Colgan, & I may just go to the first in this series, “Little Beach Street Bakery,” to see how it all begins ….

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