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Touch Is Really Strange

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Why can't we tickle ourselves? How can slow touch convey more powerful emotions than fast touch? How does touch shape our perception of the world? The latest addition to the Really Strange Series , this science-based graphic comic addresses these questions and more, revealing the complexity of touch and exploring its power and limits. Used positively, touch can change pai Why can't we tickle ourselves? How can slow touch convey more powerful emotions than fast touch? How does touch shape our perception of the world? The latest addition to the Really Strange Series , this science-based graphic comic addresses these questions and more, revealing the complexity of touch and exploring its power and limits. Used positively, touch can change pain and trauma, communicate compassion and love and generate social bonding. Get it wrong and it can be abusive and terrifying. Everyone's initial experience of life and existence is tactile and spatial at its core. Before we have language, our concepts are formed as we meet a world full of edges and textures. Touch Is Really Strange celebrates the power of inward touch (interoception) and looks at how we can use skillful contact to promote feelings of joy, connection and vitality inside another. Touch helps us feel real and connected, and is fundamental to the development of consciousness and to perception. Steve Haines' new book teaches us how to safely touch people, not parts of people.


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Why can't we tickle ourselves? How can slow touch convey more powerful emotions than fast touch? How does touch shape our perception of the world? The latest addition to the Really Strange Series , this science-based graphic comic addresses these questions and more, revealing the complexity of touch and exploring its power and limits. Used positively, touch can change pai Why can't we tickle ourselves? How can slow touch convey more powerful emotions than fast touch? How does touch shape our perception of the world? The latest addition to the Really Strange Series , this science-based graphic comic addresses these questions and more, revealing the complexity of touch and exploring its power and limits. Used positively, touch can change pain and trauma, communicate compassion and love and generate social bonding. Get it wrong and it can be abusive and terrifying. Everyone's initial experience of life and existence is tactile and spatial at its core. Before we have language, our concepts are formed as we meet a world full of edges and textures. Touch Is Really Strange celebrates the power of inward touch (interoception) and looks at how we can use skillful contact to promote feelings of joy, connection and vitality inside another. Touch helps us feel real and connected, and is fundamental to the development of consciousness and to perception. Steve Haines' new book teaches us how to safely touch people, not parts of people.

30 review for Touch Is Really Strange

  1. 5 out of 5

    Liam

    Video Review This is my 4th advanced reader copy (ARC) review. This means I received this ebook for free, in exchange for this review by Netgalley. I'm not financially motivated, as I read library books, so I only read ARCs I actually think will be good enough for me to rate and review honestly. Unfortunately, I really struggled to enjoy the writing of this book. I read this knowing nothing of the series but, being fond of graphic novels, I thought I'd give it a try. I do think Sophie Standing's Video Review This is my 4th advanced reader copy (ARC) review. This means I received this ebook for free, in exchange for this review by Netgalley. I'm not financially motivated, as I read library books, so I only read ARCs I actually think will be good enough for me to rate and review honestly. Unfortunately, I really struggled to enjoy the writing of this book. I read this knowing nothing of the series but, being fond of graphic novels, I thought I'd give it a try. I do think Sophie Standing's illustrations are really nice, some reviewers here have said the art style might be simple but I think they're really great. I was under the impression this would be a story but it's a very closely cited academic seeming essay. The problem is there's no structure or focus here, the key message is hard to grasp, some controversial things are said both on the scientific and cultural level. It's hard to know what the book is trying to do, it sometimes seems to be ushering us into being comfortable with being touched, but then also making touch seem hostile and dangerous. I found the drawings and the writing seem very disconnected it, reading it I could tell this was not a single author. It's not because the subject of the drawing or writing was wrong, the tones just didn't match. The drawings have this personal abstract element and accompany this impersonal dry science. I think the science did not need to be quoted so heavily as much of it are theoretical concepts that could have been paraphrased or changed more simply. I felt as if this was the research for an essay about Touch, but something happened to the narrator last minute so the research was used as is, instead. Having a PhD in Neuroscience (coincidentally, I had no idea this was a book about science at all), made it a bit more gruelling to read, as I thought some parts were oversimplified, lacking emphasis and potentially incorrect. But, honestly, my main gripes with the book would've held had I read this as a teenager a decade ago with the mindset that a good book must be more cohesive and nuanced no matter how fantastic and humane its subject matter. If you want to write about a sensitive topic, then one should write sensitively? I feel like the content doesn't match the book genre of being a comic (in its writing), nor of being a science non-fiction essay (in its brevity). I felt like giving this 2* for the drawings alone but when I think about it, I see this book as a hot mess that could've been much better with editing as the content is there. But something about the way it is written lacks a bit of sensitivity, or 'touch', for the subject matter? But of course, there are always some reviewers who have liked it, so my views may not reflect your own. So if touch is something you are interested in exploring the science and nature of, this might be an interesting quick read of the main mysteries it holds for human interaction.

  2. 5 out of 5

    Cassandra

    This was.... not what I wanted. Honestly, I don't even know what this was. I thought this was going to be a really nice read. I read the summary and expected so much more from the book and now that I've read it, I'm very disappointed. This is literally a book about touch. It is good for the one time you read it I guess, but this I don't see this being a book you'd read more than the one time. It is basically a factual book about touch and the importance of touch. It discusses touch during COVID bu This was.... not what I wanted. Honestly, I don't even know what this was. I thought this was going to be a really nice read. I read the summary and expected so much more from the book and now that I've read it, I'm very disappointed. This is literally a book about touch. It is good for the one time you read it I guess, but this I don't see this being a book you'd read more than the one time. It is basically a factual book about touch and the importance of touch. It discusses touch during COVID but also during the times of the #MeToo movement. I really thought that, if it was going to be more informational, it would've been structured a little better. Unfortunately, overall this did not hit the mark for me. I will say, there are a few lines in this that really hit home. As someone who LOVES to hug, I am seriously deprived of it right now. In that regard, it felt very personal. The art, although not detailed, is still lovely and worth noting as well. Thank you NetGalley and Jessica Kingsley Publishers for the ARC in exchange for an honest review.

  3. 4 out of 5

    Mego

    This is a surprisingly neat little comic. Maybe because I wasn't familiar with bodywork and touching as healing beforehand, but I really feel like I've learned something new and opened up a whole new interest for myself. This little comic is a really good introduction for anyone curious about the often overlooked sense of touch. Parts of this comic are scientific, explaining what touch is and how we feel it, and also how we can use touch to heal. There are some really cool little exercises in th This is a surprisingly neat little comic. Maybe because I wasn't familiar with bodywork and touching as healing beforehand, but I really feel like I've learned something new and opened up a whole new interest for myself. This little comic is a really good introduction for anyone curious about the often overlooked sense of touch. Parts of this comic are scientific, explaining what touch is and how we feel it, and also how we can use touch to heal. There are some really cool little exercises in the end that help you practice this idea and really begin to understand it. The illustration style of the comic is a lovely touch (ha, no pun intended). Simple, calm, with a theme of light and dark that feels healing all on its own.

  4. 5 out of 5

    Gabrielle

    Huge thanks to netgalley for providing me with this book. I really expected to learn a lot of cool trippy facts about touch but it felt more like structure-less babbling at times. The point of the novel shifted to random topics and the exercises at the end would have benefitted from being replaced by cool facts about touch also the red text at the bottom of each page was unnecessary and was very distracting as i was reading there were some facts that were interesting but the author assumed that t Huge thanks to netgalley for providing me with this book. I really expected to learn a lot of cool trippy facts about touch but it felt more like structure-less babbling at times. The point of the novel shifted to random topics and the exercises at the end would have benefitted from being replaced by cool facts about touch also the red text at the bottom of each page was unnecessary and was very distracting as i was reading there were some facts that were interesting but the author assumed that the reader knew the definition of complex words only to explain it late in the novel i think the author tried too hard to make sure to make some sort of commentary when it would have benefitted more from being light and fascinating

  5. 4 out of 5

    Angelina

    Thank you NetGalley and Jessica Kingsley Publishers for the ARC in exchange for an honest review. This was.... not what I wanted... After reading the description, I thought this was going to be a really good read. I'm very disappointed. Basic graphics within a very academic tome about touch! Honestly, I wouldn't call this a graphic novel! Thank you NetGalley and Jessica Kingsley Publishers for the ARC in exchange for an honest review. This was.... not what I wanted... After reading the description, I thought this was going to be a really good read. I'm very disappointed. Basic graphics within a very academic tome about touch! Honestly, I wouldn't call this a graphic novel!

  6. 4 out of 5

    Joy

    This was such an interesting book to read. I learned a lot about touch from it. The exercices at the end were also very suitable with the book. The art in this book is very beautiful!

  7. 5 out of 5

    Jason Wrench

    I want to first thank the author and publisher for the opportunity to read Touch is Really Strange by Steve Haines and Illustrated by Sophie Standing before its publication. Even though I am thankful for their kindness, I did not let it influence my evaluation of this book. I want to start with what I think are the positives of this project. 1) I think they do a good job of trying to discuss the importance of touch in only 32 pages. 2) I really like the art. I found the illustrator's work differ I want to first thank the author and publisher for the opportunity to read Touch is Really Strange by Steve Haines and Illustrated by Sophie Standing before its publication. Even though I am thankful for their kindness, I did not let it influence my evaluation of this book. I want to start with what I think are the positives of this project. 1) I think they do a good job of trying to discuss the importance of touch in only 32 pages. 2) I really like the art. I found the illustrator's work different. I loved the color palette she used. Very modern. Sadly, now I have to discuss the negatives of this project. 1) There is little content in this book. Now, it's possible that this series is designed this way, but a chapter in an intro to communication or an intro to psych book will give the reader more information on the subject than this book does. 2) There are some in-text citations, but the references were not included in the version I read. As such, I'm not completely sure how up-to-date or scientific these sources were. Some of the ones I could make out easily were references to non-scientific articles. As nonverbal communication and behavior are huge academic disciplines, this lack of content was a bit saddening. As a whole, I was just left kind of like "meh" when I finished reading the 32 pages. I think this could be a good introduction to the subject for someone with zero knowledge. But, based on what I read here, I'm not completely sure who the target market for this book actually is. One's thing for sure though, as an academic with 20+ years of looking at nonverbal communication research, I was not the target market.

  8. 4 out of 5

    Zoe Jackson

    Touch is Really Strange is the latest title in a series of small graphic guides to different processes, such as pain, trauma and anxiety. Pain is Really Strange radically altered my understanding of my chronic pain and so I was excited to pick this volume up. I have a sometimes fraught relationship with touch myself due to allodynia (pain at normal touch) and trauma. The first thing that struck me about the book is how gorgeous it is. The illustrations are soft and tender, with skin tones being Touch is Really Strange is the latest title in a series of small graphic guides to different processes, such as pain, trauma and anxiety. Pain is Really Strange radically altered my understanding of my chronic pain and so I was excited to pick this volume up. I have a sometimes fraught relationship with touch myself due to allodynia (pain at normal touch) and trauma. The first thing that struck me about the book is how gorgeous it is. The illustrations are soft and tender, with skin tones being used for images of positive touch and grey scale for dissociation and negative touch. This choice was inspired, and really conveys the sense of connection to self that touch can bring. The text is written in accessibly, with references given at the bottom of each page. I appreciate this decision, it makes learning the basics feel doable while giving more information for those who would like to learn more. Much is covered in the slim volume, from the importance of touch to child development and in care homes to trauma, micro aggressions, pain and massage. I learnt lots from Touch is Really Strange and would widely recommend it, especially to people reckoning with trauma and those in caring professions. Thank you to NetGalley and the publisher for providing me with an advance copy of this book in exchange for an honest review.

  9. 4 out of 5

    Jen

    This review has been hidden because it contains spoilers. To view it, click here. My thanks to NetGalley and Jessica Kingsley Publishers/Singing Dragon for an eARC copy of this book to read and review. The eARC formatting was off, making this a difficult book to read and follow. I'm not sure if it was due to the format or not, but it didn't seem like a graphic novel, it seemed like a bunch of paragraphs with pictures inserted every once in a while. I wasn't fond of the artwork and the writing seemed very scattershot and all over the place. There wasn't a smooth flow with a log My thanks to NetGalley and Jessica Kingsley Publishers/Singing Dragon for an eARC copy of this book to read and review. The eARC formatting was off, making this a difficult book to read and follow. I'm not sure if it was due to the format or not, but it didn't seem like a graphic novel, it seemed like a bunch of paragraphs with pictures inserted every once in a while. I wasn't fond of the artwork and the writing seemed very scattershot and all over the place. There wasn't a smooth flow with a logical (that I could tell anyway) procession of the information being given. Much of it felt repeated and I DNF'd at 37%. I was also disappointed in how the subject matter was presented, as from the title, "Touch is Really Strange", I assumed it was about how touch is perceived and is an issue for those who are non-neurotypical and I wanted to learn about that, not about how touch can be both a positive and a negative (hugs from loved ones vs. #metoo). While this didn't work for me, I would recommend this to those who are interested in the topic of touch and the science behind it, at least for a flip-through. Any recommendations for books about touch for those who are non-neurotypical and their loved ones, I would greatly appreciate it! 2, this wasn't what I was expecting or wanted but it wasn't bad, stars. Just not the right book for me right now.

  10. 5 out of 5

    John Dodd

    It's a brief but interesting book with a curious style of illustration. The thought being discussed is how much (in times past) humans have relied on touch as a method of greeting, of comfort, and now much now (in the time of Covid), all the things that many took for granted become signs of danger and contagion. The book doesn't go into great depth with the nature of things, but it makes the clear point that touch is indeed one of the senses by which we (humans) most define our reality, if you ca It's a brief but interesting book with a curious style of illustration. The thought being discussed is how much (in times past) humans have relied on touch as a method of greeting, of comfort, and now much now (in the time of Covid), all the things that many took for granted become signs of danger and contagion. The book doesn't go into great depth with the nature of things, but it makes the clear point that touch is indeed one of the senses by which we (humans) most define our reality, if you can touch something, it becomes real, and if you can't touch it, is it real? We have been starved for the closeness that most of us crave, and now comes the question of whether or not it's something that we can get back, or indeed, if it's something that we want to get back. There's a few exercises in the book about exploring touch with others, but also a number of warnings about how touch can be inappropriate, and while I can see why a caution would be appropriate for some, it struck me as being at odds with the general message of touch being something essential to most people. Doesn't detract from the enjoyment of the book, interesting and particularly relevant in a world where most of us have been denied it for a very long time.

  11. 4 out of 5

    Suradha

    Thanks NetGalley for an eARC of this book in exchange for an honest review. As someone just dipping their toes in graphic novels, this was so well done. I truly love the art, and how it adds dimensions to the narrative. Reading this felt like something headspace would create 20 years hence. The fact that there's citations for EVERY major theory on touch the book explores is so helpful and satisfying. Reading the footnotes made me feel so smart??? The exercises for reconnecting with touch and the Thanks NetGalley for an eARC of this book in exchange for an honest review. As someone just dipping their toes in graphic novels, this was so well done. I truly love the art, and how it adds dimensions to the narrative. Reading this felt like something headspace would create 20 years hence. The fact that there's citations for EVERY major theory on touch the book explores is so helpful and satisfying. Reading the footnotes made me feel so smart??? The exercises for reconnecting with touch and the whole inward touch principle will stick with me good. The book meanders and I'd have found it more helpful were there chapters or context on what to take away from the book/who exactly is the target audience. As a casual fan of science writing, I'd read it regardless but I do believe everyone can take away something if not entirely rethink their first principles re: touch from Touch is Really Strange.

  12. 5 out of 5

    Mia Popova

    Thanks to Netgalley and the publisher for providing an eARC for me to review. Touch is Really Strange is a short comic book. Its topic - the importance of safe consensual touch - is approached by using scientific facts and providing information on safe touching. At the end it also features touch exercises that put the ideas of the book to practice. I'd say this book is most suited for an educational resource. It's a perfect book to have in a classroom or a school library, since it gives informati Thanks to Netgalley and the publisher for providing an eARC for me to review. Touch is Really Strange is a short comic book. Its topic - the importance of safe consensual touch - is approached by using scientific facts and providing information on safe touching. At the end it also features touch exercises that put the ideas of the book to practice. I'd say this book is most suited for an educational resource. It's a perfect book to have in a classroom or a school library, since it gives information on consent and ways to practice physical contact safely and respectfully. My main critique was the poor layout of the text - at least my digital copy was hard to follow, especially reading the red text that was used in the book was kind of tricky. My copy also didn't have any bibliography, even though it featured cited works, which is sad because that way I can't check the sources for myself.

  13. 4 out of 5

    Cass - Words on Paper

    Timely, aesthetic, descriptive. Touch is Really Strange shines a light on one of the most primitive and meaningful aspects of humankind. Haines addresses the many facets of touch, which are backed by current evidence from leading science, medicine and psychology scholars. Non-fiction has the potential to be dry, lifeless and dull, but the information is packaged together with delightful illustrations that are pleasing to the eye. The pairing of the two delivers a warm and optimistic outlook into Timely, aesthetic, descriptive. Touch is Really Strange shines a light on one of the most primitive and meaningful aspects of humankind. Haines addresses the many facets of touch, which are backed by current evidence from leading science, medicine and psychology scholars. Non-fiction has the potential to be dry, lifeless and dull, but the information is packaged together with delightful illustrations that are pleasing to the eye. The pairing of the two delivers a warm and optimistic outlook into the future of healing techniques, readily accessible and comprehensible to the layman. Tucked in at the end is a few short exercises anyone can do to become more attuned to their bodies. It would be foolish to expect anything more than a brief foray into the current science surrounding touch in such a short book. Recommended for the curious, so that they may be inspired to delve deeper.

  14. 5 out of 5

    Eternally Bonkers (Shilpa)

    The book is an infographic collection on the importance and scientific facts about our fifth sense - Touch. This could not have been published in a better time with social distancing impacting our lives, and how much touch has been debated in various forms that we see today. Author Steve Haines presents the medical as well as the physical, emotional and mental effects of touch on a human being. The author also goes on to distinguish the trauma of bad touch and the healing power of good touch. It The book is an infographic collection on the importance and scientific facts about our fifth sense - Touch. This could not have been published in a better time with social distancing impacting our lives, and how much touch has been debated in various forms that we see today. Author Steve Haines presents the medical as well as the physical, emotional and mental effects of touch on a human being. The author also goes on to distinguish the trauma of bad touch and the healing power of good touch. It is a beautiful book - the illustrations are modern and geometric with minimal colors and painting like. In fact, the pictures are so beautiful, each page feels like an art in itself that can be framed. It is good book to read if you are interested to know more about Touch or have a knack of curiosity for how this sense works with many fun facts. Thanks to Jessica Kingsley Publishers and #NetGalley for the ARC in exchange for an honest review.

  15. 4 out of 5

    Claire

    The latest in the 'really strange' series and this time the focus is touch. Some useful information here, about how touch works and how it might not be what we expect. I would have liked more referencing to the Trauma is really strange book and how touch can be problematic which was glossed over here a little I felt. There are some useful exercises included which again could have been highlighted better, as in they could be used by individuals or couples trying to discover what kind of touch the The latest in the 'really strange' series and this time the focus is touch. Some useful information here, about how touch works and how it might not be what we expect. I would have liked more referencing to the Trauma is really strange book and how touch can be problematic which was glossed over here a little I felt. There are some useful exercises included which again could have been highlighted better, as in they could be used by individuals or couples trying to discover what kind of touch they enjoy. I would say a good beginning that could have made more of the knowledge of the subject the author clearly has. With thanks to the publisher and Net Galley for an ARC in exchange for an honest review.

  16. 4 out of 5

    The Curious Wanderer

    It’s interesting to see a book about exploring the world of “touch” and how any of us can’t do that at the moment due to the ongoing COVID-19 outbreak. It does good to show the different types of excercises you can do with someone and it gives references on what other news outlets have said regarding touch. However I would have liked if this book distinguished more of what the differences are to what is a bad/ good touch to bring more awareness. For example, exploring more of touch with and with It’s interesting to see a book about exploring the world of “touch” and how any of us can’t do that at the moment due to the ongoing COVID-19 outbreak. It does good to show the different types of excercises you can do with someone and it gives references on what other news outlets have said regarding touch. However I would have liked if this book distinguished more of what the differences are to what is a bad/ good touch to bring more awareness. For example, exploring more of touch with and without consent should have been added to the graphic novel. It’s a fair enough book but there were a few puzzle pieces missing from it... Thanks Netgalley and Jessica Kingsley Publishers for supplying me this graphic novel!

  17. 5 out of 5

    jordana

    I came into this not really knowing what to expect, beyond an exploration of the concept of touch. However, I was really impressed by the ways this short (32 page) graphic novel touched (pun intended) on consent and boundaries, trauma awareness, and therapeutic methods. Additionally, the artwork is beautiful, making this a very pleasant read and there were a few exercises that made the book feel more interactive. I would really highly recommend this to people working with middle and lower-high s I came into this not really knowing what to expect, beyond an exploration of the concept of touch. However, I was really impressed by the ways this short (32 page) graphic novel touched (pun intended) on consent and boundaries, trauma awareness, and therapeutic methods. Additionally, the artwork is beautiful, making this a very pleasant read and there were a few exercises that made the book feel more interactive. I would really highly recommend this to people working with middle and lower-high school students (6-10th grade) who want a way to explain consent and touch boundaries interpersonally and medically.

  18. 4 out of 5

    Rebecca

    This book is a poignant reminder of the cost of a pandemic. This book highlights the importance of touch and even the nuances on how touch can both be utilized as a tool for healing and harming. The art is gorgeous and the dialogue is almost poetic. However I felt there was a disconnect between the footnotes and the tiles. The footnotes felt very scientific jargon-y. They did help explain but at the same time they didn't explain enough. This book skims the top of the healing power of touch and l This book is a poignant reminder of the cost of a pandemic. This book highlights the importance of touch and even the nuances on how touch can both be utilized as a tool for healing and harming. The art is gorgeous and the dialogue is almost poetic. However I felt there was a disconnect between the footnotes and the tiles. The footnotes felt very scientific jargon-y. They did help explain but at the same time they didn't explain enough. This book skims the top of the healing power of touch and left me wanting to learn more. The exercises included at the end of the book were a great idea and done very well.

  19. 5 out of 5

    Saniya (sunnysidereviews)

    3.5 stars! This was a very interesting perception on what touch is. I really liked what the author said about the different types of touch. It made me look at it quite differently, and positively. I felt as though it was a bit repetitive, but it wasn't necessarily annoying. Luckily, I thought the art was phenomenal. The illustrations where calming and helpful. Overall, this was a fast and peaceful read that I recommend to anyone feeling nervous or angry. (Thank you Netgalley and Jessica Kingsley P 3.5 stars! This was a very interesting perception on what touch is. I really liked what the author said about the different types of touch. It made me look at it quite differently, and positively. I felt as though it was a bit repetitive, but it wasn't necessarily annoying. Luckily, I thought the art was phenomenal. The illustrations where calming and helpful. Overall, this was a fast and peaceful read that I recommend to anyone feeling nervous or angry. (Thank you Netgalley and Jessica Kingsley Publishers for providing me with an eARC of this book. All thoughts and opinions are my own.)

  20. 5 out of 5

    Jo-ann Wong

    Thank you to Singing Dragon and NetGalley for the digital ARC! This little book talks about the importance of touch in our society, and how to be more mindful of our physical selves. Especially during our current pandemic, it is important to talk about the related health benefits and science around touch. The illustrations were beautiful, and it was fun to learn a number of new facts. The exercises at the end were interesting. I think this would be a great introduction to a more full-length discu Thank you to Singing Dragon and NetGalley for the digital ARC! This little book talks about the importance of touch in our society, and how to be more mindful of our physical selves. Especially during our current pandemic, it is important to talk about the related health benefits and science around touch. The illustrations were beautiful, and it was fun to learn a number of new facts. The exercises at the end were interesting. I think this would be a great introduction to a more full-length discussion about this topic.

  21. 4 out of 5

    Alex (soulfullyalex)

    I really enjoyed this book. The graphics, for one, were gorgeous. I loved how the colour represented different feelings, and situations. I found the information provided in the book very interesting. It was fascinating to learn about touch, how our bodies perceive it, how it works, and why we need and like touch. I think this book would be great for anyone interested in touch and physical connection. The information was so fascinating and the art was absolutely beautiful. It is definitely a grea I really enjoyed this book. The graphics, for one, were gorgeous. I loved how the colour represented different feelings, and situations. I found the information provided in the book very interesting. It was fascinating to learn about touch, how our bodies perceive it, how it works, and why we need and like touch. I think this book would be great for anyone interested in touch and physical connection. The information was so fascinating and the art was absolutely beautiful. It is definitely a great read.

  22. 4 out of 5

    Laura

    It's funny how things come together sometimes. I taught an embodiment class on touch in relation to the nervous system for the first time ever, and lo and behold, Steven Haines announces Touch Is Really Strange! For me, it serves as an overall framework that I can refer to to refresh the basics of touch. I love that it's visual, that it has a reference flap at the back, and that it emphasises the power of consensual touch. I think this also might be an interesting read for any embodiment students It's funny how things come together sometimes. I taught an embodiment class on touch in relation to the nervous system for the first time ever, and lo and behold, Steven Haines announces Touch Is Really Strange! For me, it serves as an overall framework that I can refer to to refresh the basics of touch. I love that it's visual, that it has a reference flap at the back, and that it emphasises the power of consensual touch. I think this also might be an interesting read for any embodiment students who have worked with touch in classes and want to learn a bit more.

  23. 5 out of 5

    Holly Owens

    This was a very enlightening read. I thoroughly enjoyed how it made me think about how we use touch in our day to day lives. The illustrations were beautiful and it was great to see every point explained with past research. It poses the great debate about whether after COVID there will be more touch before as we’ve missed everyone, or less as we’ve been used to avoiding people for so long. Overall, a very interesting read which I would definitely recommend!

  24. 5 out of 5

    Geoff

    So I love the idea of non-fiction science comics, and I think exploring the ways that we as a culture have staved ourselves of touch is really important, but this comic really set off "woo" and pseudoscience warning bells. Maybe I'm just a nerd, but I kept wanting citations and references to back up the claims that were being made. Loved the minimalist art, however. **Thanks to the author, artist, publisher, and NetGalley for a free copy in exchange for an honest review. So I love the idea of non-fiction science comics, and I think exploring the ways that we as a culture have staved ourselves of touch is really important, but this comic really set off "woo" and pseudoscience warning bells. Maybe I'm just a nerd, but I kept wanting citations and references to back up the claims that were being made. Loved the minimalist art, however. **Thanks to the author, artist, publisher, and NetGalley for a free copy in exchange for an honest review.

  25. 5 out of 5

    Kristine

    Touch is Really Strange by Steve Haines is a free NetGalley e-comicbook that I read in mid-April. Touch as a form of acknowledgment, compassion, yet also fearful and dangerous. It's sensory communication with the world outside of us under the pressures of social norms and hastened affection, but made earlier through therapeutic bodywork and self-centering. I especially love this comic's really warm tones and loosely lined renderings of modern bodies. Touch is Really Strange by Steve Haines is a free NetGalley e-comicbook that I read in mid-April. Touch as a form of acknowledgment, compassion, yet also fearful and dangerous. It's sensory communication with the world outside of us under the pressures of social norms and hastened affection, but made earlier through therapeutic bodywork and self-centering. I especially love this comic's really warm tones and loosely lined renderings of modern bodies.

  26. 4 out of 5

    Mary

    A beautiful graphic novel! With recent events, and such isolation being felt by so many people, a story like this can help give us perspective on how we as humans function in a world where one of our most basic needs is now seen as an evil.

  27. 5 out of 5

    Caroline Barrett

    I don't think this was the book for me. I was really drawn in by the cover illustration but found the copy within the book very dry and skim read large sections. Although the premise of the book is quite interesting, I felt it just didnt quite hit the mark. I don't think this was the book for me. I was really drawn in by the cover illustration but found the copy within the book very dry and skim read large sections. Although the premise of the book is quite interesting, I felt it just didnt quite hit the mark.

  28. 5 out of 5

    Carol

    I received an ARC of this book in exchange for an honest review. This book was interesting. I learned quite a bit about the psychological and physiological implications of touch, some obvious and others remarkable. The version I received was clearly not the final edit, but I still enjoyed it.

  29. 5 out of 5

    Laura

    What a gorgeous book. I love the illustrations. It’s so pretty and such an aesthetically pleasing way to put the information across. A timely book in a world that lacks touch. Loved it.

  30. 4 out of 5

    Ashley Waithe

    It was okay. I don’t think I was the demographic for this book so I can’t say I didn’t like it.

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