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In this uplifting and practical book, written in collaboration with his biographer, Austen Ivereigh, the preeminent spiritual leader explains why we must—and how we can—make the world safer, fairer, and healthier for all people now. In the COVID crisis, the beloved shepherd of over one billion Catholics saw the cruelty and inequity of our society exposed more vividly than e In this uplifting and practical book, written in collaboration with his biographer, Austen Ivereigh, the preeminent spiritual leader explains why we must—and how we can—make the world safer, fairer, and healthier for all people now. In the COVID crisis, the beloved shepherd of over one billion Catholics saw the cruelty and inequity of our society exposed more vividly than ever before. He also saw, in the resilience, generosity, and creativity of so many people, the means to rescue our society, our economy, and our planet. In direct, powerful prose, Pope Francis urges us not to let the pain be in vain. He begins Let Us Dream by exploring what this crisis can teach us about how to handle upheaval of any kind in our own lives and the world at large. With unprecedented candor, he reveals how three crises in his own life changed him dramatically for the better. By its very nature, he shows, crisis presents us with a choice: we make a grievous error if we try to return to some pre-crisis state. But if we have the courage to change, we can emerge from the crisis better than before. Francis then offers a brilliant, scathing critique of the systems and ideologies that conspired to produce the current crisis, from a global economy obsessed with profit and heedless of the people and environment it harms, to politicians who foment their people’s fear and use it to increase their own power at their people’s expense. He reminds us that Christians’ first duty is to serve others, especially the poor and the marginalized, just as Jesus did. Finally, the Pope offers an inspiring and actionable blueprint for building a better world for all humanity by putting the poor and the planet at the heart of new thinking. For this plan, he draws not only on sacred sources, but on the latest findings from renowned scientists, economists, activists, and other thinkers. Yet rather than simply offer prescriptions, he shows how ordinary people acting together despite their differences can discover unforeseen possibilities. Along the way, he offers dozens of wise and surprising observations on the value of unconventional thinking, on why we must dramatically increase women’s leadership in the Church and throughout society, on what he learned while scouring the streets of Buenos Aires with garbage-pickers, and much more. Let Us Dream is an epiphany, a call to arms, and a pleasure to read. It is Pope Francis at his most personal, profound and passionate. With this book and with open hearts, we can change the world.


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In this uplifting and practical book, written in collaboration with his biographer, Austen Ivereigh, the preeminent spiritual leader explains why we must—and how we can—make the world safer, fairer, and healthier for all people now. In the COVID crisis, the beloved shepherd of over one billion Catholics saw the cruelty and inequity of our society exposed more vividly than e In this uplifting and practical book, written in collaboration with his biographer, Austen Ivereigh, the preeminent spiritual leader explains why we must—and how we can—make the world safer, fairer, and healthier for all people now. In the COVID crisis, the beloved shepherd of over one billion Catholics saw the cruelty and inequity of our society exposed more vividly than ever before. He also saw, in the resilience, generosity, and creativity of so many people, the means to rescue our society, our economy, and our planet. In direct, powerful prose, Pope Francis urges us not to let the pain be in vain. He begins Let Us Dream by exploring what this crisis can teach us about how to handle upheaval of any kind in our own lives and the world at large. With unprecedented candor, he reveals how three crises in his own life changed him dramatically for the better. By its very nature, he shows, crisis presents us with a choice: we make a grievous error if we try to return to some pre-crisis state. But if we have the courage to change, we can emerge from the crisis better than before. Francis then offers a brilliant, scathing critique of the systems and ideologies that conspired to produce the current crisis, from a global economy obsessed with profit and heedless of the people and environment it harms, to politicians who foment their people’s fear and use it to increase their own power at their people’s expense. He reminds us that Christians’ first duty is to serve others, especially the poor and the marginalized, just as Jesus did. Finally, the Pope offers an inspiring and actionable blueprint for building a better world for all humanity by putting the poor and the planet at the heart of new thinking. For this plan, he draws not only on sacred sources, but on the latest findings from renowned scientists, economists, activists, and other thinkers. Yet rather than simply offer prescriptions, he shows how ordinary people acting together despite their differences can discover unforeseen possibilities. Along the way, he offers dozens of wise and surprising observations on the value of unconventional thinking, on why we must dramatically increase women’s leadership in the Church and throughout society, on what he learned while scouring the streets of Buenos Aires with garbage-pickers, and much more. Let Us Dream is an epiphany, a call to arms, and a pleasure to read. It is Pope Francis at his most personal, profound and passionate. With this book and with open hearts, we can change the world.

30 review for Let Us Dream: The Path to a Better Future

  1. 4 out of 5

    Mehrsa

    This book was well-written and really good. Pope Francis has a clear-eyed moral critique of modern inequality, markets, and politics. It's refreshing to hear from a Christian leader about the sins of the powerful and wealthy. It should not be that rare, but so many churches have been co-opted by right-wing politics that it is unusual to have a Christian leader actually talk about the stuff Jesus actually cared about. This book was well-written and really good. Pope Francis has a clear-eyed moral critique of modern inequality, markets, and politics. It's refreshing to hear from a Christian leader about the sins of the powerful and wealthy. It should not be that rare, but so many churches have been co-opted by right-wing politics that it is unusual to have a Christian leader actually talk about the stuff Jesus actually cared about.

  2. 4 out of 5

    Book2Dragon

    I am so glad to have been gifted this book. I am not Catholic, but I like this Pope and his ideas (which agree with mine, of course). This was written in response to 2020 and the pandemic. It is a hope for us to come out of this a better world, more caring, more conscious of one another and our planet. It helps to remember that the USA is not the only country on the planet, nor is it the only one trying to negotiate this pandemic. That said, so much of what he says applied to our current politica I am so glad to have been gifted this book. I am not Catholic, but I like this Pope and his ideas (which agree with mine, of course). This was written in response to 2020 and the pandemic. It is a hope for us to come out of this a better world, more caring, more conscious of one another and our planet. It helps to remember that the USA is not the only country on the planet, nor is it the only one trying to negotiate this pandemic. That said, so much of what he says applied to our current political and social experience in 2020 and the 3 years prior that it helps to remind oneself of that fact. An important book that should be read widely and thoughtfully.

  3. 5 out of 5

    Correen

    Pope Francis writes a clarion call for Catholics to apply their faith to the needs of society and "mother earth." I am an agnostic who cares about the needs of our world and our lives. The book is divided into three parts; a time to see, to choose, and to act. Throughout the book, he uses Bible stories as allegories. He starts by warning about three disastrous ways of escaping reality: narcissism, discouragement, and pessimism, explaining each and tying each to Covid and to events of todays worl Pope Francis writes a clarion call for Catholics to apply their faith to the needs of society and "mother earth." I am an agnostic who cares about the needs of our world and our lives. The book is divided into three parts; a time to see, to choose, and to act. Throughout the book, he uses Bible stories as allegories. He starts by warning about three disastrous ways of escaping reality: narcissism, discouragement, and pessimism, explaining each and tying each to Covid and to events of todays world. He also uses the term, Covid, as a symbol of the challenges of todays world and a call to action. Once he has the problem identified, he uses stories from the Bible to identify actions of other imperfect persons. The first section is beautiful and meaningful. The second section about choice, was about Catholic ideology and, while I found the basic thinking useful but not his applications. It is written for Catholics -- which was his purpose. The right to have a communion wafer has no value to me. The third section, while still directed for his audience, was pulled together beautifully with challenges to action in three areas: land (mother earth,) lodging (general habitat,) and labor. He ends with a poem of hope. He has outlined a direction for his church to address the needs of todays world -- a worthy read.

  4. 4 out of 5

    Elizabeth K

    Provides much food for thought. Wrestles with questions of social injustice and human dignity and how we all have a role to play in bringing about a better post-Covid world. I haven’t come across anything remotely as coherent as this when it comes to discussing the impact and future of the world affected by Covid. Enlightening.

  5. 4 out of 5

    A.J. Mendoza

    I am constantly shocked by the heart of the pope. I am not Catholic, neither do I know much about the papacy, but his heart for those in need of mercy screams Christ to me. I can only fight to keep a conscious awareness of my neighbor in the way Pope Francis calls all people to. This book was not written for the church. It was written for a humanity that is going through a pandemic together, for the sake of that very same humanity leaving this united suffering with united care. Though the middle I am constantly shocked by the heart of the pope. I am not Catholic, neither do I know much about the papacy, but his heart for those in need of mercy screams Christ to me. I can only fight to keep a conscious awareness of my neighbor in the way Pope Francis calls all people to. This book was not written for the church. It was written for a humanity that is going through a pandemic together, for the sake of that very same humanity leaving this united suffering with united care. Though the middle section lost me a little with all the talks about councils, his call for a unified mindset over the justice of the world (creation included!) is nothing short than the voice of God calling his people to partner with him as he designed it from the garden. This book would be great for anyone with a high school reading level. So of his ideas get pretty metaphysical, but all in all the message can be found by most people.

  6. 5 out of 5

    Donald

    The Pope's first reactions to a COVID-19 world that emphasize the possibility of a turning point. Moves easily between folksy old stories, internal church debates and astute analysis of the political climate. I found it worth it as a quick read. The Pope's first reactions to a COVID-19 world that emphasize the possibility of a turning point. Moves easily between folksy old stories, internal church debates and astute analysis of the political climate. I found it worth it as a quick read.

  7. 4 out of 5

    Crystal

    I was born and raised Catholic and although I don’t always agree with everything the church does and says, I have loved Pope Francis since Day 1. This book was well written and covered a wide range of topics from the murder of George Floyd to the push for priests to get married. His vision for a post-COVID world is inspiring. 4.5 stars!

  8. 4 out of 5

    Clare Wojda

    -I believe that what has persuaded us is the myth of self-sufficiency, that whispering in our ears that the earth exists to be plundered; that others exist to meet our needs; that what we have earned or what we lack is what we deserve; that my reward is riches, even if that means that the fate of others will be poverty. -When that happens, we are flooded by doubts and questions: How to respond? What can we do? How can I help? What is God asking of us at this time? And in asking these questions-- -I believe that what has persuaded us is the myth of self-sufficiency, that whispering in our ears that the earth exists to be plundered; that others exist to meet our needs; that what we have earned or what we lack is what we deserve; that my reward is riches, even if that means that the fate of others will be poverty. -When that happens, we are flooded by doubts and questions: How to respond? What can we do? How can I help? What is God asking of us at this time? And in asking these questions--not rhetorically, but silently, with attentive hearts, perhaps before a lit candle--we open ourselves to the action of the Spirit. We can start to discern, to see new possibilities, at least in the little things that surround us, or that we do each day. And then, as we commit to those small things, we start to imagine another way of living together, of serving our fellow beloved creatures. We can begin to dream of real change, change that is possible. -Sin is a rejection of the limits that love requires. -In other words, if you think abortion, euthanasia, and the death penalty are acceptable, your heart will find it hard to care about contamination of rivers and the destruction of the rainforest. And the reserve is also true. So even while people will argue strenuously that these issues are different in moral terms, as long as they insist that abortion is justified but not desertification, or that euthanasia is wrong but polluted rivers are the price to pay for economic progress, we will remain stuck in the same lack of integrity that put us where we are now. -Giving to the poor is just giving back to them what is theirs, for God intended the goods of the earth for all, without excluding anyone. -How do we distinguish the spirits? They speak different languages; they use different ways to reach our hearts. The voice of God never imposes but proposes, whereas the enemy is strident, insistent, and even monotonous. The voice of God might correct us, but gently, always encouraging, consoling, giving us hope. The bad spirit on the other hand offers us dazzling illusions and tempting sensations, but they are fleeting. It exploits our fears and suspicions, and seduces us with wealth and prestige. If we ignore it, it responds with contempt and accusations, telling us: You're worthless. -Just as none of us should reject other people because of their sins and failures but hep them be what they are meant to be, Christ's followers should love and listen to the Church, build her up, take responsibility for her, including her sins and failures. -Rather than accusing others for their failures and limitations, I find some fault or attitude in myself. And I then turn to my Creator and my God and ask Him for the grace I need to move forward, confident that He loves me and cares for me. -To see contrapositions as contradictions is the result of mediocre thinking that takes us away from reality. The bad spirit--the spirit of conflict, which undermines dialogue and fraternity--turns contrapositions into contradictions, demanding we choose, and reducing reality to simples binaries. This is what ideologies and unscrupulous politicians do. So when we run up against a contradiction that does not allow us to advance to a real solution, we know we are faced with a reductive, partial mental scheme that we must try to move beyond. But the bad spirit can also deny the tension between two poles in a contraposition, opting instead for a kind of static coexistence. This is the danger of relativism or false irenicism, an attitude of "peace at any price" in which the goal is to avoid the conflict altogether. In this case, there can be no solution, because the tension has been denied, and abandoned. This is also a refusal to accept reality. So we have two temptations: on the one hand, to wrap ourselves in the banner of one side or the other, exacerbating the conflict; on the other, to avoid engaging in conflict altogether, denying the tension involved and washing our hands of it. The task of the reconciler is instead to "endure" the conflict, facing it head-on, and by discerning see beyond the surface reasons for disagreement, opening those involved to the possibility of a new synthesis, one that does not destroy either pole, but preserves what is good and valid in both in a new perspective. -For what saves us is not an idea but an encounter. Only the face of another is capable of awakening the best of ourselves. In serving the people, we save ourselves. -It is striking how neoliberal currents of thought have sought to exclude from the political arena any substantive debate about the common good and the universal destination of goods. What they promote instead is essentially the efficient management of a market and minimal government control. But the problem is that when the economy's primary purpose centers on profit, it is easy to forget that the earth's resources are for all, not the few. -Recognizing the value to society of the work on nonearners is a vital part of rethinking in the post-Covid world. That's why I believe it is time to explore concepts like the universal basic income (UBI) also known as "the negative income tax": an unconditional flat payment to all citizens, which could be dispersed through the tax system. The UBI could reshape relations in the labor market, guaranteeing people the the dignity of refusing employment terms that trap them in poverty. It would give people the basic security they need, remove the stigma of welfarism, and make it easier to move between jobs as technology-driven labor patterns increasingly demand. Policies like the UBI can also help free people to combine earning wages with giving time to the community. With the same objective, it may well be time to consider reduced working hours with adjusted salaries, which can paradoxically increase productivity. Working less so that more people can gain access to the labor market is one aspect of the kind of thinking we urgently need to explore.

  9. 4 out of 5

    Anne Morrison

    The Pope challenges readers to reflect on God's message from Covid and what the faithful should focus on in the post-Covid world. The Pope challenges readers to reflect on God's message from Covid and what the faithful should focus on in the post-Covid world.

  10. 4 out of 5

    Nate Burgess

    If you believe this man is a Christian and is a chosen person by our Lord Jesus, you clearly haven't being paying attention. Lucifer is his God If you believe this man is a Christian and is a chosen person by our Lord Jesus, you clearly haven't being paying attention. Lucifer is his God

  11. 4 out of 5

    Shiana

    This book was remarkable and concisely discussed a lot of the topics on people’s minds right now. The Pope extends his hand to us and offers us a glimpse of what hope looks like in crisis. His sagacious and humble voice shines through in the prose. Highly recommend!

  12. 5 out of 5

    Barry

    Parts of this book made me feel inspired, other parts made me feel convicted and challenged, while yet other parts just made me roll my eyes.

  13. 4 out of 5

    Spats and Hats

    I have few thoughts about this that I can concisely express. I think the Pontiff makes many excellent points that are worth noting and remembering every day and it certainly is evident that he cares about what he writes and has put significant thought into the subjects he mentions.

  14. 4 out of 5

    Becky

    A definite worthwhile read from Pope Francis on his thoughts during the Covid-19 quarantine about how the world is at the threshold of potential change. As usual, Pope Francis doesn't give out a bunch of feel good platitudes but implores us to think more globally about helping the poor, while encouraging us to start right in our own neighborhood. I find his thoughts to be complex and challenging. I love how he will not forget the environment nor put it aside as an issue. The poor, the environmen A definite worthwhile read from Pope Francis on his thoughts during the Covid-19 quarantine about how the world is at the threshold of potential change. As usual, Pope Francis doesn't give out a bunch of feel good platitudes but implores us to think more globally about helping the poor, while encouraging us to start right in our own neighborhood. I find his thoughts to be complex and challenging. I love how he will not forget the environment nor put it aside as an issue. The poor, the environment, finding community, these are the ways we are to love.

  15. 5 out of 5

    Deb (Readerbuzz) Nance

    Do we ever need to hear this book? Pope Francis speaks up for making positive changes for the good of all in our world. He offers a deep critique of the economic and political systems that are obsessed with profit and that ignore widespread human and planetary destruction. He reminds us of our duty as Christians to serve. And he suggests a plan for creating a better world, based on the work of scientists and environmentalists and economists, using all of us ordinary people. A few quotes from the Do we ever need to hear this book? Pope Francis speaks up for making positive changes for the good of all in our world. He offers a deep critique of the economic and political systems that are obsessed with profit and that ignore widespread human and planetary destruction. He reminds us of our duty as Christians to serve. And he suggests a plan for creating a better world, based on the work of scientists and environmentalists and economists, using all of us ordinary people. A few quotes from the book: 'In these difficult times, I take hope from the last words of Jesus in Matthew's Gospel: "I am with you always, to the end of the age" (Matthew 28:20). We are not alone. That is why we need not be afraid to go down into the dark nights of problems and suffering. We know that we don't have the answers all ready and neatly packaged, yet we trust that the Lord will open for us doors we had no idea were there.' "What worried me about the antiracist protests in the summer of 2020, when many statues of historical figures were toppled in several countries, was the desire to purify the past. Some wanted to project onto the past the history they would like to have now, which requires them to cancel what came before. But it should be the other way around. For there to be true history there must be memory, which demands that we acknowledge the paths already trod, even if they are shameful. Amputating history can make us lose our memory, which is one of the few remedies we have against repeating the mistakes of the past....I recall this history not to praise past oppressors but to honor the witness and greatness of soul of the oppressed. There is great danger in remembering the guilt of others to proclaim my own innocence." 'In every personal "Covid," so to speak, in every "stoppage," what is revealed is what needs to change: our lack of internal freedom, the idols we have been serving, the ideologies we have tried to live by, the relationships we have neglected.' Pope Francis brings up a fascinating new concept for me, the idea of contradictions being something he calls contrapositions. "Contrapositions," he writes, "involves two poles in tension, pulling away from each other: horizon/limit, local/global, whole/part, and so on. These are contrapositions because they are opposites that nonetheless interact in a fruitful, creative tension....To see contrapositions as contradictions is the result of mediocre thinking that takes us away from reality. The bad spirit---the spirit of conflict, which undermines dialogue and fraternity---turns contrapositions into contradictions, demanding we choose and reducing reality to simple binarities....(T)he bad spirit can also deny the tension between two poles in a contraposition, opting instead for a kind of static coexistence. This is the danger of relativism...an attitude of 'peace at any price' in which the goal is to avoid conflict altogether....The task of the reconcile is instead to 'endure' the conflict, facing it head-on, and by discerning see beyond the surface reasons for disagreement, opening those involved to the possibility of a new synthesis, one that does not destroy either pole, but preserves what is good and valid in both in a new perspective. This breakthrough comes about as a gift in dialogue, when people trust each other and humbly seek the good together, and are willing to learn from each other in a mutual exchange of gifts. At such moments, the solution to an intractable problem comes in ways that are unexpected and unforeseen...." Pope Francis also explains the concept of cynodality. "What characterizes a synodal path is the role of the Holy Spirit. We listen, we discuss in groups, but above all we pay attention to what the Spirit has to say to us."

  16. 4 out of 5

    Faith Flaherty

    "Let Us Dream" is a book written by Austin Ivereigh with the cooperation of Pope Francis. Ivereigh gathered information from interviews with Pope Francis, his letters, his articles, etc. It is very current because it is dealing with Covid-19 and its effects. The book is divided into three parts: the problem, exploring ideas, and actions. In this method, the pope offers suggestions and methods for people to take. But it takes all people, no one can do it alone. People are made to help each other "Let Us Dream" is a book written by Austin Ivereigh with the cooperation of Pope Francis. Ivereigh gathered information from interviews with Pope Francis, his letters, his articles, etc. It is very current because it is dealing with Covid-19 and its effects. The book is divided into three parts: the problem, exploring ideas, and actions. In this method, the pope offers suggestions and methods for people to take. But it takes all people, no one can do it alone. People are made to help each other and that's how to solve the problems, especially conscious of the marginalized people. They have to be included. Every person must have a dignified existence, especially the people who are considered poor. It is a very easy read and offers many good discussion points. The prologue was a little frightening because of its apocalyptic warning but the book ends with Alexis Valdes poem on Hope. We'll value more what belongs to all than what was earned. We'll be more generous and much more committed.

  17. 5 out of 5

    Heather

    “Open yourself, decenter, and transcend.” The New York Times article, “Pope Francis: A Crisis Reveals What Is in Our Hearts,” from November 26, 2020 is essentially a condensed version of this book. His overarching message is that the suffering COVID-19 has wrought can be used for transformation, but if we instead choose to maintain the status quo and bolster “hyperinflated individualism,” ignoring the needs of the most vulnerable and disenfranchised, things will only get worse for humanity and a “Open yourself, decenter, and transcend.” The New York Times article, “Pope Francis: A Crisis Reveals What Is in Our Hearts,” from November 26, 2020 is essentially a condensed version of this book. His overarching message is that the suffering COVID-19 has wrought can be used for transformation, but if we instead choose to maintain the status quo and bolster “hyperinflated individualism,” ignoring the needs of the most vulnerable and disenfranchised, things will only get worse for humanity and all of creation. While there are some things that I don’t agree with and that are not consistent with my own spiritual beliefs, overall I believe that his ideas come from a place of deep love and compassion, particularly with regard to the environment, immigration, and the economy. And I agree that those that care only about what they perceive as a violation of their “freedom” have completely lost their spiritual center and are numb to the suffering of others and that those that long only for things to go back to “normal” are entirely missing the point. More than anything, I agree with Pope Francis that food, shelter, and meaningful work are the birthright of all people and that as a global community we should be ensuring that the needs of all are met. One caveat: I grew up Catholic and have lived in Rome, and though it has been many years since I identified as Christian, the historical Jesus continues to be a very important influence in my life. Therefore, I was quite comfortable with reading this text. Some teachings of the Catholic church do come up. If that is not of interest or is uncomfortable for you, I recommend simply reading the New York Times article.

  18. 5 out of 5

    Eileen O'Finlan

    Pope Francis has a vision for a much better post-COVID future for the world. He addresses a multitude of topics in Let Us Dream: The Path to a Better Future. With compelling arguments, he presents the idea that our emergence from COVID should not lead us back to the way things were before, but into a better, more thoughtful, and humane way of living. I've loved Pope Francis since he was first elected. This book only reinforced that for me. I rarely read a book more than once, but this is one tha Pope Francis has a vision for a much better post-COVID future for the world. He addresses a multitude of topics in Let Us Dream: The Path to a Better Future. With compelling arguments, he presents the idea that our emergence from COVID should not lead us back to the way things were before, but into a better, more thoughtful, and humane way of living. I've loved Pope Francis since he was first elected. This book only reinforced that for me. I rarely read a book more than once, but this is one that I plan to read again - and maybe take notes!

  19. 5 out of 5

    Fernando Jude

    Simply Amazing. That slightest inclination to "have it my way..." or the "let it be..." cultures are set as challenges if the world has to move to a new order of living as one people. The Pope makes us believe that such days are not far away to become real. He proposes a mind to move from focusing on materials to mankind. The 3-stage arrangement of the proposal is very interesting. Our identity is that we are one people more than any other classification. The impeccable balance between the local Simply Amazing. That slightest inclination to "have it my way..." or the "let it be..." cultures are set as challenges if the world has to move to a new order of living as one people. The Pope makes us believe that such days are not far away to become real. He proposes a mind to move from focusing on materials to mankind. The 3-stage arrangement of the proposal is very interesting. Our identity is that we are one people more than any other classification. The impeccable balance between the local and the global that he invites everyone to participate in realizing it, shakes me out of the cozy slumber of bygone ideologies. This is a great follow-on for Fratelli Tutti.

  20. 4 out of 5

    Tom Wiley

    In this book, Pope Francis reflects on lessons from this pandemic and imagines a better world afterward. In order to achieve that world though, hard steps must be taken to make the world more just and equal. These include addressing income inequality, welcoming migrants, defusing populist politics that scapegoat the vulnerable, giving people access to land, lodging and labor, and finding new definitions of solidarity. (“Solidarity is not offering crumbs from the table, but creating a seat at the In this book, Pope Francis reflects on lessons from this pandemic and imagines a better world afterward. In order to achieve that world though, hard steps must be taken to make the world more just and equal. These include addressing income inequality, welcoming migrants, defusing populist politics that scapegoat the vulnerable, giving people access to land, lodging and labor, and finding new definitions of solidarity. (“Solidarity is not offering crumbs from the table, but creating a seat at the table.”) He writes about the future after the virus: “If we are to come out of this crisis less selfish than when we went in, we have to let ourselves be touched by others’ pain.” For those acquainted with Pope Francis’ writing, this book contains many familiar themes, but the pandemic gives it an urgent new framing.

  21. 5 out of 5

    Barbara Wolff

    Thought provoking book. Makes you want to help change the world for the better.

  22. 4 out of 5

    Jack Maley

    Very short but good

  23. 5 out of 5

    Cheryl Brock

    Not a Catholic, but I loved this book anyway. 🙏👍

  24. 5 out of 5

    Christina Santorello

    We can all do better and if this past year doesn’t encourage us to do so then we are missing the signs.

  25. 4 out of 5

    Sue Frances

    Whether you are religious or not this is an interesting read. Pope Francis is a very intelligent man.

  26. 5 out of 5

    Ruth M

    I'm not much of a fan of Pope Francis, but when your spiritual director asks you to read something, you do it. I was pleasantly surprised at his thesis and his message, which avoided some of the things I most dislike about him as the pope. It was a quick read, and worth the time I spent on it. I'm not much of a fan of Pope Francis, but when your spiritual director asks you to read something, you do it. I was pleasantly surprised at his thesis and his message, which avoided some of the things I most dislike about him as the pope. It was a quick read, and worth the time I spent on it.

  27. 5 out of 5

    David

    The books we need today in this pandemic and the toxic political world we find ourselves. Words of encouragement for changing our path, written for the whole world, not just the Catholic faithful. Remarkable words from a remarkable man.

  28. 4 out of 5

    Ju

    If you read this book and believe that it is about healing after COVID pandemic, you better wake up. This book would make Karl Marx very proud of Pope Francis

  29. 5 out of 5

    Emily

    The book is divided into three parts - a time to see, to choose, and to act. Bible stories are used as examples to help the reader understand along the way. The term Covid or virus is used as a symbol of the challenges of the world. I enjoyed the first section as it flowed beautifully and was easy to understand. The second section referenced Catholic ideology of which I don’t have a lot of knowledge so I needed a bit longer to understand (or Google) terms. The third section was still intended fo The book is divided into three parts - a time to see, to choose, and to act. Bible stories are used as examples to help the reader understand along the way. The term Covid or virus is used as a symbol of the challenges of the world. I enjoyed the first section as it flowed beautifully and was easy to understand. The second section referenced Catholic ideology of which I don’t have a lot of knowledge so I needed a bit longer to understand (or Google) terms. The third section was still intended for people of faith but was pulled together nicely with a call to action in three L’s - land - lodging - labor. I found some meaningful nuggets that apply to all people - regardless of faith. The media polarizes people, politicians often focus on the big picture and not their constituents, and we are doomed to repeat the past if we choose to ignore and forget it. How he addresses these topics is interesting. There is also a challenge to consider how a Covid has shined a light on all that is wrong in the world and what are we going to do to correct it? A definite recommendation for anyone to read.

  30. 5 out of 5

    Thomas G. Peterson

    A Path to Sanity Pope Francis has developed a unique formula to help the world recover from not only the effects of this pandemic but how we my improve the state of the world. If these steps were to be embraced the world would be with God's help a better place. A Path to Sanity Pope Francis has developed a unique formula to help the world recover from not only the effects of this pandemic but how we my improve the state of the world. If these steps were to be embraced the world would be with God's help a better place.

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