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History of Rome, Volume XI: Books 38-39

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Livy (Titus Livius), the great Roman historian, was born at or near Patavium (Padua) in 64 or 59 BCE; he may have lived mostly in Rome but died at Patavium, in 12 or 17 CE. Livy's only extant work is part of his history of Rome from the foundation of the city to 9 BCE. Of its 142 books, we have just 35, and short summaries of all the rest except two. The whole work was, lon Livy (Titus Livius), the great Roman historian, was born at or near Patavium (Padua) in 64 or 59 BCE; he may have lived mostly in Rome but died at Patavium, in 12 or 17 CE. Livy's only extant work is part of his history of Rome from the foundation of the city to 9 BCE. Of its 142 books, we have just 35, and short summaries of all the rest except two. The whole work was, long after his death, divided into Decades or series of ten. Books 110 we have entire; books 1120 are lost; books 2145 are entire, except parts of 41 and 4345. Of the rest only fragments and the summaries remain. In splendid style Livy, a man of wide sympathies and proud of Rome's past, presented an uncritical but clear and living narrative of the rise of Rome to greatness. The Loeb Classical Library edition of Livy is in fourteen volumes. The last volume includes a comprehensive index.


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Livy (Titus Livius), the great Roman historian, was born at or near Patavium (Padua) in 64 or 59 BCE; he may have lived mostly in Rome but died at Patavium, in 12 or 17 CE. Livy's only extant work is part of his history of Rome from the foundation of the city to 9 BCE. Of its 142 books, we have just 35, and short summaries of all the rest except two. The whole work was, lon Livy (Titus Livius), the great Roman historian, was born at or near Patavium (Padua) in 64 or 59 BCE; he may have lived mostly in Rome but died at Patavium, in 12 or 17 CE. Livy's only extant work is part of his history of Rome from the foundation of the city to 9 BCE. Of its 142 books, we have just 35, and short summaries of all the rest except two. The whole work was, long after his death, divided into Decades or series of ten. Books 110 we have entire; books 1120 are lost; books 2145 are entire, except parts of 41 and 4345. Of the rest only fragments and the summaries remain. In splendid style Livy, a man of wide sympathies and proud of Rome's past, presented an uncritical but clear and living narrative of the rise of Rome to greatness. The Loeb Classical Library edition of Livy is in fourteen volumes. The last volume includes a comprehensive index.

38 review for History of Rome, Volume XI: Books 38-39

  1. 5 out of 5

    Darwin8u

    "I'm afraid there will be too little of glory rather than too much of war." - Livy, History of Rome, XXXVIII, xvii Books 38-39 of Livy's History of Rome detail the period after the war with Antiochus. The Roman tribunes turn on the Scipio brothers and Rome begins to decend a bit into luxurious living and softness. Book 38 sees Scipio Africanus and his brother Lucius Scipio Asiaticus accused, as some say by Q. Petillius the tribune (and/or Naevius), of cheated the treasury of money taken from the de "I'm afraid there will be too little of glory rather than too much of war." - Livy, History of Rome, XXXVIII, xvii Books 38-39 of Livy's History of Rome detail the period after the war with Antiochus. The Roman tribunes turn on the Scipio brothers and Rome begins to decend a bit into luxurious living and softness. Book 38 sees Scipio Africanus and his brother Lucius Scipio Asiaticus accused, as some say by Q. Petillius the tribune (and/or Naevius), of cheated the treasury of money taken from the defeat of Antiochus. Scipio Africanus replied “On this day, citizens, I conquered Carthage,” and ascended the Capitoline. To avoid further attacks from the tribunes, Scipio withdrew to voluntary exile and died. Lucius Scipio Asiaticus was also accused and convicted on the same charge of embezzlement. When he was being led to prison, Tiberius Sempronius Gracchus, tribune of the people, formerly an enemy of the Scipio bros, intervenes. When the quaestors go to take possession of the property of Scipio, there is no money, and not even enough money to pay the fine. Scipio Asiaticus even refuses the money collected by his relatives and friends. Book 39 sees the Bacchanalia, a Greek rite celebrated by night involving sex, murder, etc., developed into a conspiracy of large numbers of Romans. An investigation is started and the Bacchanalia is suppressed with many punishment and many put to death. Censors Lucius Valerius Flaccus and Marcus Porcius Cato (the latter the greatest of men in the arts of both war and peace) expelled from the senate Lucius Quinctius Flamininus on the grounds he killed, while Consul of Gaul, a certain Gaul at the request of his degenerate lover. Scipio, Hannibal, and also Philopoemen all die in the same year. Philip of Macedon is upset his kingdom was diminished by the Romans and that he was compelled to withdraw his garrisons from Thrace, etc. This is one of my least favorite books so far. It really is an early sign of Roman degeneracy. Super early. They are quick to turn against their heros for poltical gain (Scipio Africanus) and the wealth from their wars is starting to affect those living in Rome. It isn't the end of the Republic by far, but a lot of what happens in this book seems to anticipate later issues during the last days of the Roman Republic.

  2. 4 out of 5

    Nathan

    "supplicatio extremo anno fuit prodigiorum causa, quod sanguine per biduum pluvisse in area Concordiae satis credebant . . . " Could use more of this frivolity. "supplicatio extremo anno fuit prodigiorum causa, quod sanguine per biduum pluvisse in area Concordiae satis credebant . . . " Could use more of this frivolity.

  3. 5 out of 5

    Wout Waegemans

  4. 5 out of 5

    Dies Irae

  5. 5 out of 5

    Marcio Giuseppe

  6. 4 out of 5

    Zermen

  7. 5 out of 5

    Jeannette

  8. 4 out of 5

    Daniel

  9. 5 out of 5

    Sandra Burges

  10. 4 out of 5

    Maria

  11. 5 out of 5

    Martin

  12. 4 out of 5

    Paul Vittay

  13. 4 out of 5

    Jenna

  14. 4 out of 5

    Michael Cerrato

  15. 4 out of 5

    Rareș Călugăr

  16. 5 out of 5

    Robert

  17. 4 out of 5

    Gabriel

  18. 4 out of 5

    Charles

  19. 5 out of 5

    Kevin

  20. 4 out of 5

    Διόνυσος Ελευθέριος

  21. 4 out of 5

    Charles

  22. 5 out of 5

    Joseph

  23. 5 out of 5

    Steven Feurer

  24. 5 out of 5

    Steven

  25. 5 out of 5

    Crittens

  26. 4 out of 5

    Foxglove Zayuri

  27. 4 out of 5

    Voidshark

  28. 4 out of 5

    Robert

  29. 4 out of 5

    Nancy

  30. 4 out of 5

    Ashley Baccho

  31. 5 out of 5

    Youssef

  32. 4 out of 5

    PeterF

  33. 4 out of 5

    Chris Duval

  34. 4 out of 5

    Ryan Sullivan

  35. 4 out of 5

    BookDB

  36. 5 out of 5

    Yinzadi

  37. 4 out of 5

    Jared Wilwerding

  38. 4 out of 5

    Jeffrey

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