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For seven long years, while she was imprisoned on a debtor's ship, Amaya Chandra had one plan: to survive. But now, survival is not enough. She has people counting on her; counting on her for protection, for leadership, for vengeance. And after escaping Moray by the skin of her teeth, she's determined to track down the man who betrayed her and her friends. Cayo Mercado has For seven long years, while she was imprisoned on a debtor's ship, Amaya Chandra had one plan: to survive. But now, survival is not enough. She has people counting on her; counting on her for protection, for leadership, for vengeance. And after escaping Moray by the skin of her teeth, she's determined to track down the man who betrayed her and her friends. Cayo Mercado has lost everything: his money, his father, his reputation. Everything except his beloved sister. But he's well on his way to losing her, too, with no way to afford the treatment for her deadly illness. In a foreign empire also being consumed by ash fever, Cayo has no choice but to join Amaya in uncovering the mystery of the counterfeit currency, the fever, and how his father was involved in their creation. But Cayo still hasn't forgiven Amaya for her earlier deception, and their complicated feelings for each other are getting harder and harder to ignore. Through glittering galas, dazzling trickery, and thrilling heists, Cayo and Amaya will learn that the corruption in Moray goes far deeper than they know, and in the end the only people they can trust are each other. Step into an opulent world filled with risk, romance, and revenge and find out whether two unlikely heroes can save the world and stop corruption.


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For seven long years, while she was imprisoned on a debtor's ship, Amaya Chandra had one plan: to survive. But now, survival is not enough. She has people counting on her; counting on her for protection, for leadership, for vengeance. And after escaping Moray by the skin of her teeth, she's determined to track down the man who betrayed her and her friends. Cayo Mercado has For seven long years, while she was imprisoned on a debtor's ship, Amaya Chandra had one plan: to survive. But now, survival is not enough. She has people counting on her; counting on her for protection, for leadership, for vengeance. And after escaping Moray by the skin of her teeth, she's determined to track down the man who betrayed her and her friends. Cayo Mercado has lost everything: his money, his father, his reputation. Everything except his beloved sister. But he's well on his way to losing her, too, with no way to afford the treatment for her deadly illness. In a foreign empire also being consumed by ash fever, Cayo has no choice but to join Amaya in uncovering the mystery of the counterfeit currency, the fever, and how his father was involved in their creation. But Cayo still hasn't forgiven Amaya for her earlier deception, and their complicated feelings for each other are getting harder and harder to ignore. Through glittering galas, dazzling trickery, and thrilling heists, Cayo and Amaya will learn that the corruption in Moray goes far deeper than they know, and in the end the only people they can trust are each other. Step into an opulent world filled with risk, romance, and revenge and find out whether two unlikely heroes can save the world and stop corruption.

30 review for Ravage the Dark

  1. 4 out of 5

    jessica

    what i loved about the first book and what made me give it five stars was that its inspired by one of my all time favourite novels, ‘the count of monte cristo.’ however, this sequel continues with only the original parts of the first book, which made me sad. i still really enjoyed this, but definitely not as much as ‘scavenge the stars.’ from just a YA standpoint, this has everything you could want from a sequel. the expanded world building allows for the story to become more adventurous. there i what i loved about the first book and what made me give it five stars was that its inspired by one of my all time favourite novels, ‘the count of monte cristo.’ however, this sequel continues with only the original parts of the first book, which made me sad. i still really enjoyed this, but definitely not as much as ‘scavenge the stars.’ from just a YA standpoint, this has everything you could want from a sequel. the expanded world building allows for the story to become more adventurous. there is a greater focus on characterisation, especially with side characters. and the pacing is fast with a very active plot. as a concluding book, i feel like everything is wrapped up nicely and in a way that makes sense. so if you enjoyed the first book, then you will for sure enjoy this, because its very much the same tale of revenge, just without the specific ‘the count of monte cristo’ inspiration. ↠ 4.5 stars

  2. 5 out of 5

    rachel ☾

    #1) Scavenge the Stars ★★★★☆ is it too early to be counting down the days to this release? Blog • Trigger Warning Database • Twitter • Instagram #1) Scavenge the Stars ★★★★☆ is it too early to be counting down the days to this release? Blog • Trigger Warning Database • Twitter • Instagram

  3. 5 out of 5

    Jackie ϟ Bookseller

    I received and ARC of this title from the publisher via Edelweiss in exchange for an honest review. Scavenge the Stars: 3.5/5 stars ★★★1/2☆ Ravage the Dark: 4/5 stars ★★★★☆ "There were hardly any words to describe the unbearable truth of humanity- that people were there and then gone, and that you had to live on in the aftermath." This is such a stunning series conclusion that manages to balance emotional, complex character arcs with a twist-filled plot that always kept me guessing. Amaya, Cayo, and I received and ARC of this title from the publisher via Edelweiss in exchange for an honest review. Scavenge the Stars: 3.5/5 stars ★★★1/2☆ Ravage the Dark: 4/5 stars ★★★★☆ "There were hardly any words to describe the unbearable truth of humanity- that people were there and then gone, and that you had to live on in the aftermath." This is such a stunning series conclusion that manages to balance emotional, complex character arcs with a twist-filled plot that always kept me guessing. Amaya, Cayo, and the rest of their rag-tag crew have fled the city of Moray and continue their search for the cause of the mysterious plague (so timely!) reeking havoc on their city and, gradually, the neighboring nations. They follow lead after lead in their attempts to solve the problem of the plague, some of which are red herrings while others lead terrifyingly close to the main characters themselves. Meanwhile, Amaya struggles with her own family history as it becomes more complex and painful that she ever imagined it could be while Boons betrayal continues to cut her deeply. Cayo, meanwhile, struggles to find a place in the world after his fall from the gentry and under the judgement of the group and gets desperate in his fight for his sister Soria's life. Throughout all the above drama, Amaya and Cayo continue to dance around each other in a painfully-realistic romance atypical of most YA tales. These two, the obvious love-interests from the beginning of the first book, battle issues of trust, communication, and warring priorities in ways that hit close to home for me (which is rarely the case with YA romance). Meanwhile, sub-plots include a crew-member's search for her sister on the debtor ship owned by her greatest enemy, the revelation that Amaya's best friend from her own debtor ship has become a soldier in the neighboring empire and is therefore an ideal ally, a network of alchemists with suspicious agendas and patrons, and the spread of the terrible disease that is bringing Moray to its knees and the city's enemies to its door. All in all, this is a fantastic conclusion to this duology that began as a Count of Monte Cristo retelling and grew into a tale all its own. There is death, betrayal, politics, mystery, greed, revenge, alchemy, lust, adventure, and a deeply satisfying ending that I think will stay with me for a long time. This little series is far underrated, while the power of its words is not small in the least.

  4. 4 out of 5

    Mash

    I read Scavenge the stars a while ago and I think I liked it so I look forward to this sequel!

  5. 5 out of 5

    AJ

    05/28/2020: Ooh I’m actually loving this cover! It makes me think this book will be darker than the first one!

  6. 5 out of 5

    Shelley

    *Source* Library *Genre* Young Adult / Fantasy *Rating* 4.0 *Thoughts* Ravage the Dark is the second installment in author Tara Sim's Scavenge the Stars duology. This story once again focuses on two main characters: Amaya Chandra and Cayo Mercado. 7-years ago, Amaya aka Silver Fish, was sold to a debtor ship Brackish to pay off her father's debts. For years, Amaya tried to save enough money to pay off her debts. Then she met a man named Boon who claimed he was rich beyond her dreams and needed her h *Source* Library *Genre* Young Adult / Fantasy *Rating* 4.0 *Thoughts* Ravage the Dark is the second installment in author Tara Sim's Scavenge the Stars duology. This story once again focuses on two main characters: Amaya Chandra and Cayo Mercado. 7-years ago, Amaya aka Silver Fish, was sold to a debtor ship Brackish to pay off her father's debts. For years, Amaya tried to save enough money to pay off her debts. Then she met a man named Boon who claimed he was rich beyond her dreams and needed her help with a bit of revenge on those who destroyed his life. *Full Review @ Gizmos Reviews* https://gizmosreviews.blogspot.com/20...

  7. 4 out of 5

    Amanda

    Me: 2020 has made me a dried out barnacle I feel nothing Also me: sobs twice over the ending

  8. 4 out of 5

    Sara Zaninelli

    “The rest of the casino was an unsightly blur in comparison to that smile.” • The book is a good conclusion of this beautiful duology. Honestly I have found the end a bit rushed and I would have liked to know more about politics in and outside Moray . There has been great hints about conspiracies and power struggles that it would have been interesting to actually follow them. Nonetheless the story is very gripping with a huge plot twist that I didn’t see coming. But what really drove me to this se “The rest of the casino was an unsightly blur in comparison to that smile.” • The book is a good conclusion of this beautiful duology. Honestly I have found the end a bit rushed and I would have liked to know more about politics in and outside Moray . There has been great hints about conspiracies and power struggles that it would have been interesting to actually follow them. Nonetheless the story is very gripping with a huge plot twist that I didn’t see coming. But what really drove me to this series is the relationship between Cayo and Amaya. Her betrayal had made him distance himself but in this book they both understand that life is so unfair and full of sorrow sometimes that you must take joy whenever you can and that forgiveness is very important. Amaya remains a great heroine. In my review of the first book I said she reminded me of Mia Corvere and this is still true. She needs to fight alone against a world that has taken everything from her and a family that has lied and abandoned her despite her unconditional love. I think it takes a lot of courage to love again after what she has suffered and this is why I admire her that much. I have received an early copy through NetGalley.

  9. 4 out of 5

    Christina

    4 stars. A fantastic conclusion to this duology. I was promised a gender-bent Count of Monte Cristo - a book that sat at the top of my favorites list for YEARS between junior high and high school - and this more than delivered on fulfilling the excitement/adventure/revenge of the original tale while simultaneously striking out its own brilliant nuances and world-building. This second installment truly captures the author's originality in claiming this series for her own, and she was wildly succe 4 stars. A fantastic conclusion to this duology. I was promised a gender-bent Count of Monte Cristo - a book that sat at the top of my favorites list for YEARS between junior high and high school - and this more than delivered on fulfilling the excitement/adventure/revenge of the original tale while simultaneously striking out its own brilliant nuances and world-building. This second installment truly captures the author's originality in claiming this series for her own, and she was wildly successful. No synopsis because it will spoil the first book, but can I just say: 1) I loved the realistic romance. 2) I loved the characters dealing with traumas in different ways. 3) The complex family history threw me for a spin and I live for twists like that. 4) The adventure!!!! I'm so happy to have read this and believe this duology to be criminally underrated. Thank you Edelweiss and Hachette Book Group for the ARC!

  10. 4 out of 5

    Mary Seaman

    ARC provided by Edelweiss: Although I always love an ending that ties everything nicely together, I am sad to be done with this story. I love Amaya’s character so much and the writing is so easy to read. This is full of bad a women and good ole justice. I definitely recommend this to fantasy readers. The world building is good, the story flows so well and the characters are all so well developed. They all have struggles and make mistakes but they also learn and move on. Content warnings: violence ARC provided by Edelweiss: Although I always love an ending that ties everything nicely together, I am sad to be done with this story. I love Amaya’s character so much and the writing is so easy to read. This is full of bad a women and good ole justice. I definitely recommend this to fantasy readers. The world building is good, the story flows so well and the characters are all so well developed. They all have struggles and make mistakes but they also learn and move on. Content warnings: violence, grief

  11. 4 out of 5

    Sara Zaninelli

    “The rest of the casino was an unsightly blur in comparison to that smile.” • The book is a good conclusion of this beautiful duology. Honestly I have found the end a bit rushed and I would have liked to know more about politics in and outside Moray . There has been great hints about conspiracies and power struggles that it would have been interesting to actually follow them. Nonetheless the story is very gripping with a huge plot twist that I didn’t see coming. But what really drove me to this se “The rest of the casino was an unsightly blur in comparison to that smile.” • The book is a good conclusion of this beautiful duology. Honestly I have found the end a bit rushed and I would have liked to know more about politics in and outside Moray . There has been great hints about conspiracies and power struggles that it would have been interesting to actually follow them. Nonetheless the story is very gripping with a huge plot twist that I didn’t see coming. But what really drove me to this series is the relationship between Cayo and Amaya. Her betrayal had made him distance himself but in this book they both understand that life is so unfair and full of sorrow sometimes that you must take joy whenever you can and that forgiveness is very important. Amaya remains a great heroine. In my review of the first book I said she reminded me of Mia Corvere and this is still true. She needs to fight alone against a world that has taken everything from her and a family that has lied and abandoned her despite her unconditional love. I think it takes a lot of courage to love again after what she has suffered and this is why I admire her that much. I have received an early copy through NetGalley.

  12. 4 out of 5

    Nikki

    Trigger Warnings for Death of a sibling, death of a parent, addiction (alcohol and gambling), illness/plague, violence This was a solid conclusion, though the very end kept it from being a 5 star. Reading about this disease in 2021 after enduring 2020 was definitely difficult at times, and just very interesting considering Sim wrote this book in 2019, before Rona. I really enjoyed getting to know some of the minor characters better, such as Remy, Liesel, and Deadshot (also I'm not sure why I Trigger Warnings for Death of a sibling, death of a parent, addiction (alcohol and gambling), illness/plague, violence This was a solid conclusion, though the very end kept it from being a 5 star. Reading about this disease in 2021 after enduring 2020 was definitely difficult at times, and just very interesting considering Sim wrote this book in 2019, before Rona. I really enjoyed getting to know some of the minor characters better, such as Remy, Liesel, and Deadshot (also I'm not sure why I didn't realize Deadshot was a woman and Liesel and Deadshot were an f/f couple? Whoops). Avi was in it a bit, too, but he still felt somewhat two-dimensional and wasn't in it nearly as much. Mostly he was just the trans-man. Again, I appreciated him being there, but like the last book, his comment about his binder felt a little bit out of left-field and forced in to let us know he's a transman who wears a binder. (And I do love how casually queer this book is, even if it sometimes feels a little stilted to explain 'this character is trans/enby'.) Still, I really liked Liesel who was a pretty prominent character in this book when she was a minor character in the first book. Ramora, sadly, was not in this one as much (view spoiler)[and honestly felt like she and her story as Slum Queen kind of got shoved in last minute to wrap things up with her (hide spoiler)] . I did like the element of trying to figure out how the counterfeit coins came into circulation and who was making and distributing them. This story was definitely more of a mystery story than the first one, so that was intriguing. Mostly though, it's a story about family, and having complicated relationships with your parents, and dealing with grief, and learning how to mend trust. That was really the strong suit of this story and I really loved seeing Amaya and Cayo grapple with their relationships with their fathers as well as their relationship with each other. All of that was so wonderfully done. (view spoiler)[The very ending left a bit to be desired. The cloth in Rin's Widow Vault gets a really quick wrap-up that didn't feel fully explained, nor did it have much set-up to it so the pay-off didn't feel earned. It felt like it came out of nowhere. Same with Boon, as he was dying, telling them who the Benefactor was, just like that, after they had spent so long and done so much work trying to figure it out themselves. And then the actual wrap-up happens off page and we learn about it in a letter from Liesel. I suppose it makes sense that Amaya and Cayo wouldn't be there for the whole government part of it, but I still felt a little cheated out of an ending. And again, the Ramora plotline of her being the Slum Queen and fighting her father felt a bit forced in all of a sudden. (hide spoiler)] So the very end left a bit to be desired and did disappoint me a little, but I found the rest of the book to be deeply enjoyable. I can't wait to read what Tara Sim has in store next.

  13. 5 out of 5

    sam w

    This review has been hidden because it contains spoilers. To view it, click here. 3.5 stars technically because I really, really wish this story had been stretched to a trilogy. (I listened to the audiobook so spellings are guess work at this point.) I don't really have any issues with the plot or the world building so much as I really just wanted it to be explored more. I felt like I don't know enough about the empire outside Moray to care about the possible threat of them? It kept getting mentioned but I never truly felt like it was a threat and then...it wasn't. Mostly, I 3.5 stars technically because I really, really wish this story had been stretched to a trilogy. (I listened to the audiobook so spellings are guess work at this point.) I don't really have any issues with the plot or the world building so much as I really just wanted it to be explored more. I felt like I don't know enough about the empire outside Moray to care about the possible threat of them? It kept getting mentioned but I never truly felt like it was a threat and then...it wasn't. Mostly, I wish this book hadn't had to focus on a conclusion to this story so that the relationship between Amaya and Cayo could've grown more thoroughly? They're both the victims of greedy, selfish fathers but Cayo seems to get almost no sympathy for it? Neither him nor his sister truly knew the depths of their father's freedom or what was going on with the coins until it was too late? They're just as landless as the rest of the crew but it never really gets acknowledged the same way. Amaya was my favourite part of Scavenge The Stars but she was oddly cold and cruel to Cayo in parts of this book, blaming him and his addiction issues for problems *she* helped bring into his life. She knows Cayo is trying desperately to raise money to keep his sister in the military hospital but neither Amaya nor the rest of the crew ever try to help him out? Cayo goes so far as to put himself in danger working for and spying on the alchemist, betting the money he did raise for Saroya and losing it, breakig into a party to help find Lisel's sister and just trying over and over to be helpful and all he gets is misery for it. Saroya dies a drawn out death just before the cure can be found and Cayo loses their home when his father is found guilty. Amaya gets to forgive her father- who we eventually learn DID create the virus that kills so many people??? He got far more grace and forgiveness in death than he deserved when you look at what his actions lead to. It was so frustrating to see Amaya snap and keep secrets from Cayo and even the rest of her friends but then get mad at Cayo for also keeping secrets. I wish they'd had more time to work out their bitterness and betrayals with each other instead of an ending where it kind of felt like Cayo just stays with Amaya because he has nowhere else to go. (Also, it felt like there was some of a build up to a bit of a live triangle situation with Cayo, Amaya and Remy and then....nothing. I genuinely wondered if I missed something.) The ending probably would've felt less rushed if it was expanded upon in another book- I kind of felt like someone was telling me the plot of this book instead of *reading* the book when Amaya discovers who The Benefactor is and what the cloth in her mother's vault was. Definitely torn here because I adored Scavenge The Stars, and while I wasn't bored, I kind of felt let down by this conclusion.

  14. 5 out of 5

    Olivia

    See my full review here: https://www.yabookscentral.com/yafict... RAVAGE THE DARK is a satisfying conclusion to a YA fantasy duology. In this sequel, we begin with Cayo, Amaya, and their friends heading to another land to try to track down the mysterious counterfeit money causing the ailments plaguing their kingdom. Cayo is wary of Amaya and concerned for his ill sister. Amaya is determined to get her revenge, but also to stop the unseen war of the wealthy that has destroyed so many lives. Along w See my full review here: https://www.yabookscentral.com/yafict... RAVAGE THE DARK is a satisfying conclusion to a YA fantasy duology. In this sequel, we begin with Cayo, Amaya, and their friends heading to another land to try to track down the mysterious counterfeit money causing the ailments plaguing their kingdom. Cayo is wary of Amaya and concerned for his ill sister. Amaya is determined to get her revenge, but also to stop the unseen war of the wealthy that has destroyed so many lives. Along with Liesl, who is searching for her sister on an unknown debtor's ship, and Remy, who has a surprising role in helping them to get answers, they embark on a dangerous journey through this unexpected place, full of secrets for them to uncover. What I loved: This was a fast-moving book with lots of small heists along the way as they uncover new leads in trying to discover who is behind the counterfeit money and the related disease. At the same there, there are many side plots with each character having their own personal goals as well. Cayo is trying to overcome his addiction while also dealing with his fall from the upper class, keeping his sister in the hospital to get treatment, and earn money to do so. His arc here was really powerful as he learns to redefine himself and adjust to the world as it is. Amaya is also confronting her past with her feelings about Boon and finding her footing with the people she has known in her different lives as Silverfish and the Countess. The romance was distant here, with more circling warily as they each much face their concerns separately and consider the larger problems. Despite that, I was still cheering for them, and I loved the way they interact with just the right touch of tension. The book does a good job of wrapping up the major plotlines, while also delivering a fast-paced mystery plot. What left me wanting more: As a small concern, I did want a bit more character introspection (a lot happens here and characters evolve), and I missed a slower pace in places, as this is a lot to fit in one book. This is more of an action-driven plot with much happening throughout. Final verdict: RAVAGE THE DARK is a satisfying conclusion to a unique YA fantasy duology. Would recommend for fans of FABLE, THE LAST VOYAGE OF POE BLYTHE, and SEAFIRE. Please note that I received an ARC from the publisher. All opinions are my own.

  15. 5 out of 5

    Wonkyjaw

    3.5/5 I want to love this book very badly, but a lot of pieces felt almost hollow to me. It felt oddly paced with parts of the story told too quickly and other parts feeling circular. There was a lot of waffling about for a while, following intricate twists and turns that sometimes felt like they came with no foreshadowing and sometimes were far too obvious. There were moments with certain characters that were written like they were meant to have some real impact that just fell flat, probably bec 3.5/5 I want to love this book very badly, but a lot of pieces felt almost hollow to me. It felt oddly paced with parts of the story told too quickly and other parts feeling circular. There was a lot of waffling about for a while, following intricate twists and turns that sometimes felt like they came with no foreshadowing and sometimes were far too obvious. There were moments with certain characters that were written like they were meant to have some real impact that just fell flat, probably because in the break between books I’d forgotten them entirely or why I cared about them. They didn’t have a whole lot to do or say here, just filler roles for the most part. Lastly, I understand that there’s a definite theme with the whole lack of trust and lying and everything, but one of my absolute biggest pet peeves is when major plot points could have been avoided if the characters had simply sat down and had an honest conversation. Perhaps it would have felt better for Amaya and Cayo to constantly have to force themselves into these leaps of trusts, laying it all out there (especially when what Amaya’s keeping secret is something she constantly wonders why she wasn’t told sooner; she actively laments the fact that it’d been kept a secret from her while continuing to keep it a secret herself while it festered). It would have been a more interesting character arc for either of them. The good, though, is that this book holds the same level of technical writing that the first did and held some lines that I want to keep a tight hold on because they were so beautiful and they broke my heart. I still love Cayo and Amara in general and the side characters (for the most part) remained interesting even if I didn’t care about them as much (apart from Soria, that girl deserves an award for putting up with Cayo and Amara and the whole dang world). A lot of the twists and turns were fun to follow and made sense or caught me off guard in a good way the way the first book had. So I think I’ll continue to love this duology, even if this one let me down in some frustrating ways.

  16. 5 out of 5

    Kendyl

    This review has been hidden because it contains spoilers. To view it, click here. Let me just start off by saying this book does not hold its punches 😅 There is a lot of twists and turns in this sequel that will not only keep you guessing but also break your freaking heart. After reading Scavenge the Stars I was hoping for an expansion of the world building done, but if absolutely nothing was cleared up for me. I think it’s due to the fact that in this completely made up world, there seem to be way too many made up countries. The characters only visit two of countries, yet 7 Let me just start off by saying this book does not hold its punches 😅 There is a lot of twists and turns in this sequel that will not only keep you guessing but also break your freaking heart. After reading Scavenge the Stars I was hoping for an expansion of the world building done, but if absolutely nothing was cleared up for me. I think it’s due to the fact that in this completely made up world, there seem to be way too many made up countries. The characters only visit two of countries, yet 7 or 8 countries are randomly brought up. But getting past that, it was a pretty good read! I loved the suspense element to it, and watching Cayo and Amaya work through their quest for vengeance was so satisfying. However, I felt that the ending was a huge let down and very anticlimactic. Overall I would rate this book about a 3/5 stars. The characters were awesome and interesting! They were my favorite part of this book, and I would love to have an epilogue or something so I could find out what happens next for them. However, the author built up all this suspense only to never resolve it and that made for a mediocre ending. That is the end of my review, however if you want to read my ranting about the ending please continue 😂 Spoiler alert! Do not keep reading unless you want to know the ending**** I mean after all the snooping and danger Cayo and Amaya went through to figure out who was behind the counterfeit coin scheme, they just weren’t there when the guy behind it was finally taken down? We find out what happens in a letter… lol. I was FURIOUS. Also, Amaya and Cayo just danced around each other the whole book! They would be so perfect for each other if they would just let go of their little grievances and realize they are both going through the same thing. But i did love how both of them went through different journeys to get their revenge, and both realized that vengeance just leaves you cold and empty in the end.

  17. 4 out of 5

    Taiyeaba

    This review has been hidden because it contains spoilers. To view it, click here. I really didn't want to give this book a 3⭐ as i did with the first book which I didn't like much. 3.5 maybe but since we don't have that....🤷‍♀️ I was really enjoying this one much better than the first. But by the end I was so frustrated and angry..... Couldn't let it go. Amaya didn't impress in the first one but in this one I really liked her except when she couldn't harm boon because he's her father while she always expected cayo to do that. Like girlll hypocrite much? But anyway I still liked I really didn't want to give this book a 3⭐ as i did with the first book which I didn't like much. 3.5 maybe but since we don't have that....🤷‍♀️ I was really enjoying this one much better than the first. But by the end I was so frustrated and angry..... Couldn't let it go. Amaya didn't impress in the first one but in this one I really liked her except when she couldn't harm boon because he's her father while she always expected cayo to do that. Like girlll hypocrite much? But anyway I still liked her. She needed emotional support so badly which she never got. I agree cayo has lot on his plate but every time amaya was there for him. I specially loved how she comforted him when soria died. And when Amaya needed someone to do the same for herself he just gave her space? Like wth? Even that happened at the last resort.(p.s. I liked remy's character, could have fitted smoothly here) And I know she used cayo in previous book but imo it wasn't that big for holding a grudge half of the book. But she still tried. I know she ain't innocent either. They fight cayo blurt some mean things amaya does the same BUT she's the one always apologizing first. She was going through so much and had to handle her own just gave me heartburn. I like cayo I always liked him but he was too self obsessed here. surprisingly I didn't like amaya in first book like at all. AND I have to mention a real character growth here.......RAMORA..... That girl from the alley/daughter of slum king literally became "the queen of the city" I disturbingly liked it.

  18. 5 out of 5

    Camille

    I was debating whether to give this 3.5 stars or 4, but I do think I liked this more than the first one. And I liked the first one pretty well. But this one is the culmination of all the plot points that Ms. Sim introduced in the first book, so it is very satisfying to see it all come together. I was not expecting grief and loss to be such heavy themes in this novel, but that's on me because the whole purpose of revenge is to avenge something lost. Amaya and Cayo lost much in the first book, and I was debating whether to give this 3.5 stars or 4, but I do think I liked this more than the first one. And I liked the first one pretty well. But this one is the culmination of all the plot points that Ms. Sim introduced in the first book, so it is very satisfying to see it all come together. I was not expecting grief and loss to be such heavy themes in this novel, but that's on me because the whole purpose of revenge is to avenge something lost. Amaya and Cayo lost much in the first book, and they lose much in this one as well. However, the story is not overly depressing. The friendships they have built and the life lessons they have learned keep story hopeful. Their reliance on each other is another positive, and it's heart-wrenching (in a good way) to see two broken people working to hold each other together. Another theme that comes up in this novel is the reality of parents. Both Amaya and Cayo have some seriously flawed parental units, and it's relatable to see them grappling with those realizations. Most of us can't relate to our parents being greedy murderers, but the day you realize your parents are not the all-powerful, all-perfect figures of your childhood is a day none of us can avoid. This book reminds me that we can and still should love the, newly recognized faults and all. Of course, themes are important. But this book shines in the setting. We get to explore more of the world and understand the empirical forces governing the characters' lives. I always enjoy a good fantasy world, and this one is no exception.

  19. 4 out of 5

    Avery Rose

    I mean, it's fine. Girl on a mission, found family, romantic subplot that is drawn out because they don't communicate and like, pause for a rant, why is that a thing? Why are two people who never trust each other enough to be honest supposed to be in some great romance? That's not healthy. That can be a story, sure, but don't call it a love story. Don't aspire to that. Don't find your other half in a person who is just as much a project as you are. Don't seek out love when you ARE a project. Foc I mean, it's fine. Girl on a mission, found family, romantic subplot that is drawn out because they don't communicate and like, pause for a rant, why is that a thing? Why are two people who never trust each other enough to be honest supposed to be in some great romance? That's not healthy. That can be a story, sure, but don't call it a love story. Don't aspire to that. Don't find your other half in a person who is just as much a project as you are. Don't seek out love when you ARE a project. Focus on you, babes. Get healthy yourself. Then, when you are in a good place for a partner, fucking be honest with them and trust them. But don't expect the person drowning next to you to be the one that saves you. Damn. But anyway, yeah, it's fine. There's nothing revolutionary here, which is sad, because when the first book came out I was SO. EXCITED. for a Monte Cristo retelling. And this shares themes, but I won't go as far as to consider it a retelling any more than, say, Wheel of Time retold Lord of the Rings. Chosen Ones on a Hero's Journey for the destruction of a Resurrecting Evil they may share, but it's not a retelling, ya know? Ravage has Vengeance Sought for a Wrongful Imprisonment, but it also has mystery subplots and Bigger, Badder Bads, and different characters who also have subplots for their vengeance, that somehow all wrap up together, and little off screen. I dunno. Fine. That's really all I can give it.

  20. 4 out of 5

    Monica

    "But she waited for him there, and though he had failed, they were together at last and decided they not need the stars. They had all the sweetness of the dark, the beginning of their own kingdom." This completely sums up this ending to the 'Scavenge the Stars" duology. While Amaya and Cayo had specific wants and desires at the end of "Scavenge the Stars" when none of that comes to fruition they have to learn to live with the life they have and make the best of it. Amaya, Avi, Cayo, Soria, Remy, "But she waited for him there, and though he had failed, they were together at last and decided they not need the stars. They had all the sweetness of the dark, the beginning of their own kingdom." This completely sums up this ending to the 'Scavenge the Stars" duology. While Amaya and Cayo had specific wants and desires at the end of "Scavenge the Stars" when none of that comes to fruition they have to learn to live with the life they have and make the best of it. Amaya, Avi, Cayo, Soria, Remy, Leisl and Deadshot are headed to Baleine where they hope to find answers to who is producing the counterfeit coins laced with the gray ash virus. They are also looking for Boon, who betrayed them in Moray. Cayo is looking for a cure for his sister who has been stricken with ash fever due to their father being a part of the counterfeit scheme. None of this ends up going as they thought. There are high stakes gambling games, visits to the slums of Baleine, heists of mansions and apothecary's and government buildings as they search for answers. There is also betrayal, truths discovered, lost sisters found and it all circles back to Moray where it all began. There, they must face those who have hurt and betrayed them the most as they look for the final pieces to the puzzle. Some truths should never be learned. Some deals never made.

  21. 5 out of 5

    Kenna

    Disappointed, to say the least. I bought this hoping, just maybe, that the complete story would make good on the first book's 'Monte Cristo Retelling' promise, but it seems the only similarities between these two works were 'revenge plot' and 'someone pretends to be a count[ess]'. I'm curious if the first book being sold as a Monte Cristo retelling was something the author actually intended, or just a marketing ploy. Ignoring that, this followup was lackluster all 'round. It's been over a year si Disappointed, to say the least. I bought this hoping, just maybe, that the complete story would make good on the first book's 'Monte Cristo Retelling' promise, but it seems the only similarities between these two works were 'revenge plot' and 'someone pretends to be a count[ess]'. I'm curious if the first book being sold as a Monte Cristo retelling was something the author actually intended, or just a marketing ploy. Ignoring that, this followup was lackluster all 'round. It's been over a year since I read part one so I forgot who some of the secondary characters were, but it never seemed to matter since none of them displayed a lick of personality. The plot was convoluted and meandering, halfhearted heists that paid off too easily and a resolution that just seemed tired and ready to get it over with. The switch into a story about grief was somewhat refreshing, at least. Frankly I think the author deserved more time with this. The mystery to be solved, the characters learning to trust each other again - all of that COULD have made a really great followup! Instead it was a teen romance drama disguised as political intrigue. Definitely entertaining to read, but not what I was hoping for.

  22. 4 out of 5

    Maranda

    Ravage the Dark by Tara Sims is the second book in the Scavenge the Stars duology. For so long,  Amaya Chandra's only goal was to be free of the debtor ship and it's cruelties. But freedom is no longer enough for Amaya. She wants revenge and to reveal the truth behind the sickness sweeping across Moray. For Cayo Mercado, revenge would be sweet, but more important is the health of his sister, which is slowly deteriorating, no thanks to his scoundrel of a father. Penniless and without hope, Cayo i Ravage the Dark by Tara Sims is the second book in the Scavenge the Stars duology. For so long,  Amaya Chandra's only goal was to be free of the debtor ship and it's cruelties. But freedom is no longer enough for Amaya. She wants revenge and to reveal the truth behind the sickness sweeping across Moray. For Cayo Mercado, revenge would be sweet, but more important is the health of his sister, which is slowly deteriorating, no thanks to his scoundrel of a father. Penniless and without hope, Cayo is lost and can see no way forward. Though their relationship began with betrayal, can Amaya and Cayo work together for the greater good? Or will they be too caught up in their emotions and each other to help anyone at all? This book was OK. It didn't hold my interest even nearly as much as the first book. I missed the intrigue of book one. This one felt more like a tie up of loose ends and not a conclusion to the story. What really soured this one for me, was the ending. All these things are happening and Amaya and Cayo just stay behind? They are hellbent on revealing the truth throughout the first and most of the second book and then it's like they just didn't care any more, which made me not care. For me, this book ended up turning into background filler. It didn't keep my attention and I found I didn't miss, missing something when I was listening to it. For that reason, this one gets 2.5 stars from me.

  23. 4 out of 5

    Erna

    a problem i usually have with ongoing book series is that if i read one, i tend to forget what happens in it by the time the next one comes out. however, in the one year that has passed between me reading volume one of this and now, i actually didn’t end up forgetting much. sure, some continuity things did fly right over my head but i generally still knew what was going on and who the characters were. i don’t have any particularly strong feelings about this, other than that it’s super fun and enj a problem i usually have with ongoing book series is that if i read one, i tend to forget what happens in it by the time the next one comes out. however, in the one year that has passed between me reading volume one of this and now, i actually didn’t end up forgetting much. sure, some continuity things did fly right over my head but i generally still knew what was going on and who the characters were. i don’t have any particularly strong feelings about this, other than that it’s super fun and enjoyable. my favourite thing about this series was definitely the setting and the atmosphere. it takes place in seaside towns and even though it doesn’t feature pirates, it has a pirate-esque vibe and that’s something i like very much. it’s very gritty, very dark, political, there’s even a small heist at one point. there’s a lot to love. of course i have some nitpicky remarks like how the ending was rushed (like too much, i honestly think this series would have benefitted from a third book) and how i don’t like it when authors continuously make the most dramatic statement at the end of a chapter. but still, i liked this and would be open to rereading this in the future... although knowing myself, i doubt i ever will.

  24. 4 out of 5

    Julie Rogers

    This review has been hidden because it contains spoilers. To view it, click here. 3.75 stars This was an interesting book to read amid the pandemic. The fact that there was so much trouble going on from the spreading of the fever was fascinating. The thoughts and the feelings from the characters were very real and raw, and I appreciate that in a book. It’s so easy to feel disconnected from characters who are basically invincible. Cayo is still dealing with coping with certain addictions, his sisters health, and anger at everyone. Amaya is struggling to cope with her guilt abo 3.75 stars This was an interesting book to read amid the pandemic. The fact that there was so much trouble going on from the spreading of the fever was fascinating. The thoughts and the feelings from the characters were very real and raw, and I appreciate that in a book. It’s so easy to feel disconnected from characters who are basically invincible. Cayo is still dealing with coping with certain addictions, his sisters health, and anger at everyone. Amaya is struggling to cope with her guilt about playing a part in spreading the virus, along with this list for revenge she has. It was interesting to see how she dealt with all of that. And sometimes she didn’t deal with it. I liked that because sometimes you’re not always going to do the “right” thing. Sometimes feelings overwhelm and you make the choices you know probably aren’t for the best. Both of their characters felt very human. I give this 3.75 stars mostly because I felt like the ending was kind of rushed. It felt like the resolution was a bit too convenient. I didn’t hate the ending, I just wish there was a bit more to go on. Overall, I really enjoyed this duology and would recommend to anyone

  25. 4 out of 5

    Shealea

    Initial thoughts: I'm torn and conflicted. Ravage the Dark is a fascinating follow-up and good conclusion to this dark, gritty fantasy duology. However, its boundless potential was not fully realized and that's largely due to the plot and pacing issues. On one hand, I don't think that this story has enough material to be expanded into a trilogy. But on the other hand, I also feel that Ravage the Dark tried to cram in too many things within a finite number of pages. The change in pacing was hard fo Initial thoughts: I'm torn and conflicted. Ravage the Dark is a fascinating follow-up and good conclusion to this dark, gritty fantasy duology. However, its boundless potential was not fully realized and that's largely due to the plot and pacing issues. On one hand, I don't think that this story has enough material to be expanded into a trilogy. But on the other hand, I also feel that Ravage the Dark tried to cram in too many things within a finite number of pages. The change in pacing was hard for me to ignore, especially since I had reread Scavenge the Stars prior. And even more unfortunate, despite the sequel's brisk pacing, the plot did not carry the same level of energy. Much of the politics and conspiracies were left vague and lacking. Nonetheless, I am impressed that the author managed to tie all loose ends - because believe me, there were plenty - in ways that are sensible and satisfactory. I also liked how this sequel handled grief, trauma, and healing. My main gripe lies in wishing the author had more time and more pages to work with. Recommended!

  26. 5 out of 5

    Jill Wittkopp

    This review was originally published on Myth and Magic Book Club Myth: 3.5/5 So many secrets, lies, and doubt between this crew. At the end of Scavenge the Stars, Amaya learns terrible truths, that she was used in ways she didn’t understand to perpetuate an evil she hoped to stop. We pick back up the story as Amaya and her somewhat unconventional crew flee Moray in hopes of stopping the spread of the counterfeit coins and finding a cure for the ash fever. With so many new truths learned, Amaya and This review was originally published on Myth and Magic Book Club Myth: 3.5/5 So many secrets, lies, and doubt between this crew. At the end of Scavenge the Stars, Amaya learns terrible truths, that she was used in ways she didn’t understand to perpetuate an evil she hoped to stop. We pick back up the story as Amaya and her somewhat unconventional crew flee Moray in hopes of stopping the spread of the counterfeit coins and finding a cure for the ash fever. With so many new truths learned, Amaya and Cayo struggle to understand themselves and each other. I liked the depth of this struggle, and nothing came easy for either character through this book. Every time they thought they were on the upswing, life beat them back down. I think the labels of ‘sad boy’ and ‘scary girl’ fit well with their inner dialogues. While trying to dance around spoilers, the conclusion to this book and the duology was a little unsatisfying. I thought the end was perfect, but the final act left me wanting more for Amaya. Magic: 3/5 This world was definitely more one of political alliances. The focus was more on rich merchants, slum lords, and those of influence through the empires. Alchemy added to this world building for sure as its a bit more “practical magic” to fit with the surrounding story. Overall 3.5/5 I enjoyed Amaya’s story. She is a strong heroine who has to learn plenty along the way, but keeps picking herself back up every time she gets knocked down. And a random side note, can we talk about this cover? It’s fierce.

  27. 4 out of 5

    Sasha

    While I did not enjoy this book as much as the first, I still liked it. It strayed away from that Count of Monte Cristo inspiration that made it so compelling to me in the first place, BUT that being said, had I read this without any expectations of it being anything like the original story (in the same way that the first one was), I think I would have enjoyed it a bit more. That being said, I really liked Amaya's growth throughout the novel, and it was nice to see Cayo get a job and realize jus While I did not enjoy this book as much as the first, I still liked it. It strayed away from that Count of Monte Cristo inspiration that made it so compelling to me in the first place, BUT that being said, had I read this without any expectations of it being anything like the original story (in the same way that the first one was), I think I would have enjoyed it a bit more. That being said, I really liked Amaya's growth throughout the novel, and it was nice to see Cayo get a job and realize just how difficult the world is. The concept of debtor's ships and revenge and family are all so intertwined to each other, and it provided a complex narrative with many different characters learning how to let go of certain grudges and resentments, but also finding ways to come to terms with their grief, loss, and their love for one another in various ways. A solid read.

  28. 4 out of 5

    Madi Simmons

    If this book is anything like the first. I. Am. Here. For. It. Not only is it an inspired retelling of a classic novel, but it adds a breath of fresh modern air (while still reading like a period piece). It doesn't shy away from modern issues of feminism, gender roles, homosexuality, or sexism. In fact, the series embraces the differences in us all, that make us all imperfectly perfect. With a fair spot of tea, romance, and swashbuckling to boot! I will be the first to say that March is far too lo If this book is anything like the first. I. Am. Here. For. It. Not only is it an inspired retelling of a classic novel, but it adds a breath of fresh modern air (while still reading like a period piece). It doesn't shy away from modern issues of feminism, gender roles, homosexuality, or sexism. In fact, the series embraces the differences in us all, that make us all imperfectly perfect. With a fair spot of tea, romance, and swashbuckling to boot! I will be the first to say that March is far too long a wait for a sequel. But 2020 be damned, I will be breaking my 'used book only' rule and preordering this one as well. Thank you Tara Sims ❤️ Here's hoping I can get all of my friends and followers on my level so I can discuss my impatience en mass.

  29. 4 out of 5

    Melissa F.

    This duology took on a new connotation, through no fault of its own, after the past year. Obviously the author had no idea a pandemic was coming when she started writing the books, or that some of the events she wrote would hit far closer to home than anyone ever expected. But while I still absolutely loved it, it did make it darker and more depressing to read. Still, it's excellent on so many levels if you can get past that. Cayo in particular really grew into himself in this book, and Amaya is This duology took on a new connotation, through no fault of its own, after the past year. Obviously the author had no idea a pandemic was coming when she started writing the books, or that some of the events she wrote would hit far closer to home than anyone ever expected. But while I still absolutely loved it, it did make it darker and more depressing to read. Still, it's excellent on so many levels if you can get past that. Cayo in particular really grew into himself in this book, and Amaya is still wonderful, and really just all of the characters and the various relationships they have with each other. So, so well done!

  30. 5 out of 5

    Krysta

    Source: ARC received from publisher A thrilling conclusion to this duology that packs in plenty of action as well as a complicated romance. The writing is more refined than in the first installment, but readers may be disappointed that much of the climax occurs off the page. In the end, there were too many threads for them all to be wrapped up sufficiently, and many of the vague allusions to other nations and their politics were left just that--vague. The worldbuilding is not a strong point, but Source: ARC received from publisher A thrilling conclusion to this duology that packs in plenty of action as well as a complicated romance. The writing is more refined than in the first installment, but readers may be disappointed that much of the climax occurs off the page. In the end, there were too many threads for them all to be wrapped up sufficiently, and many of the vague allusions to other nations and their politics were left just that--vague. The worldbuilding is not a strong point, but the plot is energetic enough to lure readers in.

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