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Brother, Sister, Mother, Explorer

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A sister trying to hold back her brother from the edge of the abyss, for readers of Jesmyn Ward and Tommy Orange. In the tourist town of Ciudad de Tres Hermanas, in the aftermath of their mother's passing, two siblings spend a final weekend together in their childhood home. Seeing her brother, Rafa, careening toward a place of no return, Rufina devises a bet: if they can A sister trying to hold back her brother from the edge of the abyss, for readers of Jesmyn Ward and Tommy Orange. In the tourist town of Ciudad de Tres Hermanas, in the aftermath of their mother's passing, two siblings spend a final weekend together in their childhood home. Seeing her brother, Rafa, careening toward a place of no return, Rufina devises a bet: if they can make enough money performing for privileged tourists in the plaza over the course of the weekend to afford a plane ticket out, Rafa must commit to living. If not, Rufina will make her peace with Rafa's own plan for the future, however terrifying it may be. As the siblings reckon with generational and ancestral trauma, set against the indignities of present-day prejudice, other strange hauntings begin to stalk these pages: their mother's ghost kicks her heels against the walls; Rufina's vanished child creeps into her arms at night; and above all this, watching over the siblings, a genderless, flea-bitten angel remains hell-bent on saving what can be saved.


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A sister trying to hold back her brother from the edge of the abyss, for readers of Jesmyn Ward and Tommy Orange. In the tourist town of Ciudad de Tres Hermanas, in the aftermath of their mother's passing, two siblings spend a final weekend together in their childhood home. Seeing her brother, Rafa, careening toward a place of no return, Rufina devises a bet: if they can A sister trying to hold back her brother from the edge of the abyss, for readers of Jesmyn Ward and Tommy Orange. In the tourist town of Ciudad de Tres Hermanas, in the aftermath of their mother's passing, two siblings spend a final weekend together in their childhood home. Seeing her brother, Rafa, careening toward a place of no return, Rufina devises a bet: if they can make enough money performing for privileged tourists in the plaza over the course of the weekend to afford a plane ticket out, Rafa must commit to living. If not, Rufina will make her peace with Rafa's own plan for the future, however terrifying it may be. As the siblings reckon with generational and ancestral trauma, set against the indignities of present-day prejudice, other strange hauntings begin to stalk these pages: their mother's ghost kicks her heels against the walls; Rufina's vanished child creeps into her arms at night; and above all this, watching over the siblings, a genderless, flea-bitten angel remains hell-bent on saving what can be saved.

30 review for Brother, Sister, Mother, Explorer

  1. 5 out of 5

    lark benobi

    The novel is gorgeously written. I kept highlighting passages because they were so uniquely rendered. The story itself kept me at arm’s length by withholding information and describing horrific bleak circumstances in a way so beautiful that I became a bit detached from what I was reading. The brother and sister protagonists seem to act and think in ways much younger than their ages and I wasn’t sure if that was an artifact of the style of writing, or something I was meant to believe about them, The novel is gorgeously written. I kept highlighting passages because they were so uniquely rendered. The story itself kept me at arm’s length by withholding information and describing horrific bleak circumstances in a way so beautiful that I became a bit detached from what I was reading. The brother and sister protagonists seem to act and think in ways much younger than their ages and I wasn’t sure if that was an artifact of the style of writing, or something I was meant to believe about them, that their bleak circumstances had left them childlike and helpless. Some of the magical elements were delightfully original. I think it would have worked better for me as a short story. I’m open to reading more from this author and I’m glad to have had the experience of reading something so unique even if it challenged me a little too much in the end to love it.

  2. 4 out of 5

    Sarah-Hope

    Brother, Sister, Mother, Explorer is a wild read: full of magical realism and disparate parts that a reader has to trust will come together by the end. And the reader is rewarded. The story of the four title characters—brother; sister; mother, now dead but still a presence in the family home; explorer, long vanished; a transsexual angel; the shadow of a stillborn baby; a devoted policeman; a collective of elderly women, the Grandmothers of All; and whole herds of oblivious tourists—becomes immen Brother, Sister, Mother, Explorer is a wild read: full of magical realism and disparate parts that a reader has to trust will come together by the end. And the reader is rewarded. The story of the four title characters—brother; sister; mother, now dead but still a presence in the family home; explorer, long vanished; a transsexual angel; the shadow of a stillborn baby; a devoted policeman; a collective of elderly women, the Grandmothers of All; and whole herds of oblivious tourists—becomes immensely engaging as the novel progresses and the reader sees what's at stake for each character. If you like original, rich fiction with a risk-taking style, you won't want to miss this title. There's nothing else out there like it. I received a free electronic review copy of this title from the publisher; the opinions are my own.

  3. 4 out of 5

    jazmine

    This was an emotional symphony that managed to complicate the cacophony that comes with loss--loss of identity, loss of county, loss of loved ones, loss of self. I've never read such a complex story about grief and the many forms it takes and in such a way that feels like a dream and a nightmare at the same time. This is a testament to Figueroa's writing skill because she beautiful crafts each sentence as though it was meant to be there. A true wordsmith. At times, I almost felt that I was the w This was an emotional symphony that managed to complicate the cacophony that comes with loss--loss of identity, loss of county, loss of loved ones, loss of self. I've never read such a complex story about grief and the many forms it takes and in such a way that feels like a dream and a nightmare at the same time. This is a testament to Figueroa's writing skill because she beautiful crafts each sentence as though it was meant to be there. A true wordsmith. At times, I almost felt that I was the wrong reader for this book, especially when discussing the privilege of travel, of choosing to leave one's homeland instead of choosing to leave. I have chosen to leave, while at the same time I didn't. Though I do not need to experience being forced out to appreciate this book and the perspective it gives, I do feel as though I haven't read enough voices from the people who have been forcibly thrown out of their homeland and are subjected to the exotic notions of white tourists who have only read about other cultures but have nothing that relates, nothing that's tangible to what Rufina, Rafa, and their mother experienced. To explore the world is a privilege--something I've never thought about before. That is not to say that one cannot explore the world, but explorers need to be aware of where they are at all times. Many tourists stop at the sight of two siblings earning money so that they may win a bet that is life or death, literally. But they do not know why they are subjected to the square, only that they are there to entertain. They do not know the stories because they do not care. They only care about the experience because they will go home and say, "I've had a great time." In all, this debut has made me think about both travel and the stories I have yet to read. This is such a beautiful example of what the book industry has failed to exalt in the past. Figueroa writes with power, a power that should not be ignored.

  4. 5 out of 5

    Lynne

    Very atmospheric writing that keeps the reader engaged in this story about grief and hardship. An adult brother and sister who recently lost their mother try to make it through a weekend. The impetus seems silly but the way it’s written demonstrates complexity in life, emotions and relationships. A beautiful, sad yet short and quick reading novel. Thank you NetGalley for the ARC.

  5. 4 out of 5

    Zibby Owens

    This book was beautifully written and absolutely fantastic. It starts with such a bang that it was so hard to tear myself away because of the author's language and the intimacy it creates. Also, the way the author wrote about the mother-child relationship was so beautiful, especially the grief. I love that the author approached grief with a magical realist bent to help people experience it differently. That's what literature is all about, getting people to look at things in a new way. We all ope This book was beautifully written and absolutely fantastic. It starts with such a bang that it was so hard to tear myself away because of the author's language and the intimacy it creates. Also, the way the author wrote about the mother-child relationship was so beautiful, especially the grief. I love that the author approached grief with a magical realist bent to help people experience it differently. That's what literature is all about, getting people to look at things in a new way. We all open our eyes and essentially have the same day. The world is there, but sometimes we need to shift how we see it. One passage stood out to me when the author wrote, "The day after Rosalinda's death, Rafa and Rufina had both lain on the cold tile floor of the living room, neither of them able to will themselves to stand, put a match to kindling, and tend a fire that would thaw them. Instead, they remained numb. Grief waited as the edges, sniffing the boundaries of their bodies waiting to be let in. The house had no choice but to watch." Then she writes, "With each week, then each month, Rafa had lost more weight, paled further, spoke less. Each new day had demanded he endure. He lit one of Rosalinda's cigarette butts stained with her fuchsia lipstick and let the smoke fill his nose. Laced with the sent of her headache-inducing perfume, he could not get enough of his mother, the woman who was no more." So beautiful. To listen to my interview with the author, goto my podcast at: https://zibbyowens.com/transcript/jam...

  6. 5 out of 5

    Christopher Dickerson

    Brother, Sister, Mother, Explorer was a deeply moving novel about the past and present trauma that indigenous people face. The story follows a brother and sister as they try to reckon with the loss of their mother. I was swept away into a world that is entirely different from my own. Thanks you NetGalley and Catapult for allowing me a first read of this beautiful novel. Pub Date: 02 Mar 2021 Book: 88/101 (2020) Star Rating: 4

  7. 5 out of 5

    Kate

    "Outside the bedroom door, in the hallway, their dead mother was making a racket, pounding her feet against the door. For Rafa, the dead mother shimmered in and out of reality. Mainly, he understood her to have taken the form of a memory, though there were moments he wasnt sure. He could sense her near--his nose prickling with her perfume, his hand warming as if touching her cheek--and then he couldn't sense her near at all. It was death he felt near him, a kind of lullaby that overtook him." • 🌿 T "Outside the bedroom door, in the hallway, their dead mother was making a racket, pounding her feet against the door. For Rafa, the dead mother shimmered in and out of reality. Mainly, he understood her to have taken the form of a memory, though there were moments he wasnt sure. He could sense her near--his nose prickling with her perfume, his hand warming as if touching her cheek--and then he couldn't sense her near at all. It was death he felt near him, a kind of lullaby that overtook him." • 🌿 Thoughts ~ What a beautifully written, hauntingly devastating novel about grief, siblings and trauma. Taking place in the tourists town of Ciudad de Tres Hermanas, siblings Rufina and Rafa are lost in a fog of grief after their mothers death. Rufina must keep her brother from going over the edge, so she makes a bet with him that if they make enough money over the weekend off the privileged tourists they will fly away from their dismal existence and start anew. But if she loses she must accept whatever fate her brother chooses. Figueroa blew me away with her prose and gorgeously crafted sentences. Reading this story felt dreamlike, but the content was more nightmarish. Figueroa writes about the need to flee your homeland, the many sides of loss, generational and ancestral trauma so clearly. Beautifully done, a quick but impactful read! Thank You to the publisher for sending me this book, opinions are my own. • For more of my book content check out instagram.com/bookalong

  8. 4 out of 5

    Eileen Olivieri

    Brother, Sister, Mother, Explorer by Jamie Figueroa This breathtaking debut novel by Jamie Figueroa is now on my all-time favorite book list. Her writing and storytelling is courageous, poetic, and stark. All of the characters spoke to me in a direct, raw way-- striking my heart with grief, compassion, anger, and hope. The story is layered with familial relationships that are knotted and woven with past traumas. The main characters, Rafa and Rufina struggle to integrate the past with the present w Brother, Sister, Mother, Explorer by Jamie Figueroa This breathtaking debut novel by Jamie Figueroa is now on my all-time favorite book list. Her writing and storytelling is courageous, poetic, and stark. All of the characters spoke to me in a direct, raw way-- striking my heart with grief, compassion, anger, and hope. The story is layered with familial relationships that are knotted and woven with past traumas. The main characters, Rafa and Rufina struggle to integrate the past with the present while seamlessly traversing between worlds as memories continuously unfold. Personal, cultural, and intergenerational healing is found in surprising ways within the larger "family" that surrounds and protects these characters.

  9. 4 out of 5

    Ann

    In this haunting debut novel about deep-seated trauma and grief, a sister attempts to hold back the wave of grief that threatens to wash away her one remaining family member. They live in a tourist town reminiscent of Taos, New Mexico. Its name: Ciudad de Tres Hermanas. The story takes place over the course of three days, but sweeps us back and forth in time, memory, and geography. Ghosts and angels populate the narrative, as do those blessed and/or haunted by these magically realistic character In this haunting debut novel about deep-seated trauma and grief, a sister attempts to hold back the wave of grief that threatens to wash away her one remaining family member. They live in a tourist town reminiscent of Taos, New Mexico. Its name: Ciudad de Tres Hermanas. The story takes place over the course of three days, but sweeps us back and forth in time, memory, and geography. Ghosts and angels populate the narrative, as do those blessed and/or haunted by these magically realistic characters. Author Jamie Figueroa writes as if possessed by these spirits herself; her language and style, gorgeous and fluid and striking. As in the captivating street performances that Rufina and Rafa are forced to deliver, Figueroa makes us spectators one moment, participants the next. It's amazing how she seamlessly weaves third-person omniscient point of view with second-person imperative throughout. [Thanks to NetGalley for the advanced reader’s copy of this book in exchange for my honest review.]

  10. 4 out of 5

    Kasa Cotugno

    When their mother Rosalinda dies, Rufina and Rufa, brother and sister, find their inability to accept the loss evokes ghosts, those of the past and of a particularly helpful angel. Not to mention a local member of the police force who has been in love with Rufina since they were in school. In gorgeous prose formed by layers of reality and fantasy, Jaimie Figueroa spins out their tale revealing traumas of the past and the misconceptions of the tourists who visit the high desert city they inhabit. When their mother Rosalinda dies, Rufina and Rufa, brother and sister, find their inability to accept the loss evokes ghosts, those of the past and of a particularly helpful angel. Not to mention a local member of the police force who has been in love with Rufina since they were in school. In gorgeous prose formed by layers of reality and fantasy, Jaimie Figueroa spins out their tale revealing traumas of the past and the misconceptions of the tourists who visit the high desert city they inhabit. She is deliberately vague as to Rosalinda's origins thus obfuscating the tribal traditions usually a factor in books covering this material, but that doesn't lessen the impact of the power of the fate of these three. Lovely.

  11. 4 out of 5

    Susan

    Told in the third person, this book felt more like someone describing a play to me than a story. I think this treatment, and my reaction to it, kept me somewhat distanced from the characters and the action. Instead of being in the story, I felt separated. But, that story almost felt like a fairy tale, though a grim one at best. Siblings are dealing with their mother's death while their own pasts swirl around them. It is murky and disturbing but somehow still beautiful and almost poetic in the wa Told in the third person, this book felt more like someone describing a play to me than a story. I think this treatment, and my reaction to it, kept me somewhat distanced from the characters and the action. Instead of being in the story, I felt separated. But, that story almost felt like a fairy tale, though a grim one at best. Siblings are dealing with their mother's death while their own pasts swirl around them. It is murky and disturbing but somehow still beautiful and almost poetic in the way the story is told. The descriptions of the scenery and the many people who come through the story are exquisite. A story of love shrouded in a fog of grief. Perhaps that distance is there to protect the reader from the full force of the characters' emotions? Thanks to NetGalley and Catapult for a copy of the book. This review is my own opinion.

  12. 4 out of 5

    Nelda Brangwin

    Half-siblings, Rufina, age 28 and Rafa, age 30, share their grief at their mothers death, but its worse for Rafa. He wants to end his life. Rufina makes a deal with him. If they can make enough money in their high desert town in the southwest entertaining tourists, Rafe has to promise to keep living and go look for what will make him happy. There are plenty of ghosts and memories to keep them company, including memories of their mother’s boyfriend, Explorer. There are lots of do-gooders wanting Half-siblings, Rufina, age 28 and Rafa, age 30, share their grief at their mothers death, but its worse for Rafa. He wants to end his life. Rufina makes a deal with him. If they can make enough money in their high desert town in the southwest entertaining tourists, Rafe has to promise to keep living and go look for what will make him happy. There are plenty of ghosts and memories to keep them company, including memories of their mother’s boyfriend, Explorer. There are lots of do-gooders wanting to help them, but all the good-hearted people do is slow down their goal of earning enough money in a week. The characters at times leaped off the page, but what I enjoyed the most was the comments about the gringo tourists who seemingly patronize the local Latinos. Figueroa’s deeply moving debut novel already has me looking forward to her next book.

  13. 4 out of 5

    Joseph

    I am over the moon for this book. It reminded me of Mexico, the tourists who believe all locals are there for their entertainment, and the locals who complain among each other but suck it up and perform for the benevolent coins. The language is ridiculously intelligent, evidence that every sentence was pored over relentlessly, “by that I mean” it wasn’t just deep and poetic at the beginning and the end with a massive lull in the middle but all the way through. And I’m not a fan of magical realis I am over the moon for this book. It reminded me of Mexico, the tourists who believe all locals are there for their entertainment, and the locals who complain among each other but suck it up and perform for the benevolent coins. The language is ridiculously intelligent, evidence that every sentence was pored over relentlessly, “by that I mean” it wasn’t just deep and poetic at the beginning and the end with a massive lull in the middle but all the way through. And I’m not a fan of magical realism or fantastic narratives but this one really worked for me.

  14. 4 out of 5

    Sasha (bahareads)

    Brother, Sister, Mother, Explorer was a poignant read, beautifully written. Figueroa is a master with words. The pacing for me was a little bit off, as the POV alternates between the present and the past. The other characters used in the book such as the ghosts and the angel took me a while to get used to, and I think were abstract from the storyline. I couldn't get into the story because of the slow unfolding of information. The characters were a bit childlike in their nativity, way younger th Brother, Sister, Mother, Explorer was a poignant read, beautifully written. Figueroa is a master with words. The pacing for me was a little bit off, as the POV alternates between the present and the past. The other characters used in the book such as the ghosts and the angel took me a while to get used to, and I think were abstract from the storyline. I couldn't get into the story because of the slow unfolding of information. The characters were a bit childlike in their nativity, way younger than then their actual ages. The magical elements throughout the book were beautifully done though. Even though the end was obvious I kept hoping for a different, more kind ending. I did enjoy Figeroa's writing and I would pick up something else by them.

  15. 5 out of 5

    m.

    arc provided by netgalley for an honest review This was a beautifully written prose about two siblings unable to truly process their mother's death. "Brother, Sister, Mother, Explorer" was a blend of fantasy of reality which slowly reveals both the personal traumas and cultural traumas that the characters have endured and the various misconceptions that tourists have for both Indigenous people and the town. This book took me some time to read because it dealt with very dark topics and it was a co arc provided by netgalley for an honest review This was a beautifully written prose about two siblings unable to truly process their mother's death. "Brother, Sister, Mother, Explorer" was a blend of fantasy of reality which slowly reveals both the personal traumas and cultural traumas that the characters have endured and the various misconceptions that tourists have for both Indigenous people and the town. This book took me some time to read because it dealt with very dark topics and it was a complex story about grief that makes you take breaks so you can fully process what you have just read, Figueroa's writing was very captivating and I look forward to reading more of her works.

  16. 4 out of 5

    Annie Chamberlain

    If you are looking to decolonize your imagination and journey with these characters through a story that will pull at your heartstrings, this story is for you. With an Allende-esque telling that feels as much like poetry as prose, Figueroa layers the stories of a town and the many characters that inhabit both the present, past, future, and magical realms. I read this book like I eat vanilla bean gelato: wanting to go slower and savor but devouring the story nonetheless. These are the stories we If you are looking to decolonize your imagination and journey with these characters through a story that will pull at your heartstrings, this story is for you. With an Allende-esque telling that feels as much like poetry as prose, Figueroa layers the stories of a town and the many characters that inhabit both the present, past, future, and magical realms. I read this book like I eat vanilla bean gelato: wanting to go slower and savor but devouring the story nonetheless. These are the stories we need now: the ones that give us perspectives we may not have access to otherwise, the ones that pull us into empathic places of heart and mind, the stories that bring magic and force us to see the world through the eyes of another and the Other. Read it, savor it, devour it, all the ways this story happens to you, you will love it.

  17. 5 out of 5

    Kelly Sue

    This tale of a small immigrant family is illustrated palpably by Figueroa. There's little the reader can't see, hear, taste, or smell about their experience. We are taken into a world rich in pain, pleasure, work, and wonder. And injustice, so much injustice. The author honors the experience of so many immigrant lives in her writing while shining a spotlight on the habits and behaviors of Colonizers/Explorers through the ages. The story appears to take place in an imagined American tourist desti This tale of a small immigrant family is illustrated palpably by Figueroa. There's little the reader can't see, hear, taste, or smell about their experience. We are taken into a world rich in pain, pleasure, work, and wonder. And injustice, so much injustice. The author honors the experience of so many immigrant lives in her writing while shining a spotlight on the habits and behaviors of Colonizers/Explorers through the ages. The story appears to take place in an imagined American tourist destination, but the transferability allows the reader to consider the lives of Native People in Vietnam, Belize, India—any Euro-colonized space. Cheers to this new author and book. I already look forward to reading her future offerings.

  18. 4 out of 5

    Joy

    *special thanks to Catapult publishing and NetGalley for the ARC copy in exchange for an honest review! 4 stars I’m not sure what I was expecting with this novel, but wow. A beautifully written tragic tale, this one took me by surprise. It touches on loss, thoughts of suicide, depression, prejudice, lots of other heavy topics that I won’t say to avoid spoilers. A sister trying desperately to save her brother one last time. To me, it really was Rufina’s story and all she had endured. And it was a l *special thanks to Catapult publishing and NetGalley for the ARC copy in exchange for an honest review! 4 stars I’m not sure what I was expecting with this novel, but wow. A beautifully written tragic tale, this one took me by surprise. It touches on loss, thoughts of suicide, depression, prejudice, lots of other heavy topics that I won’t say to avoid spoilers. A sister trying desperately to save her brother one last time. To me, it really was Rufina’s story and all she had endured. And it was a lot. It was, at times, hard to follow. But I found the ending wrapped it up nicely. That ending was triumphant. It’s a short novel that packs a punch.

  19. 4 out of 5

    Tina

    Reading this book was an incredibly soul satisfying experience.....a little bit fable, definitely drama as a sister tries to keep a brother from going over the abyss so perhaps a little bit existential, ancestral and cultural trauma as well as current day prejudices. Taking place in Cuidad de Tres Hermanas, the sister makes a bet with a brother that they will make enough money over the weekend from the tourists to fly away from their anguish and poverty. If she wins, he must commit to living. Th Reading this book was an incredibly soul satisfying experience.....a little bit fable, definitely drama as a sister tries to keep a brother from going over the abyss so perhaps a little bit existential, ancestral and cultural trauma as well as current day prejudices. Taking place in Cuidad de Tres Hermanas, the sister makes a bet with a brother that they will make enough money over the weekend from the tourists to fly away from their anguish and poverty. If she wins, he must commit to living. This reminded me of two other books which incorporated these writing skills: "Beloved" and "Like Water for Chocolate". That's high praise, I would think!

  20. 5 out of 5

    Robin

    “Brother, Sister, Mother, Explorer” was beautifully written prose about a brother and sister dealing with the loss of their mother. The story is a blend of fantasy and reality slowly disclosing the differences in their individual relationships with their mother and the traumas they’ve suffered. The book was challenging to read as it intertwined real and imagined events. It’s a complex story about grief and I struggled a bit while reading it.

  21. 4 out of 5

    Liz

    I don’t feel equipped to write a review of this book. I might need to reread it. The language was intense, beautiful and I often had to go back and reread a sentence. For its length, it took me a long time to read...and I still feel I didn’t take adequate time.

  22. 5 out of 5

    Stella

    Jamie Figueroa is nothing short of a genius. I've never read anything like Brother Sister Mother Explorer. I'm so grateful this beauty of a book is out in the world with its wonderful characters and themes of resiliency and caring for one another. I highly recommend it! Jamie Figueroa is nothing short of a genius. I've never read anything like Brother Sister Mother Explorer. I'm so grateful this beauty of a book is out in the world with its wonderful characters and themes of resiliency and caring for one another. I highly recommend it!

  23. 5 out of 5

    natasha

    3.5 stars

  24. 4 out of 5

    Justine Chen

    This kind of talent should not just be limited here. The way you arranged the stories is quite amazing. Why don't you join NovelStar's writing competition? This kind of talent should not just be limited here. The way you arranged the stories is quite amazing. Why don't you join NovelStar's writing competition?

  25. 4 out of 5

    Ruth

    Native American fable

  26. 4 out of 5

    Jacqueline Sutton

    Not smart enough at all for this book

  27. 4 out of 5

    Mary Ellen Sanger

    I loved inhabiting this terrible, magical world with the author. Beautiful language, inventive passages, serpentine timeline. Loved it and look forward to more from this author.

  28. 4 out of 5

    Laura

    I’m not normally a fan of magical realism, but it worked in this compelling story of what it can take to help oneself and others survive in an unjust world.

  29. 4 out of 5

    Mandy Hazen

    This book is well written and has good character development I just couldn’t personally get into the story and found it a little bit of a struggle to keep reading. In the end it does wrap up everything and answers the questions you have, just left a little lacking for me personally. I received an advance review copy for free, and I am leaving this review voluntarily.

  30. 5 out of 5

    Cece

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