web site hit counter The Marvelous Mirza Girls - Ebooks PDF Online
Hot Best Seller

The Marvelous Mirza Girls

Availability: Ready to download

To cure her post–senior year slump, made worse by the loss of her aunt Sonia, Noreen is ready to follow her mom on a gap year trip to New Delhi, hoping India can lessen her grief and bring her voice back. In the world’s most polluted city, Noreen soon meets kind, handsome Kabir, who introduces her to the wonders of this magical, complicated place. With Kabir’s help—plus Bol To cure her post–senior year slump, made worse by the loss of her aunt Sonia, Noreen is ready to follow her mom on a gap year trip to New Delhi, hoping India can lessen her grief and bring her voice back. In the world’s most polluted city, Noreen soon meets kind, handsome Kabir, who introduces her to the wonders of this magical, complicated place. With Kabir’s help—plus Bollywood celebrities, fourteenth-century ruins, karaoke parties, and Sufi saints—Noreen begins to rediscover her joyful voice. But when a family scandal erupts, Noreen and Kabir must face complicated questions in their own relationship: What does it mean to truly stand by someone—and what are the boundaries of love?


Compare

To cure her post–senior year slump, made worse by the loss of her aunt Sonia, Noreen is ready to follow her mom on a gap year trip to New Delhi, hoping India can lessen her grief and bring her voice back. In the world’s most polluted city, Noreen soon meets kind, handsome Kabir, who introduces her to the wonders of this magical, complicated place. With Kabir’s help—plus Bol To cure her post–senior year slump, made worse by the loss of her aunt Sonia, Noreen is ready to follow her mom on a gap year trip to New Delhi, hoping India can lessen her grief and bring her voice back. In the world’s most polluted city, Noreen soon meets kind, handsome Kabir, who introduces her to the wonders of this magical, complicated place. With Kabir’s help—plus Bollywood celebrities, fourteenth-century ruins, karaoke parties, and Sufi saints—Noreen begins to rediscover her joyful voice. But when a family scandal erupts, Noreen and Kabir must face complicated questions in their own relationship: What does it mean to truly stand by someone—and what are the boundaries of love?

30 review for The Marvelous Mirza Girls

  1. 5 out of 5

    Maria

    Thank you Harper Collins for the gifted copy in exchange for an honest review. This book was enjoyable right from the beginning. The writing is great, and it will stick with you. Although the book just has one girl (woman) on the cover, at its core is a mother and daughter story of resilience and strength. I loved Ruby and how cool she is (but omg, I think ALL PARENTS NEED TO BE LIKE RUBY), and I loved how she is a solid rock for Noreen, her daughter. I loved watching them together, even in the a Thank you Harper Collins for the gifted copy in exchange for an honest review. This book was enjoyable right from the beginning. The writing is great, and it will stick with you. Although the book just has one girl (woman) on the cover, at its core is a mother and daughter story of resilience and strength. I loved Ruby and how cool she is (but omg, I think ALL PARENTS NEED TO BE LIKE RUBY), and I loved how she is a solid rock for Noreen, her daughter. I loved watching them together, even in the awkward parts. IYKYK ;) Sure, the characters may have been slightly childish for me, or acting unrealistic in my POV, but it’s a romance, so this is kind of to be expected. I would not change ANYTHING about this book, and I want more from Sheba Karim * adds backlist books to TBR *

  2. 5 out of 5

    Sami

    I have so many thoughts about this book so I’m going to make a list. PROS - Clear improvement from Mariam Sharma in terms of writing style and plot - Perfect descriptions of Delhi. It truly felt like I was back there. - Accurate depiction of social life and the way life works - Lots of moments that would evoke a “Log kya kahenge?” from the elder generations. It’s nice to see brown girls depicted as normal people and not these pretentious nerdy girls. - Desi single mother and daughter relationship I have so many thoughts about this book so I’m going to make a list. PROS - Clear improvement from Mariam Sharma in terms of writing style and plot - Perfect descriptions of Delhi. It truly felt like I was back there. - Accurate depiction of social life and the way life works - Lots of moments that would evoke a “Log kya kahenge?” from the elder generations. It’s nice to see brown girls depicted as normal people and not these pretentious nerdy girls. - Desi single mother and daughter relationship that isn’t toxic. CONS - Why on Earth does Noreen call her elders by their first name most of them time but in actual dialogue refer to them as their proper titles? It’s confusing and weird. - She’s Desi, from Jersey, is close with her grandparents but still manages to constantly have the shits in India? HUH???? - No character development what so ever. Nothing changed about Noreen except that she fell in love. There was so much potential for this to be a great book if it had gone in the direction of closure after the death of a loved one or even resolvment of her massive daddy issues but nope. None of that happened. - The plot might have been better than Mariam Sharma but it wasn’t great either. Absolutely no one main focus. There are a million things that seem like will become the focus of the book and then just don’t (grief, daddy issues, long distance ect) - The MeToo part of the book. Listen if you’re just gonna have the characters take a stance of neutrality and then pass it off as advocacy for survivors, delete those parts. It was an incredibly centrist take. - Speaking of little to no nuance! The casteism, racism towards Northeasterns, being gay in India, and other social commentary fell so flat because of the lack of nuance. It honestly would’ve been better to just not include it. This book has so much potential and I was looking forward to seeing Karim’s development as a writer but I have to say as a first gen Indian that I was beyond disappointed.

  3. 5 out of 5

    Hamsini

    What a fun, fun book. I really enjoyed reading it. Lighthearted + political in equal measure, to nudge you to think and laugh. I highly recommend!

  4. 4 out of 5

    The Candid Cover (Olivia & Lori)

    Full Review on The Candid Cover The Marvelous Mirza Girls by Sheba Karim is a story of two strong women finding themselves after a loss. As a big fan of Travel YA, I was excited by the main character’s trip to New Delhi, and this one features a mother-daughter duo, which I always love to see. The setting is one of the book’s highlights, making for an immersive reading experience. I would recommend this to those looking for a heartwarming read with a compelling setting. Following the death of her a Full Review on The Candid Cover The Marvelous Mirza Girls by Sheba Karim is a story of two strong women finding themselves after a loss. As a big fan of Travel YA, I was excited by the main character’s trip to New Delhi, and this one features a mother-daughter duo, which I always love to see. The setting is one of the book’s highlights, making for an immersive reading experience. I would recommend this to those looking for a heartwarming read with a compelling setting. Following the death of her aunt, Noreen and her mother travel to India, hoping to overcome their grief. There, Noreen meets a cute local who shows her around New Delhi and helps her feel whole again. I’m a big fan of books about travel, and these aspects were a big win for me. I will say, I did find the plot a little thin, and at times, it lacks direction. However, the amusement of Noreen’s experiences mostly made up for this. ❀ LIKEABLE MAIN CHARACTER Noreen is a likeable main character, and she hopes to become a sitcom writer someday. I loved getting to read excerpts from her screenplays, and and she has such an engaging voice. However, I would have liked to see her character develop more throughout the story, besides falling in love. Noreen’s mother also plays a significant role in the book, and I really enjoyed reading about their support for each other. Parents are often absent in YA, so I appreciated this mother-daughter relationship being brought into the spotlight. ❀ VIVID SETTING One of the strongest parts of the book is its setting. Karim transports the reader to New Delhi, spotlighting delicious foods and local attractions to create an immersive reading experience. Current social issues like the #MeToo movement are also discussed. The entire atmosphere of New Delhi is vividly described, and I ultimately loved tagging along with Noreen as she and Kabir explore the city. ❀ A HEARTFELT STORY The Marvelous Mirza Girls by Sheba Karimis a heartfelt story of resilience and finding yourself after a loss. The main character has a compelling voice, and I loved the mother-daughter relationship at the centre of the story. I especially enjoyed the New Delhi setting. Fans of the Travel YA genre will not want to miss this one.

  5. 4 out of 5

    Starr ❇✌❇

    I received an ARC from Edelweiss TW: religious prejudice & hate crimes, mentioned pedophilia, talk of sexual assault, mentioned kidnapping 3 Noreen and her mother are both grieving the loss of Sonia, her mother's sister. The opportunity to temporarily relocate to New Dehli might be exactly what they both need to find their way again- and maybe even find love. As Noreen reminisces about her aunt, starts a new relationship, and struggles with writer's block & self doubt in her writing, she also h I received an ARC from Edelweiss TW: religious prejudice & hate crimes, mentioned pedophilia, talk of sexual assault, mentioned kidnapping 3 Noreen and her mother are both grieving the loss of Sonia, her mother's sister. The opportunity to temporarily relocate to New Dehli might be exactly what they both need to find their way again- and maybe even find love. As Noreen reminisces about her aunt, starts a new relationship, and struggles with writer's block & self doubt in her writing, she also has to navigate a new country and the complications of family letting you down. Travel YA is its own special category, usually involving love and a lot of character growth (and tourism), and I was excited to see it find its way in New Dehli. As I've never been there, I can't say how realistic the portrayal was, but the cultural aspects made it for me, and the descriptions felt real. Besides the culture, I appreciated the addition of some social justice. There are a few moments in this book about politics and protests, which made it feel less just mundane teenage life, and there's a large portion that talks about the MeToo movement. While I do think that could have been handled in a more powerful way, since it wasn't the focal point of the story I'm just glad it was there at all, to give it some more depth. I also was happy to see a nice, pretty healthy family dynamic. Noreen and her mother get along well, and her mother's best friend, who should also count as family, is a fun character who makes their trio feel genuine. The grandparents are more complicated, but not in a toxic way, and honestly when it comes to Indian representation it's just nice to see something that doesn't fall into toxicity in family life. The writing isn't bad and there are some funny parts. While I personally had no connection to Noreen I can see some people really loving her. And there's enough feminism outright for it do a little good. The problem is, mostly this story is just... nothing. There are plot points, obviously, but they just follow Noreen living in New Dehli, and her boyfriend's reaction to allegations against his dad, and nothing ever comes to a head or get done. There isn't much character development, the one big character development moment for Noreen doesn't show a resolution on page, and beyond the grieving Noreen's whole story revolves around a romance that is not only not compelling but feels completely unrealistic. Oh, and Noreen messing up her relationship and then mentally going "I'm messing up my relationship! I have father issues!!" and then that never coming to a head either. It's also not a big thing on page, but I was surprised and disappointed by the casual deadnaming of Caitlyn Jenner, which left a bad taste in my mouth. I think if you want a light, just character driven novel about New Dehli then you may like this one. But if you're here for story or development of any kind, then it's not going to be for you.

  6. 4 out of 5

    bookwormbullet

    This was an interesting book. I really liked following Noreen along in India as she explored Delhi. I’ve never been to Delhi specifically so it was really cool to learn about the city while also still being able to relate to the general theme of visiting India as an Indian-American. I also loved learning about the Mughal influences in Delhi’s culture, architecture, etc. As a whole, I think this book did a decent job of highlighting how multicultural India is. I think the main thing I didn’t like This was an interesting book. I really liked following Noreen along in India as she explored Delhi. I’ve never been to Delhi specifically so it was really cool to learn about the city while also still being able to relate to the general theme of visiting India as an Indian-American. I also loved learning about the Mughal influences in Delhi’s culture, architecture, etc. As a whole, I think this book did a decent job of highlighting how multicultural India is. I think the main thing I didn’t like about the book was Noreen’s character development and her relationships with the characters around her. Both Noreen and her mom travel to India in order to properly grieve for the death of Noreen’s aunt/her mother’s sister, and while that did happen by the end of the book, it seemed like all the other random events that were occurring while Noreen was in India were detracting from this main journey. I also found all the commentary about social justice and socio-economic issues in India a little superficial. There were moments where Noreen would point out an example of inequality among different classes or races in India, yet there wasn’t anything that came out of her pointing out the problem. She would just mention it and then move on with her life with an “Oh well, I can’t do anything about that” attitude, which was not helpful at all. Not to mention the lowkey neutral perspective Kabir and other characters in the book had regarding the #MeToo movement. It felt insulting, to be honest. Noreen’s relationship with her mother was also a little strange. It definitely didn’t remind me of a relationship that I and other second generation Indian-Americans have with our mothers, so I wonder if Noreen’s mom was second-generation herself. (Side note, I didn’t understand why Noreen’s mother was referred to by her first name throughout the book--it was definitely confusing.) Overall, Noreen’s mom felt quite irresponsible throughout the book and honestly didn’t seem like the best role model for Noreen so I wasn’t a fan of their relationship. I did appreciate how she was there for Noreen when she was seeking advice or support throughout their time in Delhi. I was also very thrown off that this book had so many mature themes. Even though this book is marketed as YA, I would definitely recommend this to older YA readers ages 16+. There were several fairly explicit (at least for YA) descriptions/scenes that really caught me off guard. I was also uncomfortable with the fact that Noreen and Kabir were together in this book considering that Noreen had just graduated high school and Kabir was 24 years old. Overall, I’d give this book 3.5 stars!

  7. 5 out of 5

    Erin

    3.5 Stars Note: I was provided with a free ARC by Quill Tree Books through Netgalley in exchange for an honest review. All opinions here are my own. The Marvelous Mirza Girls is definitely an acquired taste, and though it wasn't quite to my particular liking, it has its strengths. The Gilmore Girls inspiration is strong in both the relationship of Noreen and her mother and the witty banter they engage in throughout the book. And love for Delhi, both the good and the bad, comes through very strong 3.5 Stars Note: I was provided with a free ARC by Quill Tree Books through Netgalley in exchange for an honest review. All opinions here are my own. The Marvelous Mirza Girls is definitely an acquired taste, and though it wasn't quite to my particular liking, it has its strengths. The Gilmore Girls inspiration is strong in both the relationship of Noreen and her mother and the witty banter they engage in throughout the book. And love for Delhi, both the good and the bad, comes through very strongly--what a great backdrop to a coming-of-age story! A complete review of the pros and cons of this book will be published on my blog in February 2021. LINK: https://gatewaybookreviews.blogspot.c...

  8. 4 out of 5

    Vaish -bookishbelle1008

    When I first saw the cover for this book and read the blurb, I was completely in love! Having finally had a chance to get my hands on and read the book in a few hours, I was shocked at how quickly this book became boring and flat. The first half completely captures you, introducing you to Noreen's grief and her wish to embark on a journey to India so she may find closure. It felt like Karim packed all the strong points of the story e.g. meeting Kabir, sightseeing, her mother finding romance etc. When I first saw the cover for this book and read the blurb, I was completely in love! Having finally had a chance to get my hands on and read the book in a few hours, I was shocked at how quickly this book became boring and flat. The first half completely captures you, introducing you to Noreen's grief and her wish to embark on a journey to India so she may find closure. It felt like Karim packed all the strong points of the story e.g. meeting Kabir, sightseeing, her mother finding romance etc. in the first half, hence the second felt like she had to tie the loose ends and bring the book to a close. Keeping in mind the title of the book, one would think that the story would focus on Noreen and her mother, Ruby's, personal growth and relationship development, but the plot quickly moves away from them and focuses on all the side characters we are introduced to in bits and pieces. I also struggled to connect with Ruby as I found her personality and behavioural traits unbelievable and a cringe worthy effort to seem cool. The one thing that I could appreciate about this book was that it felt like a love letter to Delhi as Karim entices the reader with the various sights, smells and sounds that Delhi has to offer. Growing up, I always used to visit my mother's house in India, which is Delhi and hence I like to think of myself as a bit of a Delhi girl and this book brought back such wonderful memories of my time spent there. This was a read that had so much potential and really fell flat because of the lack of character development and strength in the storyline.

  9. 5 out of 5

    Hannah

    Soooo many things to love! Stay tuned for a Hey YA episode ;-)

  10. 5 out of 5

    Diya

    i'm undecided on what rating I should give but the bottom line is that i can not recommend at all i'm undecided on what rating I should give but the bottom line is that i can not recommend at all

  11. 5 out of 5

    Under the Covers Book Blog

    Noreen travels with her mom to New Delhi on a gap year. Feeling slumpy after her senior year of high school and the death of her aunt, this adventure seems like the perfect opportunity to reignite her life’s purpose. There are several things worth mentioning about this book. The setting If you want a book that will hit that wanderlust bug in you and transport you to India, this is the book for you. The setting and culture felt so vibrant I could almost taste it. This was certainly my favorite p Noreen travels with her mom to New Delhi on a gap year. Feeling slumpy after her senior year of high school and the death of her aunt, this adventure seems like the perfect opportunity to reignite her life’s purpose. There are several things worth mentioning about this book. The setting If you want a book that will hit that wanderlust bug in you and transport you to India, this is the book for you. The setting and culture felt so vibrant I could almost taste it. This was certainly my favorite part of this book. Noreem is exploring the city with Kabir, a boy she meets upon arrival and of course starts falling for. Getting to see some of the sights through Kabir’s eyes and perspective was also nice because it added depth to the locations they were visiting. The romance Yes, there is a romance throughout the book and honestly it was a bit insta lovey and felt like it lacked connection. But it wasn’t something that made me think twice about my enjoyment of the book. It was just there. A bit forgettable. The family Specifically here I want to talk about the importance of the mother/daughter relationship in this book. I often found their relationship a bit odd, especially when I compare it to the experience of first generation Indian that I know. At times, Noreem’s mom felt a bit immature herself. But I think that there was growth there in the relationship and it was good to see her be there for her daughter when she needed to be. The social issues I feel like a lot of very important topics are mentioned in this book, but at the same time they are not addressed in any deep way. Everything felt really superficial and without the proper handling and resolution. From MeToo to racism, casteism, discrimination. It would’ve been better to narrow these down to only tackle one but do it justice. The plot Actual plot, I mean, there wasn’t much of one? It felt like in the end there was a whole lot of nothing really going on. It’s a mix of scenes that delve into the topics I highlighted above but very little in the character growth or finding oneself as a journey or discovery that I was expecting going in. Overall, I’m glad I picked this one up. It was a very fast and enjoyable read and a great cultural experience. Reviewed by Francesca ❤ ♡ Don't want to miss any of our posts? Subscribe to our blog by email! ♡ ❤

  12. 4 out of 5

    Punkelevenn

    A very enjoyable read! Definitely true GILMORE GIRLS meets NEW DELHI vibes. I felt like a fly on the wall hearing the mother/daughter conversations, in the best way, up to Ruby (the mom) saying what type of mother she wanted to be, able to have a conversation with her daughter, unlike her own relationship with her mother. The lush setting was definitely the best part for me, the romance was sweet, there were some subjects the author tried to handle (ie #metoo, feminism) which were realistic but A very enjoyable read! Definitely true GILMORE GIRLS meets NEW DELHI vibes. I felt like a fly on the wall hearing the mother/daughter conversations, in the best way, up to Ruby (the mom) saying what type of mother she wanted to be, able to have a conversation with her daughter, unlike her own relationship with her mother. The lush setting was definitely the best part for me, the romance was sweet, there were some subjects the author tried to handle (ie #metoo, feminism) which were realistic but perhaps not given the satisfying ending I wanted from a story. Overall, Noreen is a likable character with an enviably open relationship to her mom, whose voice at times reads young but is definitely coming into her own as an adult. And the cover art...stunning!

  13. 5 out of 5

    Sami Kay

    Such a charming novel. I really enjoyed it; normally I would complain that there wasn't a whole lot of plot, but I think that's one of the things that I actually liked about it. It's rare. I only gave it four stars (4.25/5) because for a book that focuses on women's issues, I feel like a lot of the other female characters are not presented as friends for Noreen. She kind of looks at them as competition and it would have been nice for her to not only to fall in love in India, but to have a really Such a charming novel. I really enjoyed it; normally I would complain that there wasn't a whole lot of plot, but I think that's one of the things that I actually liked about it. It's rare. I only gave it four stars (4.25/5) because for a book that focuses on women's issues, I feel like a lot of the other female characters are not presented as friends for Noreen. She kind of looks at them as competition and it would have been nice for her to not only to fall in love in India, but to have a really solid female friendship. But yeah, I recommend this for sure. It's wonderful! It kind of reminds me of Gilmore Girls, but in Delhi.

  14. 4 out of 5

    Jen Ryland

    I'm always a Sheba Karim fan - her books aren't plot heavy, think more like an indie movie than a Hollywood film. This book was a lovely meditation on grief, a celebration of family a critique of rape culture/sexual harassment, plus a wonderful travelogue. Blog review soon! I'm always a Sheba Karim fan - her books aren't plot heavy, think more like an indie movie than a Hollywood film. This book was a lovely meditation on grief, a celebration of family a critique of rape culture/sexual harassment, plus a wonderful travelogue. Blog review soon!

  15. 5 out of 5

    allieereads

    3.5 stars. This book started off so strong and then lost focus in the second half. Slightly disappointing. The second half is consumed with the romance element and everything else was left to the side.

  16. 5 out of 5

    Trigger Warning Database

    Trigger & Content Warnings Hate crimes Sexual assault & paedophilia mentioned Kidnapping mentioned

  17. 5 out of 5

    USOM

    (Disclaimer: I received this book from the publisher. This has not impacted my review which is unbiased and honest.) The Marvelous Mizra Girls begins with loss. Of how we try to find ways to escape the pain inside our heart. I am a huge fan of mother/daughter relationships and the one Noreen has with her other has a tenderness, a casuallness, and a feeling of them versus the world. While they may not be each other's best friend, they are certainly confidants who share heartbreak and frustration (Disclaimer: I received this book from the publisher. This has not impacted my review which is unbiased and honest.) The Marvelous Mizra Girls begins with loss. Of how we try to find ways to escape the pain inside our heart. I am a huge fan of mother/daughter relationships and the one Noreen has with her other has a tenderness, a casuallness, and a feeling of them versus the world. While they may not be each other's best friend, they are certainly confidants who share heartbreak and frustrations. Noreen's narrative voice was frank and incredibly unique. It felt like she was talking to you in a conversation. This made the book, especially her internal passages, extremely easy to become absorbed in. Additionally, I enjoyed the romance element because it felt incredibly cute. A love that grapples with distance, disillusionment, and discovery. Yet I felt a bit frustrated by Noreen's character development. There's nothing wrong with a charming romance storyline, but I felt like in some ways The Marvelous Miza Girls was trying to tell a story about Noreen's grief and self-discovery. I felt that, on a few fronts, her character development felt shallow and more focused on the romance plot line. I do love a good romance book, I just felt like if Karim was also trying to tell a story of self-discovery, there had been some more depth for Noreen. full review; https://utopia-state-of-mind.com/revi...

  18. 4 out of 5

    Ami

    While I enjoyed many aspects of this book, the mother /daughter relationship ( which many might actually admire), bothered me. At one point, Noreen said her relationship with her mother was not like the Gilmore Girls. They didn’t need to be best friends. However, I found the relationship between Noreen and Ruby much more shocking and slightly irresponsible. The book itself was interesting and I learned a lot about Delhi. There isn’t a big plot, but still enjoyable.

  19. 5 out of 5

    Rachel

    3 ⭐️s. The book began in a promising manner, but took an annoying, culturally cliched turn. First, to sum up this book in a line: it is about a girl who goes to India and gets in a relationship with a boy that will only last 9 months because she is returning to the US. That is all. So if you are in to seeing what their bland relationship is like, read the book. There were some things that I absolutely loved, some things that made me cringe, and others that made me roll my eyes because they could 3 ⭐️s. The book began in a promising manner, but took an annoying, culturally cliched turn. First, to sum up this book in a line: it is about a girl who goes to India and gets in a relationship with a boy that will only last 9 months because she is returning to the US. That is all. So if you are in to seeing what their bland relationship is like, read the book. There were some things that I absolutely loved, some things that made me cringe, and others that made me roll my eyes because they could have been done so much better. First, I thought the book was excellent in the beginning. I loved getting to know more about the Indian culture, and there are so many similarities that I recognize between Delhi and living in a big city in Mexico that I was totally drinking it up and chuckling a lot. The writing was so easy to read and pleasant. I also loved how the author was focusing on an important group of people - first generation kids who are American born and have a culture from another country and the confusion that they can feel going to the country of their roots and looking like a native but not being quite like those natives. As a mom of American born Mexican children, I so love seeing that representation (even though they are too young to read this - ha!). I also loved hearing about some real issues in India and found the clash of religions an important thing to highlight. The negatives: A huge focus in this book is the #metoo movement. This would be an excellent topic to highlight in the book if it had not piggybacked on the redundant hashtag. If we had seen some things happening and then seen the response in characters, it would have been way more impactful. Instead, the reader feels like they are reading a Facebook newsfeed of #metoo (honestly, it’s super disconnected and overdone) and newspaper headlines for a quarter of the book. Okay, we get it’s a problem, but let’s stop reading headlines and actually see things happening and how they negatively affect women in their day to day life (and Im talking about more than just a side comment by a supporting character that just sounds like a #metoo hashtag). And if we are worried about MeToo, why don’t we get a glimpse in to the issues with the cast system. I loved hearing about a woman who is a house cleaner who wouldn’t clean a bathroom because she was not that low of a cast. Let’s see some action there. Let’s see some equality. The contrast with having a main theme be MeToo and then not address more human rights issues seems off. It seemed like the author accepted this as a fine cultural point to just sweep under the rug and accept. Going along with my MeToo annoyance would be Kabir’s reaction to being involved with MeToo. He mopes around and makes himself be a victim. Gross. Kabir started off pretty endearing with his love for history, and showing Noreen around town, but by mid book I was so annoyed with him. (Tangent, it was also annoying how Noreen and Kabir were getting to know each other and be interested in each other, and then the book literally skips over like 6 months). My other huge complaint has to deal with the fact that I found this book in the teen section at my library. It is a horrible book for teens, in my opinion. Noreen is 18, just graduated from HIGH SCHOOL and Kabir is 24. That is eyebrow raising. But what is worse is that Noreen basically starts living with Kabir in a hovel; her mom has no problem with this. The mom-daughter relationship is disturbing in that she doesn’t care that her daughter is doing this. Her mom gives her blessing to have her boyfriend over to the house for sex (while she’s there) and she also has a guy spend the weekend for sex. And then they are all eating breakfast together. It is so weird. Not to mention a disturbing inclusion about Noreen’s first love affair which plainly stated it involved her having sex all summer... and she had to have been just finishing junior year in high school. That is a little unnecessary and adult and awkward for how the book begins rather sweetly (and I guess deceptively). I get having the overbearing parents and rebeling from that. But at least have some pride. The other disappointing (and once again, weird) inclusion was Noreen drinking and being around lots of drugs, and her boyfriend living that life. He honestly starting sounding like a bum (stopped pursuing his career - so what in the world did he do to make money? Or was his living off his parents’ money, making him a true 24 year old loser?). AND Noreen’s mom smoking joints. It does not align! She is a professional and she’s smoking joints?! What kind of message does that send to teens? “Having sex, doing drugs, and being laissez-faire about it is no big deal! You can live a great, normal life with no consequences and still get a professional job! But, watch out for that MeToo movement!” The three stars because I loved all the Indian culture. And I finished the book (I almost tossed it aside at 75% done). But I do not recommend, unless you just want to read the beginning.

  20. 4 out of 5

    Sneeha

    Rating: 3/5 ☀️ You can also find this review on my blog. Happy birthday to The Marvelous Mirza Girls! This really was a rich experience of a book. Its exploration of grief was beautiful, and it was genuinely funny and sexy and unfiltered in the best of ways. As someone who is desi, reading this from the perspective of a girl who is in the South Asian diaspora visiting India made it so very relatable. First of all, I haven’t visited India since my age was in the single digits, but this brought back Rating: 3/5 ☀️ You can also find this review on my blog. Happy birthday to The Marvelous Mirza Girls! This really was a rich experience of a book. Its exploration of grief was beautiful, and it was genuinely funny and sexy and unfiltered in the best of ways. As someone who is desi, reading this from the perspective of a girl who is in the South Asian diaspora visiting India made it so very relatable. First of all, I haven’t visited India since my age was in the single digits, but this brought back so many memories. Like how obsessed people are about “motions” or things like Indian English. And I loved all the history and traveling through the ruins. I really do appreciate how the author makes a point of how India is not there to be some sort of plot device. It isn’t a stepping stone for Noreen to find herself and her spirituality, but it is a real place with people who live full social and political lives. At the same time, there are issues and injustices, and the book doesn’t shy away from being honest about that. Yet Noreen is a spectator for much of it, and not some sort of neocolonial savior, and the narrative was really aware of her place. And overall, I loved how the book does not slow down to explain or justify itself to white audiences – it is unapologetically written for desi people. And Noreen was just such an amazing character and voice throughout. I loved her writing and her little metaphors, like dancing with a limp or the lotuses. I loved how she was a hopeless romantic. And I loved how she was dealing with her grief, and her relationship with Ruby and how she retroactively remembers her time with Sonia. That initial memory with Sharlene at the car dealership was probably my favorite scene in the whole book. However, I found most of the book to be really underwhelming. It felt like things were sort of happening, but there was no overarching plot or conflict or story to it. The romance was straightforward, Kabir was a good guy all the time, and there generally was not much that Noreen was active about. It was just one event after another and she was just experiencing it, and some things happened to be more exciting than others. It felt true to life in a way, but also it was not what I would want from a novel. I got the sense that the author was riffing off sitcoms, and chapters followed episodes and small story arcs and subplots, but it just didn’t work in book form. I found myself skimming the second half, which was a shame because I really did enjoy most of the characters. Overall, it was a beautiful journey, but there was quite a bit to be desired. At least the characters and relationships were so endearing and fresh, and I felt a lot for them throughout. Thank you to the author and NetGalley for an ARC of this book for an unbiased review.

  21. 5 out of 5

    Book_Pie

    The Marvelous Mirza Girls is a beautiful mix of grief, love, family, and healing. After her aunt’s death, Noreen Mirza uses her mother’s upcoming long-term work trip to New Delhi as a way of coping. Following her roots back to India proves to be harder than expected until she meets the dashing Kabir. This book is definitely a love story, but it is much more than that too. India, and Kabir with it, helps Noreen and her mother heal and become better people in the process. This is a love story, but The Marvelous Mirza Girls is a beautiful mix of grief, love, family, and healing. After her aunt’s death, Noreen Mirza uses her mother’s upcoming long-term work trip to New Delhi as a way of coping. Following her roots back to India proves to be harder than expected until she meets the dashing Kabir. This book is definitely a love story, but it is much more than that too. India, and Kabir with it, helps Noreen and her mother heal and become better people in the process. This is a love story, but also a coming of age story. This book is about following your heart and the power that a place and the people of that place can have on someone. Overall, I think the story this book tells is beautiful. I do have a few problems with how it was told though. My biggest problem with this book is that there is SO much TMI. Like, girl, believe it or not, I actually don’t need to know what your vagina smells like. So yeah, this book made me uncomfortable at times. I am assuming the author was going for relatable, but I was just wanting the scene to be over. Anywho, I do enjoy the realism this story offers. I’m not meaning the overly-personal crotch details from the main character, but more the unsugar-coated look at racism, sexism, and poverty in the world, specifically India. The majority of the time when you are reading about a country that is often only known in the west for it’s issues, you miss the utter goodness the place has to offer. Every country has good and bad aspects, but there are some where the bad is shown more often. India is definitely one of these places. This is doubtlessly the western media’s fault. That is why I loved reading about India from the perspective of Noreen. The Marvelous Mirza Girls doesn’t hide the problems India has, especially with poverty, but it also doesn’t hide the beauty of India that is so often ignored in the media. No place is perfect, but no place is purely bad either and this book shows that. I wouldn’t say I loved this book, just because it’s rare for a rom-com to be my cup of tea. But as far as heterosexual rom-coms go (what can I say… sometimes the Hets™make me uncomfortable - straight sex is weird y’all), this one is pretty great. Warnings: sex, language, and drug/alcohol use

  22. 4 out of 5

    Lopa

    The reason this book caught my attention is because the main character has the same name as my friend Noreen Mirza (She wrote a book herself so go check it out!). Then once I learned more about it, I was expecting it to be like Gilmore Girls but with desi girls in India and since I'm a HUGE Gilmore Girls fan I was excited to read this. The book was just ok. 2.5 stars. There are things I did like about it! One of my pet peeves about YA books by desi authors is that they usually have the same theme The reason this book caught my attention is because the main character has the same name as my friend Noreen Mirza (She wrote a book herself so go check it out!). Then once I learned more about it, I was expecting it to be like Gilmore Girls but with desi girls in India and since I'm a HUGE Gilmore Girls fan I was excited to read this. The book was just ok. 2.5 stars. There are things I did like about it! One of my pet peeves about YA books by desi authors is that they usually have the same theme, a child of conservative parents who do not want them to date and when they do especially if it's someone of a different ethnicity or of the same sex, it causes issues. This story was NOT that! I liked that Noreen was the child of a first gen American and that Ruby was probably more like me and my friends who were born in or grew up in America. I liked the tiny bits of activism thrown in there and wish there was more. I liked that they mentioned the eastern Indian states like Manipur and how they tend to be forgotten when talking about India. I liked the first half of the book where Noreen was discovering Delhi. I liked that they showed a modern India and what a lot of modern day young adults are like now that don't fall into the stereotypical bucket. The Me Too stuff just felt thrown in there to make it relevant to our current times but then wasn't fleshed out enough. Noreen wanted to be a stand up comic but did I miss where she was funny? They talk about her doing a stand up show but then don't actually show what she says. The second half of the book just dragged for me and I was just waiting for it to be over. It also felt like the author was just a big Amy Sherman Palladino fan who tried to do a mashup of Gilmore Girls and The Marvelous Mrs. Maizel but didn't quite get there. I was a little disappointed because I had high hopes for this one.

  23. 5 out of 5

    pri

    Hmm. So I’m not even a 3rd of the way thru yet. It’s interesting. Or maybe I’m starved for some representation. The familiarity of some scenes is making me nostalgic. I’m already finding a few issues tho. One is the thing about air quality. It’s bad. Ik it’s bad. But it’s not as bad as this book is making it out to be. I’ve lived in India for months. Delhi where this book is set. There isn’t constant smog and all like this book is saying. And I particularly hate how each chapter in India starts Hmm. So I’m not even a 3rd of the way thru yet. It’s interesting. Or maybe I’m starved for some representation. The familiarity of some scenes is making me nostalgic. I’m already finding a few issues tho. One is the thing about air quality. It’s bad. Ik it’s bad. But it’s not as bad as this book is making it out to be. I’ve lived in India for months. Delhi where this book is set. There isn’t constant smog and all like this book is saying. And I particularly hate how each chapter in India starts off with an air quality index rating. Like “very unhealthy”. And the stereotypes as well are cringy. Like the one where all Indians are constantly late. Edit 1 It’s interesting how despite being brown herself the MC clearly finds other brown people exotic. You can tell from her descriptions of Kabir. Edit 2 Okay lmao you don’t eat mangos “desi style”. There is a certain cultivar of mango grown commonly in India that can be eaten by making a hole and sucking. You can’t do this with all mangos. Obviously Edit 3 His Nani is Muslim and rest of grandparents are Hindu? Wow. Just to be clear I don’t have anything against that. In fact I would love such a perfect interaction as it seems to be. But does the author understand the true situation and the kinds of humiliation and seclusion such a relationship would face, if it were even allowed to happen in real life India/Pakistan? Edit 3.5 Okay. Lmao. You don’t just randomly see elephants in the streets. Cows yes. Elephants. No Edit 4 I’ve ridden air India before. Multiple times. It’s not a khatara like this book is making it out to be. And it’s very interesting to see that the “Western type” mother Ruby is shown as a very good parent whereas Kabir’s raised in India parents are only self obsessed Unconscious biases I don’t know what the point of this book is and I don’t like it anyway. Dnf at 30%

  24. 4 out of 5

    Magaly C.

    E-ARC provided by NetGalley. Noreen is 18 and a fresh high school graduate. College awaits, which should be an exciting chapter in her life. Her family, however, is still reeling from the death of Aunt Sonia. When her mom gets an opportunity to move to New Delhi for a work project, Noreen takes that as an opportunity for a gap year and, unexpectedly, finds herself learning more about her Aunt Sonia and overcoming grief when she meets the handsome Kabir. Kabir and Noreen must face the reality of E-ARC provided by NetGalley. Noreen is 18 and a fresh high school graduate. College awaits, which should be an exciting chapter in her life. Her family, however, is still reeling from the death of Aunt Sonia. When her mom gets an opportunity to move to New Delhi for a work project, Noreen takes that as an opportunity for a gap year and, unexpectedly, finds herself learning more about her Aunt Sonia and overcoming grief when she meets the handsome Kabir. Kabir and Noreen must face the reality of family and the limited time they have together as Noreen's year in India inches its way to an end. This was a character-driven narrative where we learn about the relationship Noreen has with her mother and Kabir. Unfortunately, I was not a fan of the characters :-/ Noreen seemed young and insecure in her relationship with Kabir, Noreen and her mom had no real boundaries (which is fine, but it just seemed like they were facets of one character), and I was more interested in Noreen's self-exploration of grief and/or writing. Kabir was too perfect and their relationship chemistry felt one-sided. A lot of the action happens "off-stage," for example, the climax of Noreen's grief, Noreen doing stand-up (which also felt like a weird left-turn), and the conflict of Kabir's family. There are a lot of Gilmore Girls references, which was always fun to spot like movie easter eggs. 2.5 stars, rounded to 3 because I love reading about different settings and Sheba Karim creates a lovely backdrop for this story of relationships between mother and daughter, new love, and grief. For folks who love character-driven novels, this will be great!

  25. 4 out of 5

    Jennifer Willoughby

    Thank you to NetGalley and Quill Tree Books for the digital ARC of this book. This book is from the perspective of Noreen Mirza, an 18 year old Desi (the term used in the book) girl living in America. While it is classified as YA, this book is more appropriate for older teens and adults. While this book is a traditional love story, two young people meet and fall in love, it is also a love story on many other levels. It is a love story between a single mother and her adult daughter. It is a love s Thank you to NetGalley and Quill Tree Books for the digital ARC of this book. This book is from the perspective of Noreen Mirza, an 18 year old Desi (the term used in the book) girl living in America. While it is classified as YA, this book is more appropriate for older teens and adults. While this book is a traditional love story, two young people meet and fall in love, it is also a love story on many other levels. It is a love story between a single mother and her adult daughter. It is a love story between a family and a lost loved one. It is a love story between an Indian American and India. To complement these various themes of love, the author places the reader into the heart of upper-middle-class Indian culture and introduces us to different Delhi-based historical sites. Being able to look up these sites, most originating in the 14th century, as I read the book added to the rich experience of reading. This book also notes the issues of living in a city of over 31 million. It touches on poverty and the hazards of living a daily life with poor air quality. The themes of the #MeToo movement in India play a peripheral role in the story, though they are not central and could have been left out entirely. The highlight is the scenes that take place at the heritage sites. This was a sweet read and I truly enjoyed it.

  26. 5 out of 5

    Caitie

    This started off really strong for me, I would've given it a higher rating but there were just some things that I didn't like. I kept falling out of the story because it was told in third person, I didn't feel connected to Noreen because I felt that Noreen herself wasn't telling us (the reader) her own story. Because it wasn't in the first person, the book felt like "Noreen said this and Noreen did this." Also, I felt like everything happened so fast! Noreen was taking a gap year and suddenly sh This started off really strong for me, I would've given it a higher rating but there were just some things that I didn't like. I kept falling out of the story because it was told in third person, I didn't feel connected to Noreen because I felt that Noreen herself wasn't telling us (the reader) her own story. Because it wasn't in the first person, the book felt like "Noreen said this and Noreen did this." Also, I felt like everything happened so fast! Noreen was taking a gap year and suddenly she and her mother are spending the year in India. Which would have been fine, except I just felt like it was kind of sudden. I didn't get a true sense of why they were going there....spur of the moment decision. Noreen got money for her high school graduation and then bam--let's travel somewhere. Noreen also felt victim to instalove with Kabir, all of a sudden she was in love with this guy. I don't know, this just wasn't for me. I really wanted to like this, because the synopsis sound like something I'd enjoy. But the writing was just too choppy and the plot dragged quite a few times.

  27. 5 out of 5

    Shreshtha

    This book was so fun! It's kind of a Gilmore Girls meets Bollywood Realism meets YA coming-of-age book. The Marvelous Mirza Girls is told from the perspective of Noreen, an 18 year old who takes a gap year between high school and college in order to travel to India with her mom. Her mom is a single Indian Muslim woman who has raised Noreen with no support from her biological father, and the growth of their relationship with each other is one of the big themes in this book. The book also explores This book was so fun! It's kind of a Gilmore Girls meets Bollywood Realism meets YA coming-of-age book. The Marvelous Mirza Girls is told from the perspective of Noreen, an 18 year old who takes a gap year between high school and college in order to travel to India with her mom. Her mom is a single Indian Muslim woman who has raised Noreen with no support from her biological father, and the growth of their relationship with each other is one of the big themes in this book. The book also explores the relationship Noreen has with her culture, the men she dates and those that they mother dates, the friendships they cultivate, and the identities they hold. Noreen spends most of the book also overcoming her grief about the loss of her maternal aunt. There is a lot that happens in this story, but Sheba Karim writes in a way that it all flows together, and you aren't left confused about the plot lines. As an immigrant from India myself, the depiction of India felt very honest and appropriate - the book really does transport you to Delhi. I loved it and would definitely read more by this author!

  28. 5 out of 5

    Andrea Wenger

    This is the story of American Desi teen Noreen's gap year trip to New Delhi with her mother. There, Noreen meets handsome Kabir, who acts as sort of a travel guide.. They soon become lovers, and he helps her connect with parts of herself that she lost in her grief over her aunt's death. This book is best approached as a travel adventure and spiritual journey. It doesn't have a structured plot. It's not for everyone, and it's definitely not for anyone under 17. It deals with serious issues in a c This is the story of American Desi teen Noreen's gap year trip to New Delhi with her mother. There, Noreen meets handsome Kabir, who acts as sort of a travel guide.. They soon become lovers, and he helps her connect with parts of herself that she lost in her grief over her aunt's death. This book is best approached as a travel adventure and spiritual journey. It doesn't have a structured plot. It's not for everyone, and it's definitely not for anyone under 17. It deals with serious issues in a cursory way, and as a woman, it felt like one microaggression after another. (Which I think is the point.) I think it would be a lot for sensitive teen female readers. Yet there's also a lot of beauty in this book, in the search for joy and meaning. The author does a wonderful job of immersing readers in the richly detailed setting. Noreen is both an outsider and an insider, and her unique perspective informs the story. Thanks, NetGalley, for the ARC I received. This is my honest and voluntary review.

  29. 4 out of 5

    Shyleen

    First of all, thank you to NetGalley and Quill Tree Books for providing me with an ARC. This book follows Noreen after she finishes up her senior year of high school. Following the loss of her aunt Sonia, Noreen decides to take a gap year and spend some time in India with her mother. While she's there she meets Kabir, who helps her navigate her way through the trip. The beginning of the book was promising, but as the book went on I started to lose interest and struggled through the second half. Th First of all, thank you to NetGalley and Quill Tree Books for providing me with an ARC. This book follows Noreen after she finishes up her senior year of high school. Following the loss of her aunt Sonia, Noreen decides to take a gap year and spend some time in India with her mother. While she's there she meets Kabir, who helps her navigate her way through the trip. The beginning of the book was promising, but as the book went on I started to lose interest and struggled through the second half. The writing style was very hard to get into because it was mostly just descriptions of things. There also wasn't a distinctive plot, it was mainly describing her atmosphere and nothing else was really happening. Also, by the end of the book it felt like Noreen didn't go through any character development. The only thing that changed was that she fell in love. I was excited to read this book but it did not live up to my expectations.

  30. 5 out of 5

    Lala~

    Thank you for the ARC provided by the publisher through NetGalley. 3.5 stars This book was okay. It didn't really feel like YA even though it was advertised as such. And it wasn't a Muslim rep I expected it to be, but I think that was my own misguided expectations. I liked the writing and it gripped me right from the first page. The first half of the book was very atmospheric, the writing made it easy to imagine all the scenery being described, and bring New Delhi alive for the audience. The second Thank you for the ARC provided by the publisher through NetGalley. 3.5 stars This book was okay. It didn't really feel like YA even though it was advertised as such. And it wasn't a Muslim rep I expected it to be, but I think that was my own misguided expectations. I liked the writing and it gripped me right from the first page. The first half of the book was very atmospheric, the writing made it easy to imagine all the scenery being described, and bring New Delhi alive for the audience. The second half was less gripping. The characters in the book, especially main ones, felt unrealistic and I didn't find any of them particularly likable to care a lot about them. I liked some other small things, like the little scripts Noreen wrote which were parallels of her own life.

Add a review

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

Loading...