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The Almanack of Naval Ravikant: A Guide to Wealth and Happiness

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Getting rich is not just about luck; happiness is not just a trait we are born with. These aspirations may seem out of reach, but building wealth and being happy are skills we can learn. So what are these skills, and how do we learn them? What are the principles that should guide our efforts? What does progress really look like? Naval Ravikant is an entrepreneur, philosopher Getting rich is not just about luck; happiness is not just a trait we are born with. These aspirations may seem out of reach, but building wealth and being happy are skills we can learn. So what are these skills, and how do we learn them? What are the principles that should guide our efforts? What does progress really look like? Naval Ravikant is an entrepreneur, philosopher, and investor who has captivated the world with his principles for building wealth and creating long-term happiness. The Almanack of Naval Ravikant is a collection of Naval's wisdom and experience from the last ten years, shared as a curation of his most insightful interviews and poignant reflections. This isn't a how-to book, or a step-by-step gimmick. Instead, through Naval's own words, you will learn how to walk your own unique path toward a happier, wealthier life.


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Getting rich is not just about luck; happiness is not just a trait we are born with. These aspirations may seem out of reach, but building wealth and being happy are skills we can learn. So what are these skills, and how do we learn them? What are the principles that should guide our efforts? What does progress really look like? Naval Ravikant is an entrepreneur, philosopher Getting rich is not just about luck; happiness is not just a trait we are born with. These aspirations may seem out of reach, but building wealth and being happy are skills we can learn. So what are these skills, and how do we learn them? What are the principles that should guide our efforts? What does progress really look like? Naval Ravikant is an entrepreneur, philosopher, and investor who has captivated the world with his principles for building wealth and creating long-term happiness. The Almanack of Naval Ravikant is a collection of Naval's wisdom and experience from the last ten years, shared as a curation of his most insightful interviews and poignant reflections. This isn't a how-to book, or a step-by-step gimmick. Instead, through Naval's own words, you will learn how to walk your own unique path toward a happier, wealthier life.

30 review for The Almanack of Naval Ravikant: A Guide to Wealth and Happiness

  1. 4 out of 5

    Zachariah Lewis

    I cannot believe how great this book is. I was familiar with Naval through Tools of Titans, but reading this showed that he is so much more than a few pages - no matter how well written - can capture. This book is bound to be a classic, and the fact that Eric and Naval collaborated to release this for FREE, is amazing. For more social proof, Tim Ferriss even broke his iron rule of No Forewords to write the foreword to this book. There is no excuse for not picking this book up. There is something I cannot believe how great this book is. I was familiar with Naval through Tools of Titans, but reading this showed that he is so much more than a few pages - no matter how well written - can capture. This book is bound to be a classic, and the fact that Eric and Naval collaborated to release this for FREE, is amazing. For more social proof, Tim Ferriss even broke his iron rule of No Forewords to write the foreword to this book. There is no excuse for not picking this book up. There is something in it for everyone, and it's worth reflecting over.

  2. 5 out of 5

    Atharva

    (The free version of this book is available online in pdf, mobi and epub file format). This might just be the best book I've read this year. Self-help as a genre is rightly derided these days,but this is more than that, it's pure wisdom. This book is a compilation of some of the best tweets by Naval Ravikant, including the famous 'How to get rich' tweetstorm from 2018, and includes extra commentary from Naval. He explains his ideas and the reasoning behind them in simple,lucid text and lays out his (The free version of this book is available online in pdf, mobi and epub file format). This might just be the best book I've read this year. Self-help as a genre is rightly derided these days,but this is more than that, it's pure wisdom. This book is a compilation of some of the best tweets by Naval Ravikant, including the famous 'How to get rich' tweetstorm from 2018, and includes extra commentary from Naval. He explains his ideas and the reasoning behind them in simple,lucid text and lays out his principles of generating wealth succintly. This book packs a LOT of ideas,so I'd recommend reading it more than once to fully understand them.

  3. 5 out of 5

    Krzysztof

    The content of this book is pure gold, 5 out of 5. I have some issues with editing and organizing the Naval's insights. I feel like it could've been much easier to read if there was more effort put into connecting and ordering them right. Web-version is full of typos, errors, and repetitions. Ebook versions seem to be a bit better (I switched half-way). Still, for every format, the structure of the book is chaotic and often feels disconnected. I know it is not supposed to be read back to back, bu The content of this book is pure gold, 5 out of 5. I have some issues with editing and organizing the Naval's insights. I feel like it could've been much easier to read if there was more effort put into connecting and ordering them right. Web-version is full of typos, errors, and repetitions. Ebook versions seem to be a bit better (I switched half-way). Still, for every format, the structure of the book is chaotic and often feels disconnected. I know it is not supposed to be read back to back, but individual chapters and even their named smaller parts are poorly constructed. I wish it would have been published on GitHub where a community can edit it, make it better, interlink themes, link external sources, add annotations, update it with new pieces of wisdom from Naval. This approach would make it a living thing, which seems more appropriate for the material and idea behind it.

  4. 5 out of 5

    Sebastian Gebski

    I'm not going to b*shit you, the life's philosophy of NR resonates with me a lot. Like 99% of cases. This book is nothing more or less, but the essence of this philosophy. Don't get me wrong - it's far less unique than one could think about: there are pieces of stoicism, entrepreneurial approach to the career, healthy approach to balance (in life, in general), praise for essentialism, etc. But Ravikant is a true master in getting to the point: expressing the quintessence of what he means in an ex I'm not going to b*shit you, the life's philosophy of NR resonates with me a lot. Like 99% of cases. This book is nothing more or less, but the essence of this philosophy. Don't get me wrong - it's far less unique than one could think about: there are pieces of stoicism, entrepreneurial approach to the career, healthy approach to balance (in life, in general), praise for essentialism, etc. But Ravikant is a true master in getting to the point: expressing the quintessence of what he means in an extremely convincing way, in the absolutely the fewest number of words possible. "The Almanack" is written by someone else (Eric Jorgenson), but he has managed to keep that advantage (and message) - that's a huge pro. What I liked most (about this book) was probably the chapter about happiness - it doesn't just present a neo-stoical approach but goes with NR's own definition I like A LOT (& I can identify myself with wholeheartedly). Another thing I love is NR's classification of luck - a simple but striking mental model that is definitely worth digesting on your own. Highly recommended.

  5. 4 out of 5

    Chitrak gangrade

    If you have been following Naval for the last year or so, there is nothing new here. All the concepts, once very novel and insightful, have been paraded enough on tech twitter with 100s of blogs and tweetstorms. If you are someone who has been remotely in this space and has been following content of shane parish, tim ferris et al, you have probably read all of this in some form of the other. If not, you can find a lot of good content here. Try the free pdf, if it works for you, maybe go for it t If you have been following Naval for the last year or so, there is nothing new here. All the concepts, once very novel and insightful, have been paraded enough on tech twitter with 100s of blogs and tweetstorms. If you are someone who has been remotely in this space and has been following content of shane parish, tim ferris et al, you have probably read all of this in some form of the other. If not, you can find a lot of good content here. Try the free pdf, if it works for you, maybe go for it then.

  6. 5 out of 5

    Jeremias

    From the broad category of "business/life self help" I feel this book is not very helpful. Naval has obviously made it, most the book is kind of jerking off to that. The practical content of the book is common sense: excercise, value your time, don't be asshole, collect wealth and so on. The most useful part is the book recommendation list at the end. From the broad category of "business/life self help" I feel this book is not very helpful. Naval has obviously made it, most the book is kind of jerking off to that. The practical content of the book is common sense: excercise, value your time, don't be asshole, collect wealth and so on. The most useful part is the book recommendation list at the end.

  7. 5 out of 5

    Justin Young

    For a 200+ page book, I took quite a while. I guess the best reason I have for this delay can be explained through Naval Ravikant's own words: "Reading a book isn't a race—the better the book, the more slowly it should be absorbed." Clearly, this was one of the "better" ones. With each page enlightening me with new insights, whether on wealth, business, meditation, or philosophy, my mind was left in awe at the amount of wisdom this guy has. Aside from being a great businessman, investor, and decisi For a 200+ page book, I took quite a while. I guess the best reason I have for this delay can be explained through Naval Ravikant's own words: "Reading a book isn't a race—the better the book, the more slowly it should be absorbed." Clearly, this was one of the "better" ones. With each page enlightening me with new insights, whether on wealth, business, meditation, or philosophy, my mind was left in awe at the amount of wisdom this guy has. Aside from being a great businessman, investor, and decision-maker, he also has an admirable outlook on life, which he shares with the reader. After years of experience, he eventually learned that things like success or happiness are learnable skills--that anyone can learn. I can't say that I have fully internalized each one of his words of wisdom, but the ones that struck the most will definitely provide me with value as I live out my life. That being said, I plan on leaving this by my bedside for the years to come and leaf through whichever page may be significant to my life at that moment. cant wait to read up more on this dude and listen to his joe rogan episode HAHSHSHAHAHAHA 🐐

  8. 5 out of 5

    Rory Lilley

    Wow - this is a throbbing 5 star book, I am going to say it’s the best book I have ever read. Easy to read, exceptional content regarding Wealth, Happiness and Philosophy and a great gateway to other media including a full chapter dedicated to recommended reading. God bless America.

  9. 5 out of 5

    Eduards Sizovs

    Just wow. The book about life, happiness, and money.

  10. 4 out of 5

    Pablo María Fernández

    Paraphrasing Charlie Munger's book title set a high bar. Naval Ravikant is one of the most lucid thinkers of Silicon Valley and I really enjoy reading his tweets and listening to him in interviews (the one with Tim Ferriss is a good example). But this is not a traditional book because he didn’t write it but it’s a compilation of his work made by Eric Jorgenson and illustrated by Jack Butcher. I follow them on Twitter from before and like their work so I was really interested in learning which wa Paraphrasing Charlie Munger's book title set a high bar. Naval Ravikant is one of the most lucid thinkers of Silicon Valley and I really enjoy reading his tweets and listening to him in interviews (the one with Tim Ferriss is a good example). But this is not a traditional book because he didn’t write it but it’s a compilation of his work made by Eric Jorgenson and illustrated by Jack Butcher. I follow them on Twitter from before and like their work so I was really interested in learning which was the result of this combined effort. Probably for someone who is not used to Naval’s thought this book is going to be much breathtaking. In my case it was re-reading tweets and interviews I am familiar with. Despite that it is short and easy to read and ideal for skimming to find ideas and interesting points of view. Jorgenson did a good job of presenting the material as something homogeneous but sometimes it might feel repetitive or the criteria for grouping thoughts could be different in some cases. Some authors are door openers and I think Naval is one of them. This book is a great introduction to get into many topics (spirituality, ancient wisdom, science fiction). Naval Recommended Reading section is a gem and probably the part I liked more.

  11. 5 out of 5

    Laurent Michiels

    This is pure gold. If you ever have to read one book on self help and personal development, this should be the one. I first learned about Naval a couple of years ago in the Farnam Street podcast and have been following him closely on Twitter ever since. His podcasts with Tim Ferriss, Joe Rogan as well as his own podcast (nav.al) are chock-full of wisdom, and this book brings together all of these insights. Naval has the scarce ability to express ideas in a to-the-point and thoughtful manner. This This is pure gold. If you ever have to read one book on self help and personal development, this should be the one. I first learned about Naval a couple of years ago in the Farnam Street podcast and have been following him closely on Twitter ever since. His podcasts with Tim Ferriss, Joe Rogan as well as his own podcast (nav.al) are chock-full of wisdom, and this book brings together all of these insights. Naval has the scarce ability to express ideas in a to-the-point and thoughtful manner. This book lays out his views on how to build wealth, health, and happiness. You can download the book for free at https://www.navalmanack.com/

  12. 4 out of 5

    Sanchari Chaudhuri

    The thought that such a mind exists, and we can know about it, learn from it, grow from it: absolutely brilliant. Important takeaways (for me, for now) 1. Health is key. Physical, mental, spiritual. 2. Anger may or may not serve others, but definitely disserves you. 3. Read, read, read. "Reading (learning) is the ultimate meta-skill and can be traded for anything else." Also reread. A 100 reread books is better than a 1000 "just read" ones. 4. Focus on one - then nurture & perfect. 5. The journey The thought that such a mind exists, and we can know about it, learn from it, grow from it: absolutely brilliant. Important takeaways (for me, for now) 1. Health is key. Physical, mental, spiritual. 2. Anger may or may not serve others, but definitely disserves you. 3. Read, read, read. "Reading (learning) is the ultimate meta-skill and can be traded for anything else." Also reread. A 100 reread books is better than a 1000 "just read" ones. 4. Focus on one - then nurture & perfect. 5. The journey from "Freedom to" to "freedom from". + many more. Definitely coming back. Thanks a lot Rajarshi for the rec and the book!

  13. 4 out of 5

    Tomasz Onyszko

    I have come across Naval just recently. Not dug deep into him as a person or on-line presence. First - it is not book by Naval but created from his words and opinions. Still, it is a book which resonates with me on so many levels and I think that if anyone can read it and apply it to their own situation it will help you live simpler and better. I like Navals' definition of luck. I believe that luck plays an important role in our life, but mostly luck of 3'rd kind as described in this book. You ha I have come across Naval just recently. Not dug deep into him as a person or on-line presence. First - it is not book by Naval but created from his words and opinions. Still, it is a book which resonates with me on so many levels and I think that if anyone can read it and apply it to their own situation it will help you live simpler and better. I like Navals' definition of luck. I believe that luck plays an important role in our life, but mostly luck of 3'rd kind as described in this book. You have to work for your life. I found it to be a connection of many things I thought about or learned over last few years - stoicism, approach to entrepreneurship, doing business based on trust, not focusing on generating a money but doing right things with right people and generating a business as a result, taking care about yourself physically and mentally. By no means I'm perfect and this book says also you don't have to be perfect. You need to approach it with right attitude and it will make it easier for you. Do yourself a favor ... go pick this book. It is free if you don't want to pick it up from Amazon or other vendor. Get it, read it, think about it for yourself. It might be that Naval's current position does not apply to you (wealth, professional, etc.) but mental models in it will help you just be better. Seriously, pick it up.

  14. 5 out of 5

    Patrick Adekunle

    I had my doubts going into this book, I mean, the book's subtitle is "A Guide to Wealth and Happiness". More than happy to tell you the doubts were unfounded. The thoughts and musings in Naval's Almanack are remarkably real and raw; profound insights that are the result of an accomplished career and a very philosophical mind. And while I don't agree with everything, they were all worth reading and digesting - contemporary philosophy at its best. I'll sign off with a few quotes that struck home wit I had my doubts going into this book, I mean, the book's subtitle is "A Guide to Wealth and Happiness". More than happy to tell you the doubts were unfounded. The thoughts and musings in Naval's Almanack are remarkably real and raw; profound insights that are the result of an accomplished career and a very philosophical mind. And while I don't agree with everything, they were all worth reading and digesting - contemporary philosophy at its best. I'll sign off with a few quotes that struck home with me: "Another thing: spirituality, religion, Buddhism, or anything you follow will teach you over time you are more than just your mind. You are more than just your habits. You are more than just your preferences. You’re a level of awareness. You’re a body. Modern humans, we don’t live enough in our bodies. We don’t live enough in our awareness. We live too much in this internal monologue in our heads. All of which is just programmed into you by society and by the environment when you were younger." "Forty hour work weeks are a relic of the Industrial Age. Knowledge workers function like athletes—train and sprint, then rest and reassess." "Choosing what city to live in can almost completely determine the trajectory of your life, but we spend so little time trying to figure out what city to live in."

  15. 4 out of 5

    Nano Lund

    “Reading a book isn’t a race — the better the book, the more slowly it should be absorbed.” -naval I think that’s why it took quite a while to finish reading this book. I truly wish i could give a 6th star. My mind was left in awe at the amount of wisdom this guy has. This book felt like a 10-years-older me talking to me now. I really wish to have a physical copy of this book so that i can leave this by my bedside for the years to come and leaf through whichever page may be significant to my lif “Reading a book isn’t a race — the better the book, the more slowly it should be absorbed.” -naval I think that’s why it took quite a while to finish reading this book. I truly wish i could give a 6th star. My mind was left in awe at the amount of wisdom this guy has. This book felt like a 10-years-older me talking to me now. I really wish to have a physical copy of this book so that i can leave this by my bedside for the years to come and leaf through whichever page may be significant to my life at that moment. Worth reading!!

  16. 5 out of 5

    Romil Kinger

    It was not a book, it was sheer wisdom talking to me. if i simply put, Naval is a thinker, who thinks critically about everything. A billionaire with so much knowledge to share about health, happiness and wealth. To me, this book was a mental model, a way of thinking. I was once asked by a program manager, "what few books are you going to keep in your office space?" I didn't know it then but now i know. I've highlighted my notes which i will be using as references from time to time. Highly recom It was not a book, it was sheer wisdom talking to me. if i simply put, Naval is a thinker, who thinks critically about everything. A billionaire with so much knowledge to share about health, happiness and wealth. To me, this book was a mental model, a way of thinking. I was once asked by a program manager, "what few books are you going to keep in your office space?" I didn't know it then but now i know. I've highlighted my notes which i will be using as references from time to time. Highly recommend reading this. It's free, just google it up. Read the table of content and pick one topic to read. Just try one. The smartness this book has bestowed upon me is equal to saving some 5 years of time. I hardly recommend books but this one i am recommending hardly. Try it.

  17. 5 out of 5

    Javier Lorenzana

    Yes, the book could've been organized better, about 50 pages shorter, and a lot less redundant. That being said, how can you not give this book 5 stars. Yes, the book could've been organized better, about 50 pages shorter, and a lot less redundant. That being said, how can you not give this book 5 stars.

  18. 4 out of 5

    Evgeniy Oleinik

    A fantastic read that completely lives up to its title (almanack). Found myself being genuinely surprised a few times while reading, which, I suppose, is a sign you're learning something new. Love his approach to reading and relationships, as well as his "Rational Buddhism". I'd say a lot of his wisdom is rather liberating, as opposed to limiting (think Peterson). Undoubtedly a book to revisit in the future, I have a feeling it's going to be Nolan-esque and I'll find more on the subsequent reads. A fantastic read that completely lives up to its title (almanack). Found myself being genuinely surprised a few times while reading, which, I suppose, is a sign you're learning something new. Love his approach to reading and relationships, as well as his "Rational Buddhism". I'd say a lot of his wisdom is rather liberating, as opposed to limiting (think Peterson). Undoubtedly a book to revisit in the future, I have a feeling it's going to be Nolan-esque and I'll find more on the subsequent reads.

  19. 4 out of 5

    Thang

    Too much wisdom in a short book.

  20. 4 out of 5

    Elizabeth Thomas

    A Personal Classic!!

  21. 4 out of 5

    Parth Bhatt

    Read this book as many times as you can.One of the best wisdom book ever.

  22. 5 out of 5

    Omkar Inamdar

    Exceptional book !

  23. 4 out of 5

    Erlend Dahlen

    Have followed Naval for several years, and this almanack worked as a nice summary. His view on judgement and leverage have been highly influential to me. The main point is that in an age of leverage(capital, code, media) making the right decision becomes extremely important. He shares his own life formula. Some things might fit in with your own life, while others won't. In general, however, this almanack is packed with wisdom and even though everything is not directly applicable to one's own lif Have followed Naval for several years, and this almanack worked as a nice summary. His view on judgement and leverage have been highly influential to me. The main point is that in an age of leverage(capital, code, media) making the right decision becomes extremely important. He shares his own life formula. Some things might fit in with your own life, while others won't. In general, however, this almanack is packed with wisdom and even though everything is not directly applicable to one's own life, the perspectives are worth incorporating nonetheless. In particular, I like his perspective on jealousy: You cannot just pick one aspect of a person(rich, handsome), you have to be the entirety of that person(thinking, feeling, etc.). If you do not want to do a wholesale swap, there is no point in being jealous.

  24. 4 out of 5

    Srikar

    A compendium of tweets and interviews of Naval Ravikant arranged by topics. Mostly avoidable if you follow Naval regularly on Twitter/Podcasts.

  25. 5 out of 5

    Zhou Fang

    Naval Ravikant is clearly an incredibly thoughtful person, and this book is a great anthology of his perspectives on some of the most important questions in life. The book is divided into 5 sections: (1) Wealth, (2) Building Judgment (3) Learning Happiness, (4) Saving yourself and (5) Philosophy. The book itself is really Naval's life philosophy broken down into specific sections for which he as strong principles for. Much of it surrounds Naval's philosophy of "Rational Buddhism" in which he adv Naval Ravikant is clearly an incredibly thoughtful person, and this book is a great anthology of his perspectives on some of the most important questions in life. The book is divided into 5 sections: (1) Wealth, (2) Building Judgment (3) Learning Happiness, (4) Saving yourself and (5) Philosophy. The book itself is really Naval's life philosophy broken down into specific sections for which he as strong principles for. Much of it surrounds Naval's philosophy of "Rational Buddhism" in which he advocates being in the present, avoiding desires, and eliminating thoughts about the past and the future. The book is a short read and contains both personal and professional wisdom, so you should definitely read it. Below are a few of my key learnings: 1. You need to own equity in a business that allows you to earn while you sleep. You benefit from leverage in that you are not limited by scarce resources (hours you can work, etc.). 2. 3 types of leverage: labor (people working for you, not very scalable), capital (people giving you money, money is scalable), and zero incremental distribution costs (coding or media. This is permissionless; no one has to give it to you). Increasing wealth creation builds upon all of these forms of leverage occurring in conjunction. Housing repair person -> Real estate developer -> real estate fund manager -> Zillow/RedFin/Trulia. Each one of these become far more scalable as the leverage multiples. 3. Judgment is paramount. Because leverage in modern economy is very high, someone who makes correct decisions 85% of the time is worth hundreds of millions or even billions more than someone who makes correct decisions 75% of the time because of the impact of those decisions at scale. 4. We're addicted to desiring. To feeling like some external thing will bring me some kind of happiness and joy. Desire is a contract that you make with yourself to be unhappy until you get what you want. Naval tries to choose his desires very carefully, and usually one at a time. Two becomes distracting 5. Happiness is a choice. When it comes to the mind, you have to be positively inclined and not skeptical. This is because your attitude is fully internal, so you should have a positive mindset. 6. Choose your habits and who you are. Tell your friends you're a happy person, and then you'll be forced to conform to it because your friends will expect that of you. You will also face consistency bias to hold yourself accountable. Hack: when you have minor annoyances, mentally ask yourself, "What is the positive of this situation?" Your brain will eventually start doing it instantaneously 7. You have 3 choices in any situation in life: you can change it, accept it, or leave it. If you want to change it, then it is a desire. It will cause you suffering until you successfully change it. Pick one big desire. Having 2 is distracting. What is not good is to sit around wishing you would change it but not changing it, wishing you could leave it but not leaving it and not accepting it. Biggest part of this is acceptance 8. Hard choices, easy life. Easy choices, hard life. Your life long-term will be easy if you can consistently make the hard choices. If you make the easy choices now, your life will be a lot harder

  26. 4 out of 5

    Joseph Pepe

    Naval is a truly impressive polymath. He is very introspective and thoughtful about all aspects of career, relationships, wealth, and happiness, and has a true "Growth" mindset. This was a highly informative short read of Naval's gems of wisdom (taken from tweets, blogs, interviews, etc). I will summarize the most valuable concepts/quotes that I took away:  The most important skill for getting rich is becoming a perpetual learner. You have to know how to learn anything you want to learn.  Compound Naval is a truly impressive polymath. He is very introspective and thoughtful about all aspects of career, relationships, wealth, and happiness, and has a true "Growth" mindset. This was a highly informative short read of Naval's gems of wisdom (taken from tweets, blogs, interviews, etc). I will summarize the most valuable concepts/quotes that I took away:  The most important skill for getting rich is becoming a perpetual learner. You have to know how to learn anything you want to learn.  Compound interest is a very powerful concept and applies to more than just capital. Think of relationships, trust, work ethic. CEO's are trusted with huge decisions because the relationships they've built and work they've done has compounded.  If you don't own a piece of a business, you don't have a path towards financial freedom. Ownership vs wage work. Earn money while you sleep or on vacation - passive income. Own the upside.  Leverage - the most interesting and most important form of leverage is the idea of products that have no marginal cost of replication. Multiplying your efforts without involving other humans or needing money from other people. As a worker you want to be leveraged. Think of your team's output, working your way up to leverage others in an organization to expand pie.  If you can outsource something for less than your hourly rate, outsource it or don't do it at all. If you can hire someone for less than your hourly rate, hire them.  Spend more time making big decisions. There are basically 3 really big decisions you make in your early life: where you live, who you're with, and what you do.  Try not to upgrade your lifestyle as you make more money, so you will not be beholden to money. Maybe happiness is not something you inherit or even choose, but a highly personal skill that can be learned, like fitness or nutrition. It's about the absence of desire. The fewer desires I have, the more I can accept the current state of things, the less my mind is moving. Be more present. Simple trick for those you envy: think that you have to actually BE that person. You can't just get their money, their looks, their body, you have to get their family, happiness level, self-image. If you're not willing to do a 100% swap, then there is no point in being jealous.  I don't believe in specific goals. Set up systems, not goals.  We all can learn a lot from this short book and gain a new perspective on our own psychology, outlook on life, and general happiness. 

  27. 5 out of 5

    Alexej Gerstmaier

    Naval is brilliant. This is the best book about navigating modern life. What I disagree with and notes:: -Anger. Anger is one of the most useful emotions there is. It motivates action. If channeled toward the right causes, it can bring about desirable outcomes better than any other emotion -Diet. And his view on extremism in that context. Being “extreme” in and of itself does not mean one is wrong; one can also be extremely right which is *extremely* desirable. Although it seems more likely to me t Naval is brilliant. This is the best book about navigating modern life. What I disagree with and notes:: -Anger. Anger is one of the most useful emotions there is. It motivates action. If channeled toward the right causes, it can bring about desirable outcomes better than any other emotion -Diet. And his view on extremism in that context. Being “extreme” in and of itself does not mean one is wrong; one can also be extremely right which is *extremely* desirable. Although it seems more likely to me that the human body has evolved to eat animals (and mostly animal fats), I agree with most of his other views on this topics i.e. the benefits of intermittent fasting etc. -He says “An emotion is our evolved biology predicting the future impact of a current event. In modern settings, it's usually exaggerated or wrong.” I agree with the quote. But I think emotions can act as tremendously useful heuristics when dealing with uncertainty á la Gigerenzer -Happiness. I don’t want to be happy in the sense of “being at peace” in the way that Naval thinks is desirable. I want to “be at war” and win games over and over while being in the anxious/unsatisfied state that is required for that. I recently listened to a Joe Rogan podcast with some neuroscientist that said something like: when electrodes are hooked up to people's brains so that they can trigger emotions, people don’t choose ecstasy/orgasm/joy/happiness, they choose a feeling of unsatisfaction/craving/ a little bit angry anxiety but mixed with a sense of CERTAINTY about what to do. (Something along those lines, need to relisten to the podcast) The same applies for me, as in THAT is a state I most enjoy being in.

  28. 4 out of 5

    Chintan Sheth

    A great weekend read, healthy reminder to work on things that matter.

  29. 5 out of 5

    Matthias

    Amazing book, packed with useful advice and memorable quotes. Something to be read every year.

  30. 5 out of 5

    Dominic Cowell

    Genuinely brilliant read. Recommended by a couple of friends - I've given it a first read, starting yesterday and finishing today. Hard to put down, and certainly one I'll be picking up for some time. Great philosophical viewpoints on wealth, happiness and more. Genuinely brilliant read. Recommended by a couple of friends - I've given it a first read, starting yesterday and finishing today. Hard to put down, and certainly one I'll be picking up for some time. Great philosophical viewpoints on wealth, happiness and more.

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