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One Day I'll Remember This: Diaries 1987–1995

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30 review for One Day I'll Remember This: Diaries 1987–1995

  1. 4 out of 5

    Jaclyn Crupi

    3.5 Garner on gardening was particularly great in this edition of her diaries. Same of course with writing, music and all things literary. These are her Bail years (he’s writing Eucalyptus) and boy does he seem like a bastard and their relationship somewhat toxic and dysfunctional. Ending with the publication of The First Stone, I am already beside myself with anticipation for the next installment. This didn’t quite have the same impact as The Yellow Notebook but once Garner is in your head she’ 3.5 Garner on gardening was particularly great in this edition of her diaries. Same of course with writing, music and all things literary. These are her Bail years (he’s writing Eucalyptus) and boy does he seem like a bastard and their relationship somewhat toxic and dysfunctional. Ending with the publication of The First Stone, I am already beside myself with anticipation for the next installment. This didn’t quite have the same impact as The Yellow Notebook but once Garner is in your head she’s not going anywhere.

  2. 5 out of 5

    Text Publishing

    The following book reviews have been shared by Text Publishing – publisher of One Day I'll Remember This 'Garner’s self-deprecating reflections are profound and funny. Her dispatches from daily life in the late 80s and early 90s...are relayed in her trademark matter-of-fact prose, always oriented towards truth and self-examination, no matter how painful...One Day I’ll Remember This is a revealing window into the mind of one of Australia’s greatest living writers.’ Books+Publishing 'The spiritualit The following book reviews have been shared by Text Publishing – publisher of One Day I'll Remember This 'Garner’s self-deprecating reflections are profound and funny. Her dispatches from daily life in the late 80s and early 90s...are relayed in her trademark matter-of-fact prose, always oriented towards truth and self-examination, no matter how painful...One Day I’ll Remember This is a revealing window into the mind of one of Australia’s greatest living writers.’ Books+Publishing 'The spirituality of these diaries is worth a library of high-minded theology...Their acuity is ultimately healing. You will leave with the impression that you have not so much been looking at Garner’s life as at life itself.’ Age 'Will appeal not only to Garner fans but to anyone who wants a profound insight into the mind of a true artist.’ WellRead 'A delightful book, longing to be dipped in and out of, and, through it, the reader gets a picture of this remarkable woman.’ Readings 'The ordinary in these diaries – the daily, the diurnal, the stumbled-upon, the breathing in and out – is turned into something else through the writer’s extraordinary craft.’ ABR 'What a joy and a privilege it is to dive into the pages of Helen Garner’s second volume of diaries...If you have never read Garner, read them for the sheer beauty of the prose and clarity of her thinking. If, like me, you have devoured everything she has ever written, they will enhance your understanding of her work.’ Nicole Abadee, Good Weekend 'Helen Garner is one of the lords of language in our midst and something more. She has a poet’s ear, a painter’s eye and she understands profoundly and without self-pity the mystery of the tears in things.’ Australian ‘With One Day I’ll Remember This, Diaries 1987-1995, Helen Garner proves once more why anything and everything she writes is a life lesson in courage, acuity and the eviscerating quest for self-knowledge. What unites these three books, apart from sublime writing, is the revelation of the lengths to which women must go to hide their lights – protect yet nourish their secret selves – and the cost of such radical concealment.’ Clare Wright, Age 'Another 2020 reading highlight was Helen Garner’s One Day I’ll Remember This: Diaries 1987-1995. The book is typically Garneresque in its ability to cut straight through the bullshit, while also being poetic, gentle and life affirming. Garner continues to explore what it is to be human – in all its endless loss, beauty, connection and grit.’ Alice Bishop, Age ‘I loved Helen Garner’s second volume of diaries, One Day I’ll Remember This. I would read Garner’s grocery lists; she’s one of my favourites. I must have underlined something on every page.’ Fatima Bhutto ‘This volume is proof that even [Garner’s] writing for the desk drawer is exquisite. Come for the scarifying honesty; stay for sentences that could have been turned on a lathe.’ Geordie Williamson, Australian

  3. 4 out of 5

    Romany

    I just loved it. She was with a total dick who didn’t see her worth. Why? How? Did she have to put up with his shit to become the writer she is now? So many questions. The humanity just shone through.

  4. 4 out of 5

    Rosemary Atwell

    Garner’s diaries Part II are sadder and slightly less satisfying. Worst of all is the way in which she slowly shrinks and becomes weighted down by the ridiculous posturing and demands of the great novelist - her third husband - whose selfishness made me want to throw this book at the wall every time he appeared. I didn’t, because I was reading it on my IPad - another less than satisfactory experience. But I still can’t wait for the next instalment.

  5. 4 out of 5

    Zora

    I am a Garner tragic, so I know that her first book Monkey Grip was slammed at the time by one critic as something less than a novel - indeed, he accused HG of publishing her diaries. Ha! Fast forward a few decades and she has published two volumes of her diaries and like Monkey Grip they rank up there with the most satisfying reading experiences of my life.

  6. 5 out of 5

    Anne

    I have loved pretty much everything by Helen Garner, including these diaries. But they are so self-critical it’s hard to align the writing with the confident woman I assumed she must be. Some sections were almost painful to read - I can’t imagine what those periods were like to live through.

  7. 4 out of 5

    Michelle Barraclough

    Ah! Back in the land of Helen Garner. This time we follow Helen's thoughts and musings between the mid-80s to mid-90s, culminating in the publication of The First Stone and the resulting outcry. One Day I'll Remember This is another opportunity to dip in and out of Helen's life and discover a multitude of gorgeously written, insightful and relatable vignettes that makes the dip worthwhile. There's her passionate but dysfunctional affair with V where her bewilderment at some of his behaviour presag Ah! Back in the land of Helen Garner. This time we follow Helen's thoughts and musings between the mid-80s to mid-90s, culminating in the publication of The First Stone and the resulting outcry. One Day I'll Remember This is another opportunity to dip in and out of Helen's life and discover a multitude of gorgeously written, insightful and relatable vignettes that makes the dip worthwhile. There's her passionate but dysfunctional affair with V where her bewilderment at some of his behaviour presages the subsequent failure of their marriage. She is wistfully heartsick on the tug of a child growing up and away, "This state is like a second labour. I'm struggling to let her be born." Her struggle to find a physical home seems to echo her search for an emotional one. At her primitive holiday cottage in Primrose Gully she worries she'll be lonely but on the other hand doesn't mind that she talks to herself. Garner's diaries are full of the sort of self-doubt and vulnerability all writers are familiar with, but she describes the delightful satisfaction of nailing a story in ways that will inspire, "I pulled things out of thin air. I dragged stuff out of chaos. The moment when, working off diary material as a basis, I begin to invent: like the first moment on an unsupported two-wheeler, or ice skates, letting go, doing it on my own." This second instalment of Helen Garner's diaries is, like Yellow Notebook, a hardback edition which feels as though it deserves a permanent place on one's desk or bedside table; a trove of anecdotes and observations to influence, outrage, motivate, touch or bring forth a bemused Garner-like chuckle.

  8. 4 out of 5

    Melinda Nankivell

    I just want to meet her and hug her. Loved this volume for its honesty and raw look at love and not being met half way, and the criticism faced when writing The First Stone. Actually there was so much in this collection that I can’t unpack it all. Wonderful.

  9. 5 out of 5

    Elisabeth

    Relatable, funny, poignant and sad. Treasuring female friendships, trying to understand why love makes us accept the unacceptable, mother guilt and embracing nature. This book was deliciously voyeuristic and beautifully written I loved it. Thank you Helen Garner for sharing something so personal.

  10. 5 out of 5

    Dina Davis

    A poignant, honest account of the breakdown of her third marriage. Helen Garner succeeds in telling a coherent story in brief, seemingly disconnected fragments. She brings to life people, locations and domesticity with her trademark wit and lyricism.

  11. 5 out of 5

    Deb

    Big fan of Garner, but this did not grab me or keep my interest as her other books have. Quite sad to read about her marriage.

  12. 5 out of 5

    Gus Pattinson

    I like the little things

  13. 4 out of 5

    Sherry Mackay

    It’s kinda cryptic and it’s annoying that there is no explanation of who and what and where but I still enjoyed getting into her brain.

  14. 5 out of 5

    Ryan

    Bloated. Yellow Notebook felt brisker, as if particular entries were selected for inclusion.

  15. 5 out of 5

    Tracey

    Once again Helen Garner has allowed us the opportunity to see the world through her eyes. There are several themes that run through the entries this includes Garner musing on her success or failure as a mother, her relationships, writing process and friendships. Throughout the writing Garner exposes her fallibility and strength. The diaries provide an insight into the personal and writing life of a great Australian writer.

  16. 4 out of 5

    Molly

  17. 4 out of 5

    Pauline Ann Geddes

  18. 5 out of 5

    Amanda

  19. 4 out of 5

    Sarah Michell

  20. 5 out of 5

    margery forde

  21. 5 out of 5

    Sanhard Francine

  22. 5 out of 5

    Megan

  23. 4 out of 5

    Viola V

  24. 5 out of 5

    Isolde Kauffman

  25. 4 out of 5

    Donna

  26. 5 out of 5

    Joshua Venn

  27. 5 out of 5

    Tam

  28. 5 out of 5

    Fiona

  29. 5 out of 5

    Nicole Beer

  30. 5 out of 5

    Eleanor

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