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An honest, witty, and insightful memoir about what happens when your coming-of-age comes later than expected “Thanks for Waiting is the loving, wise, cuttingly funny older sister we all need in book form.”—Tara Schuster, author of Buy Yourself the F*cking Lilies Doree Shafrir spent much of her twenties and thirties feeling out of sync with her peers. She was an intern at twe An honest, witty, and insightful memoir about what happens when your coming-of-age comes later than expected “Thanks for Waiting is the loving, wise, cuttingly funny older sister we all need in book form.”—Tara Schuster, author of Buy Yourself the F*cking Lilies Doree Shafrir spent much of her twenties and thirties feeling out of sync with her peers. She was an intern at twenty-nine and met her husband on Tinder in her late thirties, after many of her friends had already gotten married, started families, and entered couples’ counseling. After a long fertility struggle, she became a first-time mom at forty-one, joining Mommy & Me classes where most of the other moms were at least ten years younger. And while she was one of Gawker’s early hires and one of the first editors at BuzzFeed, she didn’t find professional fulfillment until she co-launched the successful self-care podcast Forever35—at forty. Now, in her debut memoir, Shafrir explores the enormous pressures we feel, especially as women, to hit particular milestones at certain times and how we can redefine what it means to be a late bloomer. She writes about everything from dating to infertility, to how friendships evolve as you get older, to why being pregnant at forty-one is unexpectedly freeing—all with the goal of appreciating the lives we’ve lived so far and the lives we still hope to live. Thanks for Waiting is about how achieving the milestones you thought were so important don’t always happen on the time line you imagined. In a world of 30 Under 30 lists, this book is a welcome reminder that it’s okay to live life at your own speed.


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An honest, witty, and insightful memoir about what happens when your coming-of-age comes later than expected “Thanks for Waiting is the loving, wise, cuttingly funny older sister we all need in book form.”—Tara Schuster, author of Buy Yourself the F*cking Lilies Doree Shafrir spent much of her twenties and thirties feeling out of sync with her peers. She was an intern at twe An honest, witty, and insightful memoir about what happens when your coming-of-age comes later than expected “Thanks for Waiting is the loving, wise, cuttingly funny older sister we all need in book form.”—Tara Schuster, author of Buy Yourself the F*cking Lilies Doree Shafrir spent much of her twenties and thirties feeling out of sync with her peers. She was an intern at twenty-nine and met her husband on Tinder in her late thirties, after many of her friends had already gotten married, started families, and entered couples’ counseling. After a long fertility struggle, she became a first-time mom at forty-one, joining Mommy & Me classes where most of the other moms were at least ten years younger. And while she was one of Gawker’s early hires and one of the first editors at BuzzFeed, she didn’t find professional fulfillment until she co-launched the successful self-care podcast Forever35—at forty. Now, in her debut memoir, Shafrir explores the enormous pressures we feel, especially as women, to hit particular milestones at certain times and how we can redefine what it means to be a late bloomer. She writes about everything from dating to infertility, to how friendships evolve as you get older, to why being pregnant at forty-one is unexpectedly freeing—all with the goal of appreciating the lives we’ve lived so far and the lives we still hope to live. Thanks for Waiting is about how achieving the milestones you thought were so important don’t always happen on the time line you imagined. In a world of 30 Under 30 lists, this book is a welcome reminder that it’s okay to live life at your own speed.

30 review for Thanks for Waiting: The Joy (and Weirdness) of Being a Late Bloomer

  1. 5 out of 5

    Tess Malone

    This is a book about being a late bloomer, but mostly in a heteronormative sense. Although Shafrir started her career late, she focuses on her dating debacles and IVF troubles. I was hoping for equal emphasis on her career, but she skips her 20s entirely (why did she drop out of the Ph.D. program?) and glosses over most job problems. Instead she devotes most of the book to marriage and pregnancy issues; though I admire the vulnerability, I didn't need nearly as much detail on the problems she ha This is a book about being a late bloomer, but mostly in a heteronormative sense. Although Shafrir started her career late, she focuses on her dating debacles and IVF troubles. I was hoping for equal emphasis on her career, but she skips her 20s entirely (why did she drop out of the Ph.D. program?) and glosses over most job problems. Instead she devotes most of the book to marriage and pregnancy issues; though I admire the vulnerability, I didn't need nearly as much detail on the problems she had with breastfeeding. Some parts of the book could've gone deeper, whereas others needed to be pared down with tighter editing. Overall, this book is a breezy, quick read like a good women's magazine article, but I get the impression Shafrir thinks she's more counterculture than she actually is when really she's just maintaining a cis-het status quo.

  2. 4 out of 5

    Maeve

    I enjoy Doree’s podcasts and the book was a quick easy read. The premise of being a later bloomer felt a little thin though and not quite enough to justify a memoir.

  3. 5 out of 5

    Ashley Christensen

    *Re-uping this review for Publishing Day!* ***ARC Provided by NetGalley*** I admire Doree so much. I have known of her since she started dating her husband, and have followed her career basically since- I tune in every week to both of her podcasts, and follow her on social media. So I was planning on buying her book or getting it from the library (or both!), and then, surprise, I got a galley! It's hard to review a galley because you know some things will change. Overall, the book was wonderful, an *Re-uping this review for Publishing Day!* ***ARC Provided by NetGalley*** I admire Doree so much. I have known of her since she started dating her husband, and have followed her career basically since- I tune in every week to both of her podcasts, and follow her on social media. So I was planning on buying her book or getting it from the library (or both!), and then, surprise, I got a galley! It's hard to review a galley because you know some things will change. Overall, the book was wonderful, and gave me a glimpse of who Doree is to her core, and I also think this will be a great, relatable book to those that feel the way she does: that she is a late bloomer, that she floundered in her career a lot, took her time to get to life's "big events", and that, ultimately, ended up where she should at the time she should have. I definitely have a few people in mind that I can't wait to recommend this to! However, there were some pacing problems that I'm hoping will be resolved in the final copy. In some places, I felt like I was being rushed to the finish line, and in others, I found myself wondering how many times I need to re-read about her sister. I get it, she's younger and had her life together early on, I don't need to be reminded no fewer than 4 times, and I'm hoping this issue gets resolved in the final printing (and because I love Doree so much and this is really the only thing that kept me from a 5 star review, I will be reading this when I get my hands on a final copy). Overall, as stated above, I did enjoy this book. I think it will be a great benefit to those that are similar to Doree. I just wish the pacing had been different in places- but I will be getting the final copy to come back and update this review.

  4. 4 out of 5

    Julie Mebane

    I’ve always thought that when it comes to memoirs, being an interesting writer is more important than having an interesting life. This book proved me wrong. Her life is not interesting enough to be the subject of a memoir.

  5. 4 out of 5

    Sacha

    Most readers who come to this memoir will have a sense of who Doree Shafrir is because she has been so public and forthcoming about major aspects of her life for several years now, and I think this group will get what they are hoping for: a clear through line in a known voice. Folks who are new to Shafrir have a lot to look forward to, as well. While this was a slow start for me (I read Part One in small chunks over a couple of weeks), I read the remainder of the work in one sitting. Some of the Most readers who come to this memoir will have a sense of who Doree Shafrir is because she has been so public and forthcoming about major aspects of her life for several years now, and I think this group will get what they are hoping for: a clear through line in a known voice. Folks who are new to Shafrir have a lot to look forward to, as well. While this was a slow start for me (I read Part One in small chunks over a couple of weeks), I read the remainder of the work in one sitting. Some of the early chapters include memorable scenes and moments that certainly set up the essential flow of the work: the development of the "late bloomer." Readers will find cultural touchpoints and rites of passage in these early chapters, and if they - like me - are close in age to Shafrir, these insights may provoke some fun nostalgia. But what makes Shafrir's life and this work stand out are the events in the second half of the work, including her descriptions of meeting her future partner, going through IVF, and grappling with the details of new motherhood. As a person who has NEVER seen the appeal of having my own children (quite the opposite over here), even I found the sections on fertility and new motherhood profound. Folks who have had experiences similar to Shafrir's should come to this piece with self-care in mind. While many readers - like the podcast listeners Shafrir references - may find these discussions healing, empowering, and uplifting, others may find this content extremely difficult to manage. What most readers should experience is that Shafrir takes a forthright approach to her truths. She does not shy away from disappointments or tough realities, even in the face of others' harsh judgements (including, potentially, readers of this work). This is a particularly powerful aspect of the memoir overall. Shafrir's experiences may be relatable to many readers, but what resonated with me most is how she confronts critical moments and milestones in her life and presents them in ways that - assumedly - reflect her realities versus societal expectations. *Special thanks to NetGalley and Ballantine Books for this arc, which I received in exchange for the above honest review.

  6. 4 out of 5

    Jessica

    Listening to Thanks for Waiting was truly an act of self-care. I have been a huge fan of the Forever 35 podcast since Jenny Han posted about it in 2018 so this book was at the top of my list for my most anticipated reads of the year. Doree explores being a late bloomer in this memoir and grapples with not being on society’s timeline of the big milestones. She discusses a variety of topics including dating, relationships, career, body image, IVF, and more. Ultimately, this book filled me with a sen Listening to Thanks for Waiting was truly an act of self-care. I have been a huge fan of the Forever 35 podcast since Jenny Han posted about it in 2018 so this book was at the top of my list for my most anticipated reads of the year. Doree explores being a late bloomer in this memoir and grapples with not being on society’s timeline of the big milestones. She discusses a variety of topics including dating, relationships, career, body image, IVF, and more. Ultimately, this book filled me with a sense of comfort that I don’t need to worry about being on anyone else’s timeline except my own and that’s totally ok! I think so many people are going to connect with this book and I’m happy it exists! I highly recommend the audiobook as its narrated by the author.

  7. 4 out of 5

    Chana

    I really loved reading this, partly because I could relate to so much of what she was writing (though not the marriage and pregnancy part). I will admit I was already a fan because of listening to the F35 podcast. However, I appreciated Doree’s reflection on privilege in the later half and her ability to point out both why she was able to make the choices she did, as well as her entirely valid feelings about the process.

  8. 5 out of 5

    Sharon

    This was an interesting look into late blooming, the anxiety of being behind, and the confidence of doing things on one’s own timeline. The accomplishments of Shafrir are impressive: editorial and writing accolades, a novel, and two podcasts, and she details the path that was not as direct as she may have wanted. The parts that interested me most were her career trajectory, the development of her novel Startup and hosting two podcasts, her relationship with her husband, and her pregnancy and ear This was an interesting look into late blooming, the anxiety of being behind, and the confidence of doing things on one’s own timeline. The accomplishments of Shafrir are impressive: editorial and writing accolades, a novel, and two podcasts, and she details the path that was not as direct as she may have wanted. The parts that interested me most were her career trajectory, the development of her novel Startup and hosting two podcasts, her relationship with her husband, and her pregnancy and early motherhood days. I found myself cheering for her and her spouse, their family, and their endeavors. She had a resilience and honesty that I admired. Her insights on our current cultural moments had me thinking, and I liked the humor with which she touched upon some complicated topics.

  9. 4 out of 5

    Jill

    A quick read that is fun as a listener of the podcast but probably lacks broader appeal. The most interesting parts to me were towards the end about her infertility journey and adjustments to motherhood. Some of the work and dating stories felt too personal to me in a sorta cringey way.

  10. 5 out of 5

    Katie Dillon

    I liked this a lot! Doree is such an interesting person and I enjoyed spending time in her brain. We have a lot of the same life experiences and it was very cool to see that reflected in a book, especially when so much of modern society dictates a certain narrative about what life "should" be. This book helps you stay at peace with wherever you're at in life, which can be a helpful reminder for those of us who feel "behind." I liked this a lot! Doree is such an interesting person and I enjoyed spending time in her brain. We have a lot of the same life experiences and it was very cool to see that reflected in a book, especially when so much of modern society dictates a certain narrative about what life "should" be. This book helps you stay at peace with wherever you're at in life, which can be a helpful reminder for those of us who feel "behind."

  11. 5 out of 5

    Lina Conk

    I really admire the vulnerability and honestly behind this memoir. I do think I would have appreciated it more if I had listened to Doree’s podcast. The beginning was a little slow for me with it being centered so much around her dating fails. But I really felt her story behind fertility and IVF journey was one that so many can relate. There was in ease in her writing and I did really feel was authentic.

  12. 4 out of 5

    Wrapped Up in Books

    This is a memoir written by Doree Shafrir, a former journalist, current author and podcaster. I vaguely knew about Doree from listening to a podcast several years ago that had her husband in it. He had mentioned her first book, “Start Up”, which I bought but never read. Well, I’ll read it now, because I love how Doree writes. The book is presented as Doree’s experience being a “late bloomer” in life. She is amongst the last of her friends and family to hit certain milestones, including getting ma This is a memoir written by Doree Shafrir, a former journalist, current author and podcaster. I vaguely knew about Doree from listening to a podcast several years ago that had her husband in it. He had mentioned her first book, “Start Up”, which I bought but never read. Well, I’ll read it now, because I love how Doree writes. The book is presented as Doree’s experience being a “late bloomer” in life. She is amongst the last of her friends and family to hit certain milestones, including getting married. Doree is brave to speak openly about guys she’s dated from work, as people in her wider circle will certainly be able to figure out who she is talking about, but isn’t part of growing up not caring about what others think? So much of her story is relatable. For instance, this part about a hot guy that she tells herself she doesn’t have a crush on: “And, third, it wasn’t exactly a crush; I mean, I barely knew the guy. It was more of an appreciation. I could appreciate Luke’s attractiveness in the same way I could appreciate that Brad Pitt is attractive!” Or when she described her teenager style evolution as “between the phases of looking like I’d walked off the set of a John Hughes movie and onto the set of a Nirvana music video.” And as she turned 40, she was more interested in looking like a funky art teacher. Same! Also, we are both part of that in-between generation of Gen X and Millennial. Also, I’m a late bloomer too. But that was one of the parts of the book that was the least relatable, and it was how the book was presented and marketed- a woman’s memoir of being a little behind the curve when it comes to life. Reading about a person who has had a successful career at multiple media jobs, obtained advanced education and has lived in expensive and cool cities is hardly relatable to the common person, never mind one who has trouble keeping up with their peers. But maybe that’s partly me trying to make her even more relatable to me, when clearly she has had a different path than her peers. Though I was disappointed by the examples of being a late bloomer, I enjoyed Doree’s writing and viewpoints. Aside from adding her first novel further up my reading list, I will definitely be checking out her podcast, Forever35. 4.5 stars I was provided a copy of this book by Netgalley in exchange for my honest review

  13. 5 out of 5

    Amanda

    What a smooth, well written pleasure to read! I never thought of myself as a late bloomer, but I have so much more that I want to do with my life, and at this point, it’s just going to have to happen in my 40s. As I enter my mid-30s, and my 20s are getting further away in my rear view mirror, I appreciate this absolute confirmation that you can do things on your own time, and that’s ok. And as someone who has dealt with infertility, I really appreciate the honest, straight forward way Doree writ What a smooth, well written pleasure to read! I never thought of myself as a late bloomer, but I have so much more that I want to do with my life, and at this point, it’s just going to have to happen in my 40s. As I enter my mid-30s, and my 20s are getting further away in my rear view mirror, I appreciate this absolute confirmation that you can do things on your own time, and that’s ok. And as someone who has dealt with infertility, I really appreciate the honest, straight forward way Doree writes about this issue.

  14. 5 out of 5

    Ann

    Fabulous. I’m a huge Forever35 and Eggcellent Adventure fan so it felt like my friend was telling me a story of her life. She brought up so many topics that are completely relatable to every woman/mom/human (like dating! Breastfeeding! Women in the workplace!) She makes you not feel alone or crazy for feeling a lot of the same things. Fantastic read.

  15. 5 out of 5

    Niki

    I honestly loved this memoir. I found it refreshing and honest, and incredibly well-written. I love everything that Doree has created in the past, and this book is no different. Would recommend for anyone who feels like their life is taking a meandering path, or they're constantly playing the comparison game. We all take different journeys and Doree celebrates that fact! I honestly loved this memoir. I found it refreshing and honest, and incredibly well-written. I love everything that Doree has created in the past, and this book is no different. Would recommend for anyone who feels like their life is taking a meandering path, or they're constantly playing the comparison game. We all take different journeys and Doree celebrates that fact!

  16. 5 out of 5

    Jessica Beight

    I was just too bored to finish it. She’s a great writer, there’s no questioning that, but I’ve listened to Forever35 for a couple years now, and I don’t like her personality. I thought I’d give this memoir a chance and learn a little more about her. But alas… couldn’t get into this one, still don’t like her personality.

  17. 5 out of 5

    Amanda Zhang

    I don't identify as a late bloomer, but I still felt like I could relate to a lot of what Doree wrote about. I listened to the audiobook and loved hearing Doree narrate! I don't identify as a late bloomer, but I still felt like I could relate to a lot of what Doree wrote about. I listened to the audiobook and loved hearing Doree narrate!

  18. 5 out of 5

    Zara

    Gave up. So boring. Sorry.

  19. 4 out of 5

    Non

    Doree's beautiful memoir, Thanks For Waiting, is a thoughtful, hilarious, and compassionate reflection on belonging, empathy for self, and honoring the parts of our real and valid experiences that often get lost (or intentionally excluded) within the soul-sucking systems of enough-ness, patriarchy, capitalism, and the all-powerful "shoulds." I'm grateful to be a late bloomer. And grateful for this book! Doree's beautiful memoir, Thanks For Waiting, is a thoughtful, hilarious, and compassionate reflection on belonging, empathy for self, and honoring the parts of our real and valid experiences that often get lost (or intentionally excluded) within the soul-sucking systems of enough-ness, patriarchy, capitalism, and the all-powerful "shoulds." I'm grateful to be a late bloomer. And grateful for this book!

  20. 4 out of 5

    Kate Niestrom

    I don't really know what this book was trying to be. In it, I was looking for kinship, I suppose. It was marketed to me as the success story of one woman who was single longer than all of her friends, who put her career first and took the beat of her biological clock and made her own brand new song. And it was sort of like that... but it was also sort of all over the place. In "Thanks for Waiting," we see Doree's entire life, and a lot of that is unnecessary. I don't really need to know how she I don't really know what this book was trying to be. In it, I was looking for kinship, I suppose. It was marketed to me as the success story of one woman who was single longer than all of her friends, who put her career first and took the beat of her biological clock and made her own brand new song. And it was sort of like that... but it was also sort of all over the place. In "Thanks for Waiting," we see Doree's entire life, and a lot of that is unnecessary. I don't really need to know how she felt about her mom having another child when she was seven, or about her troubles fitting in at sleepaway camp. When we finally get to the purpose of the book, her subject of blooming late, we see that it's not really that big of a thing in her life. She dates A LOT through her twenties and thirties, and has several very serious relationships. She gets dream job after dream job in media and then meets her husband on Tinder after a series of interesting flings in her late thirties (she makes sure to mention dating Marc Anthony's touring bassist A LOT.) The part of the book that I found most compelling was her struggle with IVF and getting pregnant in her forties. It felt real and relatable, even to a 27-year-old who has never once wanted to have a child in her life. What I was looking for in this memoir, however, was the feeling of struggling with something that seemed to come so easily with everyone else, and Shafrir's pregnancy journey communicated that beautifully. This book was fun and at times, interesting, despite also being sort of a jumble. It's not what it seems, although, as the point of this memoir reiterates, when is anything?

  21. 5 out of 5

    MK

    I love Doree’s podcast so I was pumped about the book. It felt like 25 blog posts put together- choppy and predictable. If you listen to the podcast, then you’ll find there was almost nothing new shared. I kept waiting for there to be more about her late bloomer concept but I never came (the last two minutes try to tie it up but I personally didn’t think it was helpful) and for that I was sad. I really wanted her to dive deep into the later bloomer idea and it never came. Maybe I just expected to I love Doree’s podcast so I was pumped about the book. It felt like 25 blog posts put together- choppy and predictable. If you listen to the podcast, then you’ll find there was almost nothing new shared. I kept waiting for there to be more about her late bloomer concept but I never came (the last two minutes try to tie it up but I personally didn’t think it was helpful) and for that I was sad. I really wanted her to dive deep into the later bloomer idea and it never came. Maybe I just expected too much of a favorite podcaster. It wasn’t a bad book by any means but it wasn’t all that interesting either. It feels weird to call someone’s life not interesting- and I don’t mean it that way- I just thought her relaying of the stories was dry and drab and lacked the exciting details that keeps someone reading.

  22. 5 out of 5

    Katie Russell

    Such a great memoir! Its self care just reading this! Do yourself a favor and dive in!

  23. 4 out of 5

    Andria

    My one sentence review: I picked this up because I am an occasional listener of the Forever 35 podcast and found it to be a quick and engaging read, though as a self-identified late bloomer I found her experience so wholly different from my own that it was somewhat hard to relate to.

  24. 5 out of 5

    Laura Dvorak

    Great concept but repetitive. I'm not a listener of Forever 35 and I imagine if you are, you'll love this. I requested an eARC because I related to the idea of being a "late bloomer", as I didn't seriously date until after college. Shafrir has a lot of insights about her early years, but the book felt too long and without a prior relationship to her work, the book didn't quite land for me. Thank you NetGalley and the publisher for an eARC in exchange for this review. Great concept but repetitive. I'm not a listener of Forever 35 and I imagine if you are, you'll love this. I requested an eARC because I related to the idea of being a "late bloomer", as I didn't seriously date until after college. Shafrir has a lot of insights about her early years, but the book felt too long and without a prior relationship to her work, the book didn't quite land for me. Thank you NetGalley and the publisher for an eARC in exchange for this review.

  25. 5 out of 5

    Karen Germain

    Thank you to Random House Publishing Group Ballantine Books for providing me with a copy of Doree Shafrir’s memoir, Thanks for Waiting: The Joy (and Weirdness) of Being a Late Bloomer, in exchange for an honest review. Writer and journalist Doree Shafrir’s memoir details her life as a self-professed “Late Bloomer.” Shafrir reflects on her life from her preteen years at camp, when she felt like the last girl to make-out with a boy, to her young-adult years, when she didn’t hit the same life miles Thank you to Random House Publishing Group Ballantine Books for providing me with a copy of Doree Shafrir’s memoir, Thanks for Waiting: The Joy (and Weirdness) of Being a Late Bloomer, in exchange for an honest review. Writer and journalist Doree Shafrir’s memoir details her life as a self-professed “Late Bloomer.” Shafrir reflects on her life from her preteen years at camp, when she felt like the last girl to make-out with a boy, to her young-adult years, when she didn’t hit the same life milestones as her peers. Thanks for Waiting is a reminder that life often doesn’t follow a schedule, but that also doesn’t mean that your life is less fabulous or somehow a failure as compared with others who seem to be living a more traditional path. Shafrir didn’t not find her husband, Matt, until she was in her mid-thirties and she did not have a child until years later, after many rounds of IVF. However, I don’t know if this necessarily makes her a “late bloomer.” I think she just blossomed in different areas. As I read Thanks for Waiting, I viewed Shafrir as a woman focused on her education and career, both of which led her to incredible opportunities, including working for Buzzfeed. She mentioned the frustration of getting older and not owning property, yet she was living in New York City and Los Angeles. I’m Shafrir’s age and I lived a majority of my life in Los Angeles. I can count on one hand the friends in our age group that own homes. It’s an incredibly expensive city and certainly not a mark of failure to be a renter. I think the “women having it all” is a bit of a myth. Happiness is certainly possible, but there are situations in everyone’s life where they have to make choices or give-up something to have something else. Shafrir compares herself to other women who seem to “have it all,” those who had career/marriage/babies/houses, all figured out by the time they were thirty. I suspect that most women compare or have been fed the cultural idea of a “time line.” We get anxious when everyone around us seems to be getting married or having babies. We are told that something is wrong if we deviate from the timeline. It’s a message that is hard to shake. Although Shafrir admits to her anxieties of not hitting those milestones at the appropriate times and of being a “late bloomer,” in the end, it really doesn’t matter. The stress of her twenties and thirties, gives way to a new career, a loving husband, and a baby boy. She might be an older parents and her concept of her dream job has changed, but she is happy and thriving. I enjoyed Thanks for Waiting, primarily for Shafrir’s honest writing. As someone who has also taken an unusual life path, I could relate to many parts of her memoir. It’s a strong reminder that life doesn’t always go according to plan and that’s okay. Like my review? Check out my blog!

  26. 5 out of 5

    Betsy

    I did not get a job with a livable wage until I was 35 despite receiving a masters degree when I was 30 I did not move out of my parents place permanently until after I got married at 36 These are just a few of the things that I felt like I accomplished later in life than I felt like a “normal” adult did. I often have found myself struggling with the terms that are associated with adulting. The dictionary definition of adulting is to participate in the more mundane things that adults do, which was I did not get a job with a livable wage until I was 35 despite receiving a masters degree when I was 30 I did not move out of my parents place permanently until after I got married at 36 These are just a few of the things that I felt like I accomplished later in life than I felt like a “normal” adult did. I often have found myself struggling with the terms that are associated with adulting. The dictionary definition of adulting is to participate in the more mundane things that adults do, which was popularized by Kelly Williams Brown’s book Adulting: How to Become a Grown Up in 535 Easyish Steps. Back when I bought and read Adulting I remember having mixed feelings. I am a huge fan of taking responsibility for myself, however I know that a lot of the things that were in the book or all over the internet were making me feel like I was failing at as an adult. However when I examined my attitudes about these notions, I realized that there was noting wrong with me. The problem was the way these attitudes were rooted in classism (like living with my parents and not having a job l with health benefits or paid time off) or in ableism (like the ability to drive and maintain a car). So when I heard that Doree Shafrir of the Forever35 podcast was writing a memoir called Thanks for Waiting: The Joy and Weirdness of Being a Late Bloomer I was SO EXCITED to read this book. It was a breath of fresh air to read an account of someone else feeling behind what she felt like everyone else was accomplishing. The first part of the book did read like a series Sex and the City episodes in a failing economy (only with much better writing and more mature insights). She directly acknowledges that she was doing this, stressing that for women finding a spouse is often a milestone for being a full-fledged adult. She was very open about her struggles with fertility that came from getting married and trying to start a family later in life. Making herself completely vulnerable to the challenges of accomplishing milestones later in life made it feel like hearing from a friend who not only trusted me but has also experienced the same types of things that I have been through. I read through this book very quickly because it felt like I was listening to a truly kindred spirit! I am also posting this review on my blog: http://glamorousbookgal.blogspot.com/...

  27. 5 out of 5

    Meghan C.

    📚BOOK REVIEW📚 Title: Thanks for Waiting Author: Doree Shafrir Publisher: Ballentine Books Genre: Nonfiction, Memoir Rating: ⭐️⭐️⭐️⭐️💫 “So maybe part of growing up was becoming secure enough in myself to articulate what I wanted. But if that was the case, I had a lot of growing up to do.” Highlights: Doree Shafrir felt perpetually behind her peers. She was still interning at age 29. She didn’t meet her husband until her late thirties (on Tinder). She didn’t have a child until she was 41. This debut m 📚BOOK REVIEW📚 Title: Thanks for Waiting Author: Doree Shafrir Publisher: Ballentine Books Genre: Nonfiction, Memoir Rating: ⭐️⭐️⭐️⭐️💫 “So maybe part of growing up was becoming secure enough in myself to articulate what I wanted. But if that was the case, I had a lot of growing up to do.” Highlights: Doree Shafrir felt perpetually behind her peers. She was still interning at age 29. She didn’t meet her husband until her late thirties (on Tinder). She didn’t have a child until she was 41. This debut memoir covers the events of her life that she considers milestones, how her experience contrasted with similarly-aged people around her, and what there is to be gained from being a “late bloomer” in the world. Other thoughts: I rarely preorder books. However, I have been following Doree for years. First tuning in to her podcast with her husband called Eggcellent Adventure about their infertility journey (I called in with a question on roughly episode 3 that got read on the podcast many moons ago). I added her podcast Forever35 with Kate Spencer to my rotation and have been listening from day 1. I read her first fiction novel (Startup) and, collectively, that made her memoir an obvious choice for me to pick up. Especially since I also often identify as a late bloomer. I really enjoyed the book, but I know that I read it through the lens of a long-time Doree follower. Reading the book felt like a comforting walk through memory lane in a lot of ways that someone else just picking the book up wouldn’t experience. I enjoyed it immensely, but I could see how it would be a totally different type of read for someone who had no prior knowledge of Doree. Since that isn’t my experience, I can’t evaluate it from that perspective. My experience tells me that you should go buy this one and get Doree to the New York Times Bestseller list (and of course add a poignant memoir to your collection)! #nonfiction #thanksforwaiting #doreeshafrir #ballantinebooks #forever35 #thanksforwaitingbook

  28. 5 out of 5

    Jenna

    Shafrir is a charming narrator, and this was a quick, engaging read. I don't want to fault a book for not quite conforming to the brief described by the marketing hook, but it seems like the author is leaning pretty heavily into the "late bloomer" schtick in her own social media and promotion of the book, so I think it's fair to note that Thanks for Waiting didn't hit the mark for me. Ostensibly the story is about Shafrir's struggles to find herself professionally and personally, but it essentia Shafrir is a charming narrator, and this was a quick, engaging read. I don't want to fault a book for not quite conforming to the brief described by the marketing hook, but it seems like the author is leaning pretty heavily into the "late bloomer" schtick in her own social media and promotion of the book, so I think it's fair to note that Thanks for Waiting didn't hit the mark for me. Ostensibly the story is about Shafrir's struggles to find herself professionally and personally, but it essentially kicks off during her first magazine internship at age 29, with almost no mention of how she actually spent her 20s or what decisions brought her to that point. After landing on online journalism, she basically sees a meteoric professional rise (her Gawker layoff is immediately followed by a high-status role at Buzzfeed), and a series of promotions and successes that culminate in a senior staff writer position with a huge amount of autonomy and creative control. She makes much ado about leaving this role, but it's hard to feel the stakes when her departure is facilitated by both the success of her podcast, the revenues of which supposedly match her staff salary, and her new husband's income. Rather than being a so-called late bloomer, it seems like Shafrir settled on a career path in her late twenties and achieved rapid, consistent success. On the personal side, while the tales of dating adventures and misadventures are fun, if a little rote, the resolution is simply that she eventually meets someone and, after several years of infertility struggles, has a much-desired child. While I'm pleased that she found happiness and was able to build the family she wanted, there isn't nearly as much introspection or vulnerability as I would hope for. Compared to a memoir like Glynnis MacNicol's much richer and more emotionally complex No One Tells You This, book felt only surface-deep.

  29. 5 out of 5

    Karen

    I bought this book because I went to camp with Doree Shafrir, so first I want to say I loved her descriptions of camp -- stale cookies and kool-aid! boys sneaking into girls' bunks! Shaving your legs in the middle of Girls' Area! As will not surprise anyone who's read this book, I have somewhat stronger memories of Karen Shafrir than of Doree. I remember finding her intimidating when she was 9 and I was 15, though I also remember her comforting me when I was fired from waitressing in the camp di I bought this book because I went to camp with Doree Shafrir, so first I want to say I loved her descriptions of camp -- stale cookies and kool-aid! boys sneaking into girls' bunks! Shaving your legs in the middle of Girls' Area! As will not surprise anyone who's read this book, I have somewhat stronger memories of Karen Shafrir than of Doree. I remember finding her intimidating when she was 9 and I was 15, though I also remember her comforting me when I was fired from waitressing in the camp dining hall. So I get the role reversal that Doree talks about in this book. Though I also remember Doree as being in the popular crowd and her sister as looking a lot like her but with blonde hair, so I didn't quite know what to make of her saying she just didn't know how to be a girl, and her sister was so much cuter. Much of the book was like this, actually, which was what made me ultimately not that satisfied with it. She portrays herself as this nerd who took so long to figure her life out, but she's had a really successful career that she started before she turned 30. She got married on the later side, but not that late. The whole foundation of this book is basically Doree's insecurity, her *feeling* like she was doing everything late and hadn't figured life out, when actually she was fine. Though I haven't gotten much more confident as I've aged, I've gotten a lot less interested in reading about other women's insecurities.

  30. 5 out of 5

    Rebecca Brenner Graham

    THANKS FOR WAITING by Doree Shafrir is a remarkable feat. sorry if remarkable feat is a cliche. the central theme throughout the book is: Doree has been a late bloomer, which is not only okay, but also a good thing. But my central strand of thought throughout reading has been: how can this author be (1) so smart & successful & talented but also (2) so humble & modest & relatable & vulnerable. Doree covers her summer camp era, her journalistic career at Slate, Rolling Stone, Buzzfeed, & various N THANKS FOR WAITING by Doree Shafrir is a remarkable feat. sorry if remarkable feat is a cliche. the central theme throughout the book is: Doree has been a late bloomer, which is not only okay, but also a good thing. But my central strand of thought throughout reading has been: how can this author be (1) so smart & successful & talented but also (2) so humble & modest & relatable & vulnerable. Doree covers her summer camp era, her journalistic career at Slate, Rolling Stone, Buzzfeed, & various New York publications, her dating life & marriage, her debut novel STARTUP, & her infertility struggles before Henry was born, & early motherhood. while Doree’s dating life seems fairly standard & not inherently interesting, her superior eloquence, humility, insight, maturity, & especially self-awareness make her stories genuinely enjoyable to read. I don’t need to contrast w/ anything, but I’ll add that THANKS FOR WAITING is in key ways what the book GROUP wanted to be but imho very much wasn’t. in short, I highly recommend THANKS FOR WAITING, which also offers major Forever 35 podcast vibes ✨✨✨✨✨

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