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Lucky Girl

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A hilarious and poignant reflection on what money can and cannot fix 58,642,129. That’s how many dollars seventeen-year-old Fortuna Jane Belleweather just won in the lotto jackpot. It’s also about how many reasons she has for not coming forward to claim her prize. Problem #1: Jane is still a minor, and if anyone discovers she bought the ticket underage, she’ll either have to A hilarious and poignant reflection on what money can and cannot fix 58,642,129. That’s how many dollars seventeen-year-old Fortuna Jane Belleweather just won in the lotto jackpot. It’s also about how many reasons she has for not coming forward to claim her prize. Problem #1: Jane is still a minor, and if anyone discovers she bought the ticket underage, she’ll either have to forfeit the ticket, or worse . . . Problem #2: Let her hoarder mother cash it. The last thing Jane’s mom needs is millions of dollars to buy more junk. Then . . . Problem #3: Jane’s best friend, aspiring journalist Brandon Kim, declares on the news that he’s going to find the lucky winner. It’s one thing to keep her secret from the town — it’s another thing entirely to lie to her best friend. Especially when . . . Problem #4: Jane’s ex-boyfriend, Holden, is suddenly back in her life, and he has big ideas about what he’d do with the prize money. As suspicion and jealousy turn neighbor against neighbor, and no good options for cashing the ticket come forward, Jane begins to wonder: Could this much money actually be a bad thing


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A hilarious and poignant reflection on what money can and cannot fix 58,642,129. That’s how many dollars seventeen-year-old Fortuna Jane Belleweather just won in the lotto jackpot. It’s also about how many reasons she has for not coming forward to claim her prize. Problem #1: Jane is still a minor, and if anyone discovers she bought the ticket underage, she’ll either have to A hilarious and poignant reflection on what money can and cannot fix 58,642,129. That’s how many dollars seventeen-year-old Fortuna Jane Belleweather just won in the lotto jackpot. It’s also about how many reasons she has for not coming forward to claim her prize. Problem #1: Jane is still a minor, and if anyone discovers she bought the ticket underage, she’ll either have to forfeit the ticket, or worse . . . Problem #2: Let her hoarder mother cash it. The last thing Jane’s mom needs is millions of dollars to buy more junk. Then . . . Problem #3: Jane’s best friend, aspiring journalist Brandon Kim, declares on the news that he’s going to find the lucky winner. It’s one thing to keep her secret from the town — it’s another thing entirely to lie to her best friend. Especially when . . . Problem #4: Jane’s ex-boyfriend, Holden, is suddenly back in her life, and he has big ideas about what he’d do with the prize money. As suspicion and jealousy turn neighbor against neighbor, and no good options for cashing the ticket come forward, Jane begins to wonder: Could this much money actually be a bad thing

30 review for Lucky Girl

  1. 4 out of 5

    Sheena

    A 17 year old wins the lotto but you have to be 18 in order to claim and cash it. I thought this was a super fun premise but the book ended up being super repetitive with figuring out what to do with the lotto and then boyfriend and best friend drama. I didn't expect much romance in this book so I was actually excited about that so I was a little let down by that. Other than that, I think Jane is likable and fun so I did enjoy this. It deals with some grief as well since our main character is st A 17 year old wins the lotto but you have to be 18 in order to claim and cash it. I thought this was a super fun premise but the book ended up being super repetitive with figuring out what to do with the lotto and then boyfriend and best friend drama. I didn't expect much romance in this book so I was actually excited about that so I was a little let down by that. Other than that, I think Jane is likable and fun so I did enjoy this. It deals with some grief as well since our main character is still dealing with the aftermath of losing her father, 5 years later. She is trying to pick up the pieces of her mothers grief as well and dealing with her hoarding. Plus the main character is bi-sexual so we have some representation! This is a fast read that is fun but also has serious topics explored. The narrator did a pretty good job as well. Also, I would like to win 58 million dollars. Must be nice.. Thanks so much to Netgalley and to the publisher for an audiobook in exchange for an honest review.

  2. 4 out of 5

    Vicky Again

    Short & fast-paced, Lucky Girl puts us in the shoes of Fortuna Jane Belleweather, aka Jane, and her struggles after she finds out the lottery ticket she (okay, illegally) purchased as a minor is worth $58,643,129. I loved how concise this story was at teasing out the core of Jane's struggles and letting us see how this unexpected journey goes for her. How we didn't dawdle around the problems or get distracted. It's emotional and contemplative even in a condensed form. Pacton really makes every w Short & fast-paced, Lucky Girl puts us in the shoes of Fortuna Jane Belleweather, aka Jane, and her struggles after she finds out the lottery ticket she (okay, illegally) purchased as a minor is worth $58,643,129. I loved how concise this story was at teasing out the core of Jane's struggles and letting us see how this unexpected journey goes for her. How we didn't dawdle around the problems or get distracted. It's emotional and contemplative even in a condensed form. Pacton really makes every word matter. Lucky Girl teases out complicated family relationships (Jane & her hoarding mother), past romantic relationships (Jane & her ex-boyfriend who has suddenly become an econ-loving dudebro), and friendships (Jane & her best friend who's an aspiring journalist and hopes to figure out just who the winner is). We get to see just what's stopping Jane from cashing in the ticket--which, there's a lot of--and we get to see how it all resolves. Lucky Girl is a story rooted in a small, Wisconsin town and definitely one I'd recommend for anyone looking for a shorter length contemporary that packs quite a punch while pulling you in!

  3. 5 out of 5

    Sarah {The Clever Reader}

    This is an adorable YA Contemporary about a small town girl, not quite 18, who manages to buy the winning lotto ticket. Jane just won $58 million dollars but there’s one problem, she’s not 18 and can’t legally cash it in or she could face actual criminal charges. When the news announces the name of Jane’s small town in Wisconsin as being the place where the winning ticket is purchased she starts to panic. Who is she going to get to cash all this money in and guarantee they won’t take her for all This is an adorable YA Contemporary about a small town girl, not quite 18, who manages to buy the winning lotto ticket. Jane just won $58 million dollars but there’s one problem, she’s not 18 and can’t legally cash it in or she could face actual criminal charges. When the news announces the name of Jane’s small town in Wisconsin as being the place where the winning ticket is purchased she starts to panic. Who is she going to get to cash all this money in and guarantee they won’t take her for all it’s worth? I thought the author did a great job in portraying the anxiety Jane feels every time someone brings up the lotto ticket and when the whole town goes on the hunt you can feel the world around Jane getting smaller and smaller. Will she choose her best friend Bran, her mentally unstable mother, or the ex-boyfriend she thought she was in love with but left her high and dry with little explanation. I really liked the snippets of stories around other lotto winners and what happened to them throughout the book. Many of the stories included are a bit tragic from the winner taking their own life, being murdered for their money, or blowing it all and ending up broke. If all this research into past winners hasn’t given Jane enough anxiety her best friend Bran has decided to take his reporting skills to the next level to try to find the winner. Little does he know he’s connected to the winner more than he realizes. This book was really cute. I thought the emotions were well done when it came to Jane. I thought the portrayal of her mother’s mental illness felt authentic to her grief. I have someone close to me who lost their father and his mother was never really the same. She even became a hoarder and still struggles with it to this day. This book doesn’t just portray someone with anxiety but also different ways people cope with grief. I enjoyed it overall and would recommend it to anyone looking for a fast-paced YA Contemporary that deals with grief and anxiety but in a way that feels light in tone. https://thecleverreader.wordpress.com...

  4. 5 out of 5

    Aly

    This is a quick contemporary book about a girl who wins the lottery but now has to figure out how to claim the money. It was interesting to see the pros and cons of having so much money and makes you wonder what you would do in that position. Jane is only seventeen when she finds out she has the winning lottery ticket. Unfortunately, it's a crime for her to win so she needs an adult to claim the money. She's worried that her hoarder mom will use the millions to buy more junk, her grandma wants This is a quick contemporary book about a girl who wins the lottery but now has to figure out how to claim the money. It was interesting to see the pros and cons of having so much money and makes you wonder what you would do in that position. Jane is only seventeen when she finds out she has the winning lottery ticket. Unfortunately, it's a crime for her to win so she needs an adult to claim the money. She's worried that her hoarder mom will use the millions to buy more junk, her grandma wants nothing to do with the money, and her ex boyfriend may not give the money to her after he claims it. As the pressure increases, Jane isn't sure if the money will help or hurt her and wonders if she should let it go instead. I felt like Jane didn't think things through very well and was frustrated every time she fell for Holden's charm. I don't know why she didn't tell her best friend, he wasn't the kind of guy to hurt her or demand money. If she'd let him in, things would have been much less stressful. I also wanted her to talk to her mom about the hoarding and tell her how she was feeling. Watching Jane go along with her mom's shopping was hard and showed the affects of hoarding on the family members. The plot could have had more to it. There's not really romance or action, it's mostly Jane thinking. I would have liked a bit more to fill out the story to keep me engaged. Not a bad premise at all, just could have had a side story or romance to round it out. I voluntarily read and reviewed this book. Thank you to Dreamscape Media and NetGalley for the copy.

  5. 4 out of 5

    Eva B.

    3.5 stars First off, it was an incredibly cool experience to read a book that not only takes place in my home state, but in my area. Reading about a character going to the Madison Farmer's Market and looking over Lake Mendota made me feel at home in the best way possible. However, besides the setting, I feel like I never connected with the book. I'd still recommend it, but I liked Kit Sweetly a lot more. 3.5 stars First off, it was an incredibly cool experience to read a book that not only takes place in my home state, but in my area. Reading about a character going to the Madison Farmer's Market and looking over Lake Mendota made me feel at home in the best way possible. However, besides the setting, I feel like I never connected with the book. I'd still recommend it, but I liked Kit Sweetly a lot more.

  6. 5 out of 5

    Mike Lasagna

    I WANT THIS. BADLY.

  7. 4 out of 5

    Mimi

    Most surprising five-star read in 2021 so far - bisexuals are thriving 👌🏼👌🏼

  8. 5 out of 5

    Iris

    this was very sweet! I think it was generally speaking less my thing than Jamie Pacton's other book, and I didn't enjoy it quite as much, but that was through no fault of the book and it was definitely still a very good book, objectively speaking. I really loved the cast of characters (especially Bran lol), and the writing style is so engaging! I also do want to note that, though I fully recommend this book, it does deal with some tough subjects, specifically grief and dealing with a mentally ill this was very sweet! I think it was generally speaking less my thing than Jamie Pacton's other book, and I didn't enjoy it quite as much, but that was through no fault of the book and it was definitely still a very good book, objectively speaking. I really loved the cast of characters (especially Bran lol), and the writing style is so engaging! I also do want to note that, though I fully recommend this book, it does deal with some tough subjects, specifically grief and dealing with a mentally ill parent. I thought that it was very respectful with showing the balance between "her mother is mentally ill and genuinely struggling" and "her mother's actions are still hurting her" and didn't in any way demonize mental illness, but please do be aware of these themes when going in so they don't take you off guard.

  9. 5 out of 5

    Kat (Bookish Blades)

    Read the full review on my blog Bookish Blades the good: - Jane! I love her! - complex relationships and character dynamics - Bran, what a sunshine! - grief portrayed really well - complex characters - funny moments - super emotional moments the bad: ??? Rep: bi MC, Korean best friend TW: grief, loss of loved one (in the past), grief, hoarding, blackmail, manipulation Read the full review on my blog Bookish Blades the good: - Jane! I love her! - complex relationships and character dynamics - Bran, what a sunshine! - grief portrayed really well - complex characters - funny moments - super emotional moments the bad: ??? Rep: bi MC, Korean best friend TW: grief, loss of loved one (in the past), grief, hoarding, blackmail, manipulation

  10. 5 out of 5

    Lindsay (pawsomereads)

    This was a super interesting read that really got me thinking! It had a lot of depth and covered some important topics. Lucky Girl follows Fortuna Jane, though she prefers just Jane, after finding out she’s the sole winner of a 58 million dollar lottery. Sounds like a dream, right? Well, things aren’t all that simple as Jane is only 17 and shouldn’t have been allowed to buy a ticket in the first place, forcing her to scramble to find someone over 18 to claim her winnings for her. Her choices are This was a super interesting read that really got me thinking! It had a lot of depth and covered some important topics. Lucky Girl follows Fortuna Jane, though she prefers just Jane, after finding out she’s the sole winner of a 58 million dollar lottery. Sounds like a dream, right? Well, things aren’t all that simple as Jane is only 17 and shouldn’t have been allowed to buy a ticket in the first place, forcing her to scramble to find someone over 18 to claim her winnings for her. Her choices are slim as she’s faced with her money-obsessed ex, her mother’s hoarding problems that began after her father’s passing, and a small, Wisconsin town that’s desperate to know who among them is a new multi-millionaire. I couldn’t help but place myself in June’s shoes and wonder what I would’ve done in her situation. This was such a conundrum! Jane was stuck in such a difficult place and it was really captivating watching her try to work through her problems. Supporting Jane throughout her adventures was her best friend Bran, and he honestly stole the show for me. He was such a good friend in being there for Jane every step of the way and ultimately helping her solve her problem. The whole cast of characters was developed extremely well. They were all multi-faceted and easy to care about. I loved the brief nod to The Life and (Medieval) Times of Kit Sweetly! That’s another great book by Jamie that I highly recommend. I really enjoy when authors tie their works together even if it’s in a small way. This book was on the shorter side, but talked about so many meaningful things. There was obviously a lot of discussion around money; having it and not having it, what to do with a lot of it and how to handle having a little of it. Lucky Girl also covered some heavier topics. While contemplating what to do with $58,000,000 is a fun discussion to have, this story was more about family, loss and mental illness tied with grief. I was expecting a fun and light read but I got so much more than that! This was a really impactful book that I highly recommend checking out. Thank you so much to Page Street YA and Jamie Pacton for providing me with a copy of this book in exchange for an honest review!

  11. 4 out of 5

    rania | rania’s rambling reads

    Lucky Girl is a story about Fortuna Jane Belleweather, a seventeen-year old who has just won more than fifty-eight million dollars in the lottery. But along with the shock of winning, a lot more problems arise too. Jane isn’t eighteen yet, so she can’t cash the ticket, and if anyone finds out she bought the ticket as a minor, it would technically make her a criminal. Her best friend is intent on finding out the mystery winner, and her mom has a serious hoarding problem, which will only escalate Lucky Girl is a story about Fortuna Jane Belleweather, a seventeen-year old who has just won more than fifty-eight million dollars in the lottery. But along with the shock of winning, a lot more problems arise too. Jane isn’t eighteen yet, so she can’t cash the ticket, and if anyone finds out she bought the ticket as a minor, it would technically make her a criminal. Her best friend is intent on finding out the mystery winner, and her mom has a serious hoarding problem, which will only escalate if she lets the cat out of the bag. And for the cherry on top? Her ex-boyfriend has shown up out of the blue, with big plans for that money. This was a short and fluffy contemporary which dealt with hard topics in just the right way. Right from the synopsis, I knew not to expect anything going right in this book, which is basically exactly what happened. After winning the lottery, a string of funny and relatable incidents ensue, which made my experience very enjoyable. It also explains the effects of money and greed, and what it can do to people. I feel like that’s a really important lesson we need to learn in life, and Jamie Pacton does a brilliant job of putting it into light. Another thing I loved was the friendship between Bran and Jane. He was so supportive of her and never judged her for the mistakes she made and I think everyone needs someone like him in their lives. Initially, I was a bit weary of Jane hanging out with her ex-boyfriend again. I mean, her feelings were a mess when it came to him, and her conflicting emotions of how to deal with him were very amusing and annoying at the same time. And as we all know, with each YA novel comes a character we want to hurtle off to hell. I’m not going to say who it was but their ending was just SO satisfying. Jane’s mom went through some pretty hard times after her husband’s death and used hoarding as a coping method. Seeing how Jane dealt with her mom’s mental issues and how both of them came to a mutual understanding was genuinely uplifting. Overall, the writing was amazing, and this book was just a lot of problematic lives rolled into one was just so fun to read and be a part of.

  12. 4 out of 5

    Erin

    Thanks to NetGalley and Page Street Publishing for an egalley in exchange for an honest review Lucky Girl was a YA novel that seemed a bit lighthearted than my usual reading choices. Our 17-year-old protagonist, Fortuna is the latest lottery winner...the only thing is that it's illegal for her to have bought a ticket so she's keeping quiet. But as her small town keeps talking and her BFF and ex-boyfriend both are in a race to unmask the lottery winner. Fortuna might be running out of time. Pub Thanks to NetGalley and Page Street Publishing for an egalley in exchange for an honest review Lucky Girl was a YA novel that seemed a bit lighthearted than my usual reading choices. Our 17-year-old protagonist, Fortuna is the latest lottery winner...the only thing is that it's illegal for her to have bought a ticket so she's keeping quiet. But as her small town keeps talking and her BFF and ex-boyfriend both are in a race to unmask the lottery winner. Fortuna might be running out of time. Publication Date 11/05/21 Goodreads review published 31/05/21

  13. 4 out of 5

    Alaina

    I have received this ARC from NetGalley in exchange for an honest review. Okay, so I just finished Lucky Girl and I'm honestly not sure how I feel about it just yet. In it, you will meet Fortuna but she goes by Jane. One day, she ends up buying a lottery ticket just for shiggles (shits & giggles my friends). She doesn't think anything will happen from it but she also wasn't having the best of days when she went to get it either. So when she randomly finds out that she actually won the money, well I have received this ARC from NetGalley in exchange for an honest review. Okay, so I just finished Lucky Girl and I'm honestly not sure how I feel about it just yet. In it, you will meet Fortuna but she goes by Jane. One day, she ends up buying a lottery ticket just for shiggles (shits & giggles my friends). She doesn't think anything will happen from it but she also wasn't having the best of days when she went to get it either. So when she randomly finds out that she actually won the money, well, shit definitely hit the fan (sort of). Why? Well, she's technically underage because in the US you have to be at least 18 years old to buy a lottery ticket. It's true, I googled it! So being 17, she starts to freak out because she knows that she can't come forward and say that it's her ticket. Chaos comes in many ways throughout this book and I was very intrigued to see how things were going to end. For the most part, I will gladly say that I was not a huge fan of Holden. Even those he's her ex and all, I just didn't like the guy. The reason why he dumper her? Super dumb. Coming back into her life? Also dumb - be gone demon! Also, he was just an asshole through and through. Especially when he decided blackmailing her was a bright idea. Spoiler alert: it wasn't. Other than that, the family drama between her and her mom was also pretty interesting. I kept wanting her to just communicate with her mom about everything that was bottled up inside. Eventually it happened but I would have like it to happen a lot sooner than it did. Just because so much was going on in this book and it was pretty clear in the beginning that she needed to talk to someone. So, yeah, it definitely needed to happen way before the end of the book. It could just be me though... In the end, it was a cute book but I'm also kind of frustrated that her being bi was mentioned once and then nothing happened after that. It's okay that nothing romantic happened because I like a good friendship book now and then but it's weird to just say it and then never go back to it. Again, it could just be me.

  14. 5 out of 5

    kelly {BookCrushin}

    Loved every minute! Jane has such a unique story that we don't hear much in YA and I really appreciated someone who didn't have it all handed to her easily. Seriously such a good, inspiring, and fun read. Loved every minute! Jane has such a unique story that we don't hear much in YA and I really appreciated someone who didn't have it all handed to her easily. Seriously such a good, inspiring, and fun read.

  15. 5 out of 5

    Kimberly Canady

    Jamie Pacton is the best YA author out there! She knows how to capture the audience for sure! I love Her character Jane and the idea behind this book is fantastic! Thank you Jamie for giving us something that is hard to put down when we are reading! ❤️🤩😊

  16. 4 out of 5

    Melanie

    Thank you to Netgalley and Dreamscape Media for an ALC of this book. Content Warnings at end of review Fortuna "Jane" has never considered herself lucky--until a spur-of-the-moment decision to buy a lottery ticket results in her winning a 58 million dollar jackpot. Only problem? She's only 17, and she won't get the money if anyone finds out she bought it as a minor. She can't ask her mom for help, because she will just use it to continue to buy thrift finds to help her with the grief of Jane's fat Thank you to Netgalley and Dreamscape Media for an ALC of this book. Content Warnings at end of review Fortuna "Jane" has never considered herself lucky--until a spur-of-the-moment decision to buy a lottery ticket results in her winning a 58 million dollar jackpot. Only problem? She's only 17, and she won't get the money if anyone finds out she bought it as a minor. She can't ask her mom for help, because she will just use it to continue to buy thrift finds to help her with the grief of Jane's father passing away. So now Jane is left with few options, one of which is her ex-boyfriend, Holden. This book was cute and funny. There were times when I wasn't really able to suspend my disbelief enough? I almost felt like Jane didn't act the way I would expect a real person to act all the time, and it didn't feel quite right. I felt like there were really basic solutions to her problems and she was jumping to conclusions that didn't make sense to prolong the conflict. I liked how things were resolved with her mother and her friends! I wish there had been more mention of Jane's identity as a bisexual woman instead of just a one-off comment that was never mentioned again. Overall an interesting story and a quick read! Content Warnings Graphic: Mental illness, Grief, and Death of parent

  17. 4 out of 5

    Ashley Schumacher

    This book was such a delight. I was a huge fan of Kit Sweetly (which is ALSO a delight), and Lucky Girl has more than earned her spot next to Kit. Jane is such a sweetheart with the world on her shoulders (teenagers having to act as a parent to a parent is always hard but fascinating to read), the plot of a winning lotto ticket was handled realistically in a way that felt Very Relatable, and the friendships and grief woven throughout made this world shine as brightly as it's gorgeous cover. But r This book was such a delight. I was a huge fan of Kit Sweetly (which is ALSO a delight), and Lucky Girl has more than earned her spot next to Kit. Jane is such a sweetheart with the world on her shoulders (teenagers having to act as a parent to a parent is always hard but fascinating to read), the plot of a winning lotto ticket was handled realistically in a way that felt Very Relatable, and the friendships and grief woven throughout made this world shine as brightly as it's gorgeous cover. But really - this book was 10/10 huggable and the hardback looks so happy next to Kit on my bookshelf!

  18. 5 out of 5

    Kara Jorgensen

    I really enjoyed this. It's definitely more of a 4.5 for me. I really appreciate when authors make characters and their relationships complicated without totally demonizing the other characters. This story features a mentally ill mother who isn't a completely horrible person or saint, she's just messy and complex and I really appreciated Jane seeing her that even if they butted heads. Honestly, this whole book was lovely and handled so well. I'd love to see more fiction in this vein, and I loved I really enjoyed this. It's definitely more of a 4.5 for me. I really appreciate when authors make characters and their relationships complicated without totally demonizing the other characters. This story features a mentally ill mother who isn't a completely horrible person or saint, she's just messy and complex and I really appreciated Jane seeing her that even if they butted heads. Honestly, this whole book was lovely and handled so well. I'd love to see more fiction in this vein, and I loved Jamie Pacton's first book and can't wait for what she writes in the future.

  19. 5 out of 5

    Sue

    Well-written contemporary YA with themes around trust and secrets, family and friendship. I loved the main character, Jane, who loves whales!! Quick read builds up suspense and has a great ending. Bi/pan main character. CWs for death of a parent, hoarding. Some cursing and references to sex but seems appropriate for younger YA readers.

  20. 5 out of 5

    Kait Goodwin ★Kait Plus Books★

    MY HEART. ❤❤❤ I need some time to think about what exactly to say here. In the meantime, please know that I LOVE this book, I'm currently crying happy tears, and I already know what my answer is going to be next year when everyone starts asking about the best books of 2021. Full review to be published closer to the publication date on kaitplusbooks.com! Thank you SO SO MUCH to NetGalley and Page Street Kids for letting me read an eARC of this book, and thank you to Jamie for answering all my que MY HEART. ❤❤❤ I need some time to think about what exactly to say here. In the meantime, please know that I LOVE this book, I'm currently crying happy tears, and I already know what my answer is going to be next year when everyone starts asking about the best books of 2021. Full review to be published closer to the publication date on kaitplusbooks.com! Thank you SO SO MUCH to NetGalley and Page Street Kids for letting me read an eARC of this book, and thank you to Jamie for answering all my questions when some of the text decided to show up in Arabic. 💜💜💜

  21. 4 out of 5

    Chloe

    *Spoiler free* After reading The Life And (Medieval) Times Of Kit Sweetly, I was ready for this book. I think the synopsis of this book is what pushed me to pick up Kit when I did! It sounded so good, so I wanted to check out the author's other books! Anyway, this book is about a girl who wins the lottery, 58 million dollars. But, she can't claim the money since she is a minor. She feels like she doesn't have anybody to turn to for help, and money makes people do wild things. Trigger warnings: ho *Spoiler free* After reading The Life And (Medieval) Times Of Kit Sweetly, I was ready for this book. I think the synopsis of this book is what pushed me to pick up Kit when I did! It sounded so good, so I wanted to check out the author's other books! Anyway, this book is about a girl who wins the lottery, 58 million dollars. But, she can't claim the money since she is a minor. She feels like she doesn't have anybody to turn to for help, and money makes people do wild things. Trigger warnings: hoarding This book is short, sweet, and totally awesome. I will admit, that I had a hard time getting into it. It might have been my emotional state while reading it, but I felt like a good chunk of felt kind of slow to me. Despite this, when I finally got going, I ended up loving it. Since this book is pretty short (the ARC clocks in around 230 pages), this was towards the end of the book. But honestly, I can't complain. The ending made the whole book feel amazing! This is a book that has a sweetness to it, but it's also tinged with angst. Personally, I love the mix. Jane struggles to figure out what she should do with the money, who to trust, and what it could to her, her life, and the people she loves. She feels like she only has bad options to turn towards. She tries to come to a conclusion, and I really, really enjoyed seeing her journey. Plus, she's just a great character overall. She loves the ocean and whales, is hilarious, and is just a really great person. Another thing I really enjoyed was the friendships in this book. There is a central f/m platonic friendship. It's a solid, loving relationship, and boy do I love seeing guys and girls loving each other in a non romantic way. Bran and Jane truly love each other, and they completely support each other. Bran even has a girlfriend who is friends with Jane! I adore best friends-to-lovers, but I adore best friends-to-best friends too! This book features a whole lot of lottery winning horror stories, and they're TRUE. Like, names from headlines true! Money affects people, and a lot of the times those affects take a drastic and terrifying turn. And let's talk about the character I want to punch. I am going to be vague, because spoilers, but gosh, there is such a punchable character in this book. They are SUCH an asshole. Like, my sister and I were both screaming about how awful their actions were. All in all, Lucky Girl is a fantastic book! It has a certain sweetness to it, and it's tinged with angst, making a fantastic mix. I really, really enjoyed it.

  22. 5 out of 5

    Sacha

    Thanks to NetGalley and Page Street Kids for this arc, which I received in exchange for an honest review. I’ll post that review upon publication. If you’re looking for a speedy and intriguing read, keep an eye out for this one... Updates to follow. Updated 5/11/21 4 stars _Lucky Girl_ surprised me in a very good way. Jane, the m.c., is a high school senior who is dealing with a number of challenges. The most unexpected of these challenges is that she has recently and secretly won a $58 million lot Thanks to NetGalley and Page Street Kids for this arc, which I received in exchange for an honest review. I’ll post that review upon publication. If you’re looking for a speedy and intriguing read, keep an eye out for this one... Updates to follow. Updated 5/11/21 4 stars _Lucky Girl_ surprised me in a very good way. Jane, the m.c., is a high school senior who is dealing with a number of challenges. The most unexpected of these challenges is that she has recently and secretly won a $58 million lottery jackpot! Because she is underage when she purchases the ticket, and her state considers this a misdemeanor, she has added complications. Along with this awesome and confounding situation, Jane also lost her father at a young age and is continuing to deal with related grief. Her mother manages this grief in a different way: hoarding. She is so busy collecting other people's memories (aka their discarded and donated items) that she does not realize how much everything and everyone around her are suffering. Oh, and Jane also has a real trash bag of an ex-boyfriend. I enjoyed Pacton's first novel, _The Life and (Medieval) Times of Kit Sweetly_, but I struggled with some lacking development of the character there. My reaction to this novel is totally different. Both novels center on interesting premises, but Jane's story here is so much better tied together. She comes with so many lessons, and she is also strikingly easy to root for since - despite her given name and her big win - she seems to have the odds against her so frequently. This is a speedy and enjoyable read, and for me, there's a freshness to the character and the focal points. I'll be recommending this one to students and colleagues -

  23. 4 out of 5

    Tori Bovalino

    What a lovely, heartwarming book! I read it in a matter of hours -- it was so compelling and I had no idea what Jane would choose to do in the end. Jamie Pacton's treatment of grief and heartbreak felt so refreshingly honest. I loved that Jane talked to her dad through his Facebook messages, which felt like a very real representation of loss in today's world. Jane's relationship with her best friend, Bran, was so nice to read, and I really enjoyed how the book handles teenage love and breakups. O What a lovely, heartwarming book! I read it in a matter of hours -- it was so compelling and I had no idea what Jane would choose to do in the end. Jamie Pacton's treatment of grief and heartbreak felt so refreshingly honest. I loved that Jane talked to her dad through his Facebook messages, which felt like a very real representation of loss in today's world. Jane's relationship with her best friend, Bran, was so nice to read, and I really enjoyed how the book handles teenage love and breakups. Overall, it was such a delightful book, and I can't wait to see what Pacton writes next.

  24. 4 out of 5

    Jill Jemmett

    Seventeen-year-old Fortuna Jane Belleweather buys a lottery ticket on a whim one day and ends up winning the $58 million jackpot. There are a few reason she can’t cash it. First of all, she’s underage. She could wait until she turns eighteen, but she still bought the ticket while underage so she would face a misdemeanor if she claimed it. She could let her mother cash it, but that is another problem. Her mother is a hoarder who has been filling their home with other people’s discarded mementos s Seventeen-year-old Fortuna Jane Belleweather buys a lottery ticket on a whim one day and ends up winning the $58 million jackpot. There are a few reason she can’t cash it. First of all, she’s underage. She could wait until she turns eighteen, but she still bought the ticket while underage so she would face a misdemeanor if she claimed it. She could let her mother cash it, but that is another problem. Her mother is a hoarder who has been filling their home with other people’s discarded mementos since Jane’s father died. If Jane’s mother cashed in the lottery ticket, Jane is afraid of what she would spend it on. Jane’s best friend Bran wants to be a journalist, so he investigates the mysterious lottery winner. At the same time, Jane’s ex-boyfriend also wants to find out who the winner is because he has big plans of what he would do with the jackpot. As time goes on, there is more excitement around who won the lottery ticket in their small town, and Jane has to decide what she’s going to do with it. This is the third novel that I’ve read in the past month about someone winning the lottery. In two of those books, the person couldn’t cash it in because they are or would be in trouble with the law. Everyone dreams of winning the lottery, but it isn’t the dream that is seems. Jane and Bran researched past lottery winners and read about the horrible turns their lives took after winning. Many ended up dead or bankrupt. The lottery seems like it would solve all of life’s problems, but it causes a lot of new problems. One thing I didn’t really believe was the ending of the story. I won’t give away what Jane’s ultimate decision was in terms of if she cashed in the ticket or not. She talked so much about what the future could be like if she cashed in the ticket, and I don’t think the future she had planned at the end of the story was believable. It went against what he learned throughout the story about past lottery winners. This was a YA story, so it had a positive outcome, but I don’t think it was the most realistic ending. This is a thought-provoking read! Thank you Page Street Kids and TBR and Beyond for providing a copy of this book in exchange for an honest review.

  25. 4 out of 5

    Alyson Grauer

    Fortuna Jane Belleweather has won the lotto jackpot, but as a 17yo buying a lotto ticket is a misdemeanor, so she can't cash it herself. She can't have her mom do it for her - her mom's too busy hoarding other people's junk and tchotchkes in an attempt to combat the five years of grief for the loss of her husband/Jane's dad. Jane can't have her bff Bran do it; he's still 17 too. There aren't any other options except for Holden, her Wall Street wannabe ex-boyfriend who's been suspiciously nice to Fortuna Jane Belleweather has won the lotto jackpot, but as a 17yo buying a lotto ticket is a misdemeanor, so she can't cash it herself. She can't have her mom do it for her - her mom's too busy hoarding other people's junk and tchotchkes in an attempt to combat the five years of grief for the loss of her husband/Jane's dad. Jane can't have her bff Bran do it; he's still 17 too. There aren't any other options except for Holden, her Wall Street wannabe ex-boyfriend who's been suspiciously nice to her lately. In a small town like Lakesboro, WI, sooner or later the truth will come out and Jane needs a plan fast. Jane is goodhearted and kind, and wants to live a life of helping others and saving the environment. This $58 million dollars would really go far... but is the secret worth the drama? Should Jane just get rid of the winning ticket before anyone finds her out? Or is there something more to learn from being the luckiest girl in town? I loved Jamie Pacton's "The Life and Medieval Times of Kit Sweetly" and I thought "Lucky Girl" was a phenomenal sophomore book to follow up and stand on its own. Genuine characters set in a familiar-to-me backdrop of southern Wisconsin facing emotional choices and a dream bigger than they ever hoped for themselves? Yep. Sign me up. I was cheering for Jane from page one and I'm so glad to see a diverse and inclusive ensemble in Jane's corner of the world as I had seen in Kit Sweetly's too. Looking forward to Jamie Pacton's next work and feeling lucky to have gotten my hands on this one. 🍀❤️

  26. 5 out of 5

    Brandi Rae Fong

    About 20 pages in, I almost didn't finish this. I had started off skeptical with the premise. The main character bought a lottery ticket as a minor, and had planned to wait two weeks until she turned 18 to redeem the winnings. But...wouldn't the lottery commission need her birth date, and wouldn't they be smart enough to do the math and see she couldn't have been 18 when the drawing was held? What then? However, this was addressed in time and there were legal loop holes as well (that I actually About 20 pages in, I almost didn't finish this. I had started off skeptical with the premise. The main character bought a lottery ticket as a minor, and had planned to wait two weeks until she turned 18 to redeem the winnings. But...wouldn't the lottery commission need her birth date, and wouldn't they be smart enough to do the math and see she couldn't have been 18 when the drawing was held? What then? However, this was addressed in time and there were legal loop holes as well (that I actually looked up and verified. I'm that person). But the real reason I almost didn't finish this was the printing of the book itself. Holy small, faded font. It's like a size 9 font that isn't particularly dark and gets even more difficult to read when it switches to her notebook writing font. One can only hope this is fixed in the paperback. I am glad I kept reading though. Jane was in a tough spot, trying to deal with the ticket, a mother who is processing grief by hoarding, an ex-boyfriend that she may or may not like again, figuring out who she could trust now that she had won $58 million dollars. The relationships with her family and friends were believable and evolved throughout the book as she made decisions about this life changing amount of money. It isn't necessarily a stand-out book, but it was an enjoyable read that I think teens will like. It's just too bad about the font.

  27. 4 out of 5

    Kateryna

    This is a story of Jane, a 17yo girl who wins a lotto for $58 millions! But here comes a problem - she is a minor and she cannot play the lottery or cash the ticket because it’s illegal in the US, so she must find someone over 18 to claim her winnings for her. When I read the blurb I thought this was going to be a fun read. However, the book ended up being super repetitive with figuring out what to do with the lotto. It seemed clear to me what she should have done and who she should have distrus This is a story of Jane, a 17yo girl who wins a lotto for $58 millions! But here comes a problem - she is a minor and she cannot play the lottery or cash the ticket because it’s illegal in the US, so she must find someone over 18 to claim her winnings for her. When I read the blurb I thought this was going to be a fun read. However, the book ended up being super repetitive with figuring out what to do with the lotto. It seemed clear to me what she should have done and who she should have distrusted. There wasn’t really romance or action, and I would have liked a bit more to fill out the story to keep me engaged. It also dealt with some tough subjects, specifically grief and dealing with a mentally ill parent. I did like the ending and the epilogue but the middle really missed the mark for me.

  28. 4 out of 5

    Mara (marasfoldedpages)

    Thank you to the publisher for sending me a copy for review! I stayed up way too late to finish this one. At the beginning, I have to admit, I had a difficult time relating to Jane. We get it, you won the lottery. But once we got deeper into Jane's world, and found she had no one to really turn to in her life to help her cash the ticket, as she was still a minor, I really started to sympathize with her. Jane also recently just went through a breakup with her boyfriend Holden, (same), and he wants Thank you to the publisher for sending me a copy for review! I stayed up way too late to finish this one. At the beginning, I have to admit, I had a difficult time relating to Jane. We get it, you won the lottery. But once we got deeper into Jane's world, and found she had no one to really turn to in her life to help her cash the ticket, as she was still a minor, I really started to sympathize with her. Jane also recently just went through a breakup with her boyfriend Holden, (same), and he wants to get back together. That second guessing, remembering memories wrong because of nostalgia, and having that heavy weight of confusion on your heart is all too relatable. I think at this point in my life, this was exactly the book I needed to read, and has somehow validated a lot of things in my own life. As for the characters, Bran is the best person ever. I wish with my whole heart to have a best friend as smart, patient, and caring as him. Jane's mom is really sweet, and in some ways reminds me of my own mom. Always onto the next thing, always assuming I'm ready to jump in and help whenever she needs it. Don't get me wrong, I love my mom and am happy to help, but I understand that frustration and need to do your own thing sometimes. I really love how the author incorporated loss and how it can look different for different people. The grieving process can be messy, weird, and sometimes even full of other people's lost treasures. Overall, I really loved the way that things turned out, it was such an either/or decision, that it really came down to the end before we know what she chooses. Lucky Girl reads fast, and isn't quite a romance, but a heavy moral dilemma for 240 pages. This book made me feel anger, it made me laugh, and it really made me wonder what I would do if I won $58 million. 5/5 stars!

  29. 5 out of 5

    Mia

    Quick read with engaging writing. I really liked Jane and her friendship with Brandon. I just wished it was longer to flash out some things.

  30. 4 out of 5

    Christy

    I hope Holden steps on 1000 legos.

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