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A queer YA #MeToo reimagining of Thelma & Louise with the aesthetic of Riverdale, for fans of Mindy McGinnis, Courtney Summers, and Rory Power. When Trixie picks up her best friend Lux for their weekend getaway, she’s looking to escape for a little while, to forget the despair of being trapped in their dead-end Rust Belt town and the daunting responsibility of caring for he A queer YA #MeToo reimagining of Thelma & Louise with the aesthetic of Riverdale, for fans of Mindy McGinnis, Courtney Summers, and Rory Power. When Trixie picks up her best friend Lux for their weekend getaway, she’s looking to escape for a little while, to forget the despair of being trapped in their dead-end Rust Belt town and the daunting responsibility of caring for her ailing mother. The girls are packing light: a supply of Diet Coke for Lux and her ‘89 Canon to help her frame the world in a sunnier light; half a pack of cigarettes for Trixie that she doesn’t really smoke, and a knife—one she’s just hanging on to for a friend—that she’s never used before. But a single night of violence derails their trip and will forever change the course of the girls’ lives, as they go from ordinary high schoolers to wanted fugitives. Trying to stay ahead of the cops and a hellscape of media attention, the girls grapple with an unforgiving landscape, rapidly diminishing supplies, and disastrous decisions at every turn. As they are transformed by the media into the face of a #MeToo movement they didn’t ask to lead and the road before them begins to run out, Trixie and Lux realize that they can only rely on each other, and that the love they find together is the one thing that truly makes them free. In rushing, powerful prose Julia Lynn Rubin takes readers on “a blistering, unapologetic thrill ride” (Emma Berquis) that will leave them haunted and reeling. Trouble Girls is “a powerful, beautifully-written gut punch” (Sophie Gonzales).


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A queer YA #MeToo reimagining of Thelma & Louise with the aesthetic of Riverdale, for fans of Mindy McGinnis, Courtney Summers, and Rory Power. When Trixie picks up her best friend Lux for their weekend getaway, she’s looking to escape for a little while, to forget the despair of being trapped in their dead-end Rust Belt town and the daunting responsibility of caring for he A queer YA #MeToo reimagining of Thelma & Louise with the aesthetic of Riverdale, for fans of Mindy McGinnis, Courtney Summers, and Rory Power. When Trixie picks up her best friend Lux for their weekend getaway, she’s looking to escape for a little while, to forget the despair of being trapped in their dead-end Rust Belt town and the daunting responsibility of caring for her ailing mother. The girls are packing light: a supply of Diet Coke for Lux and her ‘89 Canon to help her frame the world in a sunnier light; half a pack of cigarettes for Trixie that she doesn’t really smoke, and a knife—one she’s just hanging on to for a friend—that she’s never used before. But a single night of violence derails their trip and will forever change the course of the girls’ lives, as they go from ordinary high schoolers to wanted fugitives. Trying to stay ahead of the cops and a hellscape of media attention, the girls grapple with an unforgiving landscape, rapidly diminishing supplies, and disastrous decisions at every turn. As they are transformed by the media into the face of a #MeToo movement they didn’t ask to lead and the road before them begins to run out, Trixie and Lux realize that they can only rely on each other, and that the love they find together is the one thing that truly makes them free. In rushing, powerful prose Julia Lynn Rubin takes readers on “a blistering, unapologetic thrill ride” (Emma Berquis) that will leave them haunted and reeling. Trouble Girls is “a powerful, beautifully-written gut punch” (Sophie Gonzales).

30 review for Trouble Girls

  1. 5 out of 5

    theresa

    Trouble Girls is a beautifully written thrill ride, taking readers through emotional turmoil, high stakes and grunge aesthetic. Rubin sensitively explores rape culture and victim blaming through two teenage girls unfortunately all too familiar with a system that protects abusers and denies their victims justice. With an intense relationship, vivid imagery and girls fighting back, Trouble Girls will leave you breathless. I really enjoyed this book! For me, Trouble Girls’ main strength lies in its Trouble Girls is a beautifully written thrill ride, taking readers through emotional turmoil, high stakes and grunge aesthetic. Rubin sensitively explores rape culture and victim blaming through two teenage girls unfortunately all too familiar with a system that protects abusers and denies their victims justice. With an intense relationship, vivid imagery and girls fighting back, Trouble Girls will leave you breathless. I really enjoyed this book! For me, Trouble Girls’ main strength lies in its writing. Rubin effortlessly conveys the cynical tone and character of our narrator, Trixie, a girl from small town West Virginia with a tough home life through simple, casual prose and sharp descriptions. The aesthetic and the atmosphere of the book was one of my favourite parts, though I’m not too sure how to describe it. The synopsis calls it the ‘aesthetic of Riverdale’ which I read as existing in this inbetween space of vintage aesthetic infused with modern vibrancy and pop culture. It has this blistering, run down and forgotten vibe that feels almost like falling into a dream scape at times, complemented by sharp writing and characters and the piercing urgency of conversations surrounding sexual assault. I think this line from the books most aptly describes it: "This is purgatory played to a soundtrack of pop music" Something else I enjoyed about this book was that the characters were unapologetically messy. They’re just a couple of teenagers thrown into a situation no one is ever prepared for and they make a lot of questionable decisions and mistakes but the reader always understands their reasoning. There’s also a palpable anxiety to everything that sets you on edge and helps you feel even a fraction of what they’re feeling and connect with them. I also thought that the conversations surrounding misogyny, rape culture and homophobia were handled really sensitively and enjoyed this aspect. The horrors of what’s portrayed and discussed is well offset by the girls’ reaction and narrative of fighting back. I also really enjoyed the romance between the two main characters and the development of their relationship from best friends with what felt like a lot of dependency on Trixie’s part, to just as intense but more independent of each other and capable of standing on their own together. I also really appreciated the sex positivity of their relationship and the soft moments the two of them shared, which really offset the harshness of the rest of the story. However, I would say that this relationship and Lux’s character could have done with some more development. In particular, I loved the concept of deconstructing the idea of a Manic Pixie Dreamgirl character through Lux, but felt that not enough was done to develop her character to make this effective. Additionally, I wouldn’t say this book dragged exactly, but I would say that the momentum was really inconsistent and there were times where it got lost. I think this also impacted the ending, in that there just wasn’t the same intensity or drive and it fell flat. This was coupled with a lack of resolution that honestly soured my experience after really loving the majority of the book. For me, Trouble Girls was much like the sweets Trixie and Lux delight in: great while you’re reading it but leaves you feeling kind of empty afterwards. The more I reflect on this book, the less I can say it has stuck with me, despite how much I enjoyed reading it. However, much like sweets, it was an enjoyable experience and had me hooked right from the beginning with gorgeous writing. Despite my issues I did overall love Trouble Girls for its messy characters, killer aesthetic and narrative of fighting the fuck back and challenging rape culture. I also talk about books here: youtube | instagram | twitter *eARC received in exchange for an honest review via Netgalley*

  2. 4 out of 5

    mishi

    "Shit like this is why I trust no man. You can’t ever tell who’s a hog or not just by looking at their face. Better to assume they all are." This was such a thrilling read. It's the kind of book that make you feel you are a part of it. I loved the plot, it's scary how relevant and appropriate this book is for our time. The real strength of the book lies in it's characters. I love how genuinely authentic they were. I truly felt the character's emotions. Most of the stuff they did, I could actu "Shit like this is why I trust no man. You can’t ever tell who’s a hog or not just by looking at their face. Better to assume they all are." This was such a thrilling read. It's the kind of book that make you feel you are a part of it. I loved the plot, it's scary how relevant and appropriate this book is for our time. The real strength of the book lies in it's characters. I love how genuinely authentic they were. I truly felt the character's emotions. Most of the stuff they did, I could actually imagine someone doing that in real life. They made some dumb decisions which would normally make me angry but it just made them all the more endearing to me. They are not criminal masterminds and are just kids doing the best they can in the messed up situation they found themselves in. They panic, trust the wrong people, waste money on shiny things. I adore their bond and inability to give up on each other. (Lux's reason for not taking off the ring melted me.) To see them slowly lose hope and realize the gravity of their situation was the most heartbreaking thing. The whole book is filled with so many important scenes and quotes that as a woman I found truly relatable. The contrast between how women were believing Trouble Girls and men were saying horrible things is literary what happens irl. (view spoiler)[I am just going to believe that her father actually did kill that garbage neighbor. Otherwise him doing that and getting away scot-free while Trixie and Lux suffer so much for just one mistake is unthinkable. (hide spoiler)] ARC copy provided by the publisher via NetGalley in exchange for an honest review.

  3. 4 out of 5

    Leah

    3 Stars I’m not exactly sure what to say about “Trouble Girls” by Julia Lynn Rubin. This is a sapphic YA contemporary reimagining (slightly) of Thelma & Louise. Trixie and her best friend Lux are planning a weekend trip to just get away and relax by the lake. On the way they stop to at a college bar and find far more trouble than either anticipated. Afterwards, the girls flee and go on the run across the country in Trixie’s busted up car. First off, this book has no chapters, it just continues on 3 Stars I’m not exactly sure what to say about “Trouble Girls” by Julia Lynn Rubin. This is a sapphic YA contemporary reimagining (slightly) of Thelma & Louise. Trixie and her best friend Lux are planning a weekend trip to just get away and relax by the lake. On the way they stop to at a college bar and find far more trouble than either anticipated. Afterwards, the girls flee and go on the run across the country in Trixie’s busted up car. First off, this book has no chapters, it just continues on and makes stopping somewhat difficult. And this is a book where I needed a lot of breaks. I didn’t find it easy or fun to read at all. I found myself stressed, uncomfortable, and filled with anxiety and it only got worse the further the story went. But I also think this was done on purpose. “Trouble Girls” deals with sexual assault, victim blaming, and slut shaming to name a few. None of these should make you feel comfortable and Rubin really delivered on that point. Another thing, both girls are seventeen and they continuously make bad decisions. I spent a lot of time yelling at my kindle with things like “please don’t do what you’re about to do” but alas, they did them anyway. At least they were consistent in their bad choices. They’re on the run and they don’t have a lot of money so sometimes they find themselves in situations where they don’t have many options. Sometimes you have to do what you have to do to get by and so I understood. But it didn’t make reading it any easier and I kept getting frustrated. This is told in Trixie’s point of view and although it’s okay for Trixie, it left a lot of problems for Lux with me. I don’t feel we ever got really deep with her and I didn’t understand her at times. She seemed wishy washy at certain points and the only things I know about her for certain is that she likes makeup and taking pictures. There is a romance between them but I just didn’t feel it. I wasn’t even certain they liked each other until about halfway into the book. They just seemed like best friends. While I appreciated their love and devotion to each other, their romantic feelings never came through in a believable manner to me. I think I would have enjoyed it more without the romance. Who has time for love when you’re on the run from the police and starring in your own #MeToo movement? In the end, I would suggest reading other reviews. I haven’t read too many other reviews so I’m not sure where I stand with this one relative to others. I wanted to like it more than I did but overall, I was just exhausted once I was finished. I received an ARC from NetGalley and Wednesday Books in exchange for an honest review.

  4. 4 out of 5

    E.

    "a queer, modern re-imagining of Thelma & Louise" that's all i need to know "a queer, modern re-imagining of Thelma & Louise" that's all i need to know

  5. 4 out of 5

    Katie B

    3.5 stars I read this book a few weeks ago, and I've been contemplating since then what I wanted to say in my review. I have mixed feelings about the book, although I lean more positive than negative. You pretty much get what is advertised but I couldn't help but wonder if the author chose a different path perhaps this book could have been an outstanding read instead of just a solid, decent read. Trixie has been dealt a bad hand when it comes to her home life. She's looking forward to a weekend ge 3.5 stars I read this book a few weeks ago, and I've been contemplating since then what I wanted to say in my review. I have mixed feelings about the book, although I lean more positive than negative. You pretty much get what is advertised but I couldn't help but wonder if the author chose a different path perhaps this book could have been an outstanding read instead of just a solid, decent read. Trixie has been dealt a bad hand when it comes to her home life. She's looking forward to a weekend getaway with her best friend, Lux. On their road trip, they make a stop at a college bar but a fun time quickly turns violent. These high school girls are now on the run. The publisher says it best when describing this book as a "queer YA #Metoo reimaging of Thelma and Louise". I picked this book up in the late afternoon and by bedtime I had finished it. So I definitely was into the story and the characters. Given I am old enough to be the mother of Trixie and Lux, I was naturally frustrated with some of their actions as fugitives. I had to keep reminding myself not all teenagers, and let's face it many adults, are capable of making sound financial decisions. One issue I struggled with is whether or not the story was best served as a Thelma and Louise retelling. For awhile, I had high hopes the author was headed more in The Legend of Billie Jean direction. In this #MEtoo era, I believe that's the type of story audiences would rather see play out. It became obvious towards the end of the book that key elements that made that somewhat obscure movie good, were not going to be fully developed in this story. (Sorry, for being vague as it's hard to write a review and not give away spoilers) Don't get me wrong, I liked how this book wasn't a fluffy read and there was some substance to the story. I just think it didn't reach its full potential. By the way, fair warning there's tough subject matter so this book might not be for every reader. I won a free copy of this book in a Goodreads giveaway but was not obligated to post a review. All thoughts expressed are my honest opinion.

  6. 5 out of 5

    Natasha

    I'm a simple person, I see a book is sapphic and I add it to my tbr I'm a simple person, I see a book is sapphic and I add it to my tbr

  7. 5 out of 5

    bella

    cw/tw: sexual assault, mentions of past child sexual abuse, attempted sexual assault, ptsd, death, stabbing, blood, threats of violence/sexual violence, abuse, ailing parent, parental death (mentioned)

  8. 5 out of 5

    Julia Rubin

    Anger. Frustration. Despair. Anxiety. That specific horrible feeling of being a young, vulnerable girl up against an older man looking you up and down like a potential meal. The way your blood pressure spikes while reading hateful, vicious comments online in a seemingly endless echo chamber of rage and hatred. These are just some of the feelings that inspired my novel Trouble Girls, but there are lighter feelings that guided me, too: hope, joy, love, awe. That amazing sensation of listening to yo Anger. Frustration. Despair. Anxiety. That specific horrible feeling of being a young, vulnerable girl up against an older man looking you up and down like a potential meal. The way your blood pressure spikes while reading hateful, vicious comments online in a seemingly endless echo chamber of rage and hatred. These are just some of the feelings that inspired my novel Trouble Girls, but there are lighter feelings that guided me, too: hope, joy, love, awe. That amazing sensation of listening to your favorite song blasting from your car speakers while driving on the open road in the sunshine. When I was in high school, I longed to become a director and screenwriter someday. I spent my weekends watching VHS tapes and DVDs rented from Blockbuster: movies both new and classic. Thelma & Louise was one such movie, and it shook something awake inside of me. It came out in 1991, the year after I was born. Beyond the incredible direction and acting in this rare “girl buddy” film, there’s a strong Sapphic subtext between the two main characters. It was also one of the first movies to directly address the issues of rape and sexual assault. I wanted to adapt and reimagine this story for a modern, younger audience, bringing my love for both cinema and fiction together in what I hope is far more reflective of the America we live in now, subtext and all. I truly believe that a reader sees what they need to see in every book they read. There are multiple ways to interpret this book, including the ending, and I've hidden Easter Eggs everywhere, as well as hints about possible readings. However you read this book, whatever it makes you think or feel, I'm so happy and excited to share it with you, and I hope that it resonates with you somehow. This novel took years of love and extremely hard work, many drafts, many revisions, and many nights spent agonizing over a single sentence or word. It was so worth it, and I am so honored to share it with you.

  9. 5 out of 5

    charlotte,

    On my blog. Rep: lesbian mc, bi li CWs: domestic abuse, sexual assault, past child sexual abuse Galley provided by publisher Trouble Girls is a book that feels mostly aesthetic and not much deeper. I mean, I’m perfectly willing to accept that this might just have been me — plenty of people haven’t had this problem after all. But if we’re talking why I didn’t enjoy this book, that would be the biggest reason (and one I’ll come back to later). The story follows Trixie and Lux as they set off on a w On my blog. Rep: lesbian mc, bi li CWs: domestic abuse, sexual assault, past child sexual abuse Galley provided by publisher Trouble Girls is a book that feels mostly aesthetic and not much deeper. I mean, I’m perfectly willing to accept that this might just have been me — plenty of people haven’t had this problem after all. But if we’re talking why I didn’t enjoy this book, that would be the biggest reason (and one I’ll come back to later). The story follows Trixie and Lux as they set off on a weekend roadtrip. Only, quite rapidly, their plans go downhill after Trixie stabs a man who’s sexually assaulting Lux. And, thereafter, they go on the run from the cops and media. As I said at the start, the book feels more of an aesthetic than anything particularly deep. I don’t quite know how to explain it, because it’s just a feeling, not something so concrete, but I think what illustrates it is this: there’s a line somewhere in the first quarter where Trixie says something along the lines of “you never know which nice-projecting men might be actual shits so you go around assuming they all are”. I hate to be defending cishet men here, but that line kind of loses any power it might have when all you’re shown is shitty men. That’s what I mean by this book is all aesthetic and no depth. It’s things like that, and how Lux is supposed to be some critique of the Manic Pixie Dream Girl trope but feels barely fleshed out in that respect. Add onto that the fact I actually needed to be shown a lot more than I was, particularly regarding Trixie and Lux’s feelings of powerlessness, and what led Trixie to straight up stab a guy as her first instinct. None of that felt clear to me. And then there’s the fact that there’s no real drive to the plot thereafter. They go on the run, sure, but they never feel as though they really are. There’s the occasional part where they get to see what the media’s saying, but there’s never a hint that anyone’s near to catching them, not until the very end. All you’d need is maybe someone recognising them, or someone looking about to call the police. As such, much of the plot feels somewhat pointless, like when they pick up a hitchhiker and she… I don’t know, teaches them some things? This is what I mean by pointlessness and lack of drive. They spend about 80% of the book just dicking about on the road. Which means the ending really falls flat. It’s not forecasted at all and it comes very abruptly, with no hint of perhaps they make it out of all this. I get that this book was supposed to be some catharsis, getting revenge on the system, on rape culture, for women. But none of it lands, because they end up arrested still. Not to mention all this sticking it to the system seems to come out of nowhere, because we’re not really shown Trixie and Lux’s powerlessness effectively. It seems more that they do it on a thoughtless whim, to have a bit of fun (not to mention none of what they do is that big? It’s just spraypaint). So as much as this book was supposed to be cathartic, in the end the only catharsis I experienced was in writing this review. And then we get to the romance. This is another aspect I didn’t feel was effectively foreshadowed or shown, but I won’t dwell on that because the same as above applies. But once they started on it, none of it felt like I had a reason to root for them together. Perhaps this is because the book as a whole felt somewhat rushed (again linking in to not being shown a lot maybe?). There was no time for things like romance to breathe, which I get is hard because these characters are (supposedly) on the run. They can’t exactly settle down for a few days and develop the relationship in the same way a romance novel would. But on the whole, there was not really a whole lot there that suggested to me they were in love. It felt more like “oh we’re on the run together, all this adrenaline, we have to hook-up”. Which was a shame. In the end, then, this is a book that just didn’t land for me. It had the potential, it just didn’t live up to it.

  10. 4 out of 5

    birdie

    no one's as shocked by this rating as i am, trust me. with this many elements i adore — feminism, dark vibes, morally grey sapphics on the run and more — trouble girls could've easily become an instant fave of mine. at least, that's what i expected, but unfortunately this is not the case. if you're interested in reading my full review on my blog, be sure to click here! what i liked: - the main character, trixie, is really cynical. she's our point of view and i feel like julia lynn rubin perfectly c no one's as shocked by this rating as i am, trust me. with this many elements i adore — feminism, dark vibes, morally grey sapphics on the run and more — trouble girls could've easily become an instant fave of mine. at least, that's what i expected, but unfortunately this is not the case. if you're interested in reading my full review on my blog, be sure to click here! what i liked: - the main character, trixie, is really cynical. she's our point of view and i feel like julia lynn rubin perfectly captured how things go in trixie's head. the prose was just drained with her views and i can only applaud the author for this! - julia lynn rubin really didn't beat around the bush, lol! she's blatantly honest about our patriarchy and it was so refreshing to see the truth written in a young adult book. no trying to make it seem more beautiful than it is for the audience; the author didn't hold back. - this book is GAY! the sapphic rep was probably my favourite part of the book, even though the romance wasn't really what i wanted from it (more on that later). i just loved how unmistakably queer this was. what i didn't like: - about everything else... - this is mostly due to my expectations, but i really thought this novel would dive into the trial and sexisms + the media's role in this. unfortunately, the book ended before that storyline could even begin. - the execution of this amazing idea could've been pretty revolutionary, in my opinion. but instead it lacked a lot of depth, character and plot-wise. i hoped for a story with many layers, but we only got to see one: the one that's right at the surface. - about the characters...i felt nothing for them to be honest. they were just there, but they didn't feel like actual people. plus, i really wanted to love the relationship between lux and trixie which i didn't, mainly because of the circumstances. i'm just feeling very empty, lol. - at some point, lux calls trixie out on treating her like a manic pixie dream girl, which was fair. i was glad it was acknowledged but then it! didn't! change?! make it make sense, honestly. - i don't know how else to say this but...the pacing is a mess. it ended too soon, as i already mentioned, and in key scenes everything just goes way too fast. take the stabbing scene in the very beginning as an example: i was reading there and just thinking...wait what? it felt so rushed i didn't even realise that that was it! conclusion: trouble girls isn't a bad book; it's just one that needed more. more depth, more story, more everything. it could've been revolutionary, but unfortunately it really did fell flat for me. it pains me to say this, but this highly anticipated release of mine scores two out of five. thank you to the publisher for providing me with this book in exchange for an honest review! this did not affect my opinions in any way.

  11. 5 out of 5

    Gabriella

    tw/cw: alcohol, anxiety, panic attacks, blood, graphic injuries, death, depersonalization, dementia, drugs, guilt, homelessness, misogyny, teen pregnancy, racism, white supremacy, sexual assault/rape (on-page), suicidal thoughts, teenage pregnancy, threats, tobacco use, violence I was sucked into this dark, emotional YA thriller. It’s the epitome of secondhand anxiety and there aren’t many light moments to balance out the dread, but since this book deals with the ugly aftermath of sexual assault tw/cw: alcohol, anxiety, panic attacks, blood, graphic injuries, death, depersonalization, dementia, drugs, guilt, homelessness, misogyny, teen pregnancy, racism, white supremacy, sexual assault/rape (on-page), suicidal thoughts, teenage pregnancy, threats, tobacco use, violence I was sucked into this dark, emotional YA thriller. It’s the epitome of secondhand anxiety and there aren’t many light moments to balance out the dread, but since this book deals with the ugly aftermath of sexual assault, I think the vibe was spot-on. I had an anxious, sick feeling in my gut the whole time I was reading this, and while that doesn’t sound like a good thing, I think it speaks to how well Rubin conveys those emotions. The story is told from the first-person POV of Trixie Denton, a high schooler who waitresses at a diner and cares for her single mother with dementia. Trixie has been sexually assaulted in the past and the “hog men” who frequent the diner bring up those terrible memories. Trixie’s two sources of light are Judy, the spunky grandmotherly figure who also waitresses at the diner, and Lux Leesburg, her longtime best friend and crush. When Trixie and Lux plan a weekend getaway, they’re looking forward to some time off, but a horrible event en route turns their lives upside down and prompts them to go on the run. Rubin does a great job of weaving feelings of dread throughout the novel. Trixie appears to suffer from panic attacks/PTSD and depersonalization, and she often has intense feelings that things are “off” about a situation. Trixie and Lux meet lots of people during their journey, and Trixie’s waffling between feelings of trust and distrust left me on the edge of my seat. It was also heartbreaking to witness Trixie and Lux missing the kind people they leave behind: both in their hometown (Judy, Trixie’s mom, Lux’s family) and along their journey. Trixie and Lux are both very flawed and neither is always likable. While they are oftentimes frustrating, I found their portrayal realistic and important. They actually act like teenagers, from the way they speak to their mannerisms to the way they don’t make the wisest decisions. We get to see how horrible situations might affect teenagers, might make them scared and not know where to turn to, might make them think the only way out is to dig themselves deeper and deeper into a hole of destruction. There is also a friends-to-lovers romance between the girls, but this isn’t one of those books that focuses on relationship buildup and falling in love. Trixie and Lux are implied to be already in love at the beginning of the novel, and the main focuses are their leaning on each other, supporting each other, and finally recognizing their feelings for each other. There’s also discussion of how the girls’ disastrous night impacts the whole country, as people are divided on who to believe and support. There’s some focus on activism from the local university’s WOC-led Intersectional Feminist Union, and likewise there are people who hate their activism and want to bring assault survivors down (be forewarned that the misogynistic comments in this book are very disturbing and might be too much for some readers). Trixie and Lux also acknowledge that they have privilege as white girls, which was good to see. I would have liked to have seen more from the ending, and I while I’m not mad that the girls made a bunch of reckless decisions, I thought that some of their narrow escapes were quite convenient. There is also the question of whether certain aspects of the book are playing into harmful narratives (ex: queer women hate men and/or were abused by men, cops can be saviors), but after some deliberation, I don't personally feel like this story is broadcasting those messages. Buddy read with Hsinju!. Check out her review here for a different interpretation. I received an ARC from Wednesday Books via NetGalley in exchange for an honest review.

  12. 4 out of 5

    R

    Best friends Trixie and Lux were excited to get away for a weekend of fun to Fever Lake. On the way there, they decided to stop at a college bar, a place they knew they wouldn’t get carded. Both girls were still in high school but Lux wanted to dance and have some fun with this college crowd, and she did. There was dancing, flirting, and some kisses. Then suddenly and unexpectedly their fun vacation turned into a nightmare with both girls on the run. But along the way, the girls found the freedo Best friends Trixie and Lux were excited to get away for a weekend of fun to Fever Lake. On the way there, they decided to stop at a college bar, a place they knew they wouldn’t get carded. Both girls were still in high school but Lux wanted to dance and have some fun with this college crowd, and she did. There was dancing, flirting, and some kisses. Then suddenly and unexpectedly their fun vacation turned into a nightmare with both girls on the run. But along the way, the girls found the freedom to be themselves, speak out against misogynistic treatment, and explore a newfound love. This was a fast paced read filled with nervous tension and dramatic moments. The characters were realistically portrayed and emotionally engaging. It was touted as being a YA version of Thelma and Louise, and it was. An ARC was given for an honest review.

  13. 4 out of 5

    Carrie (brightbeautifulthings)

    Trixie and her best friend, Lux, are off for a weekend of partying and camping, a brief escape from the bitter realities of life in their small town and Trix’s ailing mother. But when a stop at a nightclub turns violent, the girls are suddenly fleeing across the country from police and a media storm. Their lives have been changed forever, so the girls decide to make the most of it, branding themselves the Trouble Girls and leaving a trail of crime in their wake. I received a free e-ARC through N Trixie and her best friend, Lux, are off for a weekend of partying and camping, a brief escape from the bitter realities of life in their small town and Trix’s ailing mother. But when a stop at a nightclub turns violent, the girls are suddenly fleeing across the country from police and a media storm. Their lives have been changed forever, so the girls decide to make the most of it, branding themselves the Trouble Girls and leaving a trail of crime in their wake. I received a free e-ARC through NetGalley from the publishers at St. Martin’s Press. Trigger warnings: death, rape mention, pedophilia mention, sexual assault, trauma, guns, robbery/theft, violence, slurs, blood. I liked the premise of Trouble Girls, but it never quite came together for me. There are a number of problems, but I think the one that troubles me most is its lack of message. The description calls up the #metoo movement, but that turns out to be somewhat misleading. Trouble Girls never evolves into a movement of any kind because Trixie and Lux don’t actually stand for anything. They’re angry about things like poverty and sexism–things we have every right to be angry about–but aside from a couple social media messages and some graffiti, they don’t do anything about them. Trixie notes that a couple girls from college campuses are leading the charge, girls who suffer even more hate because they’re women of color, and she’s right. Those are the girls doing something, the ones I want to read a story about. I have no idea what the major takeaway of Trix and Lux’s story is supposed to be. Instead of launching a movement or developing any sort of belief system or agenda, the plot of the novel is actually just the two girls running from town to town, making tourist stops, and trying to survive by stealing what they need. I was sympathetic to them at times, but at others it’s clear they’re teenage girls who have no idea how to get by in the world and are alarmingly short-sighted about their options. It grows repetitive quickly, with few events that advance the plot or the character development in any significant way. The characterization is rather poor too. Trixie’s entire personality seems to be a burning hatred for all men (difficult to read at times–sexism is real and vicious, but thinking of all men as “hogs” is also sexist, however justified it might be) and a love for Lux that occasionally comes off as creepy or predatory. Lux’s personality is… I’m not sure. Pink hair and bubblegum? She’s a manic pixie dream girl who doesn’t seem to have any motivation outside of a baffling commitment to Trixie and their life of crime. The girls run out of options around the same time as the plot runs out of steam, and the ending fails to resolve much of anything. I review regularly at brightbeautifulthings.tumblr.com.

  14. 4 out of 5

    rose ✨

    dnf @ 24% as a huge thelma and louise fan, i had high expectations for trouble girls, but this contemporary reimagining just fell flat for me. i found the writing so clunky and heavy-handed that despite the incredibly high-stakes storyline and serious themes, i was never able to connect with either trixie or lux—and even their supposed connection felt forced. i do appreciate what the author was trying to do, but all in all this one was a disappointment for me. i received an arc from netgalley in dnf @ 24% as a huge thelma and louise fan, i had high expectations for trouble girls, but this contemporary reimagining just fell flat for me. i found the writing so clunky and heavy-handed that despite the incredibly high-stakes storyline and serious themes, i was never able to connect with either trixie or lux—and even their supposed connection felt forced. i do appreciate what the author was trying to do, but all in all this one was a disappointment for me. i received an arc from netgalley in exchange for an honest review.

  15. 5 out of 5

    Hsinju

    Buddy read with Gabriella! I encourage you to check out her 4-star review instead. This book is well-written and I did like the social commentary-ness of Trouble Girls, but I don’t know... maybe Thelma & Louise just isn’t meant to be retold in YA in almost its entirety. Trixie Denton (~17) and Lux Leesburg (~17) go on a weekend getaway but accidentally get entangled with a crime. Now, they are on the run and the road trip stretches into days and weeks. I… am not sure what I just read. I appreciate t Buddy read with Gabriella! I encourage you to check out her 4-star review instead. This book is well-written and I did like the social commentary-ness of Trouble Girls, but I don’t know... maybe Thelma & Louise just isn’t meant to be retold in YA in almost its entirety. Trixie Denton (~17) and Lux Leesburg (~17) go on a weekend getaway but accidentally get entangled with a crime. Now, they are on the run and the road trip stretches into days and weeks. I… am not sure what I just read. I appreciate the points this book is making, including the main theme of sexual assault and some mentions of racism, homophobia, etc., but other than that, the somewhat unnecessary descriptions included to build the scenes made me very uncomfortable. Especially some insults other characters throw around. They felt somewhat gratuitous even though, at the same time, I understand why they were included. The book is full of panic attacks and anxious energy, and yet, I never really felt enough connection to the main characters to care for them. I liked that the romance subplot is full of chemistry, but other than that, Trixie and Lux just move from town to town, meeting a lot of random people on their way. And I didn’t feel like I know them at all, even when it is told in Trixie’s first-person point of view. Had the story been told from Lux’s POV, we might have been able to learn more about the both of them. Alas, I spent most of the time waiting for the ending of the story and when I reached it, I was disappointed. Like the movie, which I have not seen, it is somewhat open-ended. I love a good open ending, but in Trouble Girls, I finished the book wondering why I road-tripped with them for almost 300 pages. I should reiterate that Rubin wrote the story well, but I personally couldn’t get into it. Perhaps, if you are a Thelma & Louise fan, you will love this YA retelling. Content warnings: murder, panic attack, dementia, sexual assault (including rape), blood, homophobia, smoking (underage), brief suicidal thoughts, mention of overdose, homophobia, misogyny, mention of teen pregnancy, mention of trans rejection, mention of racism I received a digital review copy from Wednesday Books via NetGalley in exchange for an honest review.

  16. 4 out of 5

    Sapphic Bookshelf

    *Thank you to NetGalley and St. Martin's Press for the ARC in exchange for my honest review* I thought Trouble Girls would be something like Promising Young Woman meets Thelma & Louise but unfortunately it didn’t meet my expectations. Trixie and Lux are two girls from a small town in West Virginia, who desperately need to get away for the weekend to escape their difficult lives. However, in their attempt to have fun things go sideways and they end up committing a crime and running away across the *Thank you to NetGalley and St. Martin's Press for the ARC in exchange for my honest review* I thought Trouble Girls would be something like Promising Young Woman meets Thelma & Louise but unfortunately it didn’t meet my expectations. Trixie and Lux are two girls from a small town in West Virginia, who desperately need to get away for the weekend to escape their difficult lives. However, in their attempt to have fun things go sideways and they end up committing a crime and running away across the country. I think the idea was quite interesting and appealing but this book has a lot of wasted potential: the plot gets monotonous and boring after a few pages, the main characters are so naïve and immature that it’s a bit hard to connect with them and also, the book is filled with YA clichés and it felt like I had already read it before. Another thing that made me a bit reluctant to like this book was the style of the prose: the language used in the book feels very colloquial and simple and not very literary, and while that’s fine for some readers, to me it felt like the book was written for Wattpad. Once again, this is totally fine and I often like books that read like fanfiction but I just didn’t connect with this one. If you are looking for an easy read, a sapphic teenage romance and runaway criminals on a road trip, this might be your book. The fact that it didn’t work for me doesn’t mean it won’t work for you! TW: domestic abuse, sexual assault, child sexual abuse, violence. Rep: (L)GBT – Main characters

  17. 4 out of 5

    jut

    i…am not sure what i just read.

  18. 4 out of 5

    Andy

    3.5/5 Thank you to Netgalley for providing an eARC in exchange for an honest review. All opinions are my own. Very much a feminist and queer re-imagining of Thelma & Louise. I was super excited for this book, but alas it wasn't exactly what I expected. Ultimately I still enjoyed this one and I hope we get more books like this with queer characters. Trouble Girls is about Trixie and Lux, two small town girls who are headed on a well deserved vacation. They stop in a college town bar and when Lux is 3.5/5 Thank you to Netgalley for providing an eARC in exchange for an honest review. All opinions are my own. Very much a feminist and queer re-imagining of Thelma & Louise. I was super excited for this book, but alas it wasn't exactly what I expected. Ultimately I still enjoyed this one and I hope we get more books like this with queer characters. Trouble Girls is about Trixie and Lux, two small town girls who are headed on a well deserved vacation. They stop in a college town bar and when Lux is almost sexually assaulted, Trixie stabs the guy. The two flee and later find out that he died. This started out really great, but as soon as Trixie and Lux thought that $2000 and some change was going to last them an indefinite amount of time, I might have checked out a little bit. It didn't feel realistic for these two girls. While they are teenagers, both of them had extra responsibilities at home that forced them to grow up more than a normal teenager. Lux takes care of her young brother and Trixie is the primary caregiver for her mother who is sick with either Alzheimer's or dementia and is losing memories. These two definitely knew the value of money and I couldn't reconcile it with their seemingly frivolous attitude at first. Eventually they did come back to the real world and were like shit we don't have much money now. Besides writing some blog posts, the connection to the #MeToo movement seemed a bit vague. Yes other stuff happens elsewhere in the world after Trixie & Lux's situation is broadcast, but it didn't really feel like the two girls had a direct say in it. I guess I had expected a more direct connection. Then there's the ending which was quite a mess? Open-ended endings are hit or miss for me and this one was sadly a miss. I just did not understand this ending. (view spoiler)[ Like all the sudden the girls are in a desert, literally in the middle of NOWHERE, and five seconds later you're telling me they're completely surrounded by police vehicles AND a helicopter?? Like? Bit unrealistic. (hide spoiler)] I wanted to like this one more than I did, but the naivete of the girls and some of the unrealistic events kept me from connecting with this one as much as I wanted to.

  19. 4 out of 5

    Trisha

    I'm really torn on this one - 2 stars rounded up for the love story. I liked a lot of things about this story. I liked the reality of life on the run - being dirty, breaking out, being hungry, sleeping weird hours and some of the odd people you are forced to align yourself with. I loved the love story - their shared history, their fierce protectiveness, their handholding and being there for each other. I also liked how the hog story and the fear after being attacked was handled. It's a rough topi I'm really torn on this one - 2 stars rounded up for the love story. I liked a lot of things about this story. I liked the reality of life on the run - being dirty, breaking out, being hungry, sleeping weird hours and some of the odd people you are forced to align yourself with. I loved the love story - their shared history, their fierce protectiveness, their handholding and being there for each other. I also liked how the hog story and the fear after being attacked was handled. It's a rough topic and I thought this one was gritty and dark and true. But for all these parts of the story I liked, there are a lot of slow parts. A lot of inner turmoil and driving, driving, driving. I wish I'd felt a bit more connected so the tortured thinking drew me in instead of leaving me wondering when something would happen. It was okay, I liked a lot of it, but didn't love it. A huge thank you to the author and publisher for providing an e-ARC via Netgalley. This does not affect my opinion regarding the book.

  20. 5 out of 5

    Dana Mele

    Thelma and Louise meets Natural Born Killers--incisive, unflinching, and beautifully written. I read it in one night and it took a full weekend to sink in. This book packs an emotional punch! Set aside time for this one--you won't want to put it down until you know how it ends (it's worth it). Thelma and Louise meets Natural Born Killers--incisive, unflinching, and beautifully written. I read it in one night and it took a full weekend to sink in. This book packs an emotional punch! Set aside time for this one--you won't want to put it down until you know how it ends (it's worth it).

  21. 4 out of 5

    Paige Hettinger

    EDIT: read this review on my blog now!!! A reimagined Thelma & Louise with the aesthetic of Riverdale was truly all I needed to hear—this book hooked me with that and that alone. But I think I may have set my expectations too high as a result, because no one is as shocked as I am that this book didn’t work for me. I wish I could say that the pacing and actual structure of Trouble Girls didn’t negatively impact my reading experience as much as it did, but the total lack of chapters took a toll. I’v EDIT: read this review on my blog now!!! A reimagined Thelma & Louise with the aesthetic of Riverdale was truly all I needed to hear—this book hooked me with that and that alone. But I think I may have set my expectations too high as a result, because no one is as shocked as I am that this book didn’t work for me. I wish I could say that the pacing and actual structure of Trouble Girls didn’t negatively impact my reading experience as much as it did, but the total lack of chapters took a toll. I’ve explained in reviews before how much I hate skimming, but I skimmed so much of this book because it just simply couldn’t hold my attention, but I wanted to reach its ending so badly. After the initial incident that kicks off the story, little to nothing actually happens. Two girls take off on the road, outrunning a violent act against a would-be rapist, and the plot subsequently becomes as aimless as Trixie and Lux’s journey itself. And despite the promise of a cops-hot-on-their-tail, propulsive thriller, it never felt like they were running away from much at all. It was missing true drive, and the prose couldn’t hold the concept’s weight. And much of that is due in part to the romance between Trixie and Lux, unfortunately. The Manic Pixie Dream Girl problem presented itself quickly, and when it was actively addressed, I was elated and ready for something deeper between the two girls and within the two girls as individuals to establish itself. But the MPDG problem was never actually overcome. Considering that this story is based almost solely around Trixie and Lux’s developing relationship as they try to escape, I was expecting their bond to naturally anchor the text. Instead, it felt decidedly unmoored. I never got a good sense of them as individuals nor as partners in any sense of the word. While I was glad to see an overtly “Sapphic” novel like this, I wish more had been done with Trixie and Lux. And finally, I had issues with Rubin’s exploration of rape culture. As happy as I was to see it fleshed out on the page and actively explored (major props to the use of raw, realistic, plain and oft-violent language when it came to the online abuse Trixie and Lux received/discovered), it felt somewhat empty and hollow. The prose itself bordered on trite and patronizing, and it wasn’t lost on me that activists of color were placed at the forefront of Rubin’s sociopolitical commentary, became vessels for it, yet never held significant space. It felt—to me—that they were used as props. We need to be having these conversations about rape culture in YA, we need to be having them about weaponized feminism, but for as much as I wanted to cheer on the violent and unforgiving challenge of rape culture, I also wish there had been an ending that drove home the necessity of that. The ending fell awfully flat. There was something very seriously lacking in all this that I’ve been struggling to put my finger on. It felt a lot like Promising Young Woman. Overall, I’m just not sure what to really say, comprehensively, about this book. I feel a bit speechless. I loved the aesthetic, but it felt more committed to aesthetic at times than it did plot and character. I wanted to cheer on the rape culture commentary, but I struggled with its use. The writing hooked me quickly, but it lost me just as quickly too. I feel strange even rating this book, because I’m so stunned that it didn’t work out. I think Trouble Girls was ultimately just not a book for me the way I was so certain it would be. OG REVIEW: this is the promising young woman of books.

  22. 5 out of 5

    lauraღ

    All I know is, I'd still be me, and I'd still want to love every part of someone just like Lux. 3.5 stars. I'm trying to figure out if I'd have liked this more or less if I'd ever seen/knew more than the bare basics about the movie Thelma and Louise. Would I have gotten more out of it, to see all the parallels? Or would all the similarities have frustrated me? I don't know. But I did enjoy this. Mostly? It's the story of two girls who end up on the run after what was supposed to be a weekend g All I know is, I'd still be me, and I'd still want to love every part of someone just like Lux. 3.5 stars. I'm trying to figure out if I'd have liked this more or less if I'd ever seen/knew more than the bare basics about the movie Thelma and Louise. Would I have gotten more out of it, to see all the parallels? Or would all the similarities have frustrated me? I don't know. But I did enjoy this. Mostly? It's the story of two girls who end up on the run after what was supposed to be a weekend getaway turns bloody. This is an extremely anxiety-inducing book, especially from the perspective of an adult who's just so worried and scared for these girls, and so angry about all the ugliness and hate that surrounds them. They make a lot of bad decisions, but it's all very realistic; they're scared teenagers, and they're panicking, and they don't have any experience with things like this. It's still very nerve-wracking, seeing it all play out, and that anxiety wasn't exactly enjoyable, as a reader? But that's a bit of the point. This isn't meant to be an easy read. Trixie and Lux's story is a condemnation of rape culture and misogyny; a close-lensed look at the suffering and PTSD that can come with being a queer teenage girl. Trixie and Lux aren't always likeable, but there's something very cathartic about their rage, and the way they refuse to be cowed. I really loved their burgeoning romance; everything about Trixie's feelings and insecurities and the way it was described felt so authentic and real and my heart just hurt for them. Another thing I especially liked was Rubin's writing and craftsmanship; she really succeeded in creating the perfect atmosphere and characters. I'm not quite satisfied with this though. At times it was a bit... essentialist? In its commentary and discussion? And idk, it's very possible to write a story about rape culture and the violence that men inflict upon women and the ways it's ingrained in the fabric of society without going there. IDK. I also didn't love the whole "hog" thing, though there are story reasons for it, and I understand. It was used a lot, and started to border on fatphobic, when she used it on random side characters. And the ending didn't feel very satisfying to me. It either needed to end some time before or after that moment, for me to really feel a sense of completion. (There were also a bunch of typos, but I'm assuming that's just an arc issue.) Definitely a compelling read, one that shouldn't be approached lightly.  Content warnings: (view spoiler)[past csa, attempted rape, rape culture, murder, death, homophobia, misogyny, panic attacks and anxiety. (hide spoiler)] ☆ Review copy provided via NetGalley.

  23. 4 out of 5

    Tina

    TROUBLE GIRLS by Julia Lynn Rubin is a fierce YA novel! This book is a reimagining of the movie Thelma & Louise about two teenage girls, Trixie and Lux, who escape their small town after a violent night. . I really appreciated the content warning at the front of the book stating that this book contains off-page sexual assault and on-page violence as well as support resource information. There are several intense issues and situations in this book that could make it difficult to read. . I really enjo TROUBLE GIRLS by Julia Lynn Rubin is a fierce YA novel! This book is a reimagining of the movie Thelma & Louise about two teenage girls, Trixie and Lux, who escape their small town after a violent night. . I really appreciated the content warning at the front of the book stating that this book contains off-page sexual assault and on-page violence as well as support resource information. There are several intense issues and situations in this book that could make it difficult to read. . I really enjoyed the queer representation and the strong bond between the two girls. This was one wild ride of a book! . Thank you to Wednesday Books for my gifted review copy!

  24. 4 out of 5

    Mia

    3.5 stars Trouble Girls is thought-provoking, road-trip thriller and queer love story about high schoolers turned fugitives is written great. I just wished it had epilogue but overall, it was well-written and I highly recommend it. ARC kindly provided by the publisher via NetGalley in exchange for an honest review.

  25. 4 out of 5

    Nev

    A queer, modern day Thelma & Louise for the YA market. Trouble Girls had me hooked from the very first paragraph. In a couple of sentences Julia Lynn Rubin had set the tone for the entire story. I instantly knew Trixie’s voice and her outlook on the world. The journey that Trixie and Lux go on isn’t a scene for scene recreation of the movie so the plot still kept me on the edge of my seat. I personally loved how harsh and messy this book was at times. I can see how those things won’t appeal to a A queer, modern day Thelma & Louise for the YA market. Trouble Girls had me hooked from the very first paragraph. In a couple of sentences Julia Lynn Rubin had set the tone for the entire story. I instantly knew Trixie’s voice and her outlook on the world. The journey that Trixie and Lux go on isn’t a scene for scene recreation of the movie so the plot still kept me on the edge of my seat. I personally loved how harsh and messy this book was at times. I can see how those things won’t appeal to all readers. Trixie and Lux constantly make bad decisions. However I do think that is understandable since they’re young, on the run, and in way over their heads. They’re willing to do whatever is necessary to try and protect one another. The ending of the book had my heart racing. I was anxious to find out if the story was going to end like the movie or not. I can see people wanting more from the ending, but I’m personally satisfied with where it left off. This is a dark book that won’t be for all readers, but I definitely recommend it to people who enjoy hard-hitting YA books. Thank you to the publisher for providing an advance copy via NetGalley in exchange for an honest review.

  26. 5 out of 5

    Jaye Berry

    This had so much potential but uh... no. Trouble Girls is about two girls named Trixie and Lux. They were supposed to have a fun weekend getaway but after Lux gets assaulted by a man at a bar, Trixie kills him. As they go on the run, they have only each other and money that is going fast. The summary for this book gassed it up, HARD. It goes through all this shit about how they are the queens of the #Metoo movement while it namedrops the hashtag multiple times like this is some epic feminism badas This had so much potential but uh... no. Trouble Girls is about two girls named Trixie and Lux. They were supposed to have a fun weekend getaway but after Lux gets assaulted by a man at a bar, Trixie kills him. As they go on the run, they have only each other and money that is going fast. The summary for this book gassed it up, HARD. It goes through all this shit about how they are the queens of the #Metoo movement while it namedrops the hashtag multiple times like this is some epic feminism badass book but this was fucking trash?? There is no epic road trip / on the run with cops after their every move. They go online once to see how people are seeing them and to talk some shit to gross dudes but that's it?? They watch the news a few times but besides that, they are completely unbothered and their journey has NO fucking goal. They aren't on some quest- they are on the most boring road trip ever with petty crime to survive every now and then. MAYBE if there was actually a sense of urgency and they were actually hiding from the cops?? But no the entire trip is stupid as hell as they shoplift jewelry from Walmart and rob a gas station for $90. Our greatest heroes!! This could have been SUCH a banger. Trixie literally kills a rapist, fuck yeah sis do it again. That scene was so rushed though it was WEIRD?? Like hol up this is literally the most important thing the book will do maybe we should think about this some more. The pacing in the entire book was just so bad. So many unimportant scenes were dragged out while things that could have been were just there and gone. When they turned on the news for five seconds so we could get a shot of what was happening only for it to be like okay enough of that let's read about the girls stealing chips. Then the book just said we're going to start a conversation about important things like rape culture and fighting misogyny but then we are gonna go be dumb and have no depth to ANY of this. Trixie and Lux, yikes. First I hate their names second I hate them. Lux tells off Trixie for treating her like a manic pixie dream girl and then the book does nothing after that so I wonder why they even bothered to say it. The romance was not good either. There was never any build up or even them stopping for a second to talk about their relationship. Trixie is in love with her from the beginning and after being on the run they are both like oh well okay I guess we'll make out and suddenly be girlfriends. It's funny because this isn't the first book I read with this concept but while this one was slightly gayer, they were both bad.

  27. 5 out of 5

    Rainbow Beans

    The blurb makes this book look really good and I want to read it but it was described as "the aesthetic of Riverdale" and I really don't want to read a book with the 'aesthetic of Riverdale' because have you seen Riverdale? It's not good. The blurb makes this book look really good and I want to read it but it was described as "the aesthetic of Riverdale" and I really don't want to read a book with the 'aesthetic of Riverdale' because have you seen Riverdale? It's not good.

  28. 5 out of 5

    taylor

    This one just wasn't for me pals. This one just wasn't for me pals.

  29. 4 out of 5

    emmm_reads

    3/5 stars! I had some pretty mixed feelings about this one. I really loved the premise, I thought the author did a great job at setting the atmosphere of the story, and I can definitely appreciate that the story dealt with a lot of very important topics. That being said, I never really found myself getting particularly invested in the characters or the plot, and I wasn’t the biggest fan of the pacing. (I don’t think those things were necessarily badly done, they just weren’t really for me persona 3/5 stars! I had some pretty mixed feelings about this one. I really loved the premise, I thought the author did a great job at setting the atmosphere of the story, and I can definitely appreciate that the story dealt with a lot of very important topics. That being said, I never really found myself getting particularly invested in the characters or the plot, and I wasn’t the biggest fan of the pacing. (I don’t think those things were necessarily badly done, they just weren’t really for me personally). Additionally, the lack of chapter breaks really did not work for me and made it a bit hard to actually read through the entirety of the book. Ultimately, I don’t think this is a bad book by any means, but it didn’t particularly stick with me.

  30. 4 out of 5

    I can't read straight

    Trouble Girls is a very tough book, a real punch in the stomach. There is this intrinsic sense of tragedy that made it really difficult for me to read and there have been times when I wish I could put it down for a while. But it's so well written that I've been sucked each time into this tunnel of anger, helplessness and stupid choices that is the story of Trixie and Lux. A narration without pauses, without chapters, just a single long story. You will probably be shocked too by how realistic and Trouble Girls is a very tough book, a real punch in the stomach. There is this intrinsic sense of tragedy that made it really difficult for me to read and there have been times when I wish I could put it down for a while. But it's so well written that I've been sucked each time into this tunnel of anger, helplessness and stupid choices that is the story of Trixie and Lux. A narration without pauses, without chapters, just a single long story. You will probably be shocked too by how realistic and relevant the story is. What begins as a trip to the lake, a break from their messed up homes, becomes an escape from all that is wrong with a male chauvinist and patriarchal society like ours. The book is filled with this sense of inevitability that wraps the reader like a blanket. Trixie and Lux ​​make many mistakes that don't depend on them, who are just two young girls, but on the society that surrounds them and that somehow back them into a corner, "forcing" them to make these mistakes. Yet the journey also changes them, they grow up, face their traumas, protect each other and fall in love. But they are not interested in becoming a symbol of universal feminism, they prefer to leave it to people they recognize as braver than them. Trixie and Lux ​​are not made to start a movement like the MeToo, they don't want to be its face, they are more interested in those little moments of revenge, that sense of power that suddenly pervades them when they try to fight the male-dominant society, whether it's with a message on a forum or a flat tire. There are people who thrive only from those little moments all of their life.

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