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In Rome, 89 A.D., poisonings, murders, and a bloody gang war of retribution breaks out during the festival of Saturnalia--and when her husband, Tiberius, becomes a target, it's time for Flavia Albia to take matters into her own hands … In Rome, 89 A.D., poisonings, murders, and a bloody gang war of retribution breaks out during the festival of Saturnalia--and when her husband, Tiberius, becomes a target, it's time for Flavia Albia to take matters into her own hands …


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In Rome, 89 A.D., poisonings, murders, and a bloody gang war of retribution breaks out during the festival of Saturnalia--and when her husband, Tiberius, becomes a target, it's time for Flavia Albia to take matters into her own hands … In Rome, 89 A.D., poisonings, murders, and a bloody gang war of retribution breaks out during the festival of Saturnalia--and when her husband, Tiberius, becomes a target, it's time for Flavia Albia to take matters into her own hands …

57 review for A Comedy of Terrors

  1. 4 out of 5

    Paromjit

    The latest addition to the Flavia Albia series from Lindsey Davis is a riotously chaotic and joyful read, set in Rome 89 AD amidst the mid-December Saturnalia festival celebrations, the same Saturn in mythology who ate his children. The streets and bars abound with unrestrained revellers drunk out of their skulls as the drinks flow with abandon, the inevitable throwing ups, debauchery and other filthy behaviour, pranks, insults fly, harrassment, grievous batterings, families at war, marriages in The latest addition to the Flavia Albia series from Lindsey Davis is a riotously chaotic and joyful read, set in Rome 89 AD amidst the mid-December Saturnalia festival celebrations, the same Saturn in mythology who ate his children. The streets and bars abound with unrestrained revellers drunk out of their skulls as the drinks flow with abandon, the inevitable throwing ups, debauchery and other filthy behaviour, pranks, insults fly, harrassment, grievous batterings, families at war, marriages in trouble, along with scheming and intrigue aplenty. There's the rituals and traditions to be carried out at home, festival decorations, presents to be given, the endless visitors and celebration feasts to be organised. There are two grieving young boys in Flavia's household, Gaius and Lucius, the nephews of her magistrate husband, Tiberius, who have come to live with them when his sister died. The boys bond with the donkey and the newly acquired sheep, clinging to any sense of familiarity and finding joy in playing jokes. Flavia refuses to be doomed by parenthood, and has no intention of giving up her work as a private informer, although there is precious little work to be had in the holiday period, and when she does find work, it's with a finagling client where all is not as it appears. Tiberius, an upright citizen and moral man, applies the regulations to all, immune to bribery and status, a position that is to make him a target of powerful and ruthless criminal gangsters intent on taking over Rome's nut trade with their mouldy product. Any nut traders who refuse to buy their rotten nuts are murdered in grisly ways as a lesson to others. There is no way Flavia is not going to make behind the scene inquiries on the 'nutty business' to support and protect Tiberius, picking up useful information from a number of different sources in a boisterously celebrating Rome. In this past year of Covid 19, Davis seems to be all too aware that people need some joy and to be uplifted, she provides that in spades with the comedy and hilarity to be found during Saturnalia with her fabulous cast of characters, some of whom haven't made an appearance for quite a while. This is a wonderfully irresistible, entertaining and fun murder mystery, there are grim murders, corruption, extortion, villainous criminal gangsters and racketeering, but the highlight for me were Davis's descriptions of Rome and the Saturnalia festival, seen through the eyes and experiences of Flavia, and other key characters. Highly recommended. Many thanks to Hodder and Stoughton for an ARC.

  2. 4 out of 5

    Mick Dubois

    When Flavia Alba takes her 2 young nephews shopping for Saturnalia gifts, she finds the vendor stabbed to death in his tenement. The boys are full of their adventure but Flavia wants to investigate and returns to the crime scene, where the murder victim has disappeared. Apparently, it was a Saturnalia joke and the dead man is getting drunk in the pub with his brother. She feels a bit stupid but is further happy that no harm is done. Business is slow during the festivities but it will pick up onc When Flavia Alba takes her 2 young nephews shopping for Saturnalia gifts, she finds the vendor stabbed to death in his tenement. The boys are full of their adventure but Flavia wants to investigate and returns to the crime scene, where the murder victim has disappeared. Apparently, it was a Saturnalia joke and the dead man is getting drunk in the pub with his brother. She feels a bit stupid but is further happy that no harm is done. Business is slow during the festivities but it will pick up once they’re over, she’s assured by a colleague. A woman with marital problems also comes for advice and Flavia aids her in every possible way she can. Her husband Tiberius Manlius (aided by Titus Morellus of the 4th cohort) is investigating one of his last cases; the local nut sellers are being forced to buy their products from a new wholesale cartel with very aggressive sales tactics and bad or mouldy products. With not much else to do, Flavia hears interesting things that may be connected to her husband’s case, she starts to meddle there as well. I was really happy to find a series that takes places in Rome towards the end of the 1st century. After all, the Roman Empire had a huge influence on the shape, laws and customs of modern-day Europe and the rest of the Western civilisation. A mystery set in those days intrigued me from the start. Thank you to my GR friend Paromjit who pointed it out to me. What is not to like about Flavia? She's far from perfect and will be the first one to admit this. She’s a breath of fresh air and adorable as well. Born in Britain, she lost her parents during the Boudicca uprising and ended up in Rome where she was exploited and abused by some very nasty and cruel individuals. She was noticed and later adopted by Falco and Helena her new parents and things started to look a bit better for her. She works as an informer, a term that covers the whole scheme of private detective work from simple background checks over finding missing relatives to solving crimes and murder. She learned that trade from her dad Falco but no-one has ever heard of a successful female PI. Until now, that is. She’s a level headed and logical young woman that suffers no fools. Her husband is an aedile in charge of weights and measurements band the quality of goods that are offered for sale. He’s widely known as a stickler to the rules who crosses all t’s and dots every I. The title may mislead you into thinking it is a comedy but it is historical crime fiction that has its funny moments, a lot of them in connection with the festive season. There are plenty of funny one-liners that may raise a few smiles as well, especially those incidents where you think “that could happen today”. The book is also sprinkled with all sort of interesting facts about life in that day and age. There’s an extensive cast of characters and some clever person did the right thing and put the list of their names at, the beginning of the book! Maybe they heard my usual complaint as to why so many publishers put those lists at the end of an e-book, which is totally unpractical. One thing that I would have liked to see in this book is a map of Rome at the time as there are a lot of references to streets and other geographical places. Then there’s the topic of slavery. As I understand it, Flavia and Tiberius are very liberal and tolerant in the treatment of their slaves and try to educate them for a life in freedom. I don’t think that was the general practice but I do believe that most house slaves were treated in an acceptable, humane manner. After all, they were expensive to replace. There was a hierarchy between the slaves as well. No, I don’t think that slavery is an acceptable institution but at the time, this was standard practice, not just in Rome but almost everywhere in the world there existed a form of slavery. We do have to look at it with the eyes of the period. Things were what they were. But I do wonder if we must look at the modern Italians and ask repair for the countless people of West European countries that were stolen and sold into slavery? I think it best to leave the past where it belongs; in history. As no-one alive today suffered this injustice (not included the victims of IS and other religious nutcases or those of human trafficking) we should look forward to the future instead of wallowing about the past historical crimes that everybody acknowledges as being wrong. Life in the first century posed many of the same problems, vices and crimes we know today; greed, adultery, organised crime families, unpaid debts and collecting them, … And there is the Saturnalia festival that has eerie similarities to our Christmas period in its customs and significance; greenery decorations, family reunions, gifts for the children, large meals, oil lamps and candles to illuminate the festivities (and cause a fire hazard) ... So, humanity hasn’t changed very much in the last 2000 years and that may well be the forte of this series Even though this is the 8th book in this series, I had no problems with the story. Explanation about certain situations and people were given where necessary. Some of the hints about Flavia’s history piqued my interest to read the earlier books as well. There’s a long, slow introduction that gets you acquainted with all the characters and some of their history. Some of the events seem irrelevant but later on, in the book, those seemingly uninteresting encounters and observations turn out to be very valuable after all. It’s very cleverly put together. It definitely is a series that deserves more attention. I must thank Netgalley and Hodder & Stoughton for the free ARCC they provided and this is my honest, unbiased review of it.

  3. 5 out of 5

    Elaine Tomasso

    I would like to thank Netgalley and Hodder & Stoughton for an advance copy of A Comedy of Terrors, the ninth novel to feature private informer Flavia Albia, set in Ancient Rome. AD 89. Rome is gearing up for Saturnalia, a time of excess and mayhem and a dearth of paying customers. Flavia Albia is therefore happy to take on Nephele as a client. She suspects her husband of straying and wants Flavia Albia to investigate. In the meantime Tiberius, Flavia Albia’s husband is investigating a case of org I would like to thank Netgalley and Hodder & Stoughton for an advance copy of A Comedy of Terrors, the ninth novel to feature private informer Flavia Albia, set in Ancient Rome. AD 89. Rome is gearing up for Saturnalia, a time of excess and mayhem and a dearth of paying customers. Flavia Albia is therefore happy to take on Nephele as a client. She suspects her husband of straying and wants Flavia Albia to investigate. In the meantime Tiberius, Flavia Albia’s husband is investigating a case of organised crime which has started with rotten nuts, a serious issue as fresh nuts play a major role at Saturnalia. I enjoyed A Comedy of Terrors which is an entertaining and informative romp through Ancient Rome, told in the first person by Flavia Albia. Her keen eye and caustic wit make the novel fun and her tenacious nosiness allows her to solve the case, although in this novel it is her husband who steals the show at the end with an audacious reading of the facts and the law. This cleverness is well worth the read and caps an already clever novel. The Nut War might not seem particularly prepossessing in terms of great crimes, but it is a universal theme in life, suppliers selling out of date product and in this case being strong armed into doing so. Not to mention how far the criminals are prepared to go to make money. It’s fun and ingenious- I wish I had that kind of imagination. Flavia Albia’s own investigation takes a few interesting turns and, again, you can see modern day themes reflected in it, but it is her take on it that makes the novel fun. I like this series, not just for the fun scenarios or because I can see the universality of human nature and their motives, but because it reads like contemporary fiction. Most historical fiction tries to mimic the era in its dialogue but this series tells it as it is in straightforward language. Flavia Albia is not happy about potentially losing her career now that she has two motherless nephews to care for and is happy to discuss it. There is an easiness in her tone and some stroppiness in her attitude that make her modern and easy to relate to. A Comedy of Terrors is a good read that I can recommend.

  4. 5 out of 5

    Anne Szlachcic

    This latest book featuring Flavia Albia is set during the Saturnalia festival in AD 89 - where slaves become Masters and gifts given and received and drunkenness and revelry abounds . Whilst out shopping for gifts Flavia along with her two nephews she finds a dead vendor ........ but it was just a joke , one of many being carried out that day .................. but when he is found dead for real shortly after she decides to investigate . Her husband Tiberius Manlius is investigating a case of loca This latest book featuring Flavia Albia is set during the Saturnalia festival in AD 89 - where slaves become Masters and gifts given and received and drunkenness and revelry abounds . Whilst out shopping for gifts Flavia along with her two nephews she finds a dead vendor ........ but it was just a joke , one of many being carried out that day .................. but when he is found dead for real shortly after she decides to investigate . Her husband Tiberius Manlius is investigating a case of local nut sellers being forced to by their produce from a new cartel , with aggressive sales tactics and a very poor product . But as usual Flavia also decides to get involved with her husbands case and meddles to her hearts content ..... is there a connection to her case ? This is another murder mystery involving our married duo with moments that make you laugh out loud - thoroughly enjoyable . The times reflect those of today with vices and crimes - greed , adultery , debt collection and organised crime - which the Author fully captures in her writings . I look forward to reading more in this series by the Author in the future I voluntarily read and reviewed an advanced copy of this book. All thoughts and opinions are my own.

  5. 4 out of 5

    Charlotte Pawson

    Flavia Albia is wife to local magistrate Tiberius but a private investigator in her own right. The Roman feast of Saturnalia is in full flow and this story delves into the many practices that occur in full glory. Tiberius is involved in a case of local gangsters and a turf war coming starting with a local currency Nuts. Flavia is hired to help a wife escape her gangster husband but all is not clear. This is story following the high jinks of Roman family life intertwined with murder. It combines Flavia Albia is wife to local magistrate Tiberius but a private investigator in her own right. The Roman feast of Saturnalia is in full flow and this story delves into the many practices that occur in full glory. Tiberius is involved in a case of local gangsters and a turf war coming starting with a local currency Nuts. Flavia is hired to help a wife escape her gangster husband but all is not clear. This is story following the high jinks of Roman family life intertwined with murder. It combines the witty characters Flavia encounters on a daily basis and how she is the silent investigator behind her husband. You will find the relationship between master and slave is blurred at the time of Saturnalia. It would be well worth checking out other stories about this very engaging family. I was given an arc of this book by Netgalley and the publisher in exchange for an honest review.

  6. 4 out of 5

    Soozee

    I really enjoyed the original series of the adventures of Marcus Didius Falco in Vespasian's Rome. However, when the author moved on to his adopted daughter - Flavia Albia - I lost interest. What had been witty, sharp dialogue became just sarcastic nonsense. However, I decided to give this book a whirl, and was really pleased I did, as once again the author is on her game and Flavia is an interesting and amusing character. The clever repartee is still there, if borderline acceptable, but for me i I really enjoyed the original series of the adventures of Marcus Didius Falco in Vespasian's Rome. However, when the author moved on to his adopted daughter - Flavia Albia - I lost interest. What had been witty, sharp dialogue became just sarcastic nonsense. However, I decided to give this book a whirl, and was really pleased I did, as once again the author is on her game and Flavia is an interesting and amusing character. The clever repartee is still there, if borderline acceptable, but for me it works as a fun tale set in Rome. I just hope she doesn't get too sharp and sardonic. It is the season of Saturnalia, when slaves become masters and gifts are given to all. But murder, gang family warfare and corruption lurk in Rome, and Flavia and her long-suffering husband Tiberius are on the spot to resolve matters, involving nut wars, a dead sheep and some really nasty characters. A fun read. Io Saturnalia! Thank you to NetGalley and Hodder & Stoughton for allowing me access to the ARC in exchange for an honest review.

  7. 5 out of 5

    Aidan

    tl;dr – Classic Albia / Falco, for good and maybe occasionally for ill (it’s almost entirely for good). It’s a chaotic, good-hearted and slightly overstuffed Christm- I mean, Saturnalia romp that happens to feature some grisly murders and maybe a long-term throughline for subsequent books. If you have to niggle, it maybe works a bit too hard to tie all the threads tightly together, but there are some genuinely clever plot flourishes mixed in with the obligatory series call-backs and holiday madn tl;dr – Classic Albia / Falco, for good and maybe occasionally for ill (it’s almost entirely for good). It’s a chaotic, good-hearted and slightly overstuffed Christm- I mean, Saturnalia romp that happens to feature some grisly murders and maybe a long-term throughline for subsequent books. If you have to niggle, it maybe works a bit too hard to tie all the threads tightly together, but there are some genuinely clever plot flourishes mixed in with the obligatory series call-backs and holiday madness. Quite a good nut. ————————————— From the get-go, it’s clear this is meant to be a companion to the late-Falco-era novel Saturnalia. Perhaps there's a bit less tea-family squabbling and a bit more gangland intrigue, but it bears the same drink-fuelled, slightly soapy story DNA as the original. And between obsessive dwarves, nut fights, lesbian gladiatrices, at-least-two-timing boyfriends, anachronistic jokes, leopard mummies, lots of wine and a whole host of minor recurring characters from waaaaay back in the series (Veleda! Zoilus!), it’s clear Davis is having a lot of fun with this one. Now, fun isn’t a complete departure for the Flavia Albia series, but it does run against the grain of the often-dour earlier books like. Graveyard of the Hesperides and Enemies at Home, and it’s a welcome lift in a year we all need a little colour and happy chaos. Obviously, there’s actual darkness afoot — it’s a murder mystery, after all, and life and death on the Aventine remain grubby and cheap — but it’s a level of darkness that complements the ambiguous Roman holiday of misrule rather than offsetting it. What’s also welcome is a hint of an overall direction for future Albia books, with an ending that leaves a few plot lines tantalisingly unresolved and maybe dangles an arch-nemesis for Albia and Tiberius to vie against. Between the (possible) big villains, the impending end of Tiberius’ time as aedile and the speed with which our heroes have Katamari-ed up a complete domestic household, I also get the sense the series might be heading for some kind of denouement before too much longer, but if so, it’s going out near a high and not right away. To provide a brief critical note, the central mystery could be seen as a little over-tidy, with very little on the page that doesn’t somehow fit in to the overall puzzle. And like almost every Falco/Albia book, it’s reliant on some improbable coincidences to move the main story forward at the same time as the B, C, D (and E) plots before they inevitably fold back into the main narrative. On the other hand, if these things really bothered you, you wouldn’t be reading this far, and the way threads like Sheep’s or Spendo’s are tied up were genuinely unexpected even after all these years, it’s remarkably sprightly for a series’ 29th entry, and that bodes very well for books to come. Io Saturnalia, indeed.

  8. 5 out of 5

    Gee

    It’s the time of Saturnalia, mischief, mayhem and drunkenness abound, along with mobsters planning to expand their empires whatever the cost. Flavia Alba, adopted daughter of Falco, is newly married to Tiberius Manlius but still intent on her work as an informer, Traditionally this time of year means a distinct lack of clients, and this years no different. However, as things become more bloody and dangerous, Flavia realises that the one enquiry she has isn’t quite what she thought. I’ve always e It’s the time of Saturnalia, mischief, mayhem and drunkenness abound, along with mobsters planning to expand their empires whatever the cost. Flavia Alba, adopted daughter of Falco, is newly married to Tiberius Manlius but still intent on her work as an informer, Traditionally this time of year means a distinct lack of clients, and this years no different. However, as things become more bloody and dangerous, Flavia realises that the one enquiry she has isn’t quite what she thought. I’ve always enjoyed this authors Falco series, and this is the first book I’ve read about his adopted daughter Flavia. As with all Lindsey Davis’ books, they give you a real flavour of old Rome, their practices and life styles. You can almost smell them. It is written slightly tongue in cheek, with a gentle humour running through it. The characters, new and old, are interesting and colourful, with ripe Roman language and habits. We forget how much the Romans gave us and it sometimes feels there is out of place modern language sneaking in. But this is an enjoyable read, with a well crafted storyline and satisfying ending. I look forward to the next book. Thanks to NetGalley and the publisher for the opportunity to read and review this book

  9. 5 out of 5

    Nikki Brooks

    Call it what you want but the Winter silly season has cause problems since it was invented. Christmas/Saturnalia - they both mean family squabbles, over-eating and running around buying presents. Flavia and Tiberius may be recently wed but that won't get in the way of them solving a murder or three, investigating ancient Loan Shark organisations or interfering in the lives of their nearest and dearest. Oh and possibly annoying a vigile or two. There are plenty of visits from Falco, Helena and th Call it what you want but the Winter silly season has cause problems since it was invented. Christmas/Saturnalia - they both mean family squabbles, over-eating and running around buying presents. Flavia and Tiberius may be recently wed but that won't get in the way of them solving a murder or three, investigating ancient Loan Shark organisations or interfering in the lives of their nearest and dearest. Oh and possibly annoying a vigile or two. There are plenty of visits from Falco, Helena and the extended Didii family. I swear Postumus is either going to be the ancient version of a CSI or a serial killer LOL. There are also some references to the earlier Falco books so devoted readers like myself will get the jokes/references but newer readers won't feel too left out. I loved their way of dealing with getting the bad guy using Sheep! Reminded my al Al Capone! I have loved this series from the start and am so enjoying this very British Roman matron's total disregard for the customs of her time. She is just too much of her adopted father's daughter!

  10. 5 out of 5

    Debra Davidson-Smith

    I love how Lindsey Davis manages to make the world of ancient Rome feel as familiar as our own, there’s no cloaking the past in mystery or glorifying the ancient world in her books. The Rome she shows us is as smelly, corrupt, petty, dangerous, and as comical as our own. I really enjoyed the original books featuring Marcus Didius Falco and still miss him as the star of the show, but Flavia Alba and her family are definitely growing on me and I really enjoyed this book as Flavia takes on the city I love how Lindsey Davis manages to make the world of ancient Rome feel as familiar as our own, there’s no cloaking the past in mystery or glorifying the ancient world in her books. The Rome she shows us is as smelly, corrupt, petty, dangerous, and as comical as our own. I really enjoyed the original books featuring Marcus Didius Falco and still miss him as the star of the show, but Flavia Alba and her family are definitely growing on me and I really enjoyed this book as Flavia takes on the city’s gangsters during the unruly festival of Saturnalia. Flavia has developed into a great character – witty, wise, and very sharp. Watching her efforts to combine family life and work is both amusing and a reminder that some things never change! Despite some gruesome deaths, this is a really entertaining read packed with fascinating and often very likable characters, some excellent detail about life in ancient Rome, and a really well-crafted murder/s mystery. With thanks to the publishers and NetGalley for a free ARC in return for an honest review.

  11. 4 out of 5

    Trish

    Up to the usual high standard. The ingenious, witty and unconventional Flavia Albia narrates the events of another Saturnalia in the reign of the cruel and crazy Domitian. Her marriage is now four months old and Tiberius, her husband who was struck by lightning on their wedding day is coming to the end of his term as aedile. Crime does not take a holiday even if everyone else does, including the vigiles who are primarily fire fighters, with law enforcement as a secondary duty. Mouldy nuts are ap Up to the usual high standard. The ingenious, witty and unconventional Flavia Albia narrates the events of another Saturnalia in the reign of the cruel and crazy Domitian. Her marriage is now four months old and Tiberius, her husband who was struck by lightning on their wedding day is coming to the end of his term as aedile. Crime does not take a holiday even if everyone else does, including the vigiles who are primarily fire fighters, with law enforcement as a secondary duty. Mouldy nuts are appearing in the brisk Saturnalia trade. That is the tip of the iceberg of organised crime seeking new outlets. Albia’s domestic life is complicated by the arrival of Tiberius’s wee nephews (3 and 5) after their mother’s death. (Their father as we know from the past is a waste of space!) Since Saturnalia is a family celebration most of the extended family plays a part, as a bonus.

  12. 4 out of 5

    Shannon

    Io saturnalia! It’s the festive season and Flavia Albia is up to her neck in domesticity. Only married a few months, her household has mushroomed in size the latest editions are two tiny bereaved nephews so there’s not much time to sleuth. Her husband only has a few weeks left in his run as adile and someone’s started selling dodgy nuts on his patch and of course Albia lets him get on with it without interference. Then some devious good for nothing kills the boys beloved sheep something must be Io saturnalia! It’s the festive season and Flavia Albia is up to her neck in domesticity. Only married a few months, her household has mushroomed in size the latest editions are two tiny bereaved nephews so there’s not much time to sleuth. Her husband only has a few weeks left in his run as adile and someone’s started selling dodgy nuts on his patch and of course Albia lets him get on with it without interference. Then some devious good for nothing kills the boys beloved sheep something must be done! Albia is on top form and killing the domina game in this latest instalment as she solves the mystery by proxy while running her chaotic household. There’s lots of cameos from all our old favourites and even a trip to the fourth cohorts infamous Saturnalia drinks party.

  13. 4 out of 5

    Karen

    Yet again Lindsey triumphs with a clever, hilarious and informative continuation of Flavia Albia's chaotic life as an investigator with an acute sense of the ridiculousness of Roman customs - our plucky Brit. Albia and Tiberius make a great team and what fun they have whilst investigating the Nut Wars in this book. What I really like about Lindsey's writing is her brilliant characterisation, every human, animal and bird has it's moment to shine, coupled with a wicked sense of humour it makes these Yet again Lindsey triumphs with a clever, hilarious and informative continuation of Flavia Albia's chaotic life as an investigator with an acute sense of the ridiculousness of Roman customs - our plucky Brit. Albia and Tiberius make a great team and what fun they have whilst investigating the Nut Wars in this book. What I really like about Lindsey's writing is her brilliant characterisation, every human, animal and bird has it's moment to shine, coupled with a wicked sense of humour it makes these series of books a more than 5 star rating. A Comedy of Terrors is a rip roaring, laugh out loud funny story with some bittersweet moments and it will be a trail for me to wait for the next instalment.

  14. 5 out of 5

    Kate

    I do enjoy this series (I love Flavia Albia) and this could well be my favourite as Flavia Albia takes on Rome's gangsters (male, female and parrot) through the unruly festival of Saturnalia. Lindsey Davis is always good at filling her stories with fascinating historic detail and this novel gives us such an insight into what life would have been like during this most famous of festivals, with its similarities to how Christmas is celebrated today. Really enjoyed it! Review to follow shortly on Fo I do enjoy this series (I love Flavia Albia) and this could well be my favourite as Flavia Albia takes on Rome's gangsters (male, female and parrot) through the unruly festival of Saturnalia. Lindsey Davis is always good at filling her stories with fascinating historic detail and this novel gives us such an insight into what life would have been like during this most famous of festivals, with its similarities to how Christmas is celebrated today. Really enjoyed it! Review to follow shortly on For Winter Nights.

  15. 4 out of 5

    Chris Bain

    Having read everything written by Lindsey Davis I probably write this with rose tinted glasses, but I loved this book. There was a great plot; as always the character development was molding these prople into ones I feel for in the same way as Falco and Helena, and there was that feeling of total immersion in the world of Rome. My only regret is that I have to wait for the next one.

  16. 5 out of 5

    Alison Pilkington

    Another brilliant read and I liked that there was a bigger ‘appearance’ for Falco, Helena and Petronius. A brief blast from the past so I think I may need to re-read all the Falco series whilst I wait for the next Flavia outing.

  17. 5 out of 5

    jane C.Caton

    Sol Invictus Lindsay Davis writes with humour and detailed knowledge of Ancient Rome. An excellent read, I learn more about Roman history here than ever I did in Latin lessons! The story line is fast moving and thoroughly entertaining with a grand finale.

  18. 5 out of 5

    Mrs Janet S Howard

    A comedy of terrors Flavor Album is a worthy succesor to Falcon and his family. This is another insight as to how b things might have been many many years ago!

  19. 4 out of 5

    Susan

    Rome A.D. 89 December. Festival of Saturnalia, the time to play pranks. Husband Tiberius is investigating gangsters involved in a nut war, but this also involves loan sharks. Meanwhile Flavia is helping a wife leave her gangster husband. Is all as it seems An entertaining and well-written historical mystery with its large cast of likeable and well-drawn characters. An ARC was provided by the publisher via Netgalley in exchange for an honest review

  20. 4 out of 5

    Alex Patterson

  21. 5 out of 5

    nikkia neil

  22. 5 out of 5

    Carly

  23. 4 out of 5

    Karen

  24. 4 out of 5

    Gemma

  25. 5 out of 5

    Neil

  26. 4 out of 5

    Lynne

  27. 4 out of 5

    Karey Hunter

  28. 4 out of 5

    Sian John

  29. 4 out of 5

    Hannah Wilcox

  30. 5 out of 5

    Cate

  31. 5 out of 5

    Liz Hargnett

  32. 5 out of 5

    Eve Iversen

  33. 4 out of 5

    Saana

  34. 4 out of 5

    Edward Butler

  35. 4 out of 5

    Margaret Foreman

  36. 5 out of 5

    Lauris

  37. 5 out of 5

    Kathy

  38. 4 out of 5

    Jemima Pett

  39. 5 out of 5

    Andrew Schneider

  40. 5 out of 5

    Karen

  41. 5 out of 5

    Jane Large

  42. 4 out of 5

    Joanna Cassel

  43. 4 out of 5

    Cheryl A

  44. 4 out of 5

    Jan

  45. 4 out of 5

    Sheila

  46. 5 out of 5

    David

  47. 5 out of 5

    G

  48. 5 out of 5

    Laura

  49. 4 out of 5

    Reuben

  50. 4 out of 5

    Paula E

  51. 5 out of 5

    Janice

  52. 4 out of 5

    Leslie

  53. 4 out of 5

    Ursula

  54. 5 out of 5

    Liette

  55. 4 out of 5

    Bobbie Howell

  56. 5 out of 5

    Lisa Marbach Sawyer

  57. 4 out of 5

    mmrainey

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