web site hit counter How to Catch a Duke - Ebooks PDF Online
Hot Best Seller

How to Catch a Duke

Availability: Ready to download

A fake engagement and plenty of charm keep the pages turning in this delightful Regency romance. "I have come to ask you to kill me, my lord." Miss Abigail Abbott desperately needs to disappear, and the only person she trusts to help her do that is Lord Stephen Wentworth, heir to the Duke of Walden. Stephen is brilliant, charming, and—when he needs to be—absolutely ruthless. A fake engagement and plenty of charm keep the pages turning in this delightful Regency romance. "I have come to ask you to kill me, my lord." Miss Abigail Abbott desperately needs to disappear, and the only person she trusts to help her do that is Lord Stephen Wentworth, heir to the Duke of Walden. Stephen is brilliant, charming, and—when he needs to be—absolutely ruthless. So ruthless, that, he proposes marriage instead of a pretense of murder, to keep Abigail safe. Stephen knows that Abigail has the dignity and determination of a duchess and the courage of a lioness. When she accepts his courtship of convenience, he also discovers she kisses like his most intimate wish come true. For Abigail, their arrangement is a sham to escape her dangerous enemies. For Stephen, it's his last, best hope to share a lifetime with the lady of his dreams—if he can convince her his love is real.


Compare

A fake engagement and plenty of charm keep the pages turning in this delightful Regency romance. "I have come to ask you to kill me, my lord." Miss Abigail Abbott desperately needs to disappear, and the only person she trusts to help her do that is Lord Stephen Wentworth, heir to the Duke of Walden. Stephen is brilliant, charming, and—when he needs to be—absolutely ruthless. A fake engagement and plenty of charm keep the pages turning in this delightful Regency romance. "I have come to ask you to kill me, my lord." Miss Abigail Abbott desperately needs to disappear, and the only person she trusts to help her do that is Lord Stephen Wentworth, heir to the Duke of Walden. Stephen is brilliant, charming, and—when he needs to be—absolutely ruthless. So ruthless, that, he proposes marriage instead of a pretense of murder, to keep Abigail safe. Stephen knows that Abigail has the dignity and determination of a duchess and the courage of a lioness. When she accepts his courtship of convenience, he also discovers she kisses like his most intimate wish come true. For Abigail, their arrangement is a sham to escape her dangerous enemies. For Stephen, it's his last, best hope to share a lifetime with the lady of his dreams—if he can convince her his love is real.

30 review for How to Catch a Duke

  1. 4 out of 5

    Caz

    I've given this a B- at AAR, so that's 3.5 stars rounded up. How to Catch a Duke is the sixth and final book in Grace Burrowes’  Rogues to Riches  series about the members of the Wentworth family.  The first book – My One and Only Duke– saw a ducal title conferred upon Quinton Wentworth, a wealthy banker from extremely humble origins who grew up doing whatever jobs he could find in order to provide for his younger siblings, and subsequent books have followed the various family members as they’ I've given this a B- at AAR, so that's 3.5 stars rounded up. How to Catch a Duke is the sixth and final book in Grace Burrowes’  Rogues to Riches  series about the members of the Wentworth family.  The first book – My One and Only Duke– saw a ducal title conferred upon Quinton Wentworth, a wealthy banker from extremely humble origins who grew up doing whatever jobs he could find in order to provide for his younger siblings, and subsequent books have followed the various family members as they’ve each found their HEAs.  The hero of How to Catch a Duke is Stephen, Quinn’s younger brother and heir whom we first met as a brilliant, mercurial teen whose insight and often biting wit was shadowed by melancholy, and whose frustrations over his disability – his abusive father smashed Stephen’s knee when he was a child and he needs a cane (sometimes two) to walk – came through strongly.  Ten years later, Stephen is still brilliant and mercurial; he’s also charming, loyal, generous and quite ruthless when he wants to be and hasn’t let his physical limitations stop him from shagging his way across the continent or from ‘dallying’ extensively in England with a variety of willing partners. When this book opens, Stephen receives a visit from Miss Abigail Abbott, the enquiry agent who recently did some work for his sister Constance (The Truth About Dukes).  In a dramatic opening, Abigail tells Stephen that she has “come to ask you to murder me, my lord.”  – which is, of course, not what she means at all; what she wants is to disappear while she attempts to find out why someone – a marquess no less – is out to do her harm.  Abigail is cagey, but Stephen – being Stephen – quickly works out who it is and promptly offers to kill him instead. The next morning over breakfast, Abigail explains that Lord Stapleton believes her to be in possession of some letters he wants returned – which she is unable to do as she no longer has them.  She refuses to answer Stephen’s questions as to the identity of the writer and recipient of the letters, simply saying that the marquess is not entitled to them and is clearly prepared to go to any lengths to get them.  Stephen recognises that Abigail – whom he already admires for her spirit and no-nonsense attitude (and lusts after for her other attributes) – is genuinely scared, and suggests that instead of faking her death, they should pretend to be engaged and that she should go to stay under Quinn’s protection at Walden House while they work out how to retrieve the letters or get Stapleton to stop hounding her – and preferably both. You can read the rest of this review at All About Romance .

  2. 5 out of 5

    Kimberly

    Reviewed for Wit and Sin The brilliant and enigmatic Lord Stephen Wentworth has met his match in a no-nonsense inquiry agent. I was looking forward to seeing what kind of woman Grace Burrowes would pair Stephen with and she did not disappoint. How to Catch a Duke is an engaging read thanks to its two well-drawn, unique leads and the refreshing openness that characterizes their romance. Abigail Abbott is exhausted and at the end of her rope when she goes to Stephen for help. Someone is afte Reviewed for Wit and Sin The brilliant and enigmatic Lord Stephen Wentworth has met his match in a no-nonsense inquiry agent. I was looking forward to seeing what kind of woman Grace Burrowes would pair Stephen with and she did not disappoint. How to Catch a Duke is an engaging read thanks to its two well-drawn, unique leads and the refreshing openness that characterizes their romance. Abigail Abbott is exhausted and at the end of her rope when she goes to Stephen for help. Someone is after old letters for reasons she cannot understand. But she won’t continue to put her household in danger so her last resort is to go to Stephen for help faking her own death. Except for as clever as Abigail is, Stephen is far more conniving and isn’t about to let the most intriguing woman he’s ever met vanish. He convinces her to agree to a fake courtship; his family is untouchable and thus the protection will extend to her while they figure out why someone is after the letters. Abigail knows there’s no way a match between her and a duke’s heir could ever be made real. But Stephen is a Wentworth. And Wentworths never let anything like society’s silly opinions stand in their way. Abigail and Stephen make a great match. Stephen has a big heart and he loves deeply, but he also has a devious mind and would likely have gone down the wrong path at a young age if his cousin hadn’t taken him in hand and redirected his energies. Abigail is a straight-talking inquiry agent who cuts right through the façade Stephen wears and sees him for all that he is. I loved their frank talks and the banter between them. I also really loved that both of them are vulnerable. Abigail is statuesque and comments from others about her looks have made her a bit self-conscious. And Stephen, whose knee was smashed and didn’t heal properly is incredibly self-conscious about his scars, the use of his canes, and his fear of humiliation. I loved that each of them saw the other for the gorgeous person they were. Neither dismissed the other’s vulnerabilities but they made it clear how they saw them and helped build their confidence. They truly fell for each other in a fairly low drama way and their support for one another gave their romance a rock-solid feel. The mystery of who is after Abigail and why is interesting and played out in a mostly satisfying manner. More importantly, the mystery served to draw Abigail and Stephen together and I was most invested in the love story. And it wouldn’t be a Rogues to Riches novel without at least a few additional Wentworths playing a role and I enjoyed visiting with Quinn, Jane, Duncan, Matilda, and Ned. If you’re new to the series, Burrowes avoids spoilers so you can easily start with How to Catch a Duke and pick up on the family dynamics. All in all, I greatly enjoyed How to Catch a Duke . The Wentworth family is refreshingly different from the norm and any outing with them is guaranteed to be entertaining. FTC Disclosure: I received this book for free from the publisher in exchange for an honest review. This does not affect my opinion of the book or the content of my review.

  3. 5 out of 5

    Carey’s Reviews

    2-2.5 Stars! Not a fan of this one. I think I missed something. I was very confused while reading this one. I’d say you COULD read it as a standalone but I wouldn’t recommend it. If you’ve read the previous books in series, the ‘Rogues to Riches’ series (this is book #6 in said series), you’d most likely enjoy this book more than I did. Other than feeling I missed the first few chapters, I also felt like an idiot because I had to Google the definition of a fair amount of ‘big words’. I understand 2-2.5 Stars! Not a fan of this one. I think I missed something. I was very confused while reading this one. I’d say you COULD read it as a standalone but I wouldn’t recommend it. If you’ve read the previous books in series, the ‘Rogues to Riches’ series (this is book #6 in said series), you’d most likely enjoy this book more than I did. Other than feeling I missed the first few chapters, I also felt like an idiot because I had to Google the definition of a fair amount of ‘big words’. I understand that some of it was simply using historically correct language but I’d prefer the author ‘dumb it down’. Confusing, the feeling of missing the beginning of the story, sesquipedalian - long worded (yes, I looked up a ‘big word’ & hopefully used it correctly!), anti-climatic ending with main characters I wasn’t interested in & they had absolutely zero sexual chemistry and/or romance. That sums this book up. However I did enjoy the surprise revelation at the end. *I received this book at no charge from NetGalley & I voluntarily left this review.*

  4. 5 out of 5

    Andrea (Hammock and Read)

    Out of this series this was my least favorite and took a bit for me to get into and enjoy. Stephen we know a lot about and can't wait for his chance especially when its with Miss Abigail Abbott who we meet before their story. But this just was flat from the start, I don't know if it was the flow, no chemistry when there should have been or what. But I'm a bit bummed about it... I liked that it tried to add in some bisexual aspects to it but that also felt a little too forced, as well. There are Out of this series this was my least favorite and took a bit for me to get into and enjoy. Stephen we know a lot about and can't wait for his chance especially when its with Miss Abigail Abbott who we meet before their story. But this just was flat from the start, I don't know if it was the flow, no chemistry when there should have been or what. But I'm a bit bummed about it... I liked that it tried to add in some bisexual aspects to it but that also felt a little too forced, as well. There are a lot of Stephen's past lovers in the book so maybe that is why it feels like the chemistry is off between the two. I don't know it just felt off the whole book compared to the rest of the series, also like the author just gave up but that is just my feelings... 3 stars

  5. 5 out of 5

    Gretchen

    I have enjoyed the Wentworth stories and was really looking forward to Stephen’s tale, especially when I discovered it would feature Abigail Abbott. I loved that first line - so intriguing! I may have gotten my hopes up too high, though, because this fell a bit flat for me. It felt too much like the same story as other Burrowes’ tales, like the MCs are just resigned to not being able to stay together, to not being a permanent couple. It’s worked for me before but has now gotten to be an old danc I have enjoyed the Wentworth stories and was really looking forward to Stephen’s tale, especially when I discovered it would feature Abigail Abbott. I loved that first line - so intriguing! I may have gotten my hopes up too high, though, because this fell a bit flat for me. It felt too much like the same story as other Burrowes’ tales, like the MCs are just resigned to not being able to stay together, to not being a permanent couple. It’s worked for me before but has now gotten to be an old dance. Could we also please stop referring to Abigail as a Quaker - she’s not. Get over it. I enjoyed the inside look into Stephen, his emotion and vulnerability, as well as his relationship with older brother Quinn, but again, overall it fell somewhat flat for me. Total bummer. Adult content

  6. 4 out of 5

    WhiskeyintheJar

    I received this book for free in exchange for an honest review. This does not affect my opinion of the book or the content of my review. If you've been a reader of Burrowes' Rogues to Riches series, then you've been anticipating the younger brother Lord Stephen Wentworth's book. The Wentworth family went from living hand-to-mouth to the older brother Quinn (My One and Only Duke) being saved from the gallows and inheriting a dukedom. Their hard knock life has them not quite fitting in with the ar I received this book for free in exchange for an honest review. This does not affect my opinion of the book or the content of my review. If you've been a reader of Burrowes' Rogues to Riches series, then you've been anticipating the younger brother Lord Stephen Wentworth's book. The Wentworth family went from living hand-to-mouth to the older brother Quinn (My One and Only Duke) being saved from the gallows and inheriting a dukedom. Their hard knock life has them not quite fitting in with the aristocracy and each sibling's story has reflected that while still placing them in privileged positions. I would suggest not jumping into the series at this book as you'd miss a lot of the Wentworth family dynamic and that directly affects the hows and whys of Stephen's character; you'd be missing a lot of the foundation for this story. “I have come to ask you to murder me, my lord.” Miss Abigail Abbott is a character that we meet in the previous book, Stephen's sister Constance's story (The Truth About Dukes). Abigail is an inquiry agent, a sort of private investigator. Having meet Stephen through Constance (they had some crackling tension in the previous book), Abigail thinks he's the perfect person to help her. She thinks there was a failed attempt to poison her and a failed kidnapping of her person. Abigail thinks it's a Lord Stapleton behind the attempts and it's due to some letters his now deceased son wrote Abigail when she was the son's mistress (she didn't know he was married). I'm not sure I ever completely bought into Abigail's idea that she needed to fake her own death to escape Lord Stapleton but it provided a fantastic first line to start the book off and gave a reason for Abigail to be in Stephen's company. The conundrum of his mental processes, charm juxtaposed with calculation, fascinated Abigail. She was counting on his calculating mind to keep her physically safe, while the charm imperiled her heart. I've read a good amount of Burrowes' stories and they typically have what I call a babbling brook pace and feel, gradual and gentle. I thought the tempo was different in this one, it felt more like ping pong action. I'd be reading a scene, engaged, and then the scene would cut and the next paragraph would show the characters at a later date thinking back to the scene I had been engaged in but cut out from. It worked for me at times and didn't at others as I thought I was missing out on some scene emotions; instead we get the emotions from inner thoughts from the characters. I'm not sure if my anticipating the babbling brook from Burrowes made this ping pong tempo feel off or if the tempo was off. Abigail dearest, we all need a little kissing, cuddling, and cavorting. Proving that to you shall be my fondest challenge. The mystery thread of why Lord Stapleton wanted the letters from Abigail felt thin for a a lot of the story. It takes until the end and revealing of why, for it to make sense but even then I'm not sure the journey we take to get there was supported for three hundred pages. Stephen and Abigail have good byplay but I did think for where I thought they were in their journey to come together that their first bedroom scene came a bit quick, even though it was around 50%. These two definitely have a connection, Abigail doubts her appeal because of her height and size and Stephen doubts his appeal because of his limp (his father broke his leg when he was a child) and vulnerabilities created because of these insecurities brings these two together. They're sweet with a little zip because of Stephen's kind but not always nice and Abigail's calling him on his not always nice but not letting him hide his kindness. Stephen Wentworth was stealing her heart, and she was helpless to prevent his larceny. Neither of Stephen's sisters make an appearance, which I did miss and I thought Duncan and Stephen should have had some alone scenes but there was a great breakthrough understanding between Stephen and his brother Quinn. With the ping pong tempo I talked about though, we get the brothers revealing and talking about some things but then after, granted, they do hug, we jump to Quinn with his wife and he has an emotional moment I wish could have been more with Stephen. The Wentworth's are a family that could have overwhelmed Stephen and Abigail's book but I love their dynamic all together that I could have stood for more of them. She wanted to curl up in his arms and wake up in a world where nobody got in a lather about old letters, and a common inquiry agent could fall in love with a ducal heir. Stephen was a character that I could read a series on him alone and Abigail had her own deep background, I could also read more about her, but importantly, she did match him. The mystery plot with the letters and how Abigail wanted to fake her own death, which leads to a fake engagement trope, even though these two pretty much admit their feelings are real from the beginning but thinking nothing can come of it, was a little weaker and you'll mostly go along because it keeps our two characters together. I also thought the author created a story that was open about all the bed-hopping that was going on during this time, the extramartial affairs and Stephen's bisexuality. It also looks like we are getting a Ned Wentworth book (boy Quinn adopted) and I am thrilled, especially after his appearances in this. There's always something comforting about visiting a Burrowes' world and family, How to Catch a Duke, will give you those feels.

  7. 4 out of 5

    Rose Blue

    As reviewed at Roses Are Blue: https://wp.me/p3QRh4-1u6 Stephen Wentworth is the brother of, and heir to, The Duke of Walden. This is a far cry from their childhood, which was a life of near starvation and abuse from a drunken lout of a father. This same father even intentionally crippled Stephen, thinking that he would appear more sympathetic as he was sent out on the streets to beg. Now nearing thirty, Stephen has all the wealth he needs, and his father is long dead. He has to walk with a cane, As reviewed at Roses Are Blue: https://wp.me/p3QRh4-1u6 Stephen Wentworth is the brother of, and heir to, The Duke of Walden. This is a far cry from their childhood, which was a life of near starvation and abuse from a drunken lout of a father. This same father even intentionally crippled Stephen, thinking that he would appear more sympathetic as he was sent out on the streets to beg. Now nearing thirty, Stephen has all the wealth he needs, and his father is long dead. He has to walk with a cane, sometimes two, sometimes the pain incapacitates him for days. Stephen’s lifelong anger over his condition has caused him to take a liberal sexual path, constantly seeking pleasure, and becoming quite proficient as a lover. Abigail Abbott has the unusual career of being an investigative agent, a vocation not common for women at the time. When she finds herself the prey of the schemes of a titled lord, she seeks the help of Stephen, who she knows from helping his sister with a case. Though she wants Stephen to make it appear she died, he insists on fighting Marquess Stapleton, the villain, openly. He suggests they fake a courtship, giving society the impression that Abigail is under the protection of the Wentworth family, including the duke. Truth be told, Stephen has been attracted to Abigail from the moment he met her, and is eager to aid her, as well as spend more time with her. I’ve followed this Rogues-to-Riches series from the beginning, and I really loved the character of the Duke of Walden, but I became more intrigued with each glimpse of his complicated brother, Stephen, and anxiously looked forward to his story. I’ve always been “hero-centric” in my reading, meaning I’m more interested in the male lead, and I ended up with mixed feelings about Stephen. First of all, the good – he’s brilliant, he’s charming, he’s generous, and he wants no one’s pity. He also has a dark side. As a child, he made a soul wrenching decision which left a stain on his soul. His anger with his own physical limitation has caused him to irrationally resent his brother. He also chose a path of sexual exploration which did not discriminate based on marital status or sex. Despite his jadedness, I believe that he truly fell for Abigail, quickly and deeply. Abigail, too, has a past, though it’s very tame compared to Stephen’s. I appreciated their willingness to be accepting of each other without judgment, though their attitudes seemed very modern. Some of Stephen’s past affairs, as well as many of his comments about bondage and spanking seemed jarring, and almost gratuitous, as I don’t feel they really were pertinent. Still, a lovely genuine romance develops between the couple, one that is strong enough for them both to put aside their doubts and plan a future together. One of the most emotional moments for me was a touching meeting between Stephen and the duke, where they finally have a long overdue conversation and embrace. There is an event which unfolds near the end that I really didn’t see coming, one that explains why the Marquess had Abigail in his sights. I finished HOW TO CATCH A DUKE hoping that Stephen had it within himself to keep his promise of faithfulness and that he and Abigail truly have a happy ever after. I recommend this book for fans of Grace Burrowes, as I am, with the caveat to be prepared for a different, somewhat grittier story.

  8. 5 out of 5

    Barbara Rogers

    Series: Rogues to Riches #6 Publication Date: 4//13/21 Number of Pages: 368 ** 3.5 Stars ** Grace Burrowes writing is always excellent and I always enjoy her stories. I have read almost everything she’s written, and I think this may be my least favorite. That may be because I have been waiting for Stephen’s story since the beginning of the series and it just wasn’t what I’d imagined for him. Then, add to that the cavalier way the story treated bisexuality during a time when it could get you HANGED, Series: Rogues to Riches #6 Publication Date: 4//13/21 Number of Pages: 368 ** 3.5 Stars ** Grace Burrowes writing is always excellent and I always enjoy her stories. I have read almost everything she’s written, and I think this may be my least favorite. That may be because I have been waiting for Stephen’s story since the beginning of the series and it just wasn’t what I’d imagined for him. Then, add to that the cavalier way the story treated bisexuality during a time when it could get you HANGED, it just didn’t sit well. It wasn’t that I minded the bisexuality – it was that nobody thought anything about it – nobody was careful about mentioning it – and everybody seemed to be bisexual. I’m pretty sure that if I lived during that time and I was bisexual, I would most definitely NOT be discussing it with anyone – much less everyone. Because I wouldn’t care to be hanged. Also, I think bisexuality was just gratuitous to be politically correct. It added nothing to the story and didn’t move the plot along in any way. As I mentioned above, we’ve met Stephen before, but we have also met Abigail Abbott before as well. Abigail Abbott is the plain-speaking, Quakerish, no-nonsense inquiry agent who helped the family earlier in another book. Stephen and Abigail met then, so he was pleased to see her when she showed up at his residence until she asked him to murder her. Oh! My Goodness! But, she didn’t actually want him to murder her – she just wanted him to help her disappear and for it to appear she had died. Someone is pursuing her – and she doesn’t know what lengths they’ll go to to get what they want from her. She knows WHO is after her and he’s a rich and powerful peer. She just doesn’t understand WHY exactly. She knows a lot more than she’ll tell Stephen, he doesn’t need to know all of that – he just needs to help her die. Stephen, of course, has no intention of helping her die – pretend or otherwise. Since his family is powerful and they all outrank the peer who is causing the problem, he offers an alternative. He will court her – and she will stay in his brother’s home where she’ll be well protected. Unlike some other reviewers, I actually liked Abigail for Stephen. She was no-nonsense, she was plain-spoken and direct, his disability didn’t bother her at all and she was able to physically offset his disability when needed. I wasn’t a big fan of her big ‘sacrifice’ at the end because it didn’t seem, to me, to go along with her no-nonsense, plain-spoken personality. Overall, I enjoyed the story, but I don’t think I’d read it a second time. I voluntarily read and reviewed an Advanced Reader Copy of this book. All thoughts and opinions are my own.

  9. 5 out of 5

    Niki (mustreadalltheromance)

    4.5 stars rounded up. Since she’s begun experiencing threatening attacks visited upon her household, Miss Abigail Abbott has become desperate and determined that disappearing is the best course of action. There is only one person she trusts to help her, Lord Stephen Wentworth, a genius inventor, and heir to the powerful Duke of Walden. Stephen is shrewd and personable but utterly ruthless when need be, and he has the perfect solution to her problem: he’ll keep Abigail safe by making her his prete 4.5 stars rounded up. Since she’s begun experiencing threatening attacks visited upon her household, Miss Abigail Abbott has become desperate and determined that disappearing is the best course of action. There is only one person she trusts to help her, Lord Stephen Wentworth, a genius inventor, and heir to the powerful Duke of Walden. Stephen is shrewd and personable but utterly ruthless when need be, and he has the perfect solution to her problem: he’ll keep Abigail safe by making her his pretend fiancé. Stephen finds himself in awe of Abigail’s strength and resourcefulness. As their faux courtship progresses, Stephen soon finds contentment he never expected in her arms, but for Abigail the engagement is still a mere pretense, even if her feelings are becoming real. For Stephen, every bit of his time spent with Abigail is real and his future happiness depends on his ability to convince her of the veracity of his feelings and that only she could ever become his duchess. This is such a beautifully written book. The banter amongst all the Wentworths really, but especially between Stephen and Abigail, was excellent. These characters and the struggles they faced and the pain they felt made for a strong juxtaposition of the gritty against such exquisitely detailed writing. I loved the development of the relationship between Stephen and Quinn as well as the unfailing loyalty the family displayed toward its own. Stephen suffered more than many of even his closest family members ever realized, which made his confiding in Abigail stronger. Two fiercely independent main characters learned they could ask for help and lean on each other physically, emotionally, in every way that mattered, and that was beautiful. I thought the final melodrama may prove too much for me, but it was handled with grace and aplomb by the author and her characters and wound up being satisfying for all. I loved that Stephen and Abigail were for the most part bluntly honest with each other and faced challenges together. I could’ve done without the early scene between Stephen and his mistress but it was in no way cheating at that point and it did contribute to the plot a bit so I can deal with it. I enjoyed this story and the writing and found it a nice wrap-up of the series. I look forward to this author’s next work. I voluntarily read and reviewed an advanced copy of this book. All thoughts and opinions are my own. Blog link: https://mustreadalltheromance.blogspo...

  10. 4 out of 5

    Jessica (the naptime writer)

    Thanks to Forever Pub & Netgalley for the complimentary ARC. All opinions provided are my own. 2.5 ⭐️ Witty, restrained & yet still sexy, the books I’ve read from Grace Burrowes’s Rogues to Riches series have been a joy to read. But I’m sad to say that How to Catch a Duke doesn’t work for me on a couple different levels. On the surface I love the dynamic set up between Abigail Abbott, capable & no-nonsense professional inquiry agent, & urbane & charming Stephen Wentworth. Having met in a previous bo Thanks to Forever Pub & Netgalley for the complimentary ARC. All opinions provided are my own. 2.5 ⭐️ Witty, restrained & yet still sexy, the books I’ve read from Grace Burrowes’s Rogues to Riches series have been a joy to read. But I’m sad to say that How to Catch a Duke doesn’t work for me on a couple different levels. On the surface I love the dynamic set up between Abigail Abbott, capable & no-nonsense professional inquiry agent, & urbane & charming Stephen Wentworth. Having met in a previous book, Abigail re-enters Stephen’s life by asking him to kill her so she can essentially fake her own death & avoid the very real attempts someone is making to harm her. Instead, Stephen decides to help her figure out who the threat is & why & he’ll do that while pretending to be engaged to our heroine. Like the other Grace Burrowes books I’ve read this one has shining banter. I often feel like I’m watching an episode of Downtown Abbey when reading her books; so much feels placid but there are strong currents underneath. Brava to Burrowes for including a hero & heroine who talk frankly about past relationships & sexual interests, & for how the heroine erodes the hero’s suaveness and makes a place that’s comfortable for him to be himself. Also on the emotional front, the way that the Wentworth brothers start to see one another differently as a result of their intended others is moving. But I have a problem with how Stephen’s mistress is included in this one. He goes to visit her after his initial meeting with Abigail, which could be okay for me depending on the timing of how things start with Abigail...only in this book’s case soon after leaving his mistress Stephen kisses Abigail (it’s only a let’s-kiss-so-we-can-test-looking-like-a-real-couple kiss but still...) & he ends up wanting her to see how much she arouses him. Only hours after leaving the mistress he slept with. In the beginning of this scene he even thinks to himself how frequently he is aroused soon after breaking things off with a mistress...which makes me doubt the authenticity of his feelings for Abigail. I briefly wondered, would he be this way with any available woman? In general the pacing & timing of the end of his relationship with his mistress & the beginning of his with Abigail bothers me, especially when things continue to move so quickly with Abigail *and* he goes back to see his mistress for info later in the romance. I want it to be a clean break between “relationships” & it doesn’t entirely feel that way. Second, there’s a scene here where I feel like consent is somewhat dubious; where, essentially, Stephen’s language & the narrator’s description suggests that he does not want to do/is not prepared to do something sexually, and she ignores what he says. Immediately afterwards, he seems satisfied by how things happened, but the episode makes me feel uncomfortable. I really wanted to love this one: Stephen has been a series favorite for me. But I’m sorry to say that How to Catch a Duke disappointed.

  11. 4 out of 5

    Viper Spaulding

    Absolute perfection! When a book's opening line has the heroine saying to the hero, “I have come to ask you to murder me, my lord.” You know you're going to be in for a wild ride! Once again, I'm swept away by the exquisite literary experience of a Grace Burrowes romance. This author truly is gifted with words, a lexicographer's dream who deftly arranges just the right expression to fit the story, the historical timeframe, and the gravitas of the emotions being conveyed. For that alone, her books Absolute perfection! When a book's opening line has the heroine saying to the hero, “I have come to ask you to murder me, my lord.” You know you're going to be in for a wild ride! Once again, I'm swept away by the exquisite literary experience of a Grace Burrowes romance. This author truly is gifted with words, a lexicographer's dream who deftly arranges just the right expression to fit the story, the historical timeframe, and the gravitas of the emotions being conveyed. For that alone, her books are a joy to read. The story itself is more than worthy of the effort. Stephen is the last single Wentworth, a man with more than enough cause to be a selfish reprobate who can't help being kind, generous, and loyal. Abigail seeks his help to extricate herself from a situation involving a member of the peerage who is seeking to do her harm, but as she and Stephen get deeper into the secrets underlying the subterfuge, they also fall deeper into each other's hearts. Abigail is a simple woman of inordinate intelligence and more than a few insecurities. Stephen is certainly her intellectual match, and while he has his own demons to battle, insecurity isn't really one of them. Their carefully-orchestrated dance around their mutual attraction reveals so much about their hearts and their histories, and I was amazed at the many intersections their lives had shared even before they knew each other. And just when it looks like ALL the secrets have been laid bare, the author drops the biggest secret imaginable! One that I didn't see coming at all, though in hindsight the author certainly left enough hints to support its plausibility. I was truly stunned, and couldn't wait to figure out how they were going to salvage their HEA from this. Of course their HEA was triumphant and in perfect harmony with the characters' true natures. The way this played out was in perfect step with everything Abigail and Stephen had built into their relationship right from the start, and I absolutely loved these two all the more for how well they work together. If you love historical romance, you owe it to yourself to read this and every book by Grace Burrowes. I voluntarily reviewed an ARC of this book.

  12. 5 out of 5

    Brandi Day

    I didn't think Grace Burrowes could write a novel that wasn't worth 5 stars. She always has well-developed characters, an interesting story, and beautiful prose. In this book, she maintained the prose, but everything else was lacking. Even the story was weak from the initial premiss. In this series with the Wentworths, I have found the characters less endearing in each consecutive book. In this one, however, I found them unpalatable. It seems Ms. Burrowes is on a crusade to give her characters a I didn't think Grace Burrowes could write a novel that wasn't worth 5 stars. She always has well-developed characters, an interesting story, and beautiful prose. In this book, she maintained the prose, but everything else was lacking. Even the story was weak from the initial premiss. In this series with the Wentworths, I have found the characters less endearing in each consecutive book. In this one, however, I found them unpalatable. It seems Ms. Burrowes is on a crusade to give her characters as many flaws and vices as possible and then dare the reader to be upset with them while the other characters blandly accept them as if it is of no moment at all. Murder, adultery, generally excessive philandering -- all perfectly understandable, no reason to judge. While that may be legitimate with some sins of the past (or present), I found it distasteful and, eventually, dirty when the hero of the novel admitted to having dallied with other men in his youth and then one of those other men ended up as a key character in the story. When he casually commented that both his former male and former female lover who were now lovers themselves could compare his prowess, I think the book far exceeded any standards of propriety or good taste. This is not the appropriate genre for that. I am grieved that the author chose to go in this direction as it added absolutely nothing to the character's development or the plot. As with so many things in our culture today, it was simply a means of normalizing homosexual behavior. This is not her first foray down this path, but it was her most unsettling, perhaps because it was done so boldly and in a way that detracted rather than in any way added to the story. I finished the book because I have too much respect for the author to not give the book a fair review, but it was in no way comparable to her early work. I have found each successive book of hers recently to be less enticing than the one before. It is a huge disappointment for me as she is truly one of my all-time favorite authors.

  13. 5 out of 5

    Krystal

    Sadly, this story just didn't work for me on a lot of levels. To begin with, while there was definitely an attraction between our two leads, it seemed more like a platonic sort of relationship for me rather than romantic. Added to that when Stephen casually mentions that he had a sexual relationship with both an ex, and her new husband (and how they might discuss his sexual prowess between them), Abigail just accepts it without question or comment, something that most definitely would not have h Sadly, this story just didn't work for me on a lot of levels. To begin with, while there was definitely an attraction between our two leads, it seemed more like a platonic sort of relationship for me rather than romantic. Added to that when Stephen casually mentions that he had a sexual relationship with both an ex, and her new husband (and how they might discuss his sexual prowess between them), Abigail just accepts it without question or comment, something that most definitely would not have happened during that time period. I could have overlooked that, had the rest of the story seemed to be filled with other things like it. Things that did absolutely nothing to move the plot forward. Even the culmination of who was after her and why fell flat for me. It seemed as though parts of this story were rushed, and cobbled together to try and make sense which simply leads to things feeling more disjointed than anything else. For example, how did Stapleton not know of the role that his daughter-in-law played in him getting (or not getting) what he wanted? How did no one realize the secret Harmonia kept when it took Abigail less than ten seconds to figure it out? However, I will say that these characters were definitely not your typical historical romance characters, Stephen had a bad knee forcing him to use canes in order to walk, and Abigail was not only nearly as tall as him, but able to support his weight when needed to take some of the pain away (not to mention she worked as an inquiry agent). These things made them stand out from other novels of the same time period. All things considered, the things that didn't work for me with this one will no doubt work for other reasons. Take what I've said into consideration, but not let that stop you from reading this if it sounds like something you will enjoy. DISCLAIMER: I received a complimentary copy of this novel from the publisher. This has not affected my review in any way. All thoughts and opinions expressed in this review are 100% my own.

  14. 4 out of 5

    Julie - One Book More

    This is an interesting historical romance that follows Abigail, a successful inquiry agent, and Stephen, the heir to the Duke of Walden. Abigail needs Stephen to protect her from a threatening and dangerous marquess and wants help faking her own death, but Stephen has another idea. By faking their engagement, Stephen can keep Abigail safe. Plus, this allows him to spend a bit more time with the intriguing and intelligent woman. However, will Stephen’s plan keep danger at bay, or will the secrets This is an interesting historical romance that follows Abigail, a successful inquiry agent, and Stephen, the heir to the Duke of Walden. Abigail needs Stephen to protect her from a threatening and dangerous marquess and wants help faking her own death, but Stephen has another idea. By faking their engagement, Stephen can keep Abigail safe. Plus, this allows him to spend a bit more time with the intriguing and intelligent woman. However, will Stephen’s plan keep danger at bay, or will the secrets of the past ruin the possibility of a future? Though this is a slower-paced historical romance, the characters and romance are lovely. Abigail and Stephen are compelling characters. As the story unfolds, you realize that events and relationships from the past have defined their present. They are both smart and quick-witted, but they hesitate to give in to their feelings because of their past traumas and fears. From their first conversation, their chemistry is obvious, and I love how easily they talk to, work with, and begin to trust each other. I also like that their relationship is built on respect. Abigail and Stephen both think very highly of each other, and from there, love blossoms. Stephen does everything he can to protect Abigail, and he is ruthless, cunning, and so charming when he wants to be. They prove over and over again that they are a well-matched pair. Both are loyal and brave and a bit ahead of their time, and they complement each other beautifully. This is a good story for readers who enjoy historical romance, but I would suggest reading the first four books in the series to further understand the characters and context. This story will appeal to readers who enjoy the fake relationship/engagement trope. Thanks so much to NetGalley, the author, and Forever Publishing for a copy of the book in exchange for my honest review.

  15. 5 out of 5

    Kristin

    I have read and enjoyed Grace Burrowes in the past, and this one had a lot of things I liked. I particularly like the two main characters, their banter and their willingness to have frank discussions about their past relationships. They both were "outsiders" in society, or at least on the fringes of good society, and in many ways that was a point of bonding for them. I appreciated the heroine being a tall, sturdy sort. It's not something that I see come up in historicals often. And I like an int I have read and enjoyed Grace Burrowes in the past, and this one had a lot of things I liked. I particularly like the two main characters, their banter and their willingness to have frank discussions about their past relationships. They both were "outsiders" in society, or at least on the fringes of good society, and in many ways that was a point of bonding for them. I appreciated the heroine being a tall, sturdy sort. It's not something that I see come up in historicals often. And I like an intelligent, smooth rake hero but with a secret soft core. If you've never read Grace Burrowes, I find her writing to be very steady and almost "old school" but her plot and characters are interesting enough to not be boring or too sedate. Then there were things I didn't like so much - this I can't really hold against the author, but I definitely jumped into this series in book 6. And clearly there was a lot that went on before this story that had a hand here. It was fine for me to pick it up at this point, but you would likely get more out of it having read the previous books. There was also some things that bothered me. Definitely "fat" self-talk from one of the previous heroines who just had a baby. Are we really still doing this in 2021?? So many reasons this bothered me. And also Abigail certainly engaged in a dubcon moment. Very similar to the one in Julia Quinn's The Duke and I, except despite the protesting in the moment, the hero seemed cool with it after. This still did not sit well with me. Both of these things kind of took a really good story and tainted it for me. They are small moments in the scheme of the story, but really left me feeling conflicted about the book overall, and neither of them were really necessary to the story.

  16. 5 out of 5

    Yvonne

    Finally Stephen's story. He has always interested me from the 1st time he was introduced in the series. This book is one of those cases where you get a lot more out of it if you have read the previous books in the series. It's been approximately 10 years (based on the ages of Jane & Quinn's children) since the beginning of the series until the time of this book. Just knowing his character from the periphery of the other books I can see a definite progression of his character. That's why I like G Finally Stephen's story. He has always interested me from the 1st time he was introduced in the series. This book is one of those cases where you get a lot more out of it if you have read the previous books in the series. It's been approximately 10 years (based on the ages of Jane & Quinn's children) since the beginning of the series until the time of this book. Just knowing his character from the periphery of the other books I can see a definite progression of his character. That's why I like Grace Burrowes writing style. Her characters wander in and out of her books & you see family members & friends in multiple stages of their life even before & after the book that features that character & the romance involved. Sometimes you read a book & characters make these seemingly sudden changes in character. Well maybe they had already slowly started thinking about making some life changes & meeting the right man/woman was the final impetuous to fully make those changes. However, it is hard to convey all that backstory within a single book. Her stories feel more like how it happens in real life. So I guess you can get from all of that I liked the book. Maybe later when I have time I'll do a more in depth review of some of the thing I specifically liked & yes even disliked. Grace Burrowes is human & has a different way of seeing things than I do, so even though I overall enjoy her books sometimes there are a *very few* things that I don't like. That's ok as long there are more good things about the book than bad. Usually it's just some things that I feel personally & isn't really something the author wrote or the style of writing. Also, frankly even the best of writers can have a bad day :-)

  17. 4 out of 5

    Debra Martin

    I always enjoy a Grace Burrowes book and this one did not disappoint. I was so happy to see this story was about Stephen Wentworth, the crippled younger brother and heir to the duke. Stephen is a brilliant inventor, but has been scarred since childhood when his cruel father breaks his leg, leaving Stephen with life-long pain and difficulty walking. He's bitter, but when he meets Abigail Abbott, he's intrigued and when she shows up on his doorstep asking him to kill her, he's determined to find o I always enjoy a Grace Burrowes book and this one did not disappoint. I was so happy to see this story was about Stephen Wentworth, the crippled younger brother and heir to the duke. Stephen is a brilliant inventor, but has been scarred since childhood when his cruel father breaks his leg, leaving Stephen with life-long pain and difficulty walking. He's bitter, but when he meets Abigail Abbott, he's intrigued and when she shows up on his doorstep asking him to kill her, he's determined to find out why she would take such a drastic step. Abigail has never felt good about herself--she is a big boned, nearly 6ft tall and no man has ever made her feel attractive. When Stephen offers an engagement of convenience, Abigail can't help but fall for him. I loved this book and read it in one sitting. Stephen is such a complicated character and I was happy to see his character finally revealed. Ms. Burrowes teases out how the details about Stephen's early life and his complicated relationship with his older brother, Quinn. The Wentworths are a formidable family and they all rally around Stephen and Abigail trying to uncover the threat against Abigail. For all of Abigail's independence, it's Stephen who finally makes her understand her appeal to the opposite sex. I really liked that she was not a retiring miss and was responsible for her own household. While this might be a little more modern than some other period romances, I think anything less would not let Stephen and Abigail shine and come together for their HEA. I voluntarily read the advanced reader copy and all opinions are my own.

  18. 4 out of 5

    Melanie | pagesandtealeavess

    How to Catch a Duke by Grace Burrowes Rogues to Riches #6 Publication Date: April 13, 2021 Abigail turns to Lord Stephen for assistance in faking own death to avoid a dangerous Marquess. Instead, he proposes a fake marriage and soon a fake courtship becomes all too real for them both. I have not read the previous books in the series and you can definitely read this book without having read the others. I really enjoyed the frankness between Abigail and Stephen. It felt like no topic was off the table How to Catch a Duke by Grace Burrowes Rogues to Riches #6 Publication Date: April 13, 2021 Abigail turns to Lord Stephen for assistance in faking own death to avoid a dangerous Marquess. Instead, he proposes a fake marriage and soon a fake courtship becomes all too real for them both. I have not read the previous books in the series and you can definitely read this book without having read the others. I really enjoyed the frankness between Abigail and Stephen. It felt like no topic was off the table for propriety’s sake. To be honest though, that’s the only thing I enjoyed. I made the call to DNF the book at about 30% which was a really hard decision for me. I feel like if I request an ARC on Netgalley then it’s my responsibility to finish the book and provide a review. However I didn’t see the issues I personally had with the book changing at any point. The writing was monotone, emotionless and almost clinical in delivery. My preference is for romance books filled with humor, witty dialogue and an overwhelming amount of sexual tension. The choice in tone resulted in me just being uninterested in any of the characters and uninvested in the plot. I was also turned off by the inclusion of a scene where he visits his mistress, spends the night and then breaks things off with her, before leaving he gifts her a tea shop. He had to have one last round of sex before he broke it off? Ick. This was just not the book for me. My apologies and thanks to Netgalley and Forever (Grand Central Publishing) an ARC in exchange for an honest review.

  19. 5 out of 5

    Moriah

    I received a copy of this title from the publisher for an honest review. 3.75 stars rounded up to 4. How to Catch the Duke can be read as a stand-alone although the characters have made an appearance in previous books. Stephen Wentworth grew up poor with an abusive father who broke his leg and permanently crippled him as a young child. As an young man, his fortunes (and his family's) changed when his brother unexpectedly inherited a dukedom; angry with his elder brother and his injury, Stephen s I received a copy of this title from the publisher for an honest review. 3.75 stars rounded up to 4. How to Catch the Duke can be read as a stand-alone although the characters have made an appearance in previous books. Stephen Wentworth grew up poor with an abusive father who broke his leg and permanently crippled him as a young child. As an young man, his fortunes (and his family's) changed when his brother unexpectedly inherited a dukedom; angry with his elder brother and his injury, Stephen spent his late teens and early twenties recklessly rebelling. His tutor (and cousin) saved him by taking him on an extended tour of the Continent. Now, Stephen is restless but finds himself fascinated by investigator Abigail Abbott when she arrives on his doorstep asking him to murder her. Abigail finds herself in danger as someone is attempting to steal old letters sent to her when she was younger. The mystery behind the letters is well done and kept my interest. Fans of Ms. Burrowes will not be disappointed by this title; all of her trade marks are present. Both Stephen and Abigail are well written likeable characters who have experienced difficulties in their past that they need each other to help move beyond. I always appreciate that Ms. Burrowes writes books with characters who not only have life experience, but act as mature adults. You never have to worry about Too Stupid to Live Heroines or actions that are too beyond the realm of the time period. This book is no exception and an excellent way to spend an afternoon.

  20. 5 out of 5

    Connie

    Miss Abigail Abbott wants Lord Stephen Wentworth to “kill” her. Actually, she wants word to get out saying she was killed. Evidently, Abigail has some damaging information about Lord Stapleton, a marquess, who is now intent on seeing that she does not release this information. Abigail was raised in a Quaker family, yet she is tall and a very sturdy woman with a very healthy appetite. She works for the government as “an inquiry agent." Stephen is heir to his older brother, Quinton, the Duke of Wal Miss Abigail Abbott wants Lord Stephen Wentworth to “kill” her. Actually, she wants word to get out saying she was killed. Evidently, Abigail has some damaging information about Lord Stapleton, a marquess, who is now intent on seeing that she does not release this information. Abigail was raised in a Quaker family, yet she is tall and a very sturdy woman with a very healthy appetite. She works for the government as “an inquiry agent." Stephen is heir to his older brother, Quinton, the Duke of Walden. Stephen uses two canes to walk. His knee was broken when he was a boy after his drunken father stomped on him. Stephen convinces Abigail that they enter into a pretend engagement. She can stay with his brother’s family and be safe while Stephen courts her. Soon, the pretend engagement becomes more than that as their attraction quickly grows. They attend events and watch out for key people. It didn’t take me long before I realized that this was a series that needs to be read in order. The characters were new to me as were the various family situations. Oh dear. Series can be so complicated and it’s a shame that each book cannot be read as a stand-alone. It leaves the reader confused and quite bored. I could not bond with this book at all. Stephen and Abigail seem perfect for one another but the rest of the book just didn’t make sense. Again, felt like I walked into a movie in the middle of it. Copy provided by NetGalley in exchange for a fair and honest review.

  21. 4 out of 5

    Christy

    As so often with romance series, the character who needs the most growth, the one with the scarred heart, is one of the last to have their HEA. As is the case with Lord Stephen Wentworth in How to Catch a Duke. Stephen is the most damaged and complex of the damaged and complex Wentworth family in Grace Burrowes’ Rogues to Riches series. At the end of the last book, The Truth About Dukes, we were introduced to inquiry agent Abigail Abbott and Lord Stephen was immediately intrigued. Now Abigail has As so often with romance series, the character who needs the most growth, the one with the scarred heart, is one of the last to have their HEA. As is the case with Lord Stephen Wentworth in How to Catch a Duke. Stephen is the most damaged and complex of the damaged and complex Wentworth family in Grace Burrowes’ Rogues to Riches series. At the end of the last book, The Truth About Dukes, we were introduced to inquiry agent Abigail Abbott and Lord Stephen was immediately intrigued. Now Abigail has come to London and needs Stephen’s brilliantly diabolical mind to help her save herself from a marquess who is threatening her over old, seemingly innocuous letters. She wants to disappear but Stephen proposes another option, a sham engagement which will put her under the protection of the Wentworth family and his brother the Duke of Walden. This gives Stephen time to solve the puzzle of why a powerful marquess would care about these letters and to solve the puzzle that is Miss Abigail Abbott. I enjoy a series where I can become immersed in a family. Grace Burrowes wonderful writing in the Rogues to Riches series draws you in and makes you care about the outcome of these characters. Her empathy and sensitive treatment of characters living with physical and mental disabilities in Regency England is enlightening. Thank you NetGalley and Forever Publishing for the ARC in exchange for an honest review.

  22. 5 out of 5

    Emily

    Advance copy from NetGalley I have been waiting and waiting for my request for this ARC to be approved, and I was thrilled to finally get a copy this week! Since I started reading the Rogues to Riches series, I’ve really fallen in love with the Wentworth family, but I have a special place in my heart for angry, brilliant, damaged Stephen. I was so looking forward to his book. I blew through like I usually do with this series, and I found this one extra hard to put down. Abigail and Stephen’s love Advance copy from NetGalley I have been waiting and waiting for my request for this ARC to be approved, and I was thrilled to finally get a copy this week! Since I started reading the Rogues to Riches series, I’ve really fallen in love with the Wentworth family, but I have a special place in my heart for angry, brilliant, damaged Stephen. I was so looking forward to his book. I blew through like I usually do with this series, and I found this one extra hard to put down. Abigail and Stephen’s love story was grand, as was the ever-present Wentworth family loyalty. I always love how Jane manages everyone, the scenes with Quinn were great (I might need to reread Quinn and Jane’s book), and I was happy Duncan and Matilda made an appearance or two (although too brief). The characters in these romances always feel rather modern in their views. I can get on board with it, mostly, since the Wentworths didn’t have a sheltered or conventional childhood, but the open mindedness and relaxed attitude about sex is still surprising. I do appreciate that Burrowes dispenses with drawn out angst, misunderstandings, and secret keeping (so dumb) as tools for creating conflict. Her characters are smart, and they solve problems like adults in a very straightforward way that still keeps me turning pages. Her acknowledgements make it sound like this is it for the Wentworths, and I’ll sure miss them.

  23. 4 out of 5

    Linda Walters

    I liked both Abigail and Stephen, both who were unusual characters. Abigail was one independent Amazon of a woman who had integrity and spunk. Also a somewhat unusual job, for a woman. Very few people appreciated her as she needed to be appreciated. She didn't know how to handle it at first when Stephen cherishes her. Stephen had a brilliant creative mind, a somewhat handicapped body and a kind soul. That was a surprise but actually was a good added angle to the story. When I say that he was ki I liked both Abigail and Stephen, both who were unusual characters. Abigail was one independent Amazon of a woman who had integrity and spunk. Also a somewhat unusual job, for a woman. Very few people appreciated her as she needed to be appreciated. She didn't know how to handle it at first when Stephen cherishes her. Stephen had a brilliant creative mind, a somewhat handicapped body and a kind soul. That was a surprise but actually was a good added angle to the story. When I say that he was kind, it's because he often did good things for others behind the scenes. He had the wealth to help but didn't want any applause at all. He not only helped with money but with his time. The beginning felt a bit wordy. It made it feel like it wasn't flowing very well when big and often odd words were used in the main characters first meetings. The secondary people in the story were good. There was a lot of loyalty in Stephen's family. Whether they were family by blood or adoption of the heart. There is plenty of mystery and dangers followed by several twists that I didn't see coming. I rated this book lower only because although I liked the M.C.'s and the emotions, most of the rest didn't pull me in as much as I would have liked. The H.E.A. and the Epilogue was a good ending though. "I voluntarily read and reviewed an advanced copy of this book. All thoughts and opinions are my own.”

  24. 4 out of 5

    Christine

    Stephen's story at last! Stephen, who maybe has endured the most pain of the entire eccentric Wentworth family, finally meets his match in former-Quaker-now-inquiry-agent Abigail Abbott. Although sparks abounded when Stephen and Abigail met in The Truth About Dukes (Constance's story), this book's opening lines made it clear Abigail Abbott was no ordinary woman:“I have come to ask you to murder me, my lord.” Miss Abigail Abbott made that announcement as calmly as if she were remarking on the ple Stephen's story at last! Stephen, who maybe has endured the most pain of the entire eccentric Wentworth family, finally meets his match in former-Quaker-now-inquiry-agent Abigail Abbott. Although sparks abounded when Stephen and Abigail met in The Truth About Dukes (Constance's story), this book's opening lines made it clear Abigail Abbott was no ordinary woman:“I have come to ask you to murder me, my lord.” Miss Abigail Abbott made that announcement as calmly as if she were remarking on the pleasing composition of a still life with apples.Abigail is every bit as amazing as that opening bit. And since Stephen never does what is expected or asked of him, he falls in love with Abigail instead. And despite Stephen's incredible brain, generous heart, unlimited riches, and of course his reluctant role as heir to a duke, the path to making Abigail his is one of twists and turns, with confessions, blackmail, revenge, heartbreak, and so many painful secrets. But wait, there is more than one love story here. While Stephen and Abigail find their way together, so finally do Stephen and his brother Quinn. To avoid spoilers, I won't say any more except that I actually teared up when the brothers finally opened up to each other about long suppressed secrets and feelings. See the full review on my blog Lucky Reads Romance.

  25. 5 out of 5

    Marilyn Hudson

    In the past I have enjoyed Grace Burrows' books. This one was a bit - tedious - and had tossed in aspects that really did not serve to enhance the story and seemed added in for some reason. The hero was limited in movement and had to use canes but that made him interesting and different. The heroine was a non-typical woman of the time (she worked as an inquiry agent) and this story reflected a growing trend of making a Regency historical as modern and contemporary as possible. The added on aspect In the past I have enjoyed Grace Burrows' books. This one was a bit - tedious - and had tossed in aspects that really did not serve to enhance the story and seemed added in for some reason. The hero was limited in movement and had to use canes but that made him interesting and different. The heroine was a non-typical woman of the time (she worked as an inquiry agent) and this story reflected a growing trend of making a Regency historical as modern and contemporary as possible. The added on aspects had a feel as if someone said, "Let's be really trendy and add some kinky sex!" Chains, whips, and the like have all been mentioned in other books and by other authors but in this the hero softly admits to having had sexual encounters with both men and women. At one point, he contemplates the potential one ex-female and one ex-male partner - who are marrying - may compare his sexual prowess and skills. None of this - by the way - actually contributes to the storyline. This was one book that left me disappointed - it had none of the things a historical of the Regency period has come to represent. No witty dialogue, no tension of human action against social constraints, no guilt, no sense of honor on the line, and people too much like the people at the local club of today to actually be people of another time period. Overall I found the story slow, lacking energy, and almost thrown together.

  26. 4 out of 5

    Poptart19 (ren)

    4 stars A charming story of two fascinating misfits who find love on their way to solving a mystery. Great characters, great fun. [What I liked:] •Interesting characters. Wonderful characters. Stephen is lovely & ruthless & kind & a bit warped & way too intelligent & so charming—& needs to learn to rely on others. Abigail is incredibly smart, brave, practical, wise—& needs to learn to believe how special she is. Ah, they make such a great team! They felt like real, flawed, lovable people who weren’ 4 stars A charming story of two fascinating misfits who find love on their way to solving a mystery. Great characters, great fun. [What I liked:] •Interesting characters. Wonderful characters. Stephen is lovely & ruthless & kind & a bit warped & way too intelligent & so charming—& needs to learn to rely on others. Abigail is incredibly smart, brave, practical, wise—& needs to learn to believe how special she is. Ah, they make such a great team! They felt like real, flawed, lovable people who weren’t boring or flat or predictable. •The chemistry is excellent. They connect well on so many levels. They build such a great team & friendship & fall so adorably in love. •I did not see the last twist coming! It was built up too, but so subtly I didn’t see through it. I always appreciate that. •The prose is so good. There are some wonderful descriptions & metaphors. The dialogue is so funny. I highlighted way too many quotes so I can go back & read them. [What I didn’t like as much:] •The ending isn’t bad, but I was slightly disappointed in Abigail’s misguided attempt to be noble. It didn’t fit with her forthcoming, honest nature or her trust of Stephen. It just felt out of character. [I received an ARC ebook copy from NetGalley in exchange for my honest review. Thank you for the book!]

  27. 5 out of 5

    Adriana

    This fast-paced romance is as much about the intrigue behind Abigail's reason for asking Stephen for help as it is about the phenomenal relationship these two characters have. It felt like two stories expertly woven into one and I love every twist and turn it took. The way Burrowes brings these two smart, headstrong people that are obviously perfect for each other together is fun and rather unusual for how things usually take place in historical romance. It was that difference that helped make t This fast-paced romance is as much about the intrigue behind Abigail's reason for asking Stephen for help as it is about the phenomenal relationship these two characters have. It felt like two stories expertly woven into one and I love every twist and turn it took. The way Burrowes brings these two smart, headstrong people that are obviously perfect for each other together is fun and rather unusual for how things usually take place in historical romance. It was that difference that helped make this a very refreshing read. The leads' very rational, "We're together. We're adults. Let's enjoy it," attitude leads to some very enjoyable scenes. But what perhaps made this stand out the most is that Burrowes doesn't just take time to flesh out her leads and a few side characters, even people with tangential parts in the story read like actual people and you care about what happens to them. It was nice to see an author take the time to make sure that every character on the page has a reason to be there and feels real to the reader. It's not done often or easily, so I appreciate it, even more, when it happens. Overall, I couldn't decide if this is either a book of intrigue with some very good romance mixed in or a romance with solid intrigue woven into it. Either way, it's totally enjoyable and recommendable. Many happy thanks to NetGalley and Forever for the early read!

  28. 5 out of 5

    Danielle Bush

    I don't really know what to say about this book, except that I loved everything about it.. I don't know how I havent read the other books in the series yet but Im definitely going to be reading them very soon.. I love Abigail and Stephen. They were so perfect for each other. Abigail is an investigator, she notices things most other people dont, is stubborn, and knows what she likes and what she doesn't. Stephen is a lord and in line to be the next Duke. He is so smart its crazy. He makes makes a I don't really know what to say about this book, except that I loved everything about it.. I don't know how I havent read the other books in the series yet but Im definitely going to be reading them very soon.. I love Abigail and Stephen. They were so perfect for each other. Abigail is an investigator, she notices things most other people dont, is stubborn, and knows what she likes and what she doesn't. Stephen is a lord and in line to be the next Duke. He is so smart its crazy. He makes makes and invents things. the only thing most people see about him is his leg. He has to use a cane, one occasion 2 in order for him to get around due to an injury he got as a child. But he is so much more than that.. He does whatever is in his power to do in order to help his friends or family, and does his best not to let his injury get in the way. When Abigail decides to ask Stephen for his help he is instantly smitten with her, and as she starts to learn about what a great guy she starts falling for him too.. I liked how they both had pasts and really had no problem talking about that with each other, and they had really great chemistry. I thoroughly enjoyed this story and can't wait to read the rest of the series.

  29. 4 out of 5

    Anne Morgan

    The independent Abigail Abbott asks Lord Stephen Wentworth to help her fake her death in order to escape a powerful enemy. He comes up with a better idea- a fake engagement. Abigail has trouble asking for help, trusting people, or letting others put themselves in danger. Lord Stephen has trouble asking for help, trusting people, or letting others put themselves in danger. Working together they may strangle each other, but they discover the right partner is easy to trust and is always there to he The independent Abigail Abbott asks Lord Stephen Wentworth to help her fake her death in order to escape a powerful enemy. He comes up with a better idea- a fake engagement. Abigail has trouble asking for help, trusting people, or letting others put themselves in danger. Lord Stephen has trouble asking for help, trusting people, or letting others put themselves in danger. Working together they may strangle each other, but they discover the right partner is easy to trust and is always there to help without being asked. I definitely liked Stephen and his facade of carefree, womanizing heir that even fools his older brother much of the time. Abigail helped him face his darkness and see it in a different way, and I liked how for all her Quaker tendencies toward violence she was also completely practical when it came to self defense. The plot was a little convoluted at times, trying to figure out who stole the letters, who had the letters, and who knew/cared what was in the letters, but I liked how it all worked together in the end, how Abigail and Stephen supported each other's weaknesses and encouraged their strengths, and generally became better people when trying to be together. A fun read I received an ARC of this book from NetGalley in exchange for an honest review

  30. 4 out of 5

    Tamara

    I was so excited for this book that I started reading it almost as soon as I downloaded it and finished it in less than 24 hours. Grace Burrowes is one of my favorite historical romance writers, and her books rarely disappoint. This one was a treat, particularly as it dealt with a wounded hero and untraditional heroine who both respect each other from the very beginning. This book wraps up the Rouges to Riches series, telling the Lord Stephen Wentworth whose father broke his leg in such a way th I was so excited for this book that I started reading it almost as soon as I downloaded it and finished it in less than 24 hours. Grace Burrowes is one of my favorite historical romance writers, and her books rarely disappoint. This one was a treat, particularly as it dealt with a wounded hero and untraditional heroine who both respect each other from the very beginning. This book wraps up the Rouges to Riches series, telling the Lord Stephen Wentworth whose father broke his leg in such a way that he has constant pain and often has to read two canes. Abigail is a strong, clever woman who does not put up with any foolishness. I recommend reading the series in order, as you learn a lot about both the hero and heroine in this novel from the previous ones. This book would still be enjoyable otherwise, but I think knowing about the family is key. Stephen and Abigail both have to deal with their past (which are interestingly interconnected here) and their own insecurities to find happiness together. I really enjoyed and recommend this book. I received an advanced readers copy of this book from the publisher and Net Galley in return for a fair review

Add a review

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

Loading...
We use cookies to give you the best online experience. By using our website you agree to our use of cookies in accordance with our cookie policy.