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The popular and highly regarded Pieper speaks of the necessity for human persons to be able to contemplate and appreciate beauty to develop their full humanity. Pieper expresses succinctly that the foundation of the human person in society is leisure, free time in which one can contemplate, be receptive to being and its beauty. "Joy is more profound than sadness, and our ca The popular and highly regarded Pieper speaks of the necessity for human persons to be able to contemplate and appreciate beauty to develop their full humanity. Pieper expresses succinctly that the foundation of the human person in society is leisure, free time in which one can contemplate, be receptive to being and its beauty. "Joy is more profound than sadness, and our capacity to delight in what is mostly determines what we are. Josef Pieper's welcome guidance on leisure, festivity, and contemplation is the most secure and most exciting way to arrive at, and to delight in, the truth in things. Pieper teaches us through music, sculpture, and poetry to see the luminous beauty that reflects an origin deeper than themselves." - James V. Schall, S.J., Georgetown University Table of Contents: Preface Work, Spare Time, and Leisure Learning How to See Again Thoughts about Music Music and Silence Three Talks in a Sculptor's Studio    Remembrance: Mother of the Muses    Those "Guests at the Festival"    Vita Contemplativa - the Comtemplative Life


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The popular and highly regarded Pieper speaks of the necessity for human persons to be able to contemplate and appreciate beauty to develop their full humanity. Pieper expresses succinctly that the foundation of the human person in society is leisure, free time in which one can contemplate, be receptive to being and its beauty. "Joy is more profound than sadness, and our ca The popular and highly regarded Pieper speaks of the necessity for human persons to be able to contemplate and appreciate beauty to develop their full humanity. Pieper expresses succinctly that the foundation of the human person in society is leisure, free time in which one can contemplate, be receptive to being and its beauty. "Joy is more profound than sadness, and our capacity to delight in what is mostly determines what we are. Josef Pieper's welcome guidance on leisure, festivity, and contemplation is the most secure and most exciting way to arrive at, and to delight in, the truth in things. Pieper teaches us through music, sculpture, and poetry to see the luminous beauty that reflects an origin deeper than themselves." - James V. Schall, S.J., Georgetown University Table of Contents: Preface Work, Spare Time, and Leisure Learning How to See Again Thoughts about Music Music and Silence Three Talks in a Sculptor's Studio    Remembrance: Mother of the Muses    Those "Guests at the Festival"    Vita Contemplativa - the Comtemplative Life

30 review for Only the Lover Sings: Art and Contemplation

  1. 5 out of 5

    Josh Bauder

    I've read this book nearly once a year ever since a friend gifted it to me at my high school graduation. Admittedly, that sounds more impressive than it is: Only the Lover Sings is actually five little talks and essays compiled into a thin volume with comfortable print and thick pages. It's a quick read, easily devoured in an afternoon (and maybe in an hour). In addition to his knack for brevity, Pieper has, even in translation, all the clarity of CSL. In my view this is an essential read for any I've read this book nearly once a year ever since a friend gifted it to me at my high school graduation. Admittedly, that sounds more impressive than it is: Only the Lover Sings is actually five little talks and essays compiled into a thin volume with comfortable print and thick pages. It's a quick read, easily devoured in an afternoon (and maybe in an hour). In addition to his knack for brevity, Pieper has, even in translation, all the clarity of CSL. In my view this is an essential read for anyone in the arts, and especially for Christians artists interested in avoiding both the ugliness of the radical avant-garde and the kitschiness of pop culture. In the first essay ("Work, Spare Time, and Leisure"), Pieper argues that human leisure, properly understood, is devoted to those activities that can serve as ends in themselves, including religious contemplation and feast-celebration (feasting is one of Pieper's favorite analogies for artistic experience, whether as a creator or an onlooker). The following essays are devoted to specific worthwhile artistic pursuits: visual art ("Learning How to See Again"), music ("Thoughts About Music" and "Music and Silence"), and sculpture ("Three Talks in a Sculptor's Studio"). The latter is a particularly effective closing essay, as it describes how art, when successfully executed, enables us to remember otherwise hidden aspects of reality. Pieper concludes by returning to his metaphor of art as the celebration of a feast, an act inseparable from both love and jubilation, and an act which affirms the goodness of the world, the self, and the divine order.

  2. 4 out of 5

    Joseph R.

    This slim volume of essays considers art from the perspective of the artist and the consumer of art. Pieper covers some of the same ground from his Leisure the Basis of Culture, where he distinguishes between work, which is always for some other purpose (e.g. to feed your family or to help your community), and leisure, which is an end in itself. Art is a quintessential leisure activity, or at least it should be. The artist contemplates the world and reflects that back in the works he or she prod This slim volume of essays considers art from the perspective of the artist and the consumer of art. Pieper covers some of the same ground from his Leisure the Basis of Culture, where he distinguishes between work, which is always for some other purpose (e.g. to feed your family or to help your community), and leisure, which is an end in itself. Art is a quintessential leisure activity, or at least it should be. The artist contemplates the world and reflects that back in the works he or she produces. Thus the art is not just a copy of the real world but an interpretive understanding. The artist needs to see the world in an affirmative way in order to have great art. Perceiving the world negatively results in, at best, parody. For consumers of art, the same is true. To appreciate the value and meaning of a work of art, the consumer needs to see the world in more than just a passing glance. Pieper talks about a trans-Atlantic voyage where he told other passengers about sea creatures only visible in the wake of the boat at night. The passengers reported the next day that they saw nothing the night before. They had only looked for a few minutes, not enough time for their eyes to adapt to let them see. Leisure, in a seeming paradox, requires some effort. The effort is well rewarded. The book is very short (76 pages) but very full of wisdom and is well worth reading and re-reading slowly.

  3. 5 out of 5

    Jeremy

    Excellent. Hope to use it in connection with a colloquium discussion on Pieper's Leisure: The Basis of Culture. Excellent. Hope to use it in connection with a colloquium discussion on Pieper's Leisure: The Basis of Culture.

  4. 4 out of 5

    Anne White

    Short, beautiful, profound.

  5. 4 out of 5

    Robert

    "…to contemplate means first of all to see - and not to think!" (p. 73) "…to see in contemplation…is not limited only to the tangible surface reality; it certainly perceives more than mere appearances. Art flowing from contemplation does not so much attempt to copy reality as rather to capture the archetypes of all that is. Such art does not want to make visible what everybody already sees but to make visible what not everybody sees." (. 74) "…contemplation is visual perception by loving acceptanc "…to contemplate means first of all to see - and not to think!" (p. 73) "…to see in contemplation…is not limited only to the tangible surface reality; it certainly perceives more than mere appearances. Art flowing from contemplation does not so much attempt to copy reality as rather to capture the archetypes of all that is. Such art does not want to make visible what everybody already sees but to make visible what not everybody sees." (. 74) "…contemplation is visual perception by loving acceptance!" (p. 75) "Konrad Weiss once remarked, 'Contemplation will not be satisfied until blinded by the object of its ultimate desires.' Such a statement leads us beyond the confines of this world." (p. 76)

  6. 5 out of 5

    Rose

    Josef Pieper once again rocks my world and makes me want to look at beautiful art and listen to classical music all day.

  7. 5 out of 5

    Jessi

    This little book deserves, or maybe requires, a few reads for me to really behold its beauty. It is mainly about contemplating or seeing, and about modern man's lost ability to see. He writes in 1952(!) about "visual noise...making clear perception impossible." In 1952! "One might perhaps presume that TV watchers, tabloid readers, and moviegoers exercise and sharpen their eyes. But the opposite is true. The ancient sages knew exactly why they called the 'concupiscence of the eyes' a 'destroyer.' This little book deserves, or maybe requires, a few reads for me to really behold its beauty. It is mainly about contemplating or seeing, and about modern man's lost ability to see. He writes in 1952(!) about "visual noise...making clear perception impossible." In 1952! "One might perhaps presume that TV watchers, tabloid readers, and moviegoers exercise and sharpen their eyes. But the opposite is true. The ancient sages knew exactly why they called the 'concupiscence of the eyes' a 'destroyer.' The restoration of man's inner eyes can hardly be expected in this day and age—unless, first of all, one were willing and determined simply to exclude from one's realm of life all those inane and contrived but titillating illusions incessantly generated by the entertainment industry." In addition to abstaining from these inordinate desires of the eyes, as found in entertainment, he recommends "to be active oneself in artistic creation, producing shapes and forms for the eye to see." And says that by practicing to see, in order to create, "The capacity to see increases." (The whole first section reminded me of Charlotte Mason also. She places a big emphasis on seeing as exercise.) The hardest section for me was "Thoughts About Music" because I am so undereducated in music, but I loved the very next short section called Music and Silence. My favorite section was Three Talks in a Sculptor's Studio. All three talks were beautiful. In the first talk, in 1975, he retells the account of Pindar (500 BC I think) "of how Muses were born: the greatest of the gods, Zeus, had ordered the chaos of the world into the harmony of the cosmos, and all the other gods beheld in admiration the splendor before their eyes. After some time Zeus asked them whether they could think of anything missing. A long silence ensues. Finally, they answer: yes, something is missing; an appropriate voice is missing to praise this creation. And for this very purpose the Muses are brought into being; it is their task to sing the praises of all creation." Later in the third talk in the sculptor's studio given in 1985, he says of "art flowing from contemplation," that "Such art does not want to depict what everybody already sees but to make visible what not everybody sees." And more: "The eyes see better when guided by love; a new dimension of seeing is opened up by Love alone! And this means contemplation is visual perception prompted by loving acceptance! "I hold that this is the specific mark of seeing things in contemplation: it is motivated by loving acceptance, by an affectionate affirmation." My name is Jessica and it means the Lord Beholds. I've loved the idea that God beholds me for years. I also like this task of mine to behold the Lord and his good world, and to do so in love. I think that's why this complex book speaks to me, even if I barely understand it.

  8. 5 out of 5

    Chris Padgett

    Josef Pieper is a respected philospher and a powerful writer. He is a deep thinking man who makes of his writing an artistic expression. The depth of Pieper has not gone unoticed, and I dare say that this book is one which needs to be read by any working within the arts. The importance of this work can be hinted at with a few quotes: “To serve some other purpose is the essential characteristic of work.” (19). “The restoration of man’s inner eyes can hardly be expected in this day and age-unless, Josef Pieper is a respected philospher and a powerful writer. He is a deep thinking man who makes of his writing an artistic expression. The depth of Pieper has not gone unoticed, and I dare say that this book is one which needs to be read by any working within the arts. The importance of this work can be hinted at with a few quotes: “To serve some other purpose is the essential characteristic of work.” (19). “The restoration of man’s inner eyes can hardly be expected in this day and age-unless, first of all, one were willing and determined simply to exclude from one’s realm of life all those inane and contrived but titillating illusions incessantly generated by the entertainment industry.” (33) Or, “The deal concerns “art”, created with uncommon technical skill yet entirely without substance, thriving only on the surprise it elicits by being outrageously novel and therefore unable to radiate any deeper meaning.” (63)

  9. 5 out of 5

    Jana

    I came across this book when I was searching up and down in the library for another title I never found. The title fascinated me since music has been instrumental (no pun intended) in my spiritual life for the last few years. It is a more "philosophical" read, but helps to explain what beauty does to us and why the arts (and particularly music...or was that just what I read in it?) moves us so. I came across this book when I was searching up and down in the library for another title I never found. The title fascinated me since music has been instrumental (no pun intended) in my spiritual life for the last few years. It is a more "philosophical" read, but helps to explain what beauty does to us and why the arts (and particularly music...or was that just what I read in it?) moves us so.

  10. 5 out of 5

    Titus

    Great work. I highly recommend this short meditative piece as it lends tremendous perspective to one's life and how to perceive (or try to perceive) beauty. I read this for a philosophy course and it only took me a few hours. Read it. Great work. I highly recommend this short meditative piece as it lends tremendous perspective to one's life and how to perceive (or try to perceive) beauty. I read this for a philosophy course and it only took me a few hours. Read it.

  11. 4 out of 5

    Aline Mullen

    Pieper certainly requires contemplation. I’m thankful that most of it went way over my head so that revisiting it might continue to offer new realizations of art, beauty, worth, and the love of Christ. “...Man is unable to to put into words the central and full meaning of the concept of the good, it’s complete realization: ‘We cannot say, and yet cannot be silent either... What are we to do, employing neither speech nor silence? We ought to rejoice! Jubilate! Shout out your heart’s delight in wo Pieper certainly requires contemplation. I’m thankful that most of it went way over my head so that revisiting it might continue to offer new realizations of art, beauty, worth, and the love of Christ. “...Man is unable to to put into words the central and full meaning of the concept of the good, it’s complete realization: ‘We cannot say, and yet cannot be silent either... What are we to do, employing neither speech nor silence? We ought to rejoice! Jubilate! Shout out your heart’s delight in wordless jubilation!’ Such ‘wordless jubilation’ is known as music!” “Here we somehow sense the artist’s inner relationship to the priest, who is called, above all, to keep alive the remembrance of a face that our intuition just barely perceived behind all immediate and tangible reality - the face of the God-man, bearing the marks of a shameful execution.” “The artist...seeks nothing for himself, who rather keeps the recesses of his soul in silence and simplicity, receptive to the breath of creative inspiration, which then flows, by way of his own remembrance, unadulterated into the unfolding form of his work...”

  12. 4 out of 5

    Meg Prom

    All around the tired town now rests, And silence slowly fills the dim-lit alleys... The market is empty of grapes and flowers... No noisy hands, no hustle anymore... And yet, the breeze brings, softly, melodies, The chords of lyres plucked in distant gardens... They tried, yet in vain, to tell me Of joy in words sounding joyful— Here am I taught, at last, Here, in this sadness-filled tale. -Friedrich Holderlin

  13. 5 out of 5

    Naomi

    I love the title of this little book. Artistic expression, whether art or poetry or music is all an overflow of love. This is a collection of speeches and articles that Pieper gave and so it is the place I wish I had started because he's speaking to a broader audience than in books like Leisure the basis of culture. I think he's right that we've lost the category of "leisure", we think of work or entertainment, and as a culture we've lost this receptive, contemplative mode of encountering truth I love the title of this little book. Artistic expression, whether art or poetry or music is all an overflow of love. This is a collection of speeches and articles that Pieper gave and so it is the place I wish I had started because he's speaking to a broader audience than in books like Leisure the basis of culture. I think he's right that we've lost the category of "leisure", we think of work or entertainment, and as a culture we've lost this receptive, contemplative mode of encountering truth and beauty. It's a thought provoking short read!

  14. 5 out of 5

    Ryan J.

    Making art is about seeing. Josef Pieper writes an interesting take on God, art, and the ability to see; through art. Our culture is riddled with a disease and the disease is the inability to see what is real, right, and good. Short and accessible book on art, philosophy, and faith.

  15. 5 out of 5

    Molly

    I underlined most of this book. I also finished it in a single evening. Which is to say, just read it.

  16. 4 out of 5

    Chris J

    A tremendous collection of essays/addresses. I am buying a copy for each of my four daughters. Must read.

  17. 5 out of 5

    Sharla

    Read for a conference on faith, art, and the public sphere.

  18. 4 out of 5

    Chad

    An interesting little collection of essays, and my first experience with Josef Pieper's work (besides, of course, that one time in college I checked out "Leisure: the Basis of Culture" from the library at a friend's suggestion, read three pages, and promptly returned it). As with most philosophical works, I assume my low-ish rating is due to my own shortcomings rather than Pieper's. Maybe I'm just not cut out to "appreciate" (or perhaps more accurately, "get") serious philosophy. Oh well. At any An interesting little collection of essays, and my first experience with Josef Pieper's work (besides, of course, that one time in college I checked out "Leisure: the Basis of Culture" from the library at a friend's suggestion, read three pages, and promptly returned it). As with most philosophical works, I assume my low-ish rating is due to my own shortcomings rather than Pieper's. Maybe I'm just not cut out to "appreciate" (or perhaps more accurately, "get") serious philosophy. Oh well. At any rate, I enjoyed some of these essays and expect to check out more of Pieper's work in the future (I'm looking at you, "Leisure: the Basis of Culture"). - "Work, Spare Time, and Leisure": 4/5 "The most important element in this teaching [from the Western philosophical tradition] declares: the ultimate fulfillment, the absolutely meaningful activity, the most perfect expression of being alive, the deepest satisfaction, and the fullest achievement of human existence must needs happen in an instance of beholding, namely in the contemplating awareness of the world's ultimate and intrinsic foundations." (p. 22) - "Learning How to See Again": 5/5 My favorite essay. Probably because it's the one I fully comprehended. "Before you can express anything in tangible form, you first need eyes to see. The mere attempt, therefore, to create an artistic form compels the artist to take a fresh look at the visible reality; it requires authentic and personal observation. Long before a creation is completed, the artist has gained for himself another and more intimate achievement: a deeper and more receptive vision, a more intense awareness, a sharper and more discerning understanding, a more patient openness for all things quiet and inconspicuous, an eye for things previously overlooked. In short: the artist will be able to perceive with new eyes the abundant wealth of all visible reality, and, thus challenged, additionally acquires the inner capacity to absorb into his mind such an exceedingly rich harvest. The capacity to SEE increases." (pp. 35-36) - "Thoughts About Music": 3/5 - "Music and Silence": 2/5 - "Three Talks in a Sculptor's Studio": 2/5 Although I really enjoyed moments from "Vita contemplativa - The Contemplative Life," especially the his point that contemplating something is ultimately about seeing rather than thinking. I also really enjoyed the quote he included by Konrad Weiss: "Contemplation will not be satisfied until blinded by the object of its ultimate desires" (p. 76).

  19. 5 out of 5

    Anne

    A little book, filled with big thoughts. Josef Pieper is accessible, humorous, and profound, expressing complicated concepts in simple sentences. This little collection of thoughts celebrates the beauty behind art and contemplation while encouraging the reader to actively see and appreciate the festivity of our daily lives. Step by step, Pieper leads the reader away from the realms of this world to the world beyond our own, in the same way he leads us from the little to the big. His writing has, A little book, filled with big thoughts. Josef Pieper is accessible, humorous, and profound, expressing complicated concepts in simple sentences. This little collection of thoughts celebrates the beauty behind art and contemplation while encouraging the reader to actively see and appreciate the festivity of our daily lives. Step by step, Pieper leads the reader away from the realms of this world to the world beyond our own, in the same way he leads us from the little to the big. His writing has, in every way, changed my life for the better.

  20. 5 out of 5

    Nathan

    At first blush, disappointingly slight, repetitive of earlier works (Leisure - The Basis of Culture) and seemingly hobbled together by a publisher's will to crank out one more title. This dissipates with the magnificent closing triptych of mini-essays given at a friend's studio. With breathtaking simplicity, clarity, and gentleness, Pieper's short musings on artistic inspiration reach their own summit of ecstasy. At first blush, disappointingly slight, repetitive of earlier works (Leisure - The Basis of Culture) and seemingly hobbled together by a publisher's will to crank out one more title. This dissipates with the magnificent closing triptych of mini-essays given at a friend's studio. With breathtaking simplicity, clarity, and gentleness, Pieper's short musings on artistic inspiration reach their own summit of ecstasy.

  21. 5 out of 5

    Conor

    An incredible little book by Josef Pieper that gets to the heart of what true art is (seeing/contemplation). This is a short book, but it packs a punch. Pieper's reflections on true seeing and contemplation, silence, what an artist is doing, and other topics wrapped up with the creation of art, literature, and music are incredibly profound. I highly recommend this book. An incredible little book by Josef Pieper that gets to the heart of what true art is (seeing/contemplation). This is a short book, but it packs a punch. Pieper's reflections on true seeing and contemplation, silence, what an artist is doing, and other topics wrapped up with the creation of art, literature, and music are incredibly profound. I highly recommend this book.

  22. 4 out of 5

    Ruth Paszkiewicz

    Very good, a lucid and comprehensive reflection on the spirituality of art and music

  23. 5 out of 5

    John

    This is a short essay collection on "Art and Contemplation" where Josef Pieper ascends into the area of aesthetics in philosophy. I feel this a branch of philosophy that is often overlooked, also by me who seldom think about the philosophy of beauty and the arts. Once in a while, it is still good to take a dip into it, and why not by the writings of Pieper. Pieper is well known for his book about Leisure, and the first essay here begins with that, the difference between work, free time and leisu This is a short essay collection on "Art and Contemplation" where Josef Pieper ascends into the area of aesthetics in philosophy. I feel this a branch of philosophy that is often overlooked, also by me who seldom think about the philosophy of beauty and the arts. Once in a while, it is still good to take a dip into it, and why not by the writings of Pieper. Pieper is well known for his book about Leisure, and the first essay here begins with that, the difference between work, free time and leisure. This is an important place to begin because the contemplation happens in the time of leisure, and from there he is able to dwell into the art of seeing again, music and silence, muses and contemplation. Seemingly Pieper has a very well grounded approach, a bit fractured with not much of a whole book feeling although there is a clear red thread, and although it is a topic a bit out of my major sphere of focus it is still a good thing to familiarize oneself with some of its aspects.

  24. 4 out of 5

    Subodh

    I bought this book under a mistaken impression that it would provide an analytical analysis of the power of music over the human mind. Music is very important to me but I can't explain why our brains are designed to go into such rapture by certain variations in pitch and rhythm of the sounds we hear. I had hoped for a hardnosed philosophical analysis, if not a scientific explanation. I was wrong, and I am happy I was. This is a very short book - just about sixty pages and the individual articles I bought this book under a mistaken impression that it would provide an analytical analysis of the power of music over the human mind. Music is very important to me but I can't explain why our brains are designed to go into such rapture by certain variations in pitch and rhythm of the sounds we hear. I had hoped for a hardnosed philosophical analysis, if not a scientific explanation. I was wrong, and I am happy I was. This is a very short book - just about sixty pages and the individual articles are only a few pages each. These are musings on art, in a style that can best be described as poetic. They don't satisfy one's intellectual curiosity, but they do jog the artistic part of one's mind - evoking images and feelings that add up to something ineffable. This is the kind of book that would need several readings to fully get the author's message.

  25. 4 out of 5

    Kathryn

    A small little book of short philosophical meditations on art. I particularly liked the last section, which contained three talks that Pieper gave in a sculptor’s studio. He talked about the Muses and how art is all about remembrance. And it is so true; all art is about remembering something: a thought, an event, an emotion, a revelation. Without artists, the past would merely drift away from us and lose all value. I also enjoyed his talk on the importance of celebration and feasts, and how Plat A small little book of short philosophical meditations on art. I particularly liked the last section, which contained three talks that Pieper gave in a sculptor’s studio. He talked about the Muses and how art is all about remembrance. And it is so true; all art is about remembering something: a thought, an event, an emotion, a revelation. Without artists, the past would merely drift away from us and lose all value. I also enjoyed his talk on the importance of celebration and feasts, and how Plato said that we are given the Muses as guests at every festival. And again, how true. What is any celebration without the arts present? Music, dancing, decoration, ceremony; all of these things are necessary to truly celebrate a festival mood. Art makes everything richer and more enjoyable.

  26. 5 out of 5

    Colette

    4.5 stars. There is so much to think about here. I especially loved the first three essays/speeches. I’m probably going to have to buy this book so I can read and ponder Pieper’s thoughts more often. Work, Spare Time, and Leisure Learning How to See Again Thoughts About Music Music and Silence Three Talks in a Sculptor’s Studio: Remembrance: Mother of the Muses Those “Guests at the Festival” Vita Contemplativa — the Contemplative Life

  27. 5 out of 5

    John Rullo

    "Cantare Amantis Est" -- Only one who loves can sing An accessible exploration of work, leisure, art, and other concepts which Pieper walks the reader through with grace and ease. He does not try to impress anyone or "gatekeep" with philosophical hyperbole, but rather engages in meaningful consideration of otherwise mundane topics. "Cantare Amantis Est" -- Only one who loves can sing An accessible exploration of work, leisure, art, and other concepts which Pieper walks the reader through with grace and ease. He does not try to impress anyone or "gatekeep" with philosophical hyperbole, but rather engages in meaningful consideration of otherwise mundane topics.

  28. 5 out of 5

    Erin Nugent

    Best line: "For man, to 'be' means to 'be on the way' – he cannot be in any other form; man is intrinsically a pilgrim, 'not yet arrived', regardless of whether he is aware of this or not, whether he accepts it or not. The object of this dynamism, the destination of this journey, the aim, therefore, of this becoming and the moving forces underlying it all, is the good." Best line: "For man, to 'be' means to 'be on the way' – he cannot be in any other form; man is intrinsically a pilgrim, 'not yet arrived', regardless of whether he is aware of this or not, whether he accepts it or not. The object of this dynamism, the destination of this journey, the aim, therefore, of this becoming and the moving forces underlying it all, is the good."

  29. 4 out of 5

    Katherine

    A thoughtful, short (75 pages) book on the moral and social value of art. I'm giving it 4 stars because the first section on work and leisure felt very disconnected from the rest of the book. I would recommend skipping the first chapter and jumping right into the author's main argument. A thoughtful, short (75 pages) book on the moral and social value of art. I'm giving it 4 stars because the first section on work and leisure felt very disconnected from the rest of the book. I would recommend skipping the first chapter and jumping right into the author's main argument.

  30. 5 out of 5

    Sharon Hennessy

    The art of contemplation is explained Pieper gives us an sight to the treasures we can find in doing so. A book I will be reading again to really grasp the message. This book is on the reading list of my classical education course to add to my understanding of schole.

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