web site hit counter The Devil You Know: A Black Power Manifesto - Ebooks PDF Online
Hot Best Seller

The Devil You Know: A Black Power Manifesto

Availability: Ready to download

INSTANT NEW YORK TIMES BESTSELLER From journalist and New York Times bestselling author Charles Blow comes a powerful manifesto and call to action for Black Americans to amass political power and fight white supremacy. Race, as we have come to understand it, is a fiction; but, racism, as we have come to live it, is a fact. The point here is not to impose a new racial hierarc INSTANT NEW YORK TIMES BESTSELLER From journalist and New York Times bestselling author Charles Blow comes a powerful manifesto and call to action for Black Americans to amass political power and fight white supremacy. Race, as we have come to understand it, is a fiction; but, racism, as we have come to live it, is a fact. The point here is not to impose a new racial hierarchy, but to remove an existing one. After centuries of waiting for white majorities to overturn white supremacy, it seems to me that it has fallen to Black people to do it themselves. Acclaimed columnist and author Charles Blow never wanted to write a “race book.” But as violence against Black people—both physical and psychological—seemed only to increase in recent years, culminating in the historic pandemic and protests of the summer of 2020, he felt compelled to write a new story for Black Americans. He envisioned a succinct, counterintuitive, and impassioned corrective to the myths that have for too long governed our thinking about race and geography in America. Drawing on both political observations and personal experience as a Black son of the South, Charles set out to offer a call to action by which Black people can finally achieve equality, on their own terms. So what will it take to make lasting change when small steps have so frequently failed? It’s going to take an unprecedented shift in power. The Devil You Know is a groundbreaking manifesto, proposing nothing short of the most audacious power play by Black people in the history of this country. This book is a grand exhortation to generations of a people, offering a road map to true and lasting freedom.


Compare

INSTANT NEW YORK TIMES BESTSELLER From journalist and New York Times bestselling author Charles Blow comes a powerful manifesto and call to action for Black Americans to amass political power and fight white supremacy. Race, as we have come to understand it, is a fiction; but, racism, as we have come to live it, is a fact. The point here is not to impose a new racial hierarc INSTANT NEW YORK TIMES BESTSELLER From journalist and New York Times bestselling author Charles Blow comes a powerful manifesto and call to action for Black Americans to amass political power and fight white supremacy. Race, as we have come to understand it, is a fiction; but, racism, as we have come to live it, is a fact. The point here is not to impose a new racial hierarchy, but to remove an existing one. After centuries of waiting for white majorities to overturn white supremacy, it seems to me that it has fallen to Black people to do it themselves. Acclaimed columnist and author Charles Blow never wanted to write a “race book.” But as violence against Black people—both physical and psychological—seemed only to increase in recent years, culminating in the historic pandemic and protests of the summer of 2020, he felt compelled to write a new story for Black Americans. He envisioned a succinct, counterintuitive, and impassioned corrective to the myths that have for too long governed our thinking about race and geography in America. Drawing on both political observations and personal experience as a Black son of the South, Charles set out to offer a call to action by which Black people can finally achieve equality, on their own terms. So what will it take to make lasting change when small steps have so frequently failed? It’s going to take an unprecedented shift in power. The Devil You Know is a groundbreaking manifesto, proposing nothing short of the most audacious power play by Black people in the history of this country. This book is a grand exhortation to generations of a people, offering a road map to true and lasting freedom.

30 review for The Devil You Know: A Black Power Manifesto

  1. 5 out of 5

    A.L. Smith

    The title alone piqued my interest. Simply stated, Mr. Blow does not disappoint. This is an incredible depiction of the “power struggle” in America (past and present) and exactly what it looks like from our perspective. But most importantly, it offers a solution while debunking a number of myths that have played a role in the perpetual oppression of African Americans. Prescriptively, the author provides a blueprint for yet another power shift...The “re-migration” of African Americans to the South The title alone piqued my interest. Simply stated, Mr. Blow does not disappoint. This is an incredible depiction of the “power struggle” in America (past and present) and exactly what it looks like from our perspective. But most importantly, it offers a solution while debunking a number of myths that have played a role in the perpetual oppression of African Americans. Prescriptively, the author provides a blueprint for yet another power shift...The “re-migration” of African Americans to the South. Based on the arithmetic alone, it simply makes sense. To be clear, prior to the Emancipation Proclamation, political power was dependent on the institution of slavery even though we couldn’t vote and in spite of the fact that we were only partially human. The framers of the Constitution sanctioned this method of the distribution of political power, which was rooted in greed, through the Electoral College and the 3/5th Compromise. The southern states were the initial beneficiaries and a civil war would prove to be the only remedy. However, the freeing of the enslaved was not an act of altruism... Even Lincoln, the “Great Emancipator,” was driven by the quest for power, “I will say then that I am not, nor ever have been in favor of bringing about in any way the social and political equality of the white and black races...that I am not nor ever have been in favor of making voters or jurors of negroes, nor of qualifying them to hold office, nor to intermarry with white people; and I will say in addition to this that there is a physical difference between the white and black races which I believe will forever forbid the two races living together on terms of social and political equality. And inasmuch as they cannot so live, while they do remain together there must be the position of superior and inferior, and I as much as any other man am in favor of having the superior position assigned to the white race.”  Abraham Lincoln September 18, 1858 Again, the institution of slavery was the impetus to the war, but political power was the primary objective. If we’ve learned anything since Emancipation, we know that the North is no better than the South when it comes to racism. I call it the “same whore in a different dress” or “The Devil You Know”. Dr. A.L. Smith Grambling State University c/o ‘96

  2. 5 out of 5

    Alithia Toussaint

    Moving! I am so touched by this book. I thought he was calling for millenials - what he’s saying is if where you are doesn’t feel like home, leave. He’s right. The whole world seems hostile to me, and I heard things about the south that I found to be scary. My grandparents on both sides ran in the 30’s. So much loss....this books sings a different song and it cuts true inside because I know for some reason as much as I love NY I am not, nor have I ever been happy here. Shame to live and die not k Moving! I am so touched by this book. I thought he was calling for millenials - what he’s saying is if where you are doesn’t feel like home, leave. He’s right. The whole world seems hostile to me, and I heard things about the south that I found to be scary. My grandparents on both sides ran in the 30’s. So much loss....this books sings a different song and it cuts true inside because I know for some reason as much as I love NY I am not, nor have I ever been happy here. Shame to live and die not knowing what it’s like to have a community that is at least sane much less nurturing. I’m considering it.....the migration.

  3. 5 out of 5

    Mike DuBois

    A wordy tome that can be summarized as follows: Black people should move back down South to achieve majority political status in the various states where they once constituted a majority, before the Great Migration north. I agree with Blow. It was a decent book, but I didn't find that the book had much to say other than that. A wordy tome that can be summarized as follows: Black people should move back down South to achieve majority political status in the various states where they once constituted a majority, before the Great Migration north. I agree with Blow. It was a decent book, but I didn't find that the book had much to say other than that.

  4. 5 out of 5

    Kelley

    I agree with the main thesis of this book. The first half is great. But as Blow continued on I found myself disagreeing with some of the minor points he throws in. I didn’t appreciate his diatribe against religion. He blames faith in afterlife justice as a reason for why Black Americans don’t fight harder for justice here in this life. I thought this argument had been put to rest long ago. But I guess Blow had to make his case for atheism. That’s tiring to me. Also it occurred to me while readin I agree with the main thesis of this book. The first half is great. But as Blow continued on I found myself disagreeing with some of the minor points he throws in. I didn’t appreciate his diatribe against religion. He blames faith in afterlife justice as a reason for why Black Americans don’t fight harder for justice here in this life. I thought this argument had been put to rest long ago. But I guess Blow had to make his case for atheism. That’s tiring to me. Also it occurred to me while reading that no one would actually move to the South in large numbers for social justice alone. It had to be for economic reasons. And those do exist and I think that is what is making the New South is economic opportunities. There are new jobs here and lower cost of living. But who we see coming here are Millennials, who are demographically more diverse. Blow’s book is interesting but he doesn’t really spend a lot of time on statistics or economic truths - analyzing what is currently happening already. So the second half of his book fell a bit short. Why postulate when we have the data? Anyway, everyone move South y’all.

  5. 5 out of 5

    Willie Kirschner

    This is a very interesting book. Mr. Blow suggests that black people should return to the South, where they once were and could again become the majority, and in that way seize the real political power that has too long been denied them. I found this an interesting and novel idea and considering the role of African Americans in winning the nomination and election for President Biden, something which may have some success. I hope I live long enough to see this happen.

  6. 5 out of 5

    Andre

    Interesting proposal. Thoughts coming.

  7. 5 out of 5

    Jean Fauntleroy

    This book poses a strong argument for a return to the South for Blacks who are disenfranchised with the North. Blow's ideas are cogent and his wordplay and turns of phrase are as deft as a novelist's. I hope when you read these reviews for this book that you consider the source of each rater. Audience matters. I think a reordering of the parts would be more persuasive in this sequence: Part 1, 2, 5, 3, 4, 6. As a child of the North raised in the South, I've never felt a beckoning to return. I co This book poses a strong argument for a return to the South for Blacks who are disenfranchised with the North. Blow's ideas are cogent and his wordplay and turns of phrase are as deft as a novelist's. I hope when you read these reviews for this book that you consider the source of each rater. Audience matters. I think a reordering of the parts would be more persuasive in this sequence: Part 1, 2, 5, 3, 4, 6. As a child of the North raised in the South, I've never felt a beckoning to return. I consider myself lucky to live in a city (Tampa, FL) which has burgeoning pockets of Black growth and business support. To echo the end of the book, come on down--the water's fine.

  8. 4 out of 5

    Melissa

    This is a provocative call to action from African-American New York Times columnist Charles M. Blow. I'm not sure whether his proposal might work, but it sure has given me a lot to think about. He argues that to finally achieve full equality in American society, African Americans need political power, and the best way that they can do this is to become a majority in several states and dominate politics in those states. He writes, "We need an exodus to the South in sufficient numbers and density This is a provocative call to action from African-American New York Times columnist Charles M. Blow. I'm not sure whether his proposal might work, but it sure has given me a lot to think about. He argues that to finally achieve full equality in American society, African Americans need political power, and the best way that they can do this is to become a majority in several states and dominate politics in those states. He writes, "We need an exodus to the South in sufficient numbers and density that Black people can come to know what real, lasting power feels like. Ultimately I believe this will be good not only for Black people, but for the country as a whole." A native of Louisiana who has spent most of his adult life living in the north, Blow calls for a reverse of the Great Migration and urges African Americans to leave the "destination" cities of the Great Migration and return to the South. The Great Migration failed to bring about Black equality because "In the abstract, when there were few Blacks in northern cities, people there could look down their noses at the racists in the South. But, when hundreds of thousands of Black people showed up, those northerners had to live up to their ideals. They didn’t. Instead, they employed many of the same brutal tactics—oppressive policing, housing discrimination, restrictive employment—that southern racists had used to keep Black folks subordinate and separate." He writes, "I am not advocating for a Black nationalism, but a Black regionalism—not to be apart from America but stronger within it, through consolidation and concentration. The goal is not sedition but liberty." He adds, "It is my great hope that a mass movement south would so destroy the Republican Party’s chances of winning the presidency or controlling the Senate that it would be forced to course-correct and become a desirable alternative for Black people and others." He urges African Americans to stop inching toward inclusion. "Inching toward inclusion is a luxury that the Black people cannot afford and therefore cannot abide. As Martin Luther King put it in his fiery “Letter from Birmingham Jail,” the white moderate “lives by a mythical concept of time,” one that for Black people translates into deferments and frustrations." In a particularly poignant chapter of the book, he explores police killings of African Americans and notes, "And make no mistake: The police killings were products of a war—asymmetric, government-sanctioned, and unremitting. The killings were the collateral damage, the logical extension of the criminalization of Blackness, the militarization of policing, and the commodification of penalty." He sees this pursuit of political power as a better use of energy. He notes, "Instead of pursuing truly revolutionary change, too much Black energy, both activist and intellectual, has been too obsessed with finding ever-newer phrasings to articulate an old phenomenon and often doing so in service of explaining to white liberals what Black people already know as a matter of lived experience."

  9. 5 out of 5

    Mark Taylor

    I’ve been a fan of Charles M. Blow’s op-ed pieces for The New York Times for a few years now. When I heard last summer that he had a book coming out, I was looking forward to reading it. The Devil You Know: A Black Power Manifesto, puts forth Blow’s ideas about how Blacks in the United States can gain more political power. In short, Blow thinks that Blacks should move to the South and attempt to consolidate their political power in these Southern states. The cities Blow specifically mentions are I’ve been a fan of Charles M. Blow’s op-ed pieces for The New York Times for a few years now. When I heard last summer that he had a book coming out, I was looking forward to reading it. The Devil You Know: A Black Power Manifesto, puts forth Blow’s ideas about how Blacks in the United States can gain more political power. In short, Blow thinks that Blacks should move to the South and attempt to consolidate their political power in these Southern states. The cities Blow specifically mentions are: Shreveport, Jackson, Birmingham, Atlanta, Columbia, Charlotte, Richmond, Baltimore, and Wilmington. Blow writes about wanting to launch a movement of Black resettlement that would in some ways reverse the trend of the Great Migration of Blacks who moved North during the 20th century. It’s an interesting idea, and a migration that might indeed end up consolidating Black political power, as Blow posits. Blow’s call for migration would presumably lead to a block of Democratic Senators from the South. However, a fact that Blow never mentions in his book is that Donald Trump won more Black voters in 2020 than he did in 2016. To cite just one example from the exit polls, Business Insider’s data shows that Trump won 6% more of the Black male vote, and 5% more of the Black female vote than he did in 2016. Yes, Biden still trounced Trump soundly among Black voters, but by a smaller margin than Hillary Clinton did. That doesn’t mean that Republicans will suddenly start winning the Black vote, but it will be interesting to see if Republicans continue their gains among Black voters in the 2024 Presidential election, or if Trump’s gains in 2020 were just an anomaly. The Devil You Know loses momentum during the book’s second half, after Blow has explained his theory. A review I read suggested that Blow might have written more about what is happening in these Southern cities right now. I think that’s an excellent point, and it’s something the book lacks. I’d also be interested to learn more about Blow’s experiences as a Black man living in New York City. There’s a bit sprinkled throughout the book, and then a few more details on the last page or two, but I would have been interested in reading a whole chapter about Blow’s time in New York City. The Devil You Know makes a compelling argument, and it will be interesting to see if Blow’s ideas gain traction in the years to come.

  10. 4 out of 5

    Scott Martin

    (Audiobook) (3.5 stars) This work generated a good deal of attention in literary reviews as it seemed to advocate a drastic solution for African-Americans so that they might finally achieve the meaningful changes to fight their subordinate status. It calls for a reversal of the Great Migration of the 20th century, where African Americans should look to move back to the South, states that have historic and already numerous African-American presence (LA, AL, MS, GA, etc). The idea behind this move (Audiobook) (3.5 stars) This work generated a good deal of attention in literary reviews as it seemed to advocate a drastic solution for African-Americans so that they might finally achieve the meaningful changes to fight their subordinate status. It calls for a reversal of the Great Migration of the 20th century, where African Americans should look to move back to the South, states that have historic and already numerous African-American presence (LA, AL, MS, GA, etc). The idea behind this move is that African-Americans could become the dominant political forces in these states and in turn, give them a stronger voice in national politics. This work has its merits, and Blow does make good use of history and personal experience to make his point. He all but savages Booker T. Washington, who did not use his position and status in the late 19th/early 20th century to promote African-Americans staying in the South (even as their lots got so much worse after Reconstruction). He also notes that even the destination cities, many of whom are liberal, are also proving as rough a place for African Americans now as the South was in the early 20th century. He does offer some promotion of the economic status and success of African Americans in the South. However, if such a policy were to happen, it will take a lot of time. Also, I am not so sure he sold the argument for African Americans to return to the South. Many of those states are in the lower tiers of economic development and there is not the driving allure. Also, there are some areas for quibbling with facts. The Atlanta mayor he mentions did bring the Olympics to the city, but the process to make that happen has been regarded by many as one of the most corrupt in recent memory (I.e. no different than anyone else who deals with the IOC). Overall, this book is a good thought piece, one that has merits and drawbacks. Sometimes, it felt like the author put too much in the work to make it a book more than an article. That detracts some from the thesis. Audiobook rates the same as e-copy/hard copy. One that should be read to make you think, flaws and all.

  11. 4 out of 5

    Paul G. Caron

    Books 2021 #19: The Devil You Know: A Black Power Manifesto by Charles M. Blow. I always thought that the Great Migration in American where millions of African-Americans moved from the south to destination cities in the north in the era around World War I to 1970 was a good thing for the growth of economic and social equality. It also created a wonderful world in the arts, music and literature especially when you examine the Harlem Renaissance. However, Blow, one of my favorite NY Times columnist, Books 2021 #19: The Devil You Know: A Black Power Manifesto by Charles M. Blow. I always thought that the Great Migration in American where millions of African-Americans moved from the south to destination cities in the north in the era around World War I to 1970 was a good thing for the growth of economic and social equality. It also created a wonderful world in the arts, music and literature especially when you examine the Harlem Renaissance. However, Blow, one of my favorite NY Times columnist, proposes a Reverse Migration where African-Americans move back to the south where they can attain true economic and political equality. Blow cites examples of the social and systemic injustices in several areas of the north. Many of the police murders of unarmed African-Americans have occurred in destination cities. Whites who are afraid of the Blacks doing everyday things like selling lemonade, bird watching, and grilling, have called police to take care of these threatening situations. Their unstated racism supports the police actions that we see on video these days. Remember, the police are reflections of our own attitudes and true beliefs. The author gives many examples of growing political power especially in Georgia and specifically Atlanta. The city is home to many African-American millionaires who have had the opportunity, access to resources, and freedom to succeed. This book was written right before the 2020 national elections but it does mention Stacey Abrams' work. I'm sure he would add the successful campaigns of the two recently elected Democratic senators from the state. I'm not sure of the ramifications of a Reverse Migration and would would be left in the northern cities. I await to hear how the African-American community responds to Blow's call to action. I just hope I'm around long enough to see some possible success in having a true political and social representation in this country. Four out of five stars.

  12. 4 out of 5

    Andrea Brinkley

    This is a really interesting concept. The author contends that when Black Americans left the south after Emancipation and headed to destination cities in the north, Black power potential in the south was effectively diluted. Not only political power, but power as explained here: “Look at me, I’m here. I have dignity. I have pride. I have roots. I insist, I demand that I participate in those decisions that affect my life and the lives of my children. It means that I am somebody.” In order to esta This is a really interesting concept. The author contends that when Black Americans left the south after Emancipation and headed to destination cities in the north, Black power potential in the south was effectively diluted. Not only political power, but power as explained here: “Look at me, I’m here. I have dignity. I have pride. I have roots. I insist, I demand that I participate in those decisions that affect my life and the lives of my children. It means that I am somebody.” In order to establish a balance of power, to deconstruct racial rigidity, Blow makes a bold proposal: a reverse migration to target cities in the south. Cities wherein Black power, wealth and culture are already established and thriving. He lists 8 focal cities, and acknowledges that this move is best implemented by young Blacks who may observe their current home does not allow them to feel, “physically safe, economically secure, culturally celebrated, and spiritually edified.” As a White woman, I don’t suppose I can weigh in on whether or not this is a good idea, but I can say I would definitely support anyone who felt they wanted to make it work.

  13. 4 out of 5

    Jo Stafford

    At first glance, Charles M. Blow’s proposition that African Americans move from the destination cities of the North and the West to the South in an apparent reversal of the Great Migration seems startling. But he presents his case so cogently and persuasively that it is hard not to be swayed by his arguments. In order to consolidate Black political and economic power capable of truly transforming Black lives for the better, Blow asserts that African Americans need to develop significant populatio At first glance, Charles M. Blow’s proposition that African Americans move from the destination cities of the North and the West to the South in an apparent reversal of the Great Migration seems startling. But he presents his case so cogently and persuasively that it is hard not to be swayed by his arguments. In order to consolidate Black political and economic power capable of truly transforming Black lives for the better, Blow asserts that African Americans need to develop significant population bases and the South is the region best-suited for this. He has put a great deal of thought into his thesis and the result makes for compelling reading. The Devil You Know is also a celebration of Blackness. With real joy, Blow salutes the nurturing nature of all-Black and majority-Black communities, particularly in the South. This is an important book, thought-provoking and shot through with Blow’s characteristic incisiveness.

  14. 5 out of 5

    Donna Bijas

    4.5 stars. What an absolutely incredible theory on how to build on Black power after years of abuse that I will not discuss here, however, the theory of a reverse migration back to the South for Black people who migrated North during Jim Crow is described in such a way that it makes one hope that if taken, racism and other atrocities committed against Black people could be challenged and won in government. While a slow start, this built to an amazing easy to understand diagram of this reverse ra 4.5 stars. What an absolutely incredible theory on how to build on Black power after years of abuse that I will not discuss here, however, the theory of a reverse migration back to the South for Black people who migrated North during Jim Crow is described in such a way that it makes one hope that if taken, racism and other atrocities committed against Black people could be challenged and won in government. While a slow start, this built to an amazing easy to understand diagram of this reverse racism whereby southern states would have the majority of Black voters and the ability to get laws changed that actually make “all men equal”. The concept is not even that hard. I’m a fan of Charles Blow, writer for the Times, and also a fan of his first book, Fire Shut Up in My Bones.” I recommend both to you.

  15. 5 out of 5

    Wei Han

    Blow's thesis exhorting Black people who can to move back to the South is compelling, but it doesn't quite take up the weight of this fairly slim manifesto as it should. Historical context is necessary and needed to support Blow's arguments, but they often feel like they're sucking up the air in the room. Blow is at his most compelling when honing on his call in his rhetoric and his arguments; it's just tempting to wonder what other specific arguments could have been presented. Then again, I'm n Blow's thesis exhorting Black people who can to move back to the South is compelling, but it doesn't quite take up the weight of this fairly slim manifesto as it should. Historical context is necessary and needed to support Blow's arguments, but they often feel like they're sucking up the air in the room. Blow is at his most compelling when honing on his call in his rhetoric and his arguments; it's just tempting to wonder what other specific arguments could have been presented. Then again, I'm not the primary audience for Blow's call to action, nor do I necessarily have the best awareness of the fraught history of race in this country, so I might not be in the best place to fully appreciate what Blow's done here. The thesis here is intriguing and just quite possibly influential enough that I'd be interested to see Blow's ideas catch on and get discussed more.

  16. 5 out of 5

    Meredith

    3.5 - 3.75 stars. Loved the first half of the book, but felt like the second half lost a little bit of focus. Still a fascinating proposal and well worth a read. "Race, as we have come to understand it, is a fiction; but, racism, as we have come to live it, is a fact. The point here is not to impose a new racial hierarchy, but to remove an existing one. After centuries of waiting for white majorities to overturn white supremacy, it seems to me that it has fallen to Black people to do it themselve 3.5 - 3.75 stars. Loved the first half of the book, but felt like the second half lost a little bit of focus. Still a fascinating proposal and well worth a read. "Race, as we have come to understand it, is a fiction; but, racism, as we have come to live it, is a fact. The point here is not to impose a new racial hierarchy, but to remove an existing one. After centuries of waiting for white majorities to overturn white supremacy, it seems to me that it has fallen to Black people to do it themselves." "White people outside the South say the right words but many possess the same bigotry. Racism is everywhere. And if that’s the case, wouldn’t you rather have some real political power to address that racism? And a yard!"

  17. 5 out of 5

    Serge

    Provocative proposition rooted in economic data. The South, today, holds more promise for African Americans than it did at the time of the Great Migration. I was less persuaded by Blow's strategic wordplay around the question of whether his Black regionalism argument is racialist. I concede that the cause of Black power is advanced. I am concerned that integration dies a public slow death in Blow's push for electoral victory, leveraged purchasing power, and cultural ease. The tragic American exp Provocative proposition rooted in economic data. The South, today, holds more promise for African Americans than it did at the time of the Great Migration. I was less persuaded by Blow's strategic wordplay around the question of whether his Black regionalism argument is racialist. I concede that the cause of Black power is advanced. I am concerned that integration dies a public slow death in Blow's push for electoral victory, leveraged purchasing power, and cultural ease. The tragic American experiment still calls us to an "e pluribus unum" future. I may not agree with the book, but I marvel at its bold strokes.

  18. 4 out of 5

    Sagar Jethani

    A convincing argument for a reverse Great Migration back to the South. Blow lays out a solid case within the first 50 pages; the rest of the book augments that case with his personal experience of growing up in the South, traveling North, and then ultimately settling back in Atlanta. At times I felt his argument could have been made just as powerfully as a long form piece of magazine content, but the memoir which begins roughly at page 50 until the end of the book supplements his case with stron A convincing argument for a reverse Great Migration back to the South. Blow lays out a solid case within the first 50 pages; the rest of the book augments that case with his personal experience of growing up in the South, traveling North, and then ultimately settling back in Atlanta. At times I felt his argument could have been made just as powerfully as a long form piece of magazine content, but the memoir which begins roughly at page 50 until the end of the book supplements his case with strong anecdotal evidence based on recent events. Blow recalled hearing Harry Belafonte bemoan the lack of bold ideas from civil rights thinkers. Blow certainly has delivered a powerful one of his own.

  19. 4 out of 5

    Melanie

    Very fresh perspective and a different way to view the achievement of Black economic, societal, and cultural power. Charles Blow is proposing “reverse migration” to gain real statewide political power in certain Southern states. Since power in the United States is assigned at the state level, the author proposes Black people should relocate to key Southern states to alter the political landscape. This is contrary to the historical way Blacks have been told to be more successful—that you have to Very fresh perspective and a different way to view the achievement of Black economic, societal, and cultural power. Charles Blow is proposing “reverse migration” to gain real statewide political power in certain Southern states. Since power in the United States is assigned at the state level, the author proposes Black people should relocate to key Southern states to alter the political landscape. This is contrary to the historical way Blacks have been told to be more successful—that you have to go up North to make it. Definitely something to consider.

  20. 5 out of 5

    Mark

    This is a quick read with a singular purpose. A thought provoking work well worth everyone’s time to read and discuss. I wonder about the separate but equal notion in the idea (for Blacks to increase density in selected states to create a voting bloc in Congress) working as smoothly as he hopes. Particularly given the rise and openness and violence of white supremacists since President Obama’s election in 2008. But we know the status quo isn’t working to end racism and inequities in this country This is a quick read with a singular purpose. A thought provoking work well worth everyone’s time to read and discuss. I wonder about the separate but equal notion in the idea (for Blacks to increase density in selected states to create a voting bloc in Congress) working as smoothly as he hopes. Particularly given the rise and openness and violence of white supremacists since President Obama’s election in 2008. But we know the status quo isn’t working to end racism and inequities in this country so something has to change to make it better.

  21. 5 out of 5

    Amanda

    I don't have much of an opinion to offer on the book other than to say it was very compelling. While I am not certain of Blow's thesis and ultimate argument this book was eye-opening as far as data and information. I was eager to finish and absorb as much as I could. A note on the narrator: I wasn't down with the impressions. The narrator was good until he started impersonating President Obama. Nope, just read it please. I don't have much of an opinion to offer on the book other than to say it was very compelling. While I am not certain of Blow's thesis and ultimate argument this book was eye-opening as far as data and information. I was eager to finish and absorb as much as I could. A note on the narrator: I wasn't down with the impressions. The narrator was good until he started impersonating President Obama. Nope, just read it please.

  22. 4 out of 5

    Miguel

    The idea of a reverse migration back to the South on the part of African Americans is an interesting concept that Blow explores. As I listened, I thought about a similar plan to have a plurality of libertarians move to New Hampshire in order to shape regional politics and day to day life. Blow's idea seems more reasonable and ultimately more achievable. His take on race relations and how that extends to power was nuanced and insightful. The idea of a reverse migration back to the South on the part of African Americans is an interesting concept that Blow explores. As I listened, I thought about a similar plan to have a plurality of libertarians move to New Hampshire in order to shape regional politics and day to day life. Blow's idea seems more reasonable and ultimately more achievable. His take on race relations and how that extends to power was nuanced and insightful.

  23. 4 out of 5

    Gary

    Return home to the South. At first a bit startling for an old country boy from Oregon, the case Blow makes for African Americans to undertake the Great Migration in reverse is made both thoughtfully and persuasively. Recommended for anyone with an interest in the evolution of American culture.

  24. 4 out of 5

    Adam

    A call to action to Black folk to return to the South...a reverse Great Migration, of sorts. Interesting and compelling concept...a Black power enshrined within a new sense of regionalism. The true benefits of the idea would likely take 1-2 generations to show themselves. 4 stars. Curious to see the viability of Blow's ideas, now and in the future. A call to action to Black folk to return to the South...a reverse Great Migration, of sorts. Interesting and compelling concept...a Black power enshrined within a new sense of regionalism. The true benefits of the idea would likely take 1-2 generations to show themselves. 4 stars. Curious to see the viability of Blow's ideas, now and in the future.

  25. 4 out of 5

    Stephen Rynkiewicz

    The Southern reverse migration has begun. Chicago, Detroit and other cities of the North have not lived up to the promise of the 20th century's Great Migration. Atlanta and Charlotte now hold the prospects of jobs and hope. Yet Charles Blow seems too hopeful for a power shift in the new South. Your people need you, he concludes. But that's true both North and South. The Southern reverse migration has begun. Chicago, Detroit and other cities of the North have not lived up to the promise of the 20th century's Great Migration. Atlanta and Charlotte now hold the prospects of jobs and hope. Yet Charles Blow seems too hopeful for a power shift in the new South. Your people need you, he concludes. But that's true both North and South.

  26. 4 out of 5

    Sarah Baker

    This book is not written for me - my Caucasian carcass is safe from the brutality that others are subject to. However, I see his point and agree with it. I think that the plan would be more successful than the libertarian fantasy of “A Libertarian Walks into a Bear” - mind you, it would be hard to fail more than they did!

  27. 4 out of 5

    Glenda Nelms

    “The point is not to create blind racial devotion, but rather to create responsive, race-conscious accountability.” The Devil You Know explores the idea of a reverse migration, black people returning to the south to change the political landscape. It discusses a historical look into the power struggle in America and give readers a perspective of politics in the Black Community.

  28. 5 out of 5

    Matthew

    A NYTimes columnist makes his case for a Black migration to the South, writing that integration and diversity in a society (the North) where white supremacy is ubiquitous and inveterate (p 45) can’t work.

  29. 5 out of 5

    Miriam

    Charles Blow’s excellent work gave me a new perspective into the Afro-American community. The notion of a homeland resonated. I shall read this again. Such original thinking needs multiple reads to be savored.

  30. 5 out of 5

    Kimberly Leak

    This book illustrates an interesting concept. My hope is that this creates a further discussion on how to bring this plan into fruition. While the author outlines WHY very good. I still need to see the HOW?

Add a review

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

Loading...
We use cookies to give you the best online experience. By using our website you agree to our use of cookies in accordance with our cookie policy.