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An overwhelmed new mom discovers unexpected parallels between life in twenty-first-century America and her grandmother's account of their family's escape from the Nazis in this sharp, heartfelt novel. "A fresh perspective--one that's both haunting and hilarious--on dual-timeline war stories, a feat that only a writer of Kuznetsova's caliber could pull off."--Fiona Davis An overwhelmed new mom discovers unexpected parallels between life in twenty-first-century America and her grandmother's account of their family's escape from the Nazis in this sharp, heartfelt novel. "A fresh perspective--one that's both haunting and hilarious--on dual-timeline war stories, a feat that only a writer of Kuznetsova's caliber could pull off."--Fiona Davis, New York Times bestselling author of The Lions of Fifth Avenue Larissa is a stubborn, brutally honest woman in her eighties, tired of her home in Kiev, Ukraine--tired of everything really, except for her beloved granddaughter, Natasha. Natasha is tired as well, but that's because she just had a baby, and she's struggling to balance her roles as a new mother, a wife, a struggling actress, and a host to her husband's slacker best friend, Stas, who has been staying with them in their cramped one-bedroom apartment in upper Manhattan. When Natasha asks Larissa to tell the story of her family's Soviet wartime escape from the Nazis in Kiev, she reluctantly agrees. Maybe Natasha is just looking for distraction from her own life, but Larissa is desperate to make her happy, even though telling the story makes her heart ache. Larissa recounts the nearly three-year period when she fled with her self-absorbed sister, parents, and grandmother to a factory town in the Ural Mountains where they faced starvation, a cholera outbreak, a tragic suicide, and where she was torn in her affections for two brothers from a wealthy family. But neither Larissa nor Natasha can anticipate how loudly these lessons of the past will echo in their present moments. Something Unbelievable explores with piercing wit and tender feeling just how much our circumstances shape our lives and what we pass on to the younger generations, willingly or not.


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An overwhelmed new mom discovers unexpected parallels between life in twenty-first-century America and her grandmother's account of their family's escape from the Nazis in this sharp, heartfelt novel. "A fresh perspective--one that's both haunting and hilarious--on dual-timeline war stories, a feat that only a writer of Kuznetsova's caliber could pull off."--Fiona Davis An overwhelmed new mom discovers unexpected parallels between life in twenty-first-century America and her grandmother's account of their family's escape from the Nazis in this sharp, heartfelt novel. "A fresh perspective--one that's both haunting and hilarious--on dual-timeline war stories, a feat that only a writer of Kuznetsova's caliber could pull off."--Fiona Davis, New York Times bestselling author of The Lions of Fifth Avenue Larissa is a stubborn, brutally honest woman in her eighties, tired of her home in Kiev, Ukraine--tired of everything really, except for her beloved granddaughter, Natasha. Natasha is tired as well, but that's because she just had a baby, and she's struggling to balance her roles as a new mother, a wife, a struggling actress, and a host to her husband's slacker best friend, Stas, who has been staying with them in their cramped one-bedroom apartment in upper Manhattan. When Natasha asks Larissa to tell the story of her family's Soviet wartime escape from the Nazis in Kiev, she reluctantly agrees. Maybe Natasha is just looking for distraction from her own life, but Larissa is desperate to make her happy, even though telling the story makes her heart ache. Larissa recounts the nearly three-year period when she fled with her self-absorbed sister, parents, and grandmother to a factory town in the Ural Mountains where they faced starvation, a cholera outbreak, a tragic suicide, and where she was torn in her affections for two brothers from a wealthy family. But neither Larissa nor Natasha can anticipate how loudly these lessons of the past will echo in their present moments. Something Unbelievable explores with piercing wit and tender feeling just how much our circumstances shape our lives and what we pass on to the younger generations, willingly or not.

30 review for Something Unbelievable

  1. 5 out of 5

    Ann

    This is a very well done novel that covers many subjects. It is story of a Ukrainian family, including its incredibly difficult time in Russia during WWII (because the father was an important engineer). It is a story of the lure and difficulties of pursuing an acting career in the US. But more importantly it is the story of families - particularly relationships between grandmothers and granddaughters which are extremely well portrayed (in two different generations and from both perspectives (gra This is a very well done novel that covers many subjects. It is story of a Ukrainian family, including its incredibly difficult time in Russia during WWII (because the father was an important engineer). It is a story of the lure and difficulties of pursuing an acting career in the US. But more importantly it is the story of families - particularly relationships between grandmothers and granddaughters which are extremely well portrayed (in two different generations and from both perspectives (grandmother and grandchild)). The familial relationships also include an excellent view into a present day marriage. But shining through it all is the theme of motherhood. We see a young mother (the aspiring actress) who is not at all sure that motherhood is a good idea for her. I'm sure there are some mothers who always loved their tiny babies unconditionally and never doubted their own choices in becoming mothers - but most of the women I know had plenty of doubts and stress. We watch as the young mother in the novel goes through stages of resentment, sleep deprivation and body frustration - until at the end "something unbelievable" happens and all the stress of having a baby diminishes and turns into the pure, unequivocal unmatched love we as mothers have for our children. This novel was also hilarious - I truly did laugh out loud a number of times. My negative comment would be that the young actress probably didn't need to use the "F" word so often in all its many forms (you know, adjective, adverb, noun, etc) - but that did not deter me from really enjoying this book.

  2. 4 out of 5

    Marsha

    The author seamlessly interweaves a multigenerational story of a well-to-do Ukrainian-Russian family from the time of the Russian Revolution, intensely through WWII and onto the present in the US. The novel begins with Larissa, now an elderly grandmother, telling her life story to her beloved granddaughter Natasha via regular Skype visits. Natasha is a new mother and a burgeoning actor who is struggling to put some order into her life. The intersections of these two women's personalities and wea The author seamlessly interweaves a multigenerational story of a well-to-do Ukrainian-Russian family from the time of the Russian Revolution, intensely through WWII and onto the present in the US. The novel begins with Larissa, now an elderly grandmother, telling her life story to her beloved granddaughter Natasha via regular Skype visits. Natasha is a new mother and a burgeoning actor who is struggling to put some order into her life. The intersections of these two women's personalities and weaknesses is engaging and I loved the full circle that came in the end. Larissa's struggles through WWII make for a consuming read all on their own. Many larger than life characters and incidents. I especially loved the droll voice of Larissa. This is a multi-layered and carefully crafted novel that reads smooth like butter. Brava. One of the best novels I've read this year.

  3. 5 out of 5

    Lolly K Dandeneau

    via my blog: https://bookstalkerblog.wordpress.com/ โ€œ๐‘จ๐’๐’… ๐’”๐’๐’๐’ ๐‘ฐ ๐’˜๐’Š๐’๐’ ๐’†๐’—๐’‚๐’‘๐’๐’“๐’‚๐’•๐’† ๐’‚๐’๐’… ๐’š๐’๐’– ๐’˜๐’Š๐’๐’ ๐’‰๐’‚๐’—๐’† ๐’๐’ ๐’”๐’•๐’๐’“๐’š ๐’•๐’ ๐’“๐’†๐’Ž๐’†๐’Ž๐’ƒ๐’†๐’“.โ€ Time has been brutal for widowed Larissa, and now approaching her ninetieth year, living in Kiev she video conferences her granddaughter Natasha, who lives in America- which may as well be another planet altogether. Natashaโ€™s emotional state is harried dealing with the exhaustion of caring for her newborn daughter, burdened by her husband Yuriโ€™s friend Stas (who is currently cras via my blog: https://bookstalkerblog.wordpress.com/ โ€œ๐‘จ๐’๐’… ๐’”๐’๐’๐’ ๐‘ฐ ๐’˜๐’Š๐’๐’ ๐’†๐’—๐’‚๐’‘๐’๐’“๐’‚๐’•๐’† ๐’‚๐’๐’… ๐’š๐’๐’– ๐’˜๐’Š๐’๐’ ๐’‰๐’‚๐’—๐’† ๐’๐’ ๐’”๐’•๐’๐’“๐’š ๐’•๐’ ๐’“๐’†๐’Ž๐’†๐’Ž๐’ƒ๐’†๐’“.โ€ Time has been brutal for widowed Larissa, and now approaching her ninetieth year, living in Kiev she video conferences her granddaughter Natasha, who lives in America- which may as well be another planet altogether. Natashaโ€™s emotional state is harried dealing with the exhaustion of caring for her newborn daughter, burdened by her husband Yuriโ€™s friend Stas (who is currently crashing at their place) and juggling motherhood while auditioning for parts. The truth of it is, she is barely clinging to the end of her rope. The only saving grace is that Stas is great with children, her and Yuriโ€™s baby in particular. When she asks Larissa if she will finally tell her the story of her own grandmother, the whole story about her life during World War Two, she is surprised her grandmother barely puts up a fight. Larissa wonders if her granddaughter really cares or is just using it as a distraction. Larissa admits to herself she has told it in bits and pieces, not all of it, it wears on her heart to remember. Tonya was a spoiled woman of wealth who married a banker, misfortune came to call with the Revolution in Ukraine, and the coupleโ€™s โ€˜fine apartmentโ€™ was seized by the Bolsheviks. It is everything that followed after, when the plan to flee their homeland with their children is altered after her husbandโ€™s death from typhus and Tonya is forced to make big decision on her own. This choice changes the course of her two sons lives. This is how Larissaโ€™s father and uncle, as children, were sent to an orphanage. It is also how the weak, spoiled Tonya was able to maintain her lavish lifestyle. Years later, Larissaโ€™s mother and father meet at the Polytechnic Institute in Kiev, marry and have two daughters, Larissa and her younger, achingly beautiful sister Polya. Naturally their shallow grandmother adores Polina and lavishes attention on her, which doesnโ€™t endear the sisters to one another. Life goes on until threats of Hitler invading the Soviet Union begin to take hold and the family must evacuate by train to the remote town of Lower Turinsk. Larisaโ€™s family tale spirals into darkness and raw brutality. They are not alone on this uncomfortable cargo train, joined by their fatherโ€™s brother and his family along with another couple and their sweet little girl. Soon, they will be โ€œas beaten down as mushrooms stocked away deep in a forest.โ€ Hunger, fear, jealousy, desire and death shadow their flight to safety. Larissa opens up about her love for two brothers, wildly different in personality and temperament. Remembering being driven to distraction by the crying jags of her silly sister and grandmother, of being wearied even of the terrors visited upon them, tough as nails Larissa lets the memories flow despite the ache. Everything she thinks she understands about her silly sister is challenged over the years, turning her bitterness into something inexplicable. She has many regrets and is visited by the spectre of death, outliving even her own daughter, Natashaโ€™s mother. Natasha is ashamed, at times, of her own weakness and struggles, particularly knowing her ancestors were made of sterner stuff. Just imagining everything they lived through makes her feel like a pitiful creature. Motherhood hasnโ€™t come as naturally as she expected it to, Yuri is no longer interested in her as a woman it seems and the only roles she fits the mold for are those of proustite or spy. Her body hasnโ€™t felt like her own since giving birth, and the memories sheโ€™s suppressed about her dead mother and her own hidden talent has her struggling with the past. She needs to feel like herself again, to have something that is her own. She needs to work, it is acting that fills her with purpose! Canโ€™t a mother have a life too? Though the challenges Natasha faces are nothing near as severe as war, starvation, and the horrors her grandmother Larissa confronted, there are still parallels. The telling draws them closer and the struggles of what it means being a woman with passions, while mothering a child, is a bridge to understanding the choices we make. Even when there doesnโ€™t seem to be a choice, beautiful new stories can be born from the ruins. As Larissa passes down this inheritance, her story, it reverberates through time. Natasha takes the tale and reshapes it to fit present day, and share the meaning, the very truth that is the beating heart of Larissaโ€™s life. It is about being vulnerable, selfishness, love, desire, war, death, how we judge others and ourselves and all the misunderstandings in between. It is where we go with what we have when we arrive in unexpected places. It is beautiful but make no mistake, Larissaโ€™s past is hell, one that is witness to the ugliest of humanity and still she goes on in spite of a world that tries to break her, carrying her ghosts with her. It is a harrowing tale of war and family. Gorgeously written, I canโ€™t wait for her next book, this one left me breathless. I really enjoyed Mariaโ€™s previous novel Oksana, Behave but this one is a punch in the gut! Publication Date: April 31, 2021 Random House Publishing

  4. 5 out of 5

    Barry

    Reading Something Unbelievable, I couldn't help track the core story's lineage back to the Soviet literature it itself references. Kuznetsova has created a stirring story of hardship, heartbreak, hardheaded carrying-on, and ultimately, hope. The storytelling is magnificent, and feels familiar, and is very nostalgia-inducing. 5/5. Reading Something Unbelievable, I couldn't help track the core story's lineage back to the Soviet literature it itself references. Kuznetsova has created a stirring story of hardship, heartbreak, hardheaded carrying-on, and ultimately, hope. The storytelling is magnificent, and feels familiar, and is very nostalgia-inducing. 5/5.

  5. 5 out of 5

    Mark Mindel

    An interesting look at family life in old Russia written by a Kiev, Ukraine native who now resides in the US. Thirty-something Natasha has moved to NYC from her native Kiev and has taken up acting. She is now married and has a newborn. Her only blood relative still alive is her grandmother Larissa who still lives in Kiev, but grew up there when it was in Russia during WWII. Over a long amount of time Larissa tells Natasha the story of her life, concentrating on those bitter WWII years when Germa An interesting look at family life in old Russia written by a Kiev, Ukraine native who now resides in the US. Thirty-something Natasha has moved to NYC from her native Kiev and has taken up acting. She is now married and has a newborn. Her only blood relative still alive is her grandmother Larissa who still lives in Kiev, but grew up there when it was in Russia during WWII. Over a long amount of time Larissa tells Natasha the story of her life, concentrating on those bitter WWII years when Germany froze out Russia and many Russians starved to death. Larissa was eleven at the time they were forced to move out of Kiev into the mountains to the east. A touching tale of family life and a good look at growing up in Russia during some desperate times. Well worth the read.

  6. 5 out of 5

    Karen Axnick

    Something Unbelievable is a tale told in alternating voices of two women, generations apart. Larissa is an eighty-something grandmother who is facing a move from her family home in Kiev after having lost all of her family but her beloved granddaughter, Natasha, who lives in the United States. Natasha is experiencing her own struggles with a husband preoccupied with work, a newborn infant, her acting career teetering on extinction, and her husbandโ€™s deadbeat friend living in their apartment. Thro Something Unbelievable is a tale told in alternating voices of two women, generations apart. Larissa is an eighty-something grandmother who is facing a move from her family home in Kiev after having lost all of her family but her beloved granddaughter, Natasha, who lives in the United States. Natasha is experiencing her own struggles with a husband preoccupied with work, a newborn infant, her acting career teetering on extinction, and her husbandโ€™s deadbeat friend living in their apartment. Through frequent Skype calls, the two women maintain their bond and even strengthen it as Larissa describes her life in exile during WWII. With Hitlerโ€™s invasion of Russia, teenage Larissa flees to the mountains with her extended family and their friends only to face near-starvation, disease and untimely death. I had a bit of trouble getting into the story, but once Larissa began to describe the events during WWII, I was hooked. The author draws upon her own experience of living in Kiev and immigrating to the US as a child, as well as her familyโ€™s history. It made the storyline emotionally rich and evocative with all the nuances of relationships strained by the trials of wartime. I felt much more affinity with Larissa than with Natasha, who seemed spoiled and self-absorbed, although she redeems herself somewhat by the end. And speaking of the end, the book leaves off with several unanswered issues left to the readerโ€™s imagination to resolve. Overall, the book explores how lifeโ€™s circumstances and individual choices can influence generations to come. My thanks to the author, Random House, and NetGalley for the privilege of reviewing a digital ARC in exchange for an independent, honest review.

  7. 5 out of 5

    Amanda Rosso

    It is a full 4 stars and 1/2, if these kind of methods suit you. Kuznetsova's second novel has broken the levees of my ability to read a book without pausing. This story of two women, a grandmother and a granddaughter, the former recollecting the difficult years of WWII in Kiev, the latter a thirtysomething actress still waiting for her big break, suffering from what it looks like a post partum depression, is also the story of many unsung heroes of the wars past and present, the women that did ev It is a full 4 stars and 1/2, if these kind of methods suit you. Kuznetsova's second novel has broken the levees of my ability to read a book without pausing. This story of two women, a grandmother and a granddaughter, the former recollecting the difficult years of WWII in Kiev, the latter a thirtysomething actress still waiting for her big break, suffering from what it looks like a post partum depression, is also the story of many unsung heroes of the wars past and present, the women that did everything they could to survive, including leaving their familiar homes to risk everything in another, hostile, country. There is no respite from suffering, in this novel, and yet it is told with so much irony and defiance, pride and dignified bitterness that every single moment of Larissa's struggle in the mountain during the war, and every single disappointing mistake made by Natasha in her attempt to become relevant again, carry the breadth of many other stories: Natasha's mother's, Larissa's own sister's, mother's and grandmother's, a people, starved, killed, deported, scared, and yet able to find solace in Tolstoj and Tsvetaeva, their minds transformed and transfigured by how the war had changed them and their relationship with honour, family, love and survival. There is everything I love the most in a book: complex women, historical fiction, a contemporary look on womanhood, motherhood, mental suffering and familial ties, and an uncompromised, agile, captivating and powerful storytelling.

  8. 4 out of 5

    Rachel

    Something Unbelievable by Maria Kuznetsova is a great novel that alternates points of view and the lives of Granddaughter and Grandmother, Natasha and Larissa respectively, and the similarities (and differences) they experience as women generations apart. It was fascinating to read the parallels that both women experienced in their lives despite living in completely different times and environments. They may be drastically different, however the hurdles (and joys) of: love, loss, friendship, fam Something Unbelievable by Maria Kuznetsova is a great novel that alternates points of view and the lives of Granddaughter and Grandmother, Natasha and Larissa respectively, and the similarities (and differences) they experience as women generations apart. It was fascinating to read the parallels that both women experienced in their lives despite living in completely different times and environments. They may be drastically different, however the hurdles (and joys) of: love, loss, friendship, family, acceptance, forgiveness, and finding oneโ€™s purpose, path and self-worth still remains the same. The challenges of being a woman in their respective society continues to bring its challenges. I feel that by talking about these shared experiences, struggles, and triumphs they found a connection more profound then if they had not forged down this path. Excellent. 5/5 stars Thank you NetGalley and Ballantine/Random House for this ARC and in return I am submitting my unbiased and voluntary review and opinion. I am posting this review to my GR and Bookbub accounts immediately and will post it to my Amazon and B&N accounts upon publication.

  9. 4 out of 5

    Fernanda

    This book is a multigenerational story about a Ukrainian family beginning on the Russian Revolution, specially during the WWII, going until nowadays in the US. I loved the story from Larissa's point of view. The author is extremely able to create the atmosphere and engage the reader in a historical environment and we are able to see the story unfolding and feel everything that all the characters are feeling. Some points of the story and some characters are simply heartbreaking; I felt so much fo This book is a multigenerational story about a Ukrainian family beginning on the Russian Revolution, specially during the WWII, going until nowadays in the US. I loved the story from Larissa's point of view. The author is extremely able to create the atmosphere and engage the reader in a historical environment and we are able to see the story unfolding and feel everything that all the characters are feeling. Some points of the story and some characters are simply heartbreaking; I felt so much for 2 side characters, it was so tragic, but so well done. I really liked Larissa's own story and her coming-of-age during a extremely time in her country and for her family; even though she angered me sometimes, I could understand everything she did. I didn't like Natasha's story that much. I enjoyed her relationship with her grandmother and her struggles with motherhood, but I really didn't like the story with her marriage and everything related to it. I liked the book very much, but some beats of Natasha's point of view made me not love the book, specially the ending.. Thank you Netgalley, author, and publisher for the ARC.

  10. 4 out of 5

    James Beggarly

    Thanks to Netgalley and Random House for the early ebook. I was a big fan of the authorโ€™s first novel, Oksanna, Behave! This new one is told by two wonderful narrators: Natasha who lives in NYC with her husband and her newborn daughter. After a wild early twenties, Natasha has settled down, but those old desires are coming back as she tries to resurrect her acting career and canโ€™t stop flirting with one of her husbandโ€™s best friends. The other narrator is Larissa, Natashaโ€™s grandmother who lives Thanks to Netgalley and Random House for the early ebook. I was a big fan of the authorโ€™s first novel, Oksanna, Behave! This new one is told by two wonderful narrators: Natasha who lives in NYC with her husband and her newborn daughter. After a wild early twenties, Natasha has settled down, but those old desires are coming back as she tries to resurrect her acting career and canโ€™t stop flirting with one of her husbandโ€™s best friends. The other narrator is Larissa, Natashaโ€™s grandmother who lives in Kiev. Natasha gets her grandmother on skype and has her tell her the amazing story of what happened to her family as they were shipped out of Kiev during World War 2, for fear that the Germanโ€™s would soon be overrunning the city. Her family would almost starve as her father is working in a factory, trying to design and manufacturer a new tank that could turn the tide for the Red Army. This story becomes a way for Natasha to feel closer to family she never knew and cathartic for Larissa to revisit those days one last time.

  11. 5 out of 5

    Kathleen Gray

    The one bright light in Natasha's life right now is her 90 year old grandmother Larissa. She's a new mother who is struggling to find a role - both literally and figuratively- as well as coping with her husband and his friend Stas who is living with them in their cramped apartment. Larissa, who currently lives in Kiev, tells Natasha her story, the story of their family, over Skype. It's an amazing one which rockets from the Revolution to today but her voice comes through most strongly during WWI The one bright light in Natasha's life right now is her 90 year old grandmother Larissa. She's a new mother who is struggling to find a role - both literally and figuratively- as well as coping with her husband and his friend Stas who is living with them in their cramped apartment. Larissa, who currently lives in Kiev, tells Natasha her story, the story of their family, over Skype. It's an amazing one which rockets from the Revolution to today but her voice comes through most strongly during WWII and the years immediately after. This could have been a huge long book but Kuznetsova has compressed the saga to its essence. Thanks to Netgalley for the ARC. For fans of literary fiction.

  12. 5 out of 5

    Megan Cummins

    This gorgeous sophomore novel from Maria Kuznetsova has all the heart and humor of her first book, Oksana, Behave!, and also embraces a daring structure and doesn't shy away from digging deep into the murky, complicated, feelings of three generations of women. I couldn't put this book down. I literally gasped at parts, laughed out loud to others, couldn't stop reading lines aloud to my whoever was in the room with me. I gobbled this fabulous book up in just a few days. It reminds me of Sloane Cr This gorgeous sophomore novel from Maria Kuznetsova has all the heart and humor of her first book, Oksana, Behave!, and also embraces a daring structure and doesn't shy away from digging deep into the murky, complicated, feelings of three generations of women. I couldn't put this book down. I literally gasped at parts, laughed out loud to others, couldn't stop reading lines aloud to my whoever was in the room with me. I gobbled this fabulous book up in just a few days. It reminds me of Sloane Crosley at times, but Kuznetsova also feels like no other writer writing today. Can't wait for her next book!

  13. 4 out of 5

    Leigh Ann

    I'm not sure I like any of the characters much, though their lives and stories are pretty interesting. I like the author's writing style. The foreshadowing and parallelism are great. I am a little bothered by the characters casual and/or insulting statements of homophobia, antisemitism, victim-blaming (examples: Larissa derisively thinking of Stas as a feminine homosexual; Natasha's writing and putting on a "comedy" play of a Hassidic pedophile; and young Larissa resents and blames Bogdan aged 1 I'm not sure I like any of the characters much, though their lives and stories are pretty interesting. I like the author's writing style. The foreshadowing and parallelism are great. I am a little bothered by the characters casual and/or insulting statements of homophobia, antisemitism, victim-blaming (examples: Larissa derisively thinking of Stas as a feminine homosexual; Natasha's writing and putting on a "comedy" play of a Hassidic pedophile; and young Larissa resents and blames Bogdan aged 15 for selling his body to bring her family a little extra food). Although the victim-blaming I reference eases up later in the novel, it still bothers me that it was never really resolved.

  14. 5 out of 5

    Daisy

    refreshing non-maternal-ness (and yet...) "What I remember," I said again, catching the alarm creeping into her face. "Is something else entirely." --- "There are plenty of things I have missed, my darling.โ€ --- My grandmother sighs again. "Who is to say? I have lived my life the best I could live it, but not without my share of mistakes. You have made them, too, and will continue to make them. Most of them won't kill you," she says. refreshing non-maternal-ness (and yet...) "What I remember," I said again, catching the alarm creeping into her face. "Is something else entirely." --- "There are plenty of things I have missed, my darling.โ€ --- My grandmother sighs again. "Who is to say? I have lived my life the best I could live it, but not without my share of mistakes. You have made them, too, and will continue to make them. Most of them won't kill you," she says.

  15. 5 out of 5

    Lisa

    larissa's chapters were alternately gorgeous and heartwrenching, but i wasn't too much of a fan of natasha's. i guess that's the thing about dual timeline books though, i've almost never found one whose contemporary narrative holds a candle to the historical one. still thought this was an absolutely stunning read! larissa's chapters were alternately gorgeous and heartwrenching, but i wasn't too much of a fan of natasha's. i guess that's the thing about dual timeline books though, i've almost never found one whose contemporary narrative holds a candle to the historical one. still thought this was an absolutely stunning read!

  16. 5 out of 5

    BookTrib.com

    SOMETHING UNBELIEVABLE continues the crescendo of Kuznetsovaโ€™s vibrant style, as seen in her debut. Her strengths lie in her ability to weave real-life cruelty and kindness into her works ... Her dialogue is sharp, filled with unrelenting dark humor. Read our full review here: https://booktrib.com/2021/04/14/a-dar... SOMETHING UNBELIEVABLE continues the crescendo of Kuznetsovaโ€™s vibrant style, as seen in her debut. Her strengths lie in her ability to weave real-life cruelty and kindness into her works ... Her dialogue is sharp, filled with unrelenting dark humor. Read our full review here: https://booktrib.com/2021/04/14/a-dar...

  17. 4 out of 5

    Anna Bruno

    I adored this book. After I read Oksana Behave, I joined the fan club, but man, this book is next-level amazing. Oksana made me laugh; Something Unbelievable make me cry (and also laugh). As a writer, it is inspiring to watch an author like Maria Kuznetsova up her game.

  18. 5 out of 5

    Megan

    Alternating stories of an woman who is struggling with her first child and maintaining her acting career and her sassy Ukrainian grandmother whose life has been a long, difficult journey.

  19. 5 out of 5

    Joyce

    Creatively written intertwining the story of two women from different times. A most enjoyable read.

  20. 4 out of 5

    Missy

    3.5 stars

  21. 4 out of 5

    Good Book Fairy

    4.5

  22. 5 out of 5

    Jake Douglas

    Such a fun and engaging read! For me, the 2 major draws to this book were: 1) The historical fiction aspect - I found the scenes/storytelling from Ukraine in and around WWII super interesting, and while there are tons of novels from this era, this is the first that I've found that touches on this specific affected group 2) The back and forth between the two stories and generations really kept me me on my toes and kept the book interesting throughout The characters are also all deep and engaging, a Such a fun and engaging read! For me, the 2 major draws to this book were: 1) The historical fiction aspect - I found the scenes/storytelling from Ukraine in and around WWII super interesting, and while there are tons of novels from this era, this is the first that I've found that touches on this specific affected group 2) The back and forth between the two stories and generations really kept me me on my toes and kept the book interesting throughout The characters are also all deep and engaging, and I genuinely had trouble putting the book down as their stories unfolded. Highly recommend and looking forward to the author's next novel!

  23. 4 out of 5

    Madison Hill

  24. 5 out of 5

    Peter Lyon

  25. 4 out of 5

    Lauren Kate

  26. 5 out of 5

    Angela

  27. 4 out of 5

    Andrea

  28. 4 out of 5

    Harris

  29. 5 out of 5

    Athira (Reading on a Rainy Day)

  30. 4 out of 5

    Izabela

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