web site hit counter Sidelined: Sports, Culture, and Being a Woman in America - Ebooks PDF Online
Hot Best Seller

Sidelined: Sports, Culture, and Being a Woman in America

Availability: Ready to download

Shrill meets Brotopia in this personal and researched look at women's rights and issues through the lens of sports, from an award-winning sports journalist and women's advocate In a society that is digging deep into the misogyny underlying our traditions and media, the world of sports is especially fertile ground. From casual sexism, like condescending coverage of women's p Shrill meets Brotopia in this personal and researched look at women's rights and issues through the lens of sports, from an award-winning sports journalist and women's advocate In a society that is digging deep into the misogyny underlying our traditions and media, the world of sports is especially fertile ground. From casual sexism, like condescending coverage of women's pro sports, to more serious issues, like athletes who abuse their partners and face only minimal consequences, this area of our culture is home to a vast swath of gender issues that apply to all of us--whether or not our work and leisure time revolve around what happens on the field. No one is better equipped to examine sports through this feminist lens than sports journalist Julie DiCaro. Throughout her experiences covering professional sports for more than a decade, DiCaro has been outspoken about the exploitation of the female body, the covert and overt sexism women face in the workplace, and the male-driven toxicity in sports fandom. Now through candid interviews, personal anecdotes, and deep research, she's tackling these thorny issues and exploring what America can do to give women a fair and competitive playing field in sports and beyond. Covering everything from the abusive online environment at Barstool Sports to the sexist treatment of Serena Williams and professional women's teams fighting for equal pay and treatment, and looking back at pioneering women who first took on the patriarchy in sports media, Sidelined will illuminate the ways sports present a microcosm of life as a woman in America--and the power in fighting back.


Compare

Shrill meets Brotopia in this personal and researched look at women's rights and issues through the lens of sports, from an award-winning sports journalist and women's advocate In a society that is digging deep into the misogyny underlying our traditions and media, the world of sports is especially fertile ground. From casual sexism, like condescending coverage of women's p Shrill meets Brotopia in this personal and researched look at women's rights and issues through the lens of sports, from an award-winning sports journalist and women's advocate In a society that is digging deep into the misogyny underlying our traditions and media, the world of sports is especially fertile ground. From casual sexism, like condescending coverage of women's pro sports, to more serious issues, like athletes who abuse their partners and face only minimal consequences, this area of our culture is home to a vast swath of gender issues that apply to all of us--whether or not our work and leisure time revolve around what happens on the field. No one is better equipped to examine sports through this feminist lens than sports journalist Julie DiCaro. Throughout her experiences covering professional sports for more than a decade, DiCaro has been outspoken about the exploitation of the female body, the covert and overt sexism women face in the workplace, and the male-driven toxicity in sports fandom. Now through candid interviews, personal anecdotes, and deep research, she's tackling these thorny issues and exploring what America can do to give women a fair and competitive playing field in sports and beyond. Covering everything from the abusive online environment at Barstool Sports to the sexist treatment of Serena Williams and professional women's teams fighting for equal pay and treatment, and looking back at pioneering women who first took on the patriarchy in sports media, Sidelined will illuminate the ways sports present a microcosm of life as a woman in America--and the power in fighting back.

30 review for Sidelined: Sports, Culture, and Being a Woman in America

  1. 5 out of 5

    Lorene

    Decaro's book should be required reading for anyone connected to sports, including fans. We know women in sports media are often treated poorly by athletes, team personnel and their own employers, but this book offers details on the variety of ways and the degrees women in sports are treated horribly. The author provides examples of her own experiences, as well as many examples of other women in sports media. This book is well written and hard to put down. I highly recommend it. Decaro's book should be required reading for anyone connected to sports, including fans. We know women in sports media are often treated poorly by athletes, team personnel and their own employers, but this book offers details on the variety of ways and the degrees women in sports are treated horribly. The author provides examples of her own experiences, as well as many examples of other women in sports media. This book is well written and hard to put down. I highly recommend it.

  2. 5 out of 5

    Melanie Springer Mock

    DiCaro's book is well-researched and well-written, and names many of the ways women are discriminated against in sports, at the professional level; in sports media; and by fan groups who cannot fathom that a woman might have something interesting or important to say. I will be recommending this book to others, including the men in my life who, while well meaning, still betray their sense that women cannot be good athletes and don't deserve our attention. DiCaro's book is well-researched and well-written, and names many of the ways women are discriminated against in sports, at the professional level; in sports media; and by fan groups who cannot fathom that a woman might have something interesting or important to say. I will be recommending this book to others, including the men in my life who, while well meaning, still betray their sense that women cannot be good athletes and don't deserve our attention.

  3. 5 out of 5

    Jennifer Schultz

    Read if you: Want an honest and eye-opening look at the injustices women in sports face, in both media and the actual playing of sports. DiCaro has an engaging writing style and writes with authority and passion. Librarians/booksellers: Purchase if you need titles about contemporary issues in sports. Many thanks to Dutton and NetGalley for a digital review copy in exchange for an honest review.

  4. 5 out of 5

    Victoria Waddle

    “Sidelined” consistently focuses on the place of women in American sports culture. The author, Julie DiCaro, worked in sports media before losing her job during the 2020 COVID pandemic. In the introduction she tells the reader that working in sports talk radio is “like working in a frat house” and goes on to prove it. There are very few women in sports talk radio. When they want to write about some of the larger cultural stories surrounding sports—social justice; the inequity in treatment betwee “Sidelined” consistently focuses on the place of women in American sports culture. The author, Julie DiCaro, worked in sports media before losing her job during the 2020 COVID pandemic. In the introduction she tells the reader that working in sports talk radio is “like working in a frat house” and goes on to prove it. There are very few women in sports talk radio. When they want to write about some of the larger cultural stories surrounding sports—social justice; the inequity in treatment between male and female athletes including equipment, venues, and pay; sexual harassment of the women who report on men’s sports; cases of sexual assault and domestic abuse perpetrated by male athletes—the station can shut down the story to avoid upsetting an important team or client. Stations also continue to have as guests male athletes who have been repeated and credibly accused of sexual assault because hey are popular. Some even employ these men as commentators. DiCaro begins with a history of women reporting on men’s sports and includes stories about access to male locker rooms (while raising the question of why interviews are even done in locker rooms). Early on women had buckets of water thrown on them and jockstraps thrown at them. Today many sports reporters are ‘sideline’ reporters who report from the field when there’s a lull in the action. Few have their own sports shows. Even if they are in the studio, they solicit the opinions of the males on the program. One of the worst aspects of the job for a female sports commentator today is the blowback on social media, where they are cursed out, called slurs, and even receive death threats. A complete chapter covers the toxic, misogynistic environment of Barstool Sports which has a vast following of “Stoolies” who use social media to stalk, troll, and harass women. The very sound of female voices calling sports make some sports fans irate. Because of all this, women in sports often self-police, following all the rules, leaving off personality, which is so important in sports talk media. The second half of the book deals with female athletes and women’s sports including double standards for behaviors (the treatment of Serena Williams stars in this section), the fight for equal pay (with an in-depth look at soccer) and finally the state of women’s and girls’ sports in other areas of the world relative to the United States. DiCaro makes suggestions for female sports fans to support both female athletes and reporters such as tuning in or listening in when females are playing or reporting. All of DiCaro's discussions are backed with facts, stats, and examples from life.”Sidelined” iIncludes both a bibliography of sources and a helpful index for those looking to do their own research.

  5. 4 out of 5

    Amy Lively

    If I was rating this book on the importance of the topic, I would give it a 10 out of 5 stars. The sports worlds is littered with misogynistic assholes and dude bros who are very threatened by a woman knowing as much — or more — than they do about sports. DiCaro covers some of the most well-known of these horrific offenses, including her own experience with harassment simply for having the audacity to exist in the sports media world. However, I wish this was a better book. It was obviously throw If I was rating this book on the importance of the topic, I would give it a 10 out of 5 stars. The sports worlds is littered with misogynistic assholes and dude bros who are very threatened by a woman knowing as much — or more — than they do about sports. DiCaro covers some of the most well-known of these horrific offenses, including her own experience with harassment simply for having the audacity to exist in the sports media world. However, I wish this was a better book. It was obviously thrown together fairly quickly, given the references to Covid, and it shows. It has a bit of a high school research paper feel. It’s not an academic book, so the lack of academic sources is no surprise, but I did expect a higher level of writing. This is an important topic and hopefully DiCaro’s book opens the door for more books on the subject.

  6. 5 out of 5

    Steph Carr

    This is a comprehensive look at what it's like to be a woman in sports media, and man is it brutal. It can feel like complaining at points, but that's the tough reality of the world we live in. The parts about abuse and harassment are hard to read, but they need to be addressed. I'm glad it takes a more inspirational perspective at the end to help balance out the heaviness. This is a comprehensive look at what it's like to be a woman in sports media, and man is it brutal. It can feel like complaining at points, but that's the tough reality of the world we live in. The parts about abuse and harassment are hard to read, but they need to be addressed. I'm glad it takes a more inspirational perspective at the end to help balance out the heaviness.

  7. 4 out of 5

    Chris Jaffe

    Great book. It's frequently aggrevating, maddening, horrifying, frustrating, and galling. This isn't meant as a criticism of DiCaro - it's a description of her experiences (and those of other women) in sports media. This is especially true in the middle of the book covering domestic violence, online harrassment of women, and Barstool. It actually ends on a more optimistic note, with a pair of chapters that discuss the role of sports play in helping women in Pakistan, and how (some) women in sport Great book. It's frequently aggrevating, maddening, horrifying, frustrating, and galling. This isn't meant as a criticism of DiCaro - it's a description of her experiences (and those of other women) in sports media. This is especially true in the middle of the book covering domestic violence, online harrassment of women, and Barstool. It actually ends on a more optimistic note, with a pair of chapters that discuss the role of sports play in helping women in Pakistan, and how (some) women in sports media try to help each other. One sad/cynical thought I had while reading this book: A theme in it is that if sports teams and sports media want to have a large number of female fans (and they do, 'cuz money), then they have to take more seriosly issues like sexual assault. My cynical thought: to date leagues like the NFL have been able to act in half-assed, and mealy-mouthed ways, and still maintain a large number of female fans.

  8. 5 out of 5

    Maureen

    This review has been hidden because it contains spoilers. To view it, click here. I’m not usually for one for audio books but I had the pleasure of listening to this book yesterday. I don’t find much enjoyment in Dicaro’s writing but I do find her fascinating in terms of her lack of accountability/ ability to look inward. I did appreciate her thoughts on Kobe Bryant and Alex Verdugo—I wish she credited Jessica Quiroli’s reporting. An alarming piece that didn’t get nearly enough attention https://highheelsonthefield.typepad.c... Dicaro’s very much a do as I say, not as I do do I’m not usually for one for audio books but I had the pleasure of listening to this book yesterday. I don’t find much enjoyment in Dicaro’s writing but I do find her fascinating in terms of her lack of accountability/ ability to look inward. I did appreciate her thoughts on Kobe Bryant and Alex Verdugo—I wish she credited Jessica Quiroli’s reporting. An alarming piece that didn’t get nearly enough attention https://highheelsonthefield.typepad.c... Dicaro’s very much a do as I say, not as I do do do. Pardon my take, but I found the budding vocal talent of Justin Trudell to be the most interesting part of this reading experience.

  9. 4 out of 5

    Tiffany Marion Ellefson

    Very insightful book! Kudos for Julie for willing to write and publish on this topic. I learned a lot - realizing how much more I can do to support not only women in sports media but women athletes. Social media platforms can be great in many ways but equally bad in how people use the platforms to harass/troll others. I had forgotten about Kobe Bryant’s sexual assault allegations - it really is a shame that our society can so easily forget - I’m guilty of it - and always think professional athle Very insightful book! Kudos for Julie for willing to write and publish on this topic. I learned a lot - realizing how much more I can do to support not only women in sports media but women athletes. Social media platforms can be great in many ways but equally bad in how people use the platforms to harass/troll others. I had forgotten about Kobe Bryant’s sexual assault allegations - it really is a shame that our society can so easily forget - I’m guilty of it - and always think professional athletes can do no wrong. Manitizing is now in my vocabulary. I can only hope this book will make a difference for women.

  10. 4 out of 5

    Kait F.

    The number of times I put down this book to follow a new sports media woman on social media, google a female athlete I’d never heard of, or look for the dates of games for women’s sports leagues was staggering. Julie DiCaro has written a book that’ll make your blood boil with the unfairness and then smile in the end at the strength and resilience of women in sports. Thanks, Julie, from a lifelong women’s sports fan who will now use her voice even louder in support. A must for even the most passi The number of times I put down this book to follow a new sports media woman on social media, google a female athlete I’d never heard of, or look for the dates of games for women’s sports leagues was staggering. Julie DiCaro has written a book that’ll make your blood boil with the unfairness and then smile in the end at the strength and resilience of women in sports. Thanks, Julie, from a lifelong women’s sports fan who will now use her voice even louder in support. A must for even the most passive sports fan.

  11. 5 out of 5

    Kate McMurray

    This is great and also will fill you with righteous anger! I am a sports fan who watches a lot of sports but does not consume a lot of related sports media, so although I have encountered sexism as a fan (particularly having to prove I know what I'm talking about before I'm allowed to have an opinion), I didn't realize just how pervasive sexism is in sports journalism. I don't know if this book will affect any change, but I hope sports media companies take a good hard look at their hiring practic This is great and also will fill you with righteous anger! I am a sports fan who watches a lot of sports but does not consume a lot of related sports media, so although I have encountered sexism as a fan (particularly having to prove I know what I'm talking about before I'm allowed to have an opinion), I didn't realize just how pervasive sexism is in sports journalism. I don't know if this book will affect any change, but I hope sports media companies take a good hard look at their hiring practices and harassment policies.

  12. 5 out of 5

    J.J.

    So many truths as a girl playing sports in the 1990s and watching the games for women, the sports leagues and opportunities grow and wane. I honestly didn't think about the women reporting the games unless it was the stereotypical male locker room scenarios. Highly recommend for sports and communication interests. So many truths as a girl playing sports in the 1990s and watching the games for women, the sports leagues and opportunities grow and wane. I honestly didn't think about the women reporting the games unless it was the stereotypical male locker room scenarios. Highly recommend for sports and communication interests.

  13. 5 out of 5

    Mike Smolarek

    I finished reading this book on a day my eleven year old daughter asked me to throw a football with her. Julie DiCaro’s book is a well-researched looked at how the sports media landscape treats women and that landscape is not a positive one. What I hope from this book is that in future we do better.

  14. 4 out of 5

    Katherine Lavelle

    DiCaro is very open with her experiences as a woman in sports talk radio and commentary. This book is part memoir but also includes substantial interview with women in the field and research covering a wide variety of issues that women face in sports media. This is a great companion book with Luther & Davidson's Loving Sports book from earlier in 2021. DiCaro is very open with her experiences as a woman in sports talk radio and commentary. This book is part memoir but also includes substantial interview with women in the field and research covering a wide variety of issues that women face in sports media. This is a great companion book with Luther & Davidson's Loving Sports book from earlier in 2021.

  15. 4 out of 5

    Lacy

    This book's topic left me angry, disappointed and dismayed at the men in the sports world. I had to stop reading it at night because I was going to bed so angry. It is a must read to understand many of the issues surrounding women in sports and the fan's blindness to the issues. This book's topic left me angry, disappointed and dismayed at the men in the sports world. I had to stop reading it at night because I was going to bed so angry. It is a must read to understand many of the issues surrounding women in sports and the fan's blindness to the issues.

  16. 5 out of 5

    Christi

    I really enjoyed listening to DiCaro on the radio, and so I decided to pick up her book. The contents here aren't really shocking, but they are upsetting. I appreciated the weaving of the different topics with DiCaro's own experiences. I really enjoyed listening to DiCaro on the radio, and so I decided to pick up her book. The contents here aren't really shocking, but they are upsetting. I appreciated the weaving of the different topics with DiCaro's own experiences.

  17. 4 out of 5

    Jill Brekken

    Not a huge sports fan but a big fan of this book. Well written, engaging and smart. I learned so much about the depth and breadth of gender inequality in all of the aspects of sports, most importantly media and the coverage of women's sports. Very relevant, must read for all. Not a huge sports fan but a big fan of this book. Well written, engaging and smart. I learned so much about the depth and breadth of gender inequality in all of the aspects of sports, most importantly media and the coverage of women's sports. Very relevant, must read for all.

  18. 5 out of 5

    Heather Thompson

    Absolute GARBAGE.

  19. 4 out of 5

    Steve Wellens

    This book is written by someone with their own personal views with no evidence except her word. Not good enough or convincing enough for me. Sloppy.

  20. 4 out of 5

    Juan

    A good book, I learned a lot about sports media and how poorly women are treated. I also have yet to see a negative review that wasn't related to her chapter on Barstool. A good book, I learned a lot about sports media and how poorly women are treated. I also have yet to see a negative review that wasn't related to her chapter on Barstool.

  21. 4 out of 5

    Danielle

    I won this kindle book as a goodreads giveaway! A well researched and eye opening look at how women are treated in the world of sports media. Honest and powerful.

  22. 5 out of 5

    Amanda

    4.5

  23. 5 out of 5

    Erica

    Great listen to. About sports but can be related to any field.

  24. 5 out of 5

    Hollis

    Everyone should read this book. It’s about so much more than sports.

  25. 4 out of 5

    Susan Howard

    3.5 Stars. Lots of good stuff here, some chapters grabbed me more than others.

  26. 5 out of 5

    Sarah

    This will make you angry. I don’t follow sports anymore, and it’s partly because of the sexist actions of many players, coaches, and fans.

  27. 4 out of 5

    Candice

    3.5

  28. 5 out of 5

    Ashleigh Renard

    I wished I was surprised by what journalist Julie DiCaro shared in this book, but I was not at all shocked to hear that working in sports talk radio is “like working in a frat house.” She goes on to expose some unpleasant and sometimes shocking truths about women in sports reporting, and about the role their bosses – and sometimes even the players – expect them to have. The book covers a wide range of topics, including women’s sports in Pakistan. An engaging read about sports, gender equality an I wished I was surprised by what journalist Julie DiCaro shared in this book, but I was not at all shocked to hear that working in sports talk radio is “like working in a frat house.” She goes on to expose some unpleasant and sometimes shocking truths about women in sports reporting, and about the role their bosses – and sometimes even the players – expect them to have. The book covers a wide range of topics, including women’s sports in Pakistan. An engaging read about sports, gender equality and social justice!

  29. 4 out of 5

    Ryan Perreault

  30. 4 out of 5

    Tracy Hurley

Add a review

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

Loading...
We use cookies to give you the best online experience. By using our website you agree to our use of cookies in accordance with our cookie policy.