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Moving Water: The Everglades and Big Sugar

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Only a century ago, nearly all of South Florida was under water. The Everglades, one of the largest wetlands in the world, was a watery arc extending over 3 million acres. Today, that wetland ecosystem is half of its former self, supplanted by housing for the region's exploding population and over 700,000 acres of crops, including the nation's largest supply of sugar cane. Only a century ago, nearly all of South Florida was under water. The Everglades, one of the largest wetlands in the world, was a watery arc extending over 3 million acres. Today, that wetland ecosystem is half of its former self, supplanted by housing for the region's exploding population and over 700,000 acres of crops, including the nation's largest supply of sugar cane. Countless canals, dams, and pump stations keep the trickle flowing, but rarely address the cascade of environmental consequences, including dangerous threats to a crucial drinking water source for a full third of Florida's residents. In Moving Water, environmental journalist Amy Green explores the story of unlikely conservation heroes George and Mary Barley, wealthy real estate developers and champions of the Everglades, whose complicated legacy spans from fisheries in Florida Bay to the political worlds of Tallahassee and Washington. At the center of their surprising saga is the establishment and evolution of the Comprehensive Everglades Restoration Plan (CERP), a $17 billion taxpayer-funded initiative aimed at reclaiming this vital ecosystem. Green explains that, like the meandering River of Grass, the progress of CERP rarely runs straight, especially when it comes up against the fierce efforts of sugar-growing interests, or "Big Sugar," to obstruct the cleanup of fertilizer runoff wreaking havoc with restoration. This engrossing expos� tackles some of the most important issues of our time: Is it possible to save a complex ecosystem such as the Everglades--or, once degraded, are such ecological wonders gone forever? What kind of commitments--economic, scientific, and social--will it take to rescue our vulnerable natural resources? What influences do special interests wield in our everyday lives, and what does it take to push real reform through our democracy? A must-read for anyone fascinated by stories of political intrigue and the work of environmental crusaders like Erin Brockovich, as well as anyone who cares about the future of Florida, this book reveals why the Everglades serve as a model--and a warning--for environmental restoration efforts worldwide.


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Only a century ago, nearly all of South Florida was under water. The Everglades, one of the largest wetlands in the world, was a watery arc extending over 3 million acres. Today, that wetland ecosystem is half of its former self, supplanted by housing for the region's exploding population and over 700,000 acres of crops, including the nation's largest supply of sugar cane. Only a century ago, nearly all of South Florida was under water. The Everglades, one of the largest wetlands in the world, was a watery arc extending over 3 million acres. Today, that wetland ecosystem is half of its former self, supplanted by housing for the region's exploding population and over 700,000 acres of crops, including the nation's largest supply of sugar cane. Countless canals, dams, and pump stations keep the trickle flowing, but rarely address the cascade of environmental consequences, including dangerous threats to a crucial drinking water source for a full third of Florida's residents. In Moving Water, environmental journalist Amy Green explores the story of unlikely conservation heroes George and Mary Barley, wealthy real estate developers and champions of the Everglades, whose complicated legacy spans from fisheries in Florida Bay to the political worlds of Tallahassee and Washington. At the center of their surprising saga is the establishment and evolution of the Comprehensive Everglades Restoration Plan (CERP), a $17 billion taxpayer-funded initiative aimed at reclaiming this vital ecosystem. Green explains that, like the meandering River of Grass, the progress of CERP rarely runs straight, especially when it comes up against the fierce efforts of sugar-growing interests, or "Big Sugar," to obstruct the cleanup of fertilizer runoff wreaking havoc with restoration. This engrossing expos� tackles some of the most important issues of our time: Is it possible to save a complex ecosystem such as the Everglades--or, once degraded, are such ecological wonders gone forever? What kind of commitments--economic, scientific, and social--will it take to rescue our vulnerable natural resources? What influences do special interests wield in our everyday lives, and what does it take to push real reform through our democracy? A must-read for anyone fascinated by stories of political intrigue and the work of environmental crusaders like Erin Brockovich, as well as anyone who cares about the future of Florida, this book reveals why the Everglades serve as a model--and a warning--for environmental restoration efforts worldwide.

34 review for Moving Water: The Everglades and Big Sugar

  1. 5 out of 5

    Shawna

    Very informative and eye opening read about a subject I was not aware of, the conservation of the Florida Everglades.

  2. 5 out of 5

    Bethany

    I received this book as an ARC, and was glad to have the opportunity to read it. It is an interesting look into the politics behind environmental work, specifically in the Everglades of Florida.

  3. 5 out of 5

    Kathy Fitzsimmons

  4. 5 out of 5

    Jack Young

  5. 5 out of 5

    Stephen Hesterberg

  6. 4 out of 5

    Micielle

  7. 5 out of 5

    Frederick Rotzien

  8. 4 out of 5

    Kye Cantey

  9. 5 out of 5

    AC

  10. 5 out of 5

    Deborah Gerhart

  11. 4 out of 5

    Kim Ellis

  12. 5 out of 5

    Hannah

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    Brenda Maki

  14. 4 out of 5

    Jen Schlott

  15. 5 out of 5

    Lydia Wallace

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    Melisa Dowling

  17. 4 out of 5

    Britt

  18. 5 out of 5

    lou brown

  19. 5 out of 5

    Garrett

  20. 4 out of 5

    Bettye Short

  21. 5 out of 5

    Donna

  22. 5 out of 5

    Jo

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    Jacquelyn C.

  24. 5 out of 5

    Deborah Hughes

  25. 4 out of 5

    Lori Piscicelli

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    Ron

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    Jennifer

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    Melissa ahmed

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    Brandi Valdez

  30. 4 out of 5

    Jaclyn

  31. 4 out of 5

    Leighann

  32. 4 out of 5

    Lone_shewolf

  33. 4 out of 5

    Chip Howard

  34. 4 out of 5

    Sue

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