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Accra Noir

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Accra joins Lagos, Nairobi, Marrakech, and Addis Ababa in representing the African continent in the Noir Series arena. Akashic Books continues its award-winning series of original noir anthologies, launched in 2004 with Brooklyn Noir. Each book comprises all new stories, each one set in a distinct neighborhood or location within the respective city. Brand-new stories by: Nan Accra joins Lagos, Nairobi, Marrakech, and Addis Ababa in representing the African continent in the Noir Series arena. Akashic Books continues its award-winning series of original noir anthologies, launched in 2004 with Brooklyn Noir. Each book comprises all new stories, each one set in a distinct neighborhood or location within the respective city. Brand-new stories by: Nana Ekua Brew-Hammond, Kwame Dawes, Adjoa Twum, Kofi Blankson Ocansey, Billie Adwoa McTernan, Ernest Kwame Nkrumah Addo, Patrick Smith, Anne Sackey, Gbontwi Anyetei, Nana-Ama Danquah, Ayesha Harruna Attah, Eibhlín Ní Chléirigh, and Anna Bossman. From the introduction by Nana-Ama Danquah: Accra is one of the most well-known cities on the African continent. It’s the capital of Ghana, which in 1957 became the first sub-Saharan (read: black) nation to gain its independence from colonialism. But the city, in all its globalism, predates the nation. Prior to becoming a sovereign land, the area now known as Ghana was the Gold Coast colony. In 1877, when the British took possession of the colony, Accra was installed as its capital. For nearly a century, in addition to being a political and financial center, the city was a major trade hub. People came from Europe and other African nations to trade everything from gold and salt to guns and slaves . . . One thing that people, too easily seduced by the city’s charm and history and beauty, forget about Accra is that it is a major metropolis. Accra is New York; it is Los Angeles; it is Shanghai, Mexico City, Santiago, Caracas, and Cape Town. It is an urban area, with poverty, desperation, and the inevitable result of a marriage between the two: crime . . . The stories that you will read in this collection highlight all things Accra, everything that the city was and is—the remaining vestiges of colonialism, the pride of independence, the nexus of indigenous tribes and other groups from all over the world, the tension between modernity and traditionalism, the symbolism and storytelling both obvious and coded, the moral high ground, the duplicity and deceit, the most basic human failings laid bare alongside fear and love and pain and the corrupting desire to have the very things you are not meant to have.


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Accra joins Lagos, Nairobi, Marrakech, and Addis Ababa in representing the African continent in the Noir Series arena. Akashic Books continues its award-winning series of original noir anthologies, launched in 2004 with Brooklyn Noir. Each book comprises all new stories, each one set in a distinct neighborhood or location within the respective city. Brand-new stories by: Nan Accra joins Lagos, Nairobi, Marrakech, and Addis Ababa in representing the African continent in the Noir Series arena. Akashic Books continues its award-winning series of original noir anthologies, launched in 2004 with Brooklyn Noir. Each book comprises all new stories, each one set in a distinct neighborhood or location within the respective city. Brand-new stories by: Nana Ekua Brew-Hammond, Kwame Dawes, Adjoa Twum, Kofi Blankson Ocansey, Billie Adwoa McTernan, Ernest Kwame Nkrumah Addo, Patrick Smith, Anne Sackey, Gbontwi Anyetei, Nana-Ama Danquah, Ayesha Harruna Attah, Eibhlín Ní Chléirigh, and Anna Bossman. From the introduction by Nana-Ama Danquah: Accra is one of the most well-known cities on the African continent. It’s the capital of Ghana, which in 1957 became the first sub-Saharan (read: black) nation to gain its independence from colonialism. But the city, in all its globalism, predates the nation. Prior to becoming a sovereign land, the area now known as Ghana was the Gold Coast colony. In 1877, when the British took possession of the colony, Accra was installed as its capital. For nearly a century, in addition to being a political and financial center, the city was a major trade hub. People came from Europe and other African nations to trade everything from gold and salt to guns and slaves . . . One thing that people, too easily seduced by the city’s charm and history and beauty, forget about Accra is that it is a major metropolis. Accra is New York; it is Los Angeles; it is Shanghai, Mexico City, Santiago, Caracas, and Cape Town. It is an urban area, with poverty, desperation, and the inevitable result of a marriage between the two: crime . . . The stories that you will read in this collection highlight all things Accra, everything that the city was and is—the remaining vestiges of colonialism, the pride of independence, the nexus of indigenous tribes and other groups from all over the world, the tension between modernity and traditionalism, the symbolism and storytelling both obvious and coded, the moral high ground, the duplicity and deceit, the most basic human failings laid bare alongside fear and love and pain and the corrupting desire to have the very things you are not meant to have.

35 review for Accra Noir

  1. 5 out of 5

    2TReads

    A great collection of stories showing the vibrancy and intensity of life in Accra, the corruption and darkness that also exist in and around us. But they also very much, centre the human experience. As with all the Noir series, Accra Noir takes us into markets, compounds, spaces of everyday people. It just so happens that sometimes, darkness, violence, and death are also along for the ride. The first story drops us in the bustling Mallam Atta Market, where the hustle for survival can be felt and t A great collection of stories showing the vibrancy and intensity of life in Accra, the corruption and darkness that also exist in and around us. But they also very much, centre the human experience. As with all the Noir series, Accra Noir takes us into markets, compounds, spaces of everyday people. It just so happens that sometimes, darkness, violence, and death are also along for the ride. The first story drops us in the bustling Mallam Atta Market, where the hustle for survival can be felt and the intensity does not let up until the very last story. These stories are vibrant with atmosphere, crisp and succinct, yet deeply revealing of what drives the darkness at our core, whether or not we were willing to let it out; how cycles of hurt and victimization are perpetuated, how the vulnerable are used and discarded without a thought. Corruption, jealousy, mistaken identity, jungle justice, exploitation, abandonment, neglect, and revenge are just some of the themes that are brought to life in this collection and in some instances will shock, while in others highlight a pervasive atmosphere of societal decay that is worldwide. But what struck me as I read each and every story is the human experience that ties this collection together. The characters are all searching, hoping, and striving; to survive, to be happy, to be free. Big up to #Akashic for bringing these stories to us. I enjoyed every story in this collection but the stunners that had my eyes bugging, my heart clenching and my mind raging were: Chop Money, Moon Over Aburi, The Boy Who Wasn't There, and Intentional Consequences.

  2. 4 out of 5

    Amy

    Reviewed for Library Journal 12/2020. Full review found there. "Each story reaffirms how fundamental "place" is to the noir genre and how the locale shapes the story as much as the characters themselves. Stories range from the underbelly of the urban scene, filled with grifters, prostitutes, and thieves, while others explore love, infidelity, and vengeance. " Reviewed for Library Journal 12/2020. Full review found there. "Each story reaffirms how fundamental "place" is to the noir genre and how the locale shapes the story as much as the characters themselves. Stories range from the underbelly of the urban scene, filled with grifters, prostitutes, and thieves, while others explore love, infidelity, and vengeance. "

  3. 5 out of 5

    Thomas Petri

    I thoroughly enjoyed reading this book. It had a slight, but refreshing, difference in tone from the noir I am used to reading. The editor did a great job in the introduction of preparing me for the nuances of the culture I was about to encounter and I found differences and yet people aren't that different, where ever they are found. But the stories were unique and exciting, and the endings, surprising as they were, were very satisfying. Unique people, unique atmosphere, and an education about h I thoroughly enjoyed reading this book. It had a slight, but refreshing, difference in tone from the noir I am used to reading. The editor did a great job in the introduction of preparing me for the nuances of the culture I was about to encounter and I found differences and yet people aren't that different, where ever they are found. But the stories were unique and exciting, and the endings, surprising as they were, were very satisfying. Unique people, unique atmosphere, and an education about how big the world really is. Great! reviewed for LibraryThing Early Readers by Thom

  4. 4 out of 5

    Andréa

    Note: I accessed a digital review copy of this book through Edelweiss.

  5. 5 out of 5

    Julia

    My favorite story in this collection was Intentional Consequences. My least favorites were Moon Over Aburi and Fantasia in Fans and Flat Screens. In fact I hated both of these stories so much I bailed on them. Overall I found this collection alternated between boring and confusing. I think it was the pacing and feel of the stories I didn't care for. The themes of the stories are familiar enough. A jilted lover, drug deals, etc. It was the writing style that I didn't care for. I read Columbus Noi My favorite story in this collection was Intentional Consequences. My least favorites were Moon Over Aburi and Fantasia in Fans and Flat Screens. In fact I hated both of these stories so much I bailed on them. Overall I found this collection alternated between boring and confusing. I think it was the pacing and feel of the stories I didn't care for. The themes of the stories are familiar enough. A jilted lover, drug deals, etc. It was the writing style that I didn't care for. I read Columbus Noir earlier in the year and really enjoyed it. I had high hopes for Accra Noir but was very disappointed. I received a free copy from Library Thing and the publisher in exchange for my honest review.

  6. 5 out of 5

    Andrea Hays

  7. 4 out of 5

    Araba

  8. 5 out of 5

    Greg

  9. 5 out of 5

    Carolyn Schroeder

  10. 4 out of 5

    Akashic Books

  11. 4 out of 5

    Dave

  12. 4 out of 5

    Marcus Linderos

  13. 5 out of 5

    Iris Longo

  14. 5 out of 5

    Neonomad

  15. 4 out of 5

    Ayooluwa

  16. 4 out of 5

    Kara

  17. 4 out of 5

    Victoria G

  18. 5 out of 5

    Audrey Swatson-Eshun

  19. 5 out of 5

    Ty

  20. 4 out of 5

    Debbie

  21. 4 out of 5

    nap385

  22. 5 out of 5

    Melon109

  23. 4 out of 5

    Artsgirl

  24. 5 out of 5

    Emmarae

  25. 4 out of 5

    Nohemi

  26. 5 out of 5

    Jo

  27. 5 out of 5

    Jennifer Porter

  28. 4 out of 5

    Tera Slawson

  29. 5 out of 5

    E

  30. 5 out of 5

    Hugh Rosenberg

  31. 4 out of 5

    Jennifer Anitzberger

  32. 4 out of 5

    Abby

  33. 4 out of 5

    Dixie Meeks

  34. 4 out of 5

    Tricia

  35. 5 out of 5

    Candice

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