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Broken (in the best possible way)

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From the #1 New York Times bestselling author of Furiously Happy and Let’s Pretend This Never Happened comes a deeply relatable book filled with humor and honesty about depression and anxiety. As Jenny Lawson’s hundreds of thousands of fans know, she suffers from depression. In Broken, Jenny brings readers along on her mental and physical health journey, offering heartbreak From the #1 New York Times bestselling author of Furiously Happy and Let’s Pretend This Never Happened comes a deeply relatable book filled with humor and honesty about depression and anxiety. As Jenny Lawson’s hundreds of thousands of fans know, she suffers from depression. In Broken, Jenny brings readers along on her mental and physical health journey, offering heartbreaking and hilarious anecdotes along the way. With people experiencing anxiety and depression now more than ever, Jenny humanizes what we all face in an all-too-real way, reassuring us that we’re not alone and making us laugh while doing it. From the business ideas that she wants to pitch to Shark Tank to the reason why Jenny can never go back to the post office, Broken leaves nothing to the imagination in the most satisfying way. And of course, Jenny’s long-suffering husband Victor―the Ricky to Jenny’s Lucille Ball―is present throughout. A treat for Jenny Lawson’s already existing fans, and destined to convert new ones, Broken is a beacon of hope and a wellspring of laughter when we all need it most.


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From the #1 New York Times bestselling author of Furiously Happy and Let’s Pretend This Never Happened comes a deeply relatable book filled with humor and honesty about depression and anxiety. As Jenny Lawson’s hundreds of thousands of fans know, she suffers from depression. In Broken, Jenny brings readers along on her mental and physical health journey, offering heartbreak From the #1 New York Times bestselling author of Furiously Happy and Let’s Pretend This Never Happened comes a deeply relatable book filled with humor and honesty about depression and anxiety. As Jenny Lawson’s hundreds of thousands of fans know, she suffers from depression. In Broken, Jenny brings readers along on her mental and physical health journey, offering heartbreaking and hilarious anecdotes along the way. With people experiencing anxiety and depression now more than ever, Jenny humanizes what we all face in an all-too-real way, reassuring us that we’re not alone and making us laugh while doing it. From the business ideas that she wants to pitch to Shark Tank to the reason why Jenny can never go back to the post office, Broken leaves nothing to the imagination in the most satisfying way. And of course, Jenny’s long-suffering husband Victor―the Ricky to Jenny’s Lucille Ball―is present throughout. A treat for Jenny Lawson’s already existing fans, and destined to convert new ones, Broken is a beacon of hope and a wellspring of laughter when we all need it most.

30 review for Broken (in the best possible way)

  1. 4 out of 5

    Jenny Lawson

    Am I allowed to rate my own book? Because *technically* I have read it so I think it still counts. I'm giving it one star for every year I thought I'd never finish it and if you are reading this and struggling with your own story, know that you are not alone. We all have stories inside of us that grow and change and inspire and mortify and serve as warning sign or guideposts. Thank you for listening to mine. Am I allowed to rate my own book? Because *technically* I have read it so I think it still counts. I'm giving it one star for every year I thought I'd never finish it and if you are reading this and struggling with your own story, know that you are not alone. We all have stories inside of us that grow and change and inspire and mortify and serve as warning sign or guideposts. Thank you for listening to mine.

  2. 5 out of 5

    Emily (Books with Emily Fox)

    Just started it and I'm already laughing! Just started it and I'm already laughing!

  3. 4 out of 5

    Regina

    In the last two pages of “Broken (In the Best Possible Way),” Jenny Lawson explains that the cover illustration was done by an artist named Omar Rayyan. His collection contains “whimsical paintings of people carrying their own baffling little monsters.” To her, this embodies how she feels about her battles with depression and anxiety. “I take mine out in the sun and try to appreciate that the flowers it rips up from the garden can sometimes be just as lovely when stuck in the teeth of its terrib In the last two pages of “Broken (In the Best Possible Way),” Jenny Lawson explains that the cover illustration was done by an artist named Omar Rayyan. His collection contains “whimsical paintings of people carrying their own baffling little monsters.” To her, this embodies how she feels about her battles with depression and anxiety. “I take mine out in the sun and try to appreciate that the flowers it rips up from the garden can sometimes be just as lovely when stuck in the teeth of its terrible mouth.” As fans of Jenny AKA The Bloggess know from either her previous two books or social media accounts, she suffers from not only mental illness but ailments such as rheumatoid arthritis, pre-diabetes, and anemias. In “Broken,” she really takes those monsters by their horns. One chapter is a painfully-relatable letter to her insurance company, another details her many months going through experimental treatments. While her wit can be found in these sections, they’re just not… funny. And that’s OK, it doesn’t appear they’re supposed to be. The unique thing about this book is that intermixed with these more stoic chapters are laugh-out-loud ones. That is, if your brand of humor includes things like toddler-sized tiny condoms for your dog to use as boots, buttworms, and bearcat hot buttered pee. (Yes, you read that right.) There are lists of mortifying things she’s said, mortifying things strangers have done and tweeted to her, and mortifying corrections she’s received from her editors. It’s been a few years since I read her other books, but I don’t recall their ranges of emotion being so vast. As a whole, reading “Broken” is a bit like doing laps in a pool. Start in the deep end with illness, swim to the shallow end to LOL, flip turn and head back to the deep. Seems fitting, since I think she’d agree that to deal with the depths of life, you have to just keep swimming. My thanks to Ms. Lawson and Henry Holt & Co. for the opportunity to read an advanced review copy via NetGalley. “Broken” is now available. Blog: www.confettibookshelf.com IG: @confettibookshelf

  4. 4 out of 5

    karen

    NOW AVAILABLE!! this might be my favorite one yet, but i am too broken to review it RN. go get it, though - you will not be disappointed! ************************************************* apparently, because jenny lawson is the vaccine that will protect me against anything 2021 has in store is an acceptable response to the question "why are you requesting this book?" over on edelweiss. WHOLEHEART THANK YOUS TO J-LAW AND E-WEISS!!! NOW AVAILABLE!! this might be my favorite one yet, but i am too broken to review it RN. go get it, though - you will not be disappointed! ************************************************* apparently, because jenny lawson is the vaccine that will protect me against anything 2021 has in store is an acceptable response to the question "why are you requesting this book?" over on edelweiss. WHOLEHEART THANK YOUS TO J-LAW AND E-WEISS!!!

  5. 5 out of 5

    jv poore

    Broken: In the Best Way Possible is the third collection of comical, every-day-life essays by Jenny Lawson (also known as The Bloggess). Ms. Lawson is one of the few people on this planet willing to share self-deprecating stories, not just for a laugh; but to show those who feel alone that they really aren’t. Most of us have felt the frustration of our own forgetfulness. Ms. Lawson’s recollection issues provide perspective. Her open letter to her health insurance company highlights contradiction Broken: In the Best Way Possible is the third collection of comical, every-day-life essays by Jenny Lawson (also known as The Bloggess). Ms. Lawson is one of the few people on this planet willing to share self-deprecating stories, not just for a laugh; but to show those who feel alone that they really aren’t. Most of us have felt the frustration of our own forgetfulness. Ms. Lawson’s recollection issues provide perspective. Her open letter to her health insurance company highlights contradictions in their policies along with procedures that are almost nonsensical. Relatable, if you’ve ever been baffled by insurance. Some chapters surprised me with anxieties and odd decisions so very similar to mine. Finally, someone else who waffles between answering the door when the mail-carrier requires a signature or just ignoring it and driving to the post office on another day. Hoping to feel up to face-to-face communication in the future. To me, one of the most challenging aspects of clinical depression is not being to explain how it feels. I cannot emphasize enough how validating and exactly-what-I-needed-right-now this book is. It isn’t written to a specific, clinically-depressed audience, though. Ms. Lawson bravely speaks to absolutely everyone. Even those with brilliantly-balanced chemistry will be amused by these anecdotes. Oh! And I learned what kintsugi is. When Ms. Lawson’s husband suggested it, he was so spot-on that he must have felt like a rock-star for a moment. Reading Broken is like receiving a desperately needed hug from the person who knows you best and loves you anyway. And, I absolutely adore the new name she gives to the Acknowledgements section. This review was written by jv poore for Buried Under Books, with huge “Thank You!” to Henry Holt & Company and Goodreads for the Advance Review Copy.

  6. 4 out of 5

    Jeanette (Ms. Feisty)

    Completed second reading. Review to come... Jenny Jenny, you're the girl for me, You don't know me but you make me so happy... We could all use a little Jenny Lawson right this very minute. I finished reading this four months ago. It has been sitting on my currently reading shelf ever since, because I kept meaning to go back and read it a second time when my life had settled down a bit. Finally starting the re-read today. Completed second reading. Review to come... Jenny Jenny, you're the girl for me, You don't know me but you make me so happy... We could all use a little Jenny Lawson right this very minute. I finished reading this four months ago. It has been sitting on my currently reading shelf ever since, because I kept meaning to go back and read it a second time when my life had settled down a bit. Finally starting the re-read today.

  7. 5 out of 5

    Tucker (TuckerTheReader)

    Many thanks to Henry Holt & Co for the ARC!! um yes i need | Goodreads | Blog | Pinterest | LinkedIn | YouTube | Instagram Many thanks to Henry Holt & Co for the ARC!! um yes i need | Goodreads | Blog | Pinterest | LinkedIn | YouTube | Instagram

  8. 4 out of 5

    Barbara

    Jenny Lawson Jenny Lawson - born and raised in Texas - is a journalist, blogger, author, and humorist who suffers from mental illness, attention deficit disorder, clinical depression, anxiety attacks, rheumatoid arthritis, autoimmune problems, and more. This makes Lawson's life challenging, but her medication - as well as her husband and daughter - help Jenny cope. Jenny tries to see the 'funny' in life, and shares her observations with her readers. I'll give some examples of Jenny's anecdotes, t Jenny Lawson Jenny Lawson - born and raised in Texas - is a journalist, blogger, author, and humorist who suffers from mental illness, attention deficit disorder, clinical depression, anxiety attacks, rheumatoid arthritis, autoimmune problems, and more. This makes Lawson's life challenging, but her medication - as well as her husband and daughter - help Jenny cope. Jenny tries to see the 'funny' in life, and shares her observations with her readers. I'll give some examples of Jenny's anecdotes, to provide a feel for her humor. Jenny tells a story about constantly losing a shoe, because one foot is slightly larger than the other. So Jenny walked out of a shoe in a hotel elevator, waited for the elevator to return.....and no shoe! Turns out someone reported it to security. Jenny vowed to stop losing a shoe, but proceeded to do it again and again. Thus Jenny once had to pretend wearing one shoe was an Avant-garde fashion choice, once lost a shoe in a public toilet, once lost a shoe in a storm drain, and so on. (I'd advise fashionable sneakers. 😃) *** Jenny writes about being so uncomfortable at parties that she gets verbal diarrhea and makes terrible small talk, like comparing dog poop and human poop. Ick!! ***** After repeatedly mentioning genitals in a chapter about a cockchafer maggot, Jenny looked to Twitter for gender-neutral words for private parts. Hundreds of responses poured in, some of Jenny's favorites being niblets, no-no zone, Area 51, the south 40, the Department of the Interior, my hoopty, my chamber of secrets, my bidness, fandanglies, and the good china. ***** In a chapter about editing her books - which Jenny does with a gallery of professionals - Jenny acknowledges that the process is awful and painful and hilarious and mortifying...but not boring. For fun, Jenny describes conversations she had about her books with a variety of editors. Some examples: ◙ Jenny confuses the pirates Blackbeard and Bluebeard because they have the same last name. Editor: I don't think "Beard" was their last name. ◙ Jenny: Let's change "butt" to "buttonhole." Editor: Are you sure you want to do that? Jenny: Oops, that was autocorrect. I meant let's change "butt" to "butthole." ◙ Jenny: Can I just leave a poop emoticon to say sorry for being shitty at words. Editor: The poop image is an "emoji." An emoticon is a typographical display of facial representation using text only. Jenny: Jesus, I can't even use poop correctly. ***** Jenny has a knack for fun animal names. Her dog is called Dorothy Barker; her suggested monikers for a neighborhood owl are Owl Roker and Owlexander Hamilton; a yard rat is dubbed Boo Ratley; and a squirrel who steals peanut butter crackers is named Squirrelly Temple. Dorothy Barker ***** Jenny also tells stories about her husband Victor, her daughter Hailey, and her parents and grandparents. Much of this is amusing, though stories about pulling off chicken heads, eating goats roasted in ground pits, and snacking on gerbil jerky can be stomach-churning. Ground Pit Oven ***** In a serious vein, Jenny excoriates her insurance company, which avoids paying for her medication and treatments....a phenomenon that's probably familiar to much of the general public. Jenny also talks about contracting tuberculosis because she takes immunosuppressant drugs for her rheumatoid arthritis; getting panic attacks; having childhood anxiety attacks that were so frequent her mother had to change jobs to work in her school; having regular suicidal thoughts; and experiencing extended periods of depression. Jenny goes on to describe the transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS) she received to relieve her psychiatric symptoms - treatments that are extensive and painful, but which helped. Jenny getting TMS treatment Jenny's books do good by helping others who suffer from mental illness. Jenny writes about being on a book tour and meeting wonderful people who dealt with some of the same issues she had. Many folks shakily told her that it was the first time they'd left their house in weeks. Jenny was proud to be able to talk to each person, though it was VERY draining for HER, because she gets anxious being around people. A difficult conundrum indeed. Jenny signing books I like Jenny's humor, and there are some REALLY amusing chapters in the book. However, many sections feel forced, like the author was trying too hard to be funny. Still, the book demonstrates that mentally ill individuals can have good times and enjoy life, which is a lesson worth learning. Thanks to Netgalley, the author (Jenny Lawson), and the publisher (Henry Holt and Company) for a copy of the book. You can follow my reviews at http://reviewsbybarbsaffer.blogspot.com/

  9. 5 out of 5

    Jessica | JustReadingJess

    I loved Broken (in the best possible way). This book is real and unfiltered. Broken is similar to her other books where she says what she thinks. It is very honest and comes out like a stream of conscience. Lawson does a great job bringing the reader inside her head and explaining what she is thinking. Sometimes this results in long tangents. I found Broken to be refreshingly honest. Lawson talks very openly about her depression and anxiety. She even describes how difficult book signings are for I loved Broken (in the best possible way). This book is real and unfiltered. Broken is similar to her other books where she says what she thinks. It is very honest and comes out like a stream of conscience. Lawson does a great job bringing the reader inside her head and explaining what she is thinking. Sometimes this results in long tangents. I found Broken to be refreshingly honest. Lawson talks very openly about her depression and anxiety. She even describes how difficult book signings are for her but how worthwhile she finds meeting her fans. Broken is a mix of funny and serious. Lawson will make you laugh with a hilarious story and then talk openly about her loneliness and depression. I think the world needs more people with Lawson’s honesty. I recommend Broken (in the best possible way) to fans of Jenny Lawson and anyone that thinks the idea of a mix of funny stories and serious discussions of depression would be interesting. Thank you Libro.fm, Macmillan Audio, Henry Holt & Company and NetGalley for Broken (in the best possible way). Full Review: https://justreadingjess.wordpress.com...

  10. 4 out of 5

    Maxwell

    Jenny Lawson never fails to deliver—both laughter and tears. She balances humor and sincerity so well and seems like such a darn good person that I'd love to be friends with. If you have read and enjoyed her two previous memoirs, you'll love this one just as much. She is consistent, if not a bit repetitive, but honestly I can't fault her for that because her voice is so strong and she always has the most ridiculously amazing stories to tell. How does she have so many mishaps in her life?! Also t Jenny Lawson never fails to deliver—both laughter and tears. She balances humor and sincerity so well and seems like such a darn good person that I'd love to be friends with. If you have read and enjoyed her two previous memoirs, you'll love this one just as much. She is consistent, if not a bit repetitive, but honestly I can't fault her for that because her voice is so strong and she always has the most ridiculously amazing stories to tell. How does she have so many mishaps in her life?! Also the animal encounters never end. I loved it. I'd highly recommend reading all of her books, in order preferably, but you definitely can just dive into this one if you're interested!

  11. 4 out of 5

    Catherine Woodward

    **Many thanks to NetGalley, Henry Holt & Co., and Jenny Lawson for an ARC of this book! Now available as of 4.6!** You ever had that friend that who not only can make you laugh, not only can make you cry, but can make you laugh from crying AND cry from laughing? Jenny Lawson is JUST that wizard. This is Jenny's third book, and those familiar with her humor realize she will be discussing everything from some 'interesting' (and not G rated) product pitches for Shark Tank to embarrassing and ridiculou **Many thanks to NetGalley, Henry Holt & Co., and Jenny Lawson for an ARC of this book! Now available as of 4.6!** You ever had that friend that who not only can make you laugh, not only can make you cry, but can make you laugh from crying AND cry from laughing? Jenny Lawson is JUST that wizard. This is Jenny's third book, and those familiar with her humor realize she will be discussing everything from some 'interesting' (and not G rated) product pitches for Shark Tank to embarrassing and ridiculous anecdotes from some of her blog and Twitter followers that will have you have you snickering, if not full-out belly laughing. Jenny loves taxidermy and tangents, and her frick-and-frack banter with husband Victor is always a treat. What I love most about her comedic essays (and this is just in their written form) is that they are the weirdest stories where the beginning of the chapter can leave you saying "Huh? How exactly is she going to circle back to receiving a bag of dicks at the post office?" But lo and behold. She always does, and once you've actually heard the story, you think "Well of course. Why WOULDN'T she have received a bag of dicks? Perfectly logical." The juxtaposition to the wild and wacky, however, is Jenny's discussion of her mental health struggles, which are heartbreaking in a sense, but also so relatable at times she takes my breath away. The essays in this book were particular poignant and interesting, since Jenny also discusses her experience with TMS (transcranial magnetic stimulation) therapy, which I had only heard of prior to reading this book. Other than Matt Haig, there is nobody who discusses depression and anxiety with such acuity as Jenny Lawson. The few essays on these topics alone provide enough advice (including a top ten list of what techniques work best for Jenny), empathy, and insight to put her alongside some of the best self-help writers I've read, like Brene Brown. There are so many passages I wanted to go back and highlight in this book, and as an avid fan of her blog and all other social media, I can say some of the email newsletters she sends are just the right words you need to hear on a particularly bad day. I am so proud to call myself a Jenny Lawson fan, because she is one of the most unflinchingly authentic, unique, intelligent, and real bloggers I've ever come across, and her essay about being Broken is one of the best of the bunch here. If you need a cry-laugh, a laugh-cry (and let's face it, you could probably use at least one of those!), PLEASE pick up this fantastic book! She is quirky, gifted, funny, and empathetic...in all the best possible ways! 4.5 ⭐

  12. 5 out of 5

    Laura

    Free copy received through NetGalley for my honest review. Jenny Lawson has a gift for balancing humor and rawness in a way I've never seen done outside of her books. Broken (In the Best Possible Way) is a series of extremely readable chapters ranging from post-office catastrophes to transcranial magnetic stimulation. I want to be Jenny's friend, I want to tell her what she says makes a difference, and thank her for sharing her stories. I laughed out loud so many times. I thought to myself, yep, Free copy received through NetGalley for my honest review. Jenny Lawson has a gift for balancing humor and rawness in a way I've never seen done outside of her books. Broken (In the Best Possible Way) is a series of extremely readable chapters ranging from post-office catastrophes to transcranial magnetic stimulation. I want to be Jenny's friend, I want to tell her what she says makes a difference, and thank her for sharing her stories. I laughed out loud so many times. I thought to myself, yep, I feel that so many times too. I learned some new things too This is more than a humor book, a self help book, a memoir, and I'm already looking forward to whatever she writes next. If you loved her other books, you'll love this. If you're looking to read something that'll make you laugh and give you hope, you'll love this too. If you've ever done or said something embarrassing, you'll definitely love and relate to this book!

  13. 5 out of 5

    Doug

    4.5, rounded up. Just what this horrible year needs right now is the return of Jenny Lawson, who is really the ONLY author ever to make me LOL so hard I cry, blow milk out my nose and pee my pants, all at the same time. I've now read all four of her books, and this is something of a return to the full power she exhibited in her first classic (Let's Pretend This Never Happened: A Mostly True Memoir). Along with the side-splitting, sometimes implausible, yet entirely true mishaps she relates, are a 4.5, rounded up. Just what this horrible year needs right now is the return of Jenny Lawson, who is really the ONLY author ever to make me LOL so hard I cry, blow milk out my nose and pee my pants, all at the same time. I've now read all four of her books, and this is something of a return to the full power she exhibited in her first classic (Let's Pretend This Never Happened: A Mostly True Memoir). Along with the side-splitting, sometimes implausible, yet entirely true mishaps she relates, are also some sobering chapters that deal more intimately with her issues with anxiety and other illnesses, both mental and physical; along with her battles with medical professionals and dastardly insurance companies to get the help she needs. Long-suffering husband Victor and sister Lisa are back, as well as a cameo from the taxidermied mice of the first book, and a full contingent of bewildered new encounters. Some chapters don't quite measure up - the Shark Tank ideas one goes on much too long and devolves into some sophomoric scatology, but those missteps are few and far between. It's just a real comfort to have Ms. Lawson back to remind us that no matter how bad things are - she's probably had it worse! Sincere thanks to Netgalley and Henry Holt & Company for the opportunity and privilege to preview and honestly review this book a full 5 months before it's available to the rest of you! :-)

  14. 5 out of 5

    Kim

    Full disclosure: I adore #JennyLawson. I follow her on social media in addition to having read all of her books. So I was very excited to be able to read this ARC of #BrokenInTheBestPossibleWay. For those familiar with Lawson, this book will be exact as you hope: many stories she has shared in real time on Twitter or on her blog are made available here in more refined, equally amusing or heartbreaking storytelling as only she can do. She is candid about her life with mental and physical health c Full disclosure: I adore #JennyLawson. I follow her on social media in addition to having read all of her books. So I was very excited to be able to read this ARC of #BrokenInTheBestPossibleWay. For those familiar with Lawson, this book will be exact as you hope: many stories she has shared in real time on Twitter or on her blog are made available here in more refined, equally amusing or heartbreaking storytelling as only she can do. She is candid about her life with mental and physical health concerns, family loss, and more. Even in moments of sadness, she can turn a tale into a life lesson or a silver lining. There are also certainly those laugh-out-loud moments where I realized I shouldn't be reading this book in public because I was making a scene. The photographs were a nice touch to many of the stories. For those not familiar with Lawson, this may not be the book I'd recommend to you first. While you certainly will be able to pick up on who her family is or some of her back story, it may feel a bit like jumping into the middle of some inside jokes. I would recommend either of her other books and then moving on to this one. Thanks to the publisher and #NetGalley for this ARC!

  15. 5 out of 5

    Jessica Jeffers

    When I was about halfway through this book, I went back and read my review of Jenny Lawson’s last set of essays, Furiously Happy: A Funny Book About Horrible Things , in which I had noted, essentially, that she’s best when she’s writing about her mental health but that she seemed to only want to touch that stuff with a ten-foot pole. Well, she gets right up in it this time. This book is also at its best when she’s writing about mental health, but she’s much more willing to dive into it this t When I was about halfway through this book, I went back and read my review of Jenny Lawson’s last set of essays, Furiously Happy: A Funny Book About Horrible Things , in which I had noted, essentially, that she’s best when she’s writing about her mental health but that she seemed to only want to touch that stuff with a ten-foot pole. Well, she gets right up in it this time. This book is also at its best when she’s writing about mental health, but she’s much more willing to dive into it this time around and explore some real nitty-gritty shit. I also noted last time that I loved the Twitter thread in which she asked people to share their most embarrassing awkward encounters. As soon as I finished reading that part of my review, I turned the page in my copy of this book and discovered she had included an entire chapter here of some of her favorite responses to the thread. That chapter alone would almost be worth the price of this book if for no other reason than the Tweet in which one (presumably) woman referred to her gyno as a VAGINACOLOGIST. But once again, the chapters where she’s just writing about how weird she is – things like discovering a bug named a cock chafer or trying to buy condoms that she can use as booties for her dog – are fine, but they aren’t what I come to Jenny Lawson’s work for. It’s when she’s willing to be vulnerable and dig into her anxiety and depression that I really love reading her. “Over the years, I’d hide in bathrooms and closets and books. And in myself. It was a lonely place to be, but safe. Except when I got stuck.” Jesus Christ on a flying popsicle stick, is there anything that I could relate to more when thinking about what I now recognize as the intense social anxiety that I grew up with? In Broken (in the Best Possible Way), Jenny shares her experience with TMS treatment for depression, the agoraphobia she felt while on her last book tour, and the trauma that is trying to get your health insurance company to pay for medicine that will keep you from becoming suicidal. She talks about her various chronic health issues and the days that her marriage is particularly challenging. It's the most vulnerable collection of essays that I've read by her (though, to be fair, I don't follow her blog), but that's also what makes it her best.

  16. 5 out of 5

    Molli

    I cannot wait for this!!! Jenny Lawson has helped me get through some tough times and I have listened to her audio books repeatedly. I can’t wait to add another one into the mix.

  17. 4 out of 5

    The Story Girl

    Loved this! Some parts were hilarious, some were just very real about her depression, and some I related to. [pre-review from 2020] It has a cover now! And is it 2021 yet? Because I need this book so badly!

  18. 4 out of 5

    Melissa

    A new book by Jenny Lawson is such a treat. (Out April 2021, sorry) Classic Funny Jenny chapters (like buying her dog condoms or how she almost went blind during an eclipse because of the rats in her yard or how penises got all over the inside of her car (we are all Victor in that one)) interspersed with beautiful and enraging chapters about her struggle with depression and anxiety (she includes both her open letter to her health insurance and her diary from TMS treatment - which I remember from A new book by Jenny Lawson is such a treat. (Out April 2021, sorry) Classic Funny Jenny chapters (like buying her dog condoms or how she almost went blind during an eclipse because of the rats in her yard or how penises got all over the inside of her car (we are all Victor in that one)) interspersed with beautiful and enraging chapters about her struggle with depression and anxiety (she includes both her open letter to her health insurance and her diary from TMS treatment - which I remember from her social media - and there are few people who can mix both eloquence and deadpan humor so well). I would have perhaps cut down the Failed Shark Tank Pitches chapter, which loses steam after about the 10th idea, but that's an extremely minor thing.

  19. 4 out of 5

    S. Jess

    When I saw Jenny Lawson was publishing a new book I wanted to cry. Then I realized it was coming out April of 2021 and I wanted to cry for a whole different reason.

  20. 4 out of 5

    Gerardine Betancourt

    My favorite author has always been, Jenny Lawson. Her books have always made me feel like I have a friend by my side who understands the things I've been through. In this new book, Jenny continues to share her anecdotes in her daily life and experiences with her physical health, anxiety, and depression. Many of her stories are posts that Jenny shared on her Twitter account or on her blog https://thebloggess.com/ If you have never entered that blog I highly recommend it there is a lot of content abo My favorite author has always been, Jenny Lawson. Her books have always made me feel like I have a friend by my side who understands the things I've been through. In this new book, Jenny continues to share her anecdotes in her daily life and experiences with her physical health, anxiety, and depression. Many of her stories are posts that Jenny shared on her Twitter account or on her blog https://thebloggess.com/ If you have never entered that blog I highly recommend it there is a lot of content about her life and many weird things that you will probably like. Like all her books, there are parts that made me laugh and others that I could not bear the urge to cry, in particular, the part that talks about her grandmother because it is the same thing that is happening with my grandma right now. My dream is to one day travel to Nowhere Bookshop and thank her for sharing her stories and for helping me find hope in the most difficult moments of my life. Thank you so much to Henry Holt and Company for this Arc in exchange for an honest review. ⭐⭐⭐⭐⭐5 stars!!!!

  21. 5 out of 5

    Leslie - Shobizreads

    This is my first Jenny Lawson book and I loved it. It’s rare for a book to make me actually laugh aloud but this one did, several times. So yeah, I looked like a crazy person laughing while I was driving alone in my car. Totally worth the crazy looks! Seriously, Jenny manages to be hilarious and insightful at the same time. Making you laugh about the ridiculous things we all do in the name of googling things and avoiding people (only monsters call your phone instead of texting). While this was fu This is my first Jenny Lawson book and I loved it. It’s rare for a book to make me actually laugh aloud but this one did, several times. So yeah, I looked like a crazy person laughing while I was driving alone in my car. Totally worth the crazy looks! Seriously, Jenny manages to be hilarious and insightful at the same time. Making you laugh about the ridiculous things we all do in the name of googling things and avoiding people (only monsters call your phone instead of texting). While this was funny, it also deals head-on with chronic depression and anxiety in a way that is incredibly honest while also being hopeful - but still realistic. Highly recommend. Audio is fantastic.

  22. 5 out of 5

    Joanna Burr

    Jenny Lawson has done it again! I remember a few years back when a friend came up to me with this look of awe on her face, and she said "You HAVE to read this book! It's life-changing!" As an English teacher, I come across a lot of books that I think are life-changing, so I took it more hyperbolic than a serious judgment. However, once I started reading the first chapter, full of it's stream of consciousness writing mixed with the language of a sailor,I KNEW my friend's assessment had NOTHING to Jenny Lawson has done it again! I remember a few years back when a friend came up to me with this look of awe on her face, and she said "You HAVE to read this book! It's life-changing!" As an English teacher, I come across a lot of books that I think are life-changing, so I took it more hyperbolic than a serious judgment. However, once I started reading the first chapter, full of it's stream of consciousness writing mixed with the language of a sailor,I KNEW my friend's assessment had NOTHING to do with exaggeration. She was so right, and Jenny Lawson has literally changed my life. As someone who suffers from auto-immune disorders topped with depression and anxiety, I instantly felt a connection with Jenny. And even though I didn't grow up in Texas with a taxidermist for a dad, I did grow up in Hillbillyville, West Virginia with a dad who was an avid hunter and fisherman. I clearly remember the taste of squirrel and deer and rabbit, so reading about Jenny's wacky childhood brought back a whole slew of my own memories. In this installment, Jenny gives us more insight into her life, her marriage, her mental health, and makes us realize that we are NOT alone in this battle. Despite how our mental and physical issues make us feel, sometimes we just have to stand back and appreciate the $hi+-$how. Stop having regrets and STET!

  23. 5 out of 5

    Alicia Bayer

    While I'm a fan of the Bloggess (Blogess?), I'm not a regular reader so I don't know if these essays were previously published on her blog. They felt quite a lot like a compilation of random blog posts, though, and many of them really didn't seem to have to do with the supposed topic, Lawson's lifelong battles with mental illness. Some were funny, some were serious. There was always a bit of funny with the serious and vice versa. I enjoyed some chapters much more than others. One chapter was com While I'm a fan of the Bloggess (Blogess?), I'm not a regular reader so I don't know if these essays were previously published on her blog. They felt quite a lot like a compilation of random blog posts, though, and many of them really didn't seem to have to do with the supposed topic, Lawson's lifelong battles with mental illness. Some were funny, some were serious. There was always a bit of funny with the serious and vice versa. I enjoyed some chapters much more than others. One chapter was composed of very NSFW product suggestions for Shark Tank or something like that, and those were kinda terrible even for me. I really enjoyed her sections that dealt with her anxiety and depression, but so much of the book felt like filler of just random silly stuff. I read in the blurb or the intro about the experimental procedures she's been going though and expected a lot more about that, but she just kind of describes it in one chapter and says that it seems to have helped a bit and she acknowledges that since insurance doesn't cover it and it's expensive, she knows how lucky she is to have been able to do it (and it may need to be repeated). I've read her first book and also have purchased two of her adult coloring books (one for me and one for my oldest child), and I enjoy everything she puts out. I certainly love her as a person and relate to many of her struggles. A few parts of this book did have me really laughing out loud, and a few were really touching and relatable. A lot of other parts just felt like skimming through old blog posts, some of which were more successful than others. This was a 3 star book for me -- liked it. I can't say I loved it but I love her and do recommend the book. I read a digital ARC of this book via Net Galley.

  24. 5 out of 5

    Christina (A Reader of Fictions)

    As ever, I adore Jenny Lawson's humor. She's so funny and so raw and so ridiculous, and it all just works for me. There's a lot in here, between the absurd stories, about how broken the healthcare system is in the US and about the failures of health insurance that is timely and painful. If you loved Lawson's first two books, Broken (in the Best Possible Way) will not disappoint in the least; it's every bit as wonderful as her first two. As ever, I adore Jenny Lawson's humor. She's so funny and so raw and so ridiculous, and it all just works for me. There's a lot in here, between the absurd stories, about how broken the healthcare system is in the US and about the failures of health insurance that is timely and painful. If you loved Lawson's first two books, Broken (in the Best Possible Way) will not disappoint in the least; it's every bit as wonderful as her first two.

  25. 4 out of 5

    Cassidy Washburn

    I would highly recommend the audiobook for this since it is narrated by Jenny Lawson herself. It is hilarious while also having a serious undertone. It deals with topics of depression, death, covid, and many more.

  26. 4 out of 5

    Stewart Tame

    Fair warning: I won a free ARC of this book in a Goodreads giveaway. Wow! That was fun! This is the first of Lawson’s books that I’ve read, though she's been on my radar for a while now. She has a finely honed sense of written comic timing. There were times when it was all I could do not to burst out laughing while reading this in the break room at work. Which would have been bad because someone would have asked me what I was reading, and then I’d have been like, “Hahahaha! Omigod! The DICKS!! In Fair warning: I won a free ARC of this book in a Goodreads giveaway. Wow! That was fun! This is the first of Lawson’s books that I’ve read, though she's been on my radar for a while now. She has a finely honed sense of written comic timing. There were times when it was all I could do not to burst out laughing while reading this in the break room at work. Which would have been bad because someone would have asked me what I was reading, and then I’d have been like, “Hahahaha! Omigod! The DICKS!! In the car holes!! Hahaha!” Though that probably would have assured that I’d have the break room all to myself for the foreseeable future. Hmmm … But after laughing yourself silly, you’ll turn the page and there will be a moving and insightful essay on dealing with depression. Because part of what makes the funny bits so good is that Lawson makes them so relatable. And that relatability works for more serious topics as well. I know that I don’t possess the sort of deep understanding that comes with having depression myself, but I feel like I’ve gained at least a little more insight into what it must be like. This is also one of those books that cries out to be shared. I considered reading portions out loud to my wife, but there are so many to choose from. I’m pretty sure that, once I start down that road, I won't stop until I’ve read the whole thing to her. So I settled for urging her to read it. And you as well. Everyone should read this book. Highly recommended!

  27. 4 out of 5

    Janet

    I definitely liked this book better than the previous one I read (Let's Pretend This Never Happened: A Mostly True Memoir)...but I'm wondering if it was because I listened to this one, rather than reading. I think if I had read this, I would have again been irritated by the run-on sentences and express trains of thought, but listening to Jenny narrate her stories made all the difference. There were many laugh out loud chapters sprinkled amongst the more serious ones dealing with her anxieties, d I definitely liked this book better than the previous one I read (Let's Pretend This Never Happened: A Mostly True Memoir)...but I'm wondering if it was because I listened to this one, rather than reading. I think if I had read this, I would have again been irritated by the run-on sentences and express trains of thought, but listening to Jenny narrate her stories made all the difference. There were many laugh out loud chapters sprinkled amongst the more serious ones dealing with her anxieties, depression, and the host of other issues. Her letter to her insurance company was spot on! I loved the chapter about the buttons. But I hated the Shark Tank chapter, I felt it totally unnecessary.

  28. 4 out of 5

    Tex

    I appreciate netgalley giving me this book for a fair and honest review. I give this book a scant 4 stars. I enjoy the perspective of Jenny as she relates herself to us and I’ll try not to compare them. This one deserves to be observed on its own. There is as much light as there is dark here. Mental illness and chronic pain and family life. It could be one of those progressive TV dramas where you get amazed that both happy and sad can endure in the same character. In the end, this is about family I appreciate netgalley giving me this book for a fair and honest review. I give this book a scant 4 stars. I enjoy the perspective of Jenny as she relates herself to us and I’ll try not to compare them. This one deserves to be observed on its own. There is as much light as there is dark here. Mental illness and chronic pain and family life. It could be one of those progressive TV dramas where you get amazed that both happy and sad can endure in the same character. In the end, this is about family and how we can get there together. There was one chapter on Shark Tank that I could have done without almost entirely, but that’s entirely a sense of humor thing.

  29. 5 out of 5

    Coley

    I find it incredibly telling when an author can make you feel extreme joy, empathy, sadness, compassion and happiness all at once. Lawson nailed it. In one chapter, she pens a letter to her insurance company asking them if they want her to die. Lawson is depressed and suffers from a myriad of health issues and is getting constant rejections for her medications and treatments. The letter and stories about her health are heartbreaking and telling of our current healthcare system. Then she literall I find it incredibly telling when an author can make you feel extreme joy, empathy, sadness, compassion and happiness all at once. Lawson nailed it. In one chapter, she pens a letter to her insurance company asking them if they want her to die. Lawson is depressed and suffers from a myriad of health issues and is getting constant rejections for her medications and treatments. The letter and stories about her health are heartbreaking and telling of our current healthcare system. Then she literally segues in the next chapter to a story involving her neighbor, a bug on a sidewalk and Victor on a conference call. I was full-on laughing so hard that I couldn’t breathe. I read the chapter out loud to my husband a second time and had to stop because even reading it the second time made it that much better. The magic of Lawson’s book is the back and forth - between the light and the dark; the truth to her life as she’s living it. Her illness and how it debilitates her, but also her marriage, her real-talk with her editors, and her sending a disco ball to a monkey refugee camp because they wouldn’t take the tiny roller skates she wanted to send them.

  30. 4 out of 5

    Lizz Axnick

    I love Jenny Lawson. She writes from her heart and she writes about the tough subjects. However, she will make you laugh your fanny off while doing it. I laughed through most of this book and when she got serious I got serious with her. This is one of those where you'll laugh, you'll cry and you'll read the best parts out to anyone who will listen. If you have never read Jenny Lawson, she suffers from depression. In this book she describes what it is like to suffer from crippling depression and h I love Jenny Lawson. She writes from her heart and she writes about the tough subjects. However, she will make you laugh your fanny off while doing it. I laughed through most of this book and when she got serious I got serious with her. This is one of those where you'll laugh, you'll cry and you'll read the best parts out to anyone who will listen. If you have never read Jenny Lawson, she suffers from depression. In this book she describes what it is like to suffer from crippling depression and how it affects the person's life. She talks about her struggles with autoimmune diseases, including RA, with a spectacular chapter on how she accidentally got TB. Her books make me feel warm and fuzzy and when I am in a dark place myself, she is there to comfort me. I know that last paragraph makes this book sound like a real downer. I promise you it is not. Jenny is extremely clever and hilarious and some of the situations she gets into remind me a lot of I Love Lucy, only with more taxidermy. She writes from the heart and I just love escaping into her books. I cannot say enough wonderful things about Jenny and her books. She reaches out to an audience that is often ignored and gets real about some dark and scary places. I appreciate her honesty, her struggles and her ability to still laugh about life in general Thank you Netgalley and Jenny Lawson for allowing me to read this in advance!

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