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In the companion novel to the beloved and award-winning Amina’s Voice, Amina once again uses her voice to bridge the places, people, and communities she loves—this time across continents. It’s the last few days of her vacation in Pakistan, and Amina has loved every minute of it. The food, the shops, the time she’s spent with her family—all of it holds a special place in Am In the companion novel to the beloved and award-winning Amina’s Voice, Amina once again uses her voice to bridge the places, people, and communities she loves—this time across continents. It’s the last few days of her vacation in Pakistan, and Amina has loved every minute of it. The food, the shops, the time she’s spent with her family—all of it holds a special place in Amina’s heart. Now that the school year is starting again, she’s sad to leave, but also excited to share the wonders of Pakistan with her friends back in Greendale. After she’s home, though, her friends don’t seem overly interested in her trip. And when she decides to do a presentation on Pakistani hero Malala Yousafzai, her classmates focus on the worst parts of the story. How can Amina share the beauty of Pakistan when no one wants to listen?


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In the companion novel to the beloved and award-winning Amina’s Voice, Amina once again uses her voice to bridge the places, people, and communities she loves—this time across continents. It’s the last few days of her vacation in Pakistan, and Amina has loved every minute of it. The food, the shops, the time she’s spent with her family—all of it holds a special place in Am In the companion novel to the beloved and award-winning Amina’s Voice, Amina once again uses her voice to bridge the places, people, and communities she loves—this time across continents. It’s the last few days of her vacation in Pakistan, and Amina has loved every minute of it. The food, the shops, the time she’s spent with her family—all of it holds a special place in Amina’s heart. Now that the school year is starting again, she’s sad to leave, but also excited to share the wonders of Pakistan with her friends back in Greendale. After she’s home, though, her friends don’t seem overly interested in her trip. And when she decides to do a presentation on Pakistani hero Malala Yousafzai, her classmates focus on the worst parts of the story. How can Amina share the beauty of Pakistan when no one wants to listen?

30 review for Amina's Song

  1. 4 out of 5

    Darla

    Amina is back in the sequel to 'Amina's Voice' and this time the books starts while she is visiting their relatives in Pakistan. While there she realizes that it is easy to form an opinion of an entire country based on one or two news stories. She herself had been apprehensive about visiting her the home country of her parents until Baba talked through it with her. Before she returns to the states, her uncle asks her to share the good things about Pakistan with people in the US. For a 7th grader Amina is back in the sequel to 'Amina's Voice' and this time the books starts while she is visiting their relatives in Pakistan. While there she realizes that it is easy to form an opinion of an entire country based on one or two news stories. She herself had been apprehensive about visiting her the home country of her parents until Baba talked through it with her. Before she returns to the states, her uncle asks her to share the good things about Pakistan with people in the US. For a 7th grader, that is a big ask and at first it seems impossible. She chooses Malala as her wax museum project and then realizes that the Taliban does not give her classmates a view of Pakistan that would make them want to visit. She also befriends a new student named Nico who is passionate about making his own beats. Could Nico help Amina write a song using the journal she started after returning from Pakistan? Will her song be something that makes her family proud and reflects their love for their home country? Along with the project and songwriting, Amina is also talking with her friends and family about ways they can help others. Includes some great ideas that kids can incorporate in their own communities. This one would be really good as an audiobook as well. Wondering if there will be a Youtube video to show Amina's talents? Thank you to Simon & Schuster and NetGalley for a DRC in exchange for an honest review.

  2. 4 out of 5

    zaheerah

    *I received a copy via the publisher and NetGalley in return for an honest review. This in no way affected my opinion of the book.* When Amina returns home from her vacation in Pakistan, she is brimming with pride for her country and wants everyone else to know it. When she’s assigned homework where you have to choose an important figure, she chooses to represent Malala Yousafzai, but everyone can only focus on the horror that occurred. Once again, Amina must speak up to use her voice speak up, a *I received a copy via the publisher and NetGalley in return for an honest review. This in no way affected my opinion of the book.* When Amina returns home from her vacation in Pakistan, she is brimming with pride for her country and wants everyone else to know it. When she’s assigned homework where you have to choose an important figure, she chooses to represent Malala Yousafzai, but everyone can only focus on the horror that occurred. Once again, Amina must speak up to use her voice speak up, and hopefully, no one will drown her out. I found Amina’s Song really endearing. Hena Khan wonderfully captures the beautiful connection between the home of her parent’s, Pakistan, and the home where she lives, the US. Amina really works hard to send a message to her classmates about unifying different parts of ourselves. The way its written evokes a lot of heart and emotion that will make this book a perfect series to buy for middle-grade readers. Amina is a wonderful character, with so much compassion and love for the people around her, in both her communities and the story’s main conflict is her wanting to share her Pakistani side with her American side, but it doesn’t go the way she planned. This story is also a wake-up call, not only for Amina but her peers around her as she aims to help them question their understanding of the world beyond their borders. Amina, herself, admits she had second-guessed Pakistan herself before visiting but returns with a new-found appreciation. She’s determined to let her peers see the cultural value of Pakistan that wasn’t sourced from negative media. Amina isn’t Amina without music, so as a side plot, she ends up befriending new boy Nico and they come together to work on music production. Everyone around her immediately assumes it’s a romance and she’s clearly frustrated because all she wants is a friend. In this follow-up to Amina’s Voice, Amina yearns to showcase her love for Pakistan with her American community. Using her passion for music, she makes it her mission to change everyone’s tune. A delightful companion novel that I would highly recommend to younger readers!

  3. 4 out of 5

    Kathie

    Thank you to the publisher for sending me an ARC of this story. I recently reread Amina's Voice in preparation for this new book coming out in March 2021, and I'd forgotten how much I enjoyed these characters. If you haven't read it yet, I suggest you do so before you pick up this one. Amina's Song begins in Pakistan, where Amina and her family are visiting Thaya Jaan and their other relatives after he's returned home from his visit to the United States. Amina feels very connected to Pakistan, and Thank you to the publisher for sending me an ARC of this story. I recently reread Amina's Voice in preparation for this new book coming out in March 2021, and I'd forgotten how much I enjoyed these characters. If you haven't read it yet, I suggest you do so before you pick up this one. Amina's Song begins in Pakistan, where Amina and her family are visiting Thaya Jaan and their other relatives after he's returned home from his visit to the United States. Amina feels very connected to Pakistan, and after she returns home she finds it difficult to leave it all behind. It's difficult for her friends to understand the impact of this experience on her, but she wants to find a way to express how much she loves Pakistan with those around her. She chooses Malala Yousafzai as the subject for a presentation, but is dismayed when her classmates only see the negative side of life in Pakistan for some women. Amina starts to explore her feelings in her journal, which also leads to an interest in collaborating with a classmate when she discover he creates his own music. But since the classmate is a boy, the reaction of Amina's friends and family give her even more things to think about. I really loved seeing Amina's connection to her extended family grow from the first book and through this one. Maintaining those relationships across the distance is very important to her, and when Thaya Jaan's health is in jeopardy, it brings the two families even closer together. There is a strong theme of family that runs through this story, as well as a connection to culture, self-discovery, and self-expression. We see Amina mature as she works to integrate this new knowledge about herself into the person that she is now, and find a way to express what truly matters to her. Perceptions about other countries and the people who live there are is explored, and I appreciated we see it both from multiple perspectives. This is an excellent addition to a middle school collection, particularly for readers who like to read about self-expression and connecting to family who live far away.

  4. 5 out of 5

    Shireen Hakim

    I really enjoyed this book, first because Amina visits her relatives in Lahore, which I've had a wonderful time doing in the past as well! Actually my cousin from Lahore is named Amna! Secondly I'm really happy that Amina talks about other female heroines from Pakistan besides Malala during her class presentation. I liked learning about these other cool feminists and I'm sure the middle grade readers will as well. Thank you to my Twitter connection for the physical ARC! :) I really enjoyed this book, first because Amina visits her relatives in Lahore, which I've had a wonderful time doing in the past as well! Actually my cousin from Lahore is named Amna! Secondly I'm really happy that Amina talks about other female heroines from Pakistan besides Malala during her class presentation. I liked learning about these other cool feminists and I'm sure the middle grade readers will as well. Thank you to my Twitter connection for the physical ARC! :)

  5. 5 out of 5

    Kim Huls

    I received an ARC of this book from the publisher through NetGalley. I was very excited to see this book as a follow up to Amina's Voice! This story was lovely. I really enjoyed learning more about Amina and seeing her pursue her passion for singing, and facing her stage fright in many ways throughout the book. I also loved how the beginning of the book took place in Pakistan and how Amina learned more about powerful Pakistani women throughout the story. I find Malala to be so inspirational and I I received an ARC of this book from the publisher through NetGalley. I was very excited to see this book as a follow up to Amina's Voice! This story was lovely. I really enjoyed learning more about Amina and seeing her pursue her passion for singing, and facing her stage fright in many ways throughout the book. I also loved how the beginning of the book took place in Pakistan and how Amina learned more about powerful Pakistani women throughout the story. I find Malala to be so inspirational and I love teaching my 5th grade students about her, but I thought it was so important that Hena Khan highlighted a variety of wonderful Pakistani women in this book. I look forward to adding this book to my classroom library once it is released in print!

  6. 4 out of 5

    Kary H.

    Thanks to NetGalley for an e-arc of this book. This is the year for sequels that stand up to, and even surpass, the first book. Hena Khan has done it again with Amina’s Song. I loved having a chance to see Pakistan through Amina’s eyes, and the way she helped educate her classmates was perfectly depicted. The friendship with Nico was a welcome addition, and I appreciated how Khan navigated the line between friendship and romance...where others assumed romance, Amina wanted a friend. I honestly l Thanks to NetGalley for an e-arc of this book. This is the year for sequels that stand up to, and even surpass, the first book. Hena Khan has done it again with Amina’s Song. I loved having a chance to see Pakistan through Amina’s eyes, and the way she helped educate her classmates was perfectly depicted. The friendship with Nico was a welcome addition, and I appreciated how Khan navigated the line between friendship and romance...where others assumed romance, Amina wanted a friend. I honestly loved everything about this book and will miss the characters now that I’m done.

  7. 5 out of 5

    Ms. Yingling

    E ARC provided by Edelweiss Plus Amina and her family get to spend some time in Pakistan visiting her uncle Thaya Jaan (who had been unwell) and his family. While there are some things that she doesn't like (no one seems to let her speak anything but English), she loves being with her cousin Zohra and feels at home. Once she is back in the US, Amina is concerned about starting 7th grade with her friends Soojin and Emily. Her social studies teacher assigns a Wax Museum project, and Amina decides t E ARC provided by Edelweiss Plus Amina and her family get to spend some time in Pakistan visiting her uncle Thaya Jaan (who had been unwell) and his family. While there are some things that she doesn't like (no one seems to let her speak anything but English), she loves being with her cousin Zohra and feels at home. Once she is back in the US, Amina is concerned about starting 7th grade with her friends Soojin and Emily. Her social studies teacher assigns a Wax Museum project, and Amina decides to research Malala Yousafzai. While her friends are generally supportive, and Amina has a small but solid community of Muslim friends (including Rabiya), she does sometimes feel that people in her Wisconsin town. In Amina's Voice, her mosque was attacked, mean girls at school make snide comments, and while she is proud of her heritage and her religion, she sometimes feels that her mother could allow her to make different choices, like wearing a more fashionable dress to a school dance. When Amina talks to Nico about music, the two decide to work on some sound mixing together, and her friends and family seem to worry that this has romantic implications. She likes Nico, sure, but she just wants to work with him on music and spend time with someone else with a background that is different from many of her school mates (Nico is half French, half Egyptian). Her uncle told Amina that she needed to spread the word about her culture; will Amina be secure enough in her identity to do this? Strengths: I'm always a fan of books where children go to other countries to visit grandparents! Growing up, I had a friend who would spend summers in Greece, and that seemed absolutely fascinating. It's also something some of my students experience. Amina's fondness for both the US and Pakistan is interesting to observe, and her desire to spread knowledge about her family's culture is great to see. The relationship with Nico, and the inclusion of music, was well done. There's a lot of good friend and school drama, as well as the Wax Museum project, that will speak to a wide range of middle grade readers. Weaknesses: This felt a tiny bit unfocused at the beginning, and it would have helped to have the plot emerge a bit earlier. Having worked with teachers who have assigned Wax Museum projects, I found it hard to believe that the teacher would have cared at all that Amina didn't follow the rubric exactly when she did MORE research on other people. I would have given her an A+! What I really think: Amina's Voice has circulated very well, so I know I'll have readers for this sequel, but I did so love the Zayd Saleem series and wish that Ms. Khan would turn herself to a similar book for slightly older readers! While there are a growing number of books with cultural connections, a lot more of them have girls as the main characters, and it is a learning process to get boys from any culture to read books about girls!

  8. 5 out of 5

    Jennybeast

    I loved Amina's Voice, but I think this book takes her story to a whole new level. There's a line where she's talking about leaving her family after a visit in Pakistan, where she's sad because she's missing all the memories they won't make together in the future, being far away from each other -- her experience really resonates with me. Hena Khan really captured that bittersweet and beautiful connection to faraway family. This is a book full of good moments -- funny, sweet, confused, growing-up I loved Amina's Voice, but I think this book takes her story to a whole new level. There's a line where she's talking about leaving her family after a visit in Pakistan, where she's sad because she's missing all the memories they won't make together in the future, being far away from each other -- her experience really resonates with me. Hena Khan really captured that bittersweet and beautiful connection to faraway family. This is a book full of good moments -- funny, sweet, confused, growing-up moments. I love the different ways Amina finds to talk with her American friends about Pakistan, and that she finds a way to change the conversation and celebrate her heritage. I also loved the emphasis on kids helping others in the community. Empowering, and really stellar. Advanced Reader's Copy Provided by Edelweiss.

  9. 5 out of 5

    Panda Incognito

    This sequel to Amina's Voice begins in Pakistan, where Amina's family is visiting with her aunt, uncle, and cousins. Amina is soaking up every experience, trying to make the most of her limited time, but when she goes home, her friends don't understand how important this trip was to her. She deals with hurt because of this, and tries to navigate a more complex sense of her identity, now that she has been to her ancestral country. This book is just as well-written and engaging as the previous This sequel to Amina's Voice begins in Pakistan, where Amina's family is visiting with her aunt, uncle, and cousins. Amina is soaking up every experience, trying to make the most of her limited time, but when she goes home, her friends don't understand how important this trip was to her. She deals with hurt because of this, and tries to navigate a more complex sense of her identity, now that she has been to her ancestral country. This book is just as well-written and engaging as the previous novel, has great continuity, and expands on Amina's character as she enters seventh grade and deals with deeper questions about her identity. She ultimately finds a way to share her culture with her classmates, and figures out how to help people see Pakistan in its fullness and beauty, instead of limiting it to negative, scary headlines. This book engages with the misconceptions that different cultures have about each other, and the importance of having supportive family and friends. Readers who enjoyed Amina's Voice will appreciate this book as well. It is perfect for middle grade readers who are interested in complex, sophisticated themes, but don't feel ready for YA books that have heavier content. I would have loved this when I was the target age, and enjoyed it as an adult. I would highly recommend both of these books, and hope that there will be more in the future.

  10. 5 out of 5

    Becca

    I first met Amina a year ago, and this sequel was like catching up with an old friend! The book begins during her summer vacation visiting family in Pakistan, as Amina spends time getting to know her older cousin and exploring the city where she lives. However, Amina still occasionally feels that she doesn't completely fit in with her family there. That feeling reappears as she returns home to Glendale, WI, and starts seventh grade with her best friends Soojin and Emily. How is Amina supposed to I first met Amina a year ago, and this sequel was like catching up with an old friend! The book begins during her summer vacation visiting family in Pakistan, as Amina spends time getting to know her older cousin and exploring the city where she lives. However, Amina still occasionally feels that she doesn't completely fit in with her family there. That feeling reappears as she returns home to Glendale, WI, and starts seventh grade with her best friends Soojin and Emily. How is Amina supposed to feel settled when the parts of her heart are scattered? I adored getting glimpses into her extended family's life in Pakistan, and Khan masterfully described the feeling of your heart being stretched between multiple 'homes' as you grow older. The tension that Amina feels with her friends and family feels authentic, as does her struggle to please her parents and fit in at school. She's a character who's all heart, and her voice (no pun intended!) will speak to many middle-grade students. Fans of Front Desk and New Kid will adore this! Thank you to NetGalley and Simon and Schuster Children's Publishing for providing an ARC!

  11. 5 out of 5

    Laura

    I think the quote that wraps up this whole book for me is one that Amina thinks about both herself and the refugees that she and her family are helping. What if your heart still lives somewhere else? Amina has just come back from visiting cousins in Pakistan, and one thing they have asked her is to let her American friends know what Pakistan is really about. And for a while, Amina feels she is in two places at once, here in America and with her cousins in Pakistan. What really brings it home fo I think the quote that wraps up this whole book for me is one that Amina thinks about both herself and the refugees that she and her family are helping. What if your heart still lives somewhere else? Amina has just come back from visiting cousins in Pakistan, and one thing they have asked her is to let her American friends know what Pakistan is really about. And for a while, Amina feels she is in two places at once, here in America and with her cousins in Pakistan. What really brings it home for her is when she is helping, with others in her mosque, to set up an apartment for refugees from Afghanistan, that are trying to be welcomed into the neighborhood. This is a great story about how we can all serve others, and make people feel welcome when they have no home. It is not heavy hitting, and instead wraps the story around other things. This is a sweet story, the second in the series, that is also a stand alone. Thanks to Netgalley for making this book available for an honest review.

  12. 4 out of 5

    Julie

    Thank you to Simon and Schuster and Edelweiss for the early copy of this book. In this sequel to Amina’s Voice, Amina spends part of her summer visiting family in Pakistan connecting with relatives, exploring her parents’ homeland, and discovering a deeper appreciation for her culture and personal history. When she arrives home in the United States, Amina senses a change in herself and her world. She misses Pakistan and her family she left behind. She desperately wants to share how much her trip Thank you to Simon and Schuster and Edelweiss for the early copy of this book. In this sequel to Amina’s Voice, Amina spends part of her summer visiting family in Pakistan connecting with relatives, exploring her parents’ homeland, and discovering a deeper appreciation for her culture and personal history. When she arrives home in the United States, Amina senses a change in herself and her world. She misses Pakistan and her family she left behind. She desperately wants to share how much her trip meant to her, but no matter how hard she tries, her friends don’t seem to understand. She has one last chance to share her new appreciation and love for the beauty of Pakistan through a wax museum presentation on Pakistani Malala Yousafzai, but will her plan backfire when her class only sees the dark side of the country? A wonderful follow up to Amina’s Voice, readers will love returning to share in Amina’s new adventures.

  13. 4 out of 5

    Josie Stewart

    Thank you to NetGalley and Salaam Reads / Simon & Schuster Books for Young Readers for providing this ARC. I didn't know that is was possible to love a sequel as much as I loved Amina's Voice. I hope many middle grade readers will have the opportunity to read this book. Thank you to NetGalley and Salaam Reads / Simon & Schuster Books for Young Readers for providing this ARC. I didn't know that is was possible to love a sequel as much as I loved Amina's Voice. I hope many middle grade readers will have the opportunity to read this book.

  14. 5 out of 5

    Rameela (Star)

    I received this from the publisher through netgalley in exchange for a review. This does not affect my review which is unbiased and honest. You can check out my review for Amina’s Voice HERE. This book brought up some really great discussions about ignorance in schools and communities especially when teaching about presumed third world countries. I loved seeing Amina stand up for Pakistan and try her best to educate the ignorant students and teachers about education in Pakistan and women’s rights I received this from the publisher through netgalley in exchange for a review. This does not affect my review which is unbiased and honest. You can check out my review for Amina’s Voice HERE. This book brought up some really great discussions about ignorance in schools and communities especially when teaching about presumed third world countries. I loved seeing Amina stand up for Pakistan and try her best to educate the ignorant students and teachers about education in Pakistan and women’s rights. She’s braver than I ever was at that age! I also just related so hard to Amina feeling like she was suspended between two different identities. Not knowing enough urdu but also not being allowed to practice it was something I struggled with a lot as a kid! Amina also deal with homesickness for her family in Pakistan that she visits over the summer and having to come home and wonder how to explain all her feelings to her friends who think she’s just having an identity crisis. I also just LOVE that there were platonic friendships without romance being some big issue. Gotta admit I was scared for a minute but Hena Khan never lets me down. It was so refreshing to step back into Amina’s little world and see her world grow bigger and her slowly grow. She’s like a little fictional sister to me haha. This is so wholesome and educational and I just want to shove it in everyone’s face and tell them LOOK! We need more little girls like Amina! What I really loved about this book is just how willing to work Amina is. She really goes above and beyond to show her culture and is okay with wearing shalwar khameez at school dances. I wish I had had this as a kid because I wouldn’t have been so reluctant wearing traditional clothes in predominantly white spaces! Her old and new friendships were so wholesome and her love of music and communication was so pure! Getting to see a new friendship especially with a boy that had no romantic pretense was honestly so refreshing! I truly love all of Hena Khan’s writing and look forward to what she does next! I would recommend this to anyone who wants a quick wholesome book to read featuring a Pakistani Muslim! If you like fierce and hard working girls that want to learn and educate ignorant people, this is definitely something you would enjoy! This has wonderful friendships and family relationships and a great discussion about amazing female icons from Pakistan!

  15. 4 out of 5

    Beth

    ARC provided by Edelweiss and Salaam Reads/Simon & Schuster Books for Young Readers. More thoughts to come, but I enjoyed this so much more than the first. Excellent.

  16. 5 out of 5

    Musharrat Zahin

    I loved this book. A very diverse cast, beautifully written, perfectly paced, relatable, and inspiring story. Though it is written for ages 8-12, every person will enjoy this. Thanks, NetGalley for providing the ARC.

  17. 4 out of 5

    Gail Lynch

    I am a librarian for a diverse Christian Elementary school. I will be donating Amina's Voice and Amina's Song which I won from Goodreads to my school's library. They are some of the best children's books I have read. The story is relatable to all children no matter what their background. We all have the same hopes and fears. It expressed the importance of family, friends, and community. I especially liked reading about Amina's trip to Pakistan I am a librarian for a diverse Christian Elementary school. I will be donating Amina's Voice and Amina's Song which I won from Goodreads to my school's library. They are some of the best children's books I have read. The story is relatable to all children no matter what their background. We all have the same hopes and fears. It expressed the importance of family, friends, and community. I especially liked reading about Amina's trip to Pakistan

  18. 5 out of 5

    Carol

    I am a little sad that I won't be reading any more about Amina This is last of the two book series about a Pakistani American girl in junior high. In this book, her family flew to Pakistan to see her uncle's family. Amina gets to experience more Pakistani food, going to the shops and learning more Urdu. Oddly enough, I do identify with Amina at this age, I was very shy at school and did not have great friends like Amina did. When Amina returned home, she was bursting with exciting news about her I am a little sad that I won't be reading any more about Amina This is last of the two book series about a Pakistani American girl in junior high. In this book, her family flew to Pakistan to see her uncle's family. Amina gets to experience more Pakistani food, going to the shops and learning more Urdu. Oddly enough, I do identify with Amina at this age, I was very shy at school and did not have great friends like Amina did. When Amina returned home, she was bursting with exciting news about her trip To Pakistan but her friends were only mildly interested. They thought that all of Pakistab was a dangerous place and could not understand why she went. But So0jin decides to run for class president and Amina joins the drama club. That led to her meeting Nico, who has moved into the community and did not have any friends. But together they found a common interest in music and that led to collaboration on a big project. I wish that I could post direct quotes from this book because Amina learns for herself many illuminating truths about community service and correcting wrong perceptions. Her cousin in Pakistan helps her with the project and she now adds Nico as a true friend who is accepted among all her family. I highly recommend thiI am a little sad that I won't be reading any more about Amina This is last of the two book series about a Pakistani American girl in junior high. In this book, her family flew to Pakistan to see her uncle's family. Amina gets to experience more Pakistani food, going to the shops and learning more Urdu. Oddly enough, I do identify with Amina at this age, I was very shy at school and did not have great friends like Amina did. When Amina returned home, she was bursting with exciting news about her trip To Pakistan but her friends were only mildly interested. They thought that all of Pakistab was a dangerous place and could not understand why she went. But So0jin decides to run for class president and Amina joins the drama club. That led to her meeting Nico, who has moved into the community and did not have any friends. But together they found a common interest in music and that led to collaboration on a big project. I wish that I could post direct quotes from this book because Amina learns for herself many illuminating truths about community service and correcting wrong perceptions. Her cousin in Pakistan helps her with the project and she now adds Nico as a true friend who is accepted among all her family. I highly recommend thiI am a little sad that I won't be reading any more about Amina This is last of the two book series about a Pakistani American girl in junior high. In this book, her family flew to Pakistan to see her uncle's family. Amina gets to experience more Pakistani food, going to the shops and learning more Urdu. Oddly enough, I do identify with Amina at this age, I was very shy at school and did not have great friends like Amina did. When Amina returned home, she was bursting with exciting news about her trip To Pakistan but her friends were only mildly interested. They thought that all of Pakistab was a dangerous place and could not understand why she went. But So0jin decides to run for class president and Amina joins the drama club. That led to her meeting Nico, who has moved into the community and did not have any friends. But together they found a common interest in music and that led to collaboration on a big project. I wish that I could post direct quotes from this book because Amina learns for herself many illuminating truths about community service and correcting wrong perceptions. Her cousin in Pakistan helps her with the project and she now adds Nico as a true friend who is accepted among all her family. I highly recommend this book to all pre-teens and older. I won this Advance Review Copy along with the first book in the series, Amina's Voice in a contest in First Reads and the publisher sent both books. All my thoughts and feelings in this review are my own.

  19. 5 out of 5

    Alex Baugh

    We first met Amina Khokar, a middle grader living in Milwaukee, Wisconsin, in Amina's Voice. She's a Pakistani American and even though she has perfect pitch and a beautiful singing voice, she also had crippling stage fright. With the support of family, especially her uncle Thaya Jaan visiting from Pakistan, and friends, Amina was able to ultimately perform in public. Now, Amina and her family are spending their summer vacation visiting family in Lahore, Pakistan. Amina has fallen in love with th We first met Amina Khokar, a middle grader living in Milwaukee, Wisconsin, in Amina's Voice. She's a Pakistani American and even though she has perfect pitch and a beautiful singing voice, she also had crippling stage fright. With the support of family, especially her uncle Thaya Jaan visiting from Pakistan, and friends, Amina was able to ultimately perform in public. Now, Amina and her family are spending their summer vacation visiting family in Lahore, Pakistan. Amina has fallen in love with the country and has become very close to her cousin Zohra, Thaya Jaan's daughter. Just before they leave Pakistan to return home, Thaya Jaan challenges her to "show people in America the beauty of Pakistan. They don't know this place like you do now." How, Amina wonders, is she supposed to the that? Back home, Amina and her friends are starting 7th grade, but to her disappointment, no one seems interested in hearing about her trip to Pakistan. However, when her history teacher gives the class an interactive learning assignment on the first day of class, Amina may have just found the outlet she needs for carrying out Thaya Jaan's challenge. Students must pick a person from history who has made a positive contribution and thoroughly research them, to the point of becoming the person they pick by the end of the term. Amina is excited to pick Malala Yousafzai, but when she presents her initial report to the class, it isn't her accomplishments that the class focuses on, but rather the oppressive conditions by the Taliban in Pakistan with regard to women and girls. Again, Amina is disappointed and frustrated. What can she do to help people know the Pakistan she loves so much? Meanwhile, Amina meets Nico, a new kids in school who is also very much interested in music and has a real talent for mixing to create different sounds. Encouraged by her music teacher, Ms. Holly, Amina has been playing around with composing songs to express herself. She's been keep a diary of her thoughts and feelings for a while, recognizing that her experiences have changed her, but unable to express them quite the way she wants. Could a song be the answer with Nico's help? On top of that, Amina learns that her uncle Thaya Jaan has become ill again and will require delicate heart surgery. Seventh grade is proving to be a year of changes, challenges, identity questions and more for 12-year-old Amina Khokar, all of which makes for a very satisfying sequel. In Amina's Voice, most of the conflicts in Amina's life were external, but in Amina's Song, they are more internal, having to do with who she is and is becoming. Though Amina is changing and growing up, she narrates her life with the same open honesty as in Amina's Voice, even when things aren't going as well as they could. And she is still somewhat flawed, which makes her a very interesting character. I felt she is a more confident girl and I liked especially liked seeing the changes she goes through, even challenging some of her mother's control. I have to admit, the way she handled the history project and her uncle's challenge surprised me and at first seemed so out character, but then I also cheered her on for it, even if her teacher was not receptive. I thoroughly enjoyed reading Amina's Song and wondered if there might be a third novel in the making, since this one left a few loose ends that could be tied up nicely. Meanwhile, I highly recommend this to fans of Amina's and to those who haven't met her, though I might consider reading book one first. There are references to it in Amina's Song, but they are made clear in Amina's Voice. This book is recommended for readers age 9+ This book was an eARC gratefully received from NetGalley

  20. 5 out of 5

    Zainab

    Thank you to @Netgalley and Salaamreads/Simon Schuster from an ARC in exchange of an honest review. Amina’s Song by Hena Khan is available March 9th, 2021. Hena Khan had me at “What if your heart lives elsewhere” Amina’s Song is a sequel to Amina’s Voice. The book opens in the busy bazaars of Anarkali in Lahore, Pakistan. The opening of this story was home; all my senses were transported to Pakistan. The haggling with shopkeepers, sugarcane juice, the funny commercials, lying under the open skies, Thank you to @Netgalley and Salaamreads/Simon Schuster from an ARC in exchange of an honest review. Amina’s Song by Hena Khan is available March 9th, 2021. Hena Khan had me at “What if your heart lives elsewhere” Amina’s Song is a sequel to Amina’s Voice. The book opens in the busy bazaars of Anarkali in Lahore, Pakistan. The opening of this story was home; all my senses were transported to Pakistan. The haggling with shopkeepers, sugarcane juice, the funny commercials, lying under the open skies, the fragrant smells of raat ke rani (queen of the night), the evening tea, all have a sense of belonging. Amina is visiting her Thaya jaan and his family in Pakistan. She has connected emotionally with Pakistan and her extended family and especially her cousin Zohra. She has grown close to her brother and developed an appreciation for relationships. Amina is excited to return home and share her love of Pakistan with her friends. However, upon returning home Amina realizes that her friends, Soojin and Emily, don’t have an interest in her trip, along with a project in Social Studies and some disturbing news from Pakistan, Amina feels that everything is falling apart. How Amina shows the beauty and strength of Pakistan and displays her pride in Pakistani culture makes up the rest of the story. Hena Khan does a wonderful job of presenting that countries are so much more than what media and news headlines portray. Amina’s struggle of trying to find her place between two cultures and show the good of both, is real. Amina learns to shift perspectives and not generalize. Through her school project and her family’s community outreach project, she teaches others how to view things through a different lens and that countries are so much more than just governments. There is goodness and charm in everyone’s culture, and I enjoyed how Amina, in a very innovative manner, shares the positivity and beauty of Pakistan with her peers. That being said, although I thoroughly enjoyed the read, there were parts that I struggled with. The dance, the hint of romance (friendship),mix messaging by her parents- left me with some questions. Amina's Song is recommended for Middle Grade readers. “Every culture has shameful parts of its history and groups of people who do things that are wrong.”-Amina’s Song. Amina's SongHena Khan

  21. 4 out of 5

    Tonja Drecker

    With tons of heart and a touch of bittersweetness, this tale illustrates the push and pull when stuck between cultures and the struggle to find balance when no one truly understands. Amina spends time in Pakistan, visiting her relatives and soaking up the moments with them as much as she can before returning to her home in the US. Of course, she's sad to go but excited to return to her friends at home, too. Over bubbling with the joys of the trip, she tries to share it with her friends at home, b With tons of heart and a touch of bittersweetness, this tale illustrates the push and pull when stuck between cultures and the struggle to find balance when no one truly understands. Amina spends time in Pakistan, visiting her relatives and soaking up the moments with them as much as she can before returning to her home in the US. Of course, she's sad to go but excited to return to her friends at home, too. Over bubbling with the joys of the trip, she tries to share it with her friends at home, but they aren't as interested. When she decides it might be great to give a presentation on her home country, especially on a historical figure, things don't go quite as planned. This is simply a well done book and set perfectly for middle grade readers. Amina is a wonderful character with tons of heart, lots of room for love, and yet, unbalanced in her own state of being thanks to her stretch between two 'worlds'. I really enjoyed how naturally she comes across. Every moment, exchange, and scene flows smoothly and let me sink in. Amina is the kind of girl, anyone wants to be friends with, and when she has problems, it's hard not to feel for her and want to help her figure out how to handle things. In that way, this read does a marvelous job at awakening empathy and, at least, begins to show what problems people like Amina face. While many books, which tackle this sort of topic, tend to be dry and preachy, this one has a lovely pacing and keeps the reader in the pages. The author allows scenes and descriptions to open up Pakistan without becoming long-drawn or boring. So, kudos on this end! With my own family strapped between countries and cultures, I was really looking forward to seeing how the author handled this. And I can give it a two thumbs up! My own kids have been repeatedly asked if they are related to Hitler or support his ideas and such...and while they were at first offended, they now roll their eyes. Usually, explanations fall flat on other kids because they really aren't interested in learning anything outside of whatever they've heard. So, this hits home and, obviously, gives us a special view on Amina's tale. In any case, this is well done and definitely worth a read. I received an ARC through the publisher and was really surprised at how well this is done.

  22. 5 out of 5

    Rez

    Thank you @netgalley @salaamreads and @simonkidsuk for giving me this ARC in exchange for an honest review. I enjoyed the first book and was really happy to read the sequel before the release of the kindle version on 9th March. I have already pre-ordered the paperback for the 7th April so we can complete our set. Also, as well as posting this for #MiddleGradeMarch I think this is important as a book for #InternationalWomensDay because in order to create a strong woman we need to ensure our daught Thank you @netgalley @salaamreads and @simonkidsuk for giving me this ARC in exchange for an honest review. I enjoyed the first book and was really happy to read the sequel before the release of the kindle version on 9th March. I have already pre-ordered the paperback for the 7th April so we can complete our set. Also, as well as posting this for #MiddleGradeMarch I think this is important as a book for #InternationalWomensDay because in order to create a strong woman we need to ensure our daughters have a voice and are brought up to believe in themselves. The narrative starts in Lahore, Pakistan and vividly describes the bustling market places, the vibrant buildings and mosques and the food and culture. I was reminded so much of my own visit to Bangladesh when I was younger. I loved the way the book centred on family and the bond between family that live far away and it really resonated, especially now that many of us are unable to see our family and friends as much as we used to. I was really impressed at how the love that Amina had for her faith came through in this book and how all the important topics were weaved into the story in a subtle way without coming across too harsh. Topics such as the plight of refugees, helping out in the community, the story of Malala Yousafzai, and the mention of other strong characters who have made a difference. It also touches on the mixed emotions of belonging that a lot of children feel when their family roots are abroad. There were also other situations that children go through when starting “middle school” or secondary school such as friends doing different things, being friends with boys and going to school dances which led to lively discussions in our household. Books which help to trigger a conversation are so important in order to help build confidence, empathy and a better understanding of society as a whole - Important building blocks for strong minded, kind and successful women, whatever they decide to do in the future. I was not disappointed with this sequel and really enjoyed reading and talking about it with my eldest daughters, both of whom loved it too!

  23. 5 out of 5

    Jill Jemmett

    Amina is on vacation in Pakistan to visit her extended family. She loves everything on the trip, including the food, the shopping, and spending time with family members. During the trip, Amina takes lots of photos and videos to save her favourite memories. Amina had to return to the US when the summer was over, but her uncle makes her promise that she will share her memories of Pakistan with her friends. Her teacher assigns a project to research a person who has made a significant contribution t Amina is on vacation in Pakistan to visit her extended family. She loves everything on the trip, including the food, the shopping, and spending time with family members. During the trip, Amina takes lots of photos and videos to save her favourite memories. Amina had to return to the US when the summer was over, but her uncle makes her promise that she will share her memories of Pakistan with her friends. Her teacher assigns a project to research a person who has made a significant contribution to history. Amina chooses Malala Yousafzai, to show her students an important person from Pakistan. However, her classmates only remembered the negative parts of her story, like that girls in her village couldn’t get an education, leading her classmates to believe Pakistan is a bad place. Amina had to show her friends and classmates that her family is from a wonderful country. This story gives an informative look at Pakistan. I’ve never been there, but it sounded like a beautiful place in the story. Amina was surprised when her cousin told her that she would be too scared to visit America. The stories her family hears are only negative ones, since those are shared more in the news. At the same time, Amina was scared to go to Pakistan at first, because she had only heard stories like Malala’s story of being attacked by terrorists, so that was her image of the country. This shows that you can’t always believe the stories that you hear about a place without visiting for yourself. This reminded me of how Toronto, where I live, used to be known around the world for the SARS virus. Only a small number of people had the virus, but the news story about it being in Toronto made it around the world, giving us that reputation for years. Just because a country or city is known for one thing, doesn’t mean the entire place is like that. This book is a companion to the book Amina’s Voice. The events of that book are mentioned in this story, but you could read this one as a stand-alone. This was such a beautiful middle grade novel! Thank you Simon and Schuster Canada for providing a copy of this book in exchange for an honest review.

  24. 5 out of 5

    Jennifer

    Thanks to Partners NetGalley, Salaam Reads, and Simon & Schuster Books for Young Readers for the digital ARC of Hena Khan’s Amina’s Song in exchange for an honest review. Hena Khan’s Amina’s Song, the sequel to Amina’s Voice, begins in the summer after book one, when Amina and her family are visiting their relatives in Pakistan before she begins seventh grade. Amina feels braver after having mustered her courage both to recite the Quran and sing in front of a crowd, but she’s still working on fi Thanks to Partners NetGalley, Salaam Reads, and Simon & Schuster Books for Young Readers for the digital ARC of Hena Khan’s Amina’s Song in exchange for an honest review. Hena Khan’s Amina’s Song, the sequel to Amina’s Voice, begins in the summer after book one, when Amina and her family are visiting their relatives in Pakistan before she begins seventh grade. Amina feels braver after having mustered her courage both to recite the Quran and sing in front of a crowd, but she’s still working on figuring out what is most important: she wants to say and to whom. Amina absolutely loves her extended family, including her uncle, who visited the United States when she was in sixth grade (that’s in Amina’s Voice), and her cousin Zohra, who is an amazing guide to the community and culture of her parents’ home country. It’s while she’s still visiting that Amina begins to work through the way we think about other places: she had been afraid to travel because of stories about Pakistan that she heard on the news. When she talks to Zohra about visiting Amina’s home, she finds that Zohra feels the same way, afraid of visiting the U.S. because of similar reports of violence and discrimination. When Amina returns home, feeling utterly changed, she finds that her friends seem to be the same and are uninterested in exploring what Amina has discovered about herself. She wants to share and to work through her complicated questions, but she’s either brushed aside or met with resistance. What I love about both of these books centers on Amina herself. She is (as many middle schoolers are) working through some big questions: Can people change? How do we share what’s most important to us with the people we love? What does it mean to be someone’s friend? How do we share our pride in a country or community while also acknowledging its faults? What does it mean to be a good person? These are questions that I hope my own children consider, and I love that Khan is presenting them in a narrative that is both compelling and relatable for a middle-school audience. While I do think that Amina’s Song could work as a standalone, I highly recommend both books: do yourself a favor and pick up both Amina’s Voice and Amina’s Song!

  25. 4 out of 5

    Ellie M

    4.5 stars. This is a sequel to "Amina's Voice," but it's probably fine to read this one without having read the first. The blurb doesn't say everything about the plot, so here goes: The story opens during the last week of Amina Khokar's trip to Pakistan, where she spends most of her time with her older cousin, Zohra. Before she leaves, her uncle makes her promise that she will share the beauty of Pakistan with everyone at home. When Amina returns, she finds herself deeply missing Zohra and her rela 4.5 stars. This is a sequel to "Amina's Voice," but it's probably fine to read this one without having read the first. The blurb doesn't say everything about the plot, so here goes: The story opens during the last week of Amina Khokar's trip to Pakistan, where she spends most of her time with her older cousin, Zohra. Before she leaves, her uncle makes her promise that she will share the beauty of Pakistan with everyone at home. When Amina returns, she finds herself deeply missing Zohra and her relatives, but is still excited to be reunited with her closest friends Soojin, Emily and Rabiya. When her history class is assigned to each choose a person who has made "a positive impact on society" for an upcoming presentation, Amina chooses Malala Yousafzai because of her recent trip. But when the class hears the first draft of her presentation, it makes them think of Pakistan as a dystopian, third-world society where girls have no rights. Amina didn't spend several weeks in her cousin's big city house to be told that her family's homeland is such an awful place to live. But with the news only covering negative events there, it's impossible to convince anyone. I found that point about the news to be my favorite part of the book. At least here in the US, many countries don't get reported on by "world news" organizations unless it's because of a negative event (including terrorist attacks or civil wars,) so it might be easy to forget that not everyone in these countries is constantly suffering. Plus, there's plenty of suffering that's already in the United States. I recommend that anyone unfamiliar with cultural aspects of these countries read this book, because it's important to show that traumatic events are not the only ones that deserve to be reported on.

  26. 4 out of 5

    Kaye

    Amina's Song is a wonderful sequel to Amina's Voice. The story starts with Amina visiting her extended family in Pakistan. We get to see her with her cousin when they barter in the market and visit a historic mosque. Arriving back home she is excited to share her experiences with her friends but they aren't very interested. As her new school year starts there are changes. Friends have different interests such as clubs, running for class offices and school dances. Amina's Mosque is involved in pr Amina's Song is a wonderful sequel to Amina's Voice. The story starts with Amina visiting her extended family in Pakistan. We get to see her with her cousin when they barter in the market and visit a historic mosque. Arriving back home she is excited to share her experiences with her friends but they aren't very interested. As her new school year starts there are changes. Friends have different interests such as clubs, running for class offices and school dances. Amina's Mosque is involved in projects helping immigrant families. Amina is trying to figure out where she fits in as an American with Pakistan heritage. A new friend Nico adds more to the story. I like how realistic the teens were in their speaking and actions towards each other. I appreciate that Nico is wanted as a friend and not a love interest, which wouldn't be acceptable in her culture. And I especially enjoyed how Amina decides to celebrate her culture and share it with others. It reminded me that cultures and whole histories can't be summarized by small stories we see on the evening news. As a public school librarian I want to encourage authentic voices in representing diverse cultures. It is important for my muslin students to see themselves represented in literature. And this book combines learning about a country and culture in an entertaining and relatable way. I will definitely add it to my library shelves and spotlight it for my students to read. Appropriate for 5th grade and up. Thank you to NetGalley and Simon & Schuster Children's Publishing for an ARC e-book in exchange for an honest review.

  27. 4 out of 5

    Eileen

    5 stars! I loved this book even more than the first one. The first part of the book describes Amina's time in Pakistan with her family and the connections she makes there. While she was nervous about visiting there, she ends up forming a strong friendship with her cousin, who becomes the sister she never had, and uncle, who becomes a beloved mentor. One of the things he asks that she does is share the beauty of Pakistan with her friends. When she returns to the states, she struggles with the mis 5 stars! I loved this book even more than the first one. The first part of the book describes Amina's time in Pakistan with her family and the connections she makes there. While she was nervous about visiting there, she ends up forming a strong friendship with her cousin, who becomes the sister she never had, and uncle, who becomes a beloved mentor. One of the things he asks that she does is share the beauty of Pakistan with her friends. When she returns to the states, she struggles with the misconception her classmates have about Pakistan as well as the fact that her best friends are not as excited by her trip as she was. Ultimately, Amina has to find her voice so that she can share both who she is to her friends and family, as well as her love of Pakistan in part to break down barriers and show how we are more alike than unalike. This book also talked about friendships, including friendships between boys and girls, and that it does not have to be romantic or weird. I really appreciated this #ownvoice book and it made me want to visit Pakistan and see some of what she loved about it. In fact, some of what she loved about Pakistan is what I love about Taiwan. I also liked that one of her best friends is Korean and that another one of her best friends who used to make fun of them for "ethnic" foods has grown to love and appreciate other cultures. Highly recommend this one, both for middle schools and anyone else who appreciates learning about other cultures and/or religions. I received an advance review copy from Netgalley for free, and I am leaving this review voluntarily.

  28. 5 out of 5

    Neelam

    This story is one that I think many young people and even adults will be able to relate to a lot. A story about belonging and being the child of parents who immigrated to a different country for various reasons and now you’re in between two worlds. A story about how even though there can be many differences in being from different cultures there are also many things that can bring us together. Reading this book reminded me of how I felt when as a young teen I went to Pakistan for a holiday and wh This story is one that I think many young people and even adults will be able to relate to a lot. A story about belonging and being the child of parents who immigrated to a different country for various reasons and now you’re in between two worlds. A story about how even though there can be many differences in being from different cultures there are also many things that can bring us together. Reading this book reminded me of how I felt when as a young teen I went to Pakistan for a holiday and while I loved it, I couldn’t shake that feeling of not quite fitting in and yet being born and raised in the UK, sometimes I still feel like I don’t quite fit in. That sense of not quite belonging in either place because you are a combination of both cultures and also how you may even reject one culture to be able to belong in the other. Amina doesn’t want to wear salwar kameez or take Pakistani food to school for lunch because it would make her stand out and yet her white friend can bring kebabs without feeling like that. There were so many scenes like this in the book that really hit home for me and how I had felt growing up. How when the only thing you see about countries you’re family is from is how “backwards” and “violent” they are it can make you want to distance yourself from it yet that isn’t the truth of things and people being violent is a universal thing no matter where you are from. As Amina learns about Malala and tries to show the beauty of Pakistan through her she is faced with people only seeing how a group of people hurt a young girl when all she wanted was to get an education. How people pity girls from there but don’t see how the same thing is happening in their own countries albeit in different ways. That there are incredible people all over the world. I just truly loved how Hena wove all this into the story and showed how beautiful countries like Pakistan can be. I really liked how Amina has an internal conflict but is determined to show how beautiful her heritage and culture is. It felt so real and relatable and also woven into the story of friendship and family and loving each other despite differences. At the end when Amina shared the stories of some of the many incredible women from Pakistan and their incredible achievements, it was wonderful to see and seeing people’s reactions go from pity to awe. In the west we are rarely told positive stories of people living in places like Pakistan and I love how Hena tackled this problem through Amina’s story. This book is one I related to deep in soul and I am so happy to see these stories being published where we can celebrate our heritage and culture instead of being ashamed by it. It’s a wholesome story of love between family and friends and how despite being worlds apart you can still be connected to each other.

  29. 5 out of 5

    Janet

    I enjoyed this heartwarming story of a young girl who wants to change people's perceptions of her parent's hometown Pakistan. This character is such an inspiring teenager who truly cares about others and desires to make a positive impact in her community. She's assigned a project in her history class where she has to present someone that has made a great impact. She chooses Malala because she wants to share some of her Pakistani culture with her American classmates. Quickly she realizes that her I enjoyed this heartwarming story of a young girl who wants to change people's perceptions of her parent's hometown Pakistan. This character is such an inspiring teenager who truly cares about others and desires to make a positive impact in her community. She's assigned a project in her history class where she has to present someone that has made a great impact. She chooses Malala because she wants to share some of her Pakistani culture with her American classmates. Quickly she realizes that her classmate's reaction of pity for how women in Pakistan are oppressed is not the reaction she wanted. She knows that in America there is a negative perception of her parent's beloved country and wants to do everything possible to change it. Amina starts journaling her feelings and with a new classmate that has a mutual love for music ends up writing a song that shows her deep love for her country. At the last minute, she unexpectedly switches her project and speaks about various female heroines in Pakistan, which her teacher is not happy with at first, but admits to her that it showed much bravery. She explains that she didn't want others to just see the negative effects of the Taliban in Pakistan. Instead, Amina wanted others to see how much greatness has come out of the country and culture she deeply connected with during her summer visit. This book has a strong sense of family and community. I truly recommend this book for older elementary students. Thanks to NetGalley for providing me with this ARC.

  30. 4 out of 5

    Sirah

    When Amina gets home from visiting her relatives in Pakistan, she finds it odd that no one pays much attention to her uncertainty over her own identity. Learning about her roots changed her and gave her a better understanding of why other people think the way they do. But how can she convince her friends and classmates to care amid the flurry of excitement over first crushes, school events, community service and all the ordinary thrills of middle school? Once again Amina turns to song to speak t When Amina gets home from visiting her relatives in Pakistan, she finds it odd that no one pays much attention to her uncertainty over her own identity. Learning about her roots changed her and gave her a better understanding of why other people think the way they do. But how can she convince her friends and classmates to care amid the flurry of excitement over first crushes, school events, community service and all the ordinary thrills of middle school? Once again Amina turns to song to speak the language that everyone understands. If hard pressed, I don't know if I'd be able to tell you why I decided to read this book. I didn't love the first one, although it's lovely for what it is. To me, Amina has always felt a little flat--too good without any significant character flaws. I also have a hard time forgiving the author for not including the phonetic pronunciation of her name until like halfway through the book because I instantly felt guilty for pronouncing it wrong in my head up to that point. The message and themes are really beautiful, and I like the idea of this book, but to me the characters get in the way of the story, and I have a hard time getting excited about a book whose protagonist feels unrealistic. That being said, the plot is really clever and the story really made me think. I would be happy to recommend this book to my students as a soft way to let them know that the world is bigger than what one set of eyes can see.

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