web site hit counter Almost There and Almost Not - Ebooks PDF Online
Hot Best Seller

Almost There and Almost Not

Availability: Ready to download

From acclaimed author Linda Urban comes the funny, bittersweet story of a girl and her ghosts—and the welcoming home they find where they least expect it. California Poppy has been dropped off, yet again, with an unsuspecting relative. This time it’s her eccentric Great-Aunt Monica, a woman she’s never even met. Aunt Monica has no idea what to do with an eleven-year-old, so From acclaimed author Linda Urban comes the funny, bittersweet story of a girl and her ghosts—and the welcoming home they find where they least expect it. California Poppy has been dropped off, yet again, with an unsuspecting relative. This time it’s her eccentric Great-Aunt Monica, a woman she’s never even met. Aunt Monica has no idea what to do with an eleven-year-old, so she puts California to work researching their ancestor, the once-famous etiquette expert Eleanor Fontaine. California soon discovers that Great-Great-Great Aunt Eleanor is...not exactly alive and well, but a ghost—and a super sensitive one at that. The grand dame bursts into clouds of dust whenever she loses her composure, which happens quite often. Still, an unexpected four-legged friend and some old-fashioned letter writing make this decidedly strange situation one that California can handle. Just as California’s starting to feel like she’s found a place for herself, life turns upside-down yet again. Thankfully, this time she has some friends almost by her side...


Compare

From acclaimed author Linda Urban comes the funny, bittersweet story of a girl and her ghosts—and the welcoming home they find where they least expect it. California Poppy has been dropped off, yet again, with an unsuspecting relative. This time it’s her eccentric Great-Aunt Monica, a woman she’s never even met. Aunt Monica has no idea what to do with an eleven-year-old, so From acclaimed author Linda Urban comes the funny, bittersweet story of a girl and her ghosts—and the welcoming home they find where they least expect it. California Poppy has been dropped off, yet again, with an unsuspecting relative. This time it’s her eccentric Great-Aunt Monica, a woman she’s never even met. Aunt Monica has no idea what to do with an eleven-year-old, so she puts California to work researching their ancestor, the once-famous etiquette expert Eleanor Fontaine. California soon discovers that Great-Great-Great Aunt Eleanor is...not exactly alive and well, but a ghost—and a super sensitive one at that. The grand dame bursts into clouds of dust whenever she loses her composure, which happens quite often. Still, an unexpected four-legged friend and some old-fashioned letter writing make this decidedly strange situation one that California can handle. Just as California’s starting to feel like she’s found a place for herself, life turns upside-down yet again. Thankfully, this time she has some friends almost by her side...

30 review for Almost There and Almost Not

  1. 4 out of 5

    Stephanie

    I knew this would be funny and clever and kind and beautifully written, because it's a Linda Urban book. I didn't know just HOW funny and beautiful it would be, how much I would love the magical/ghostly elements, and also just how sneakily heartwrenching it would become by the end - when I teared up for the very best possible reasons. I love California Poppy and her wonderful ghostly visitors, her fabulous letters, and her huge heart, and I really, really loved this book. I knew this would be funny and clever and kind and beautifully written, because it's a Linda Urban book. I didn't know just HOW funny and beautiful it would be, how much I would love the magical/ghostly elements, and also just how sneakily heartwrenching it would become by the end - when I teared up for the very best possible reasons. I love California Poppy and her wonderful ghostly visitors, her fabulous letters, and her huge heart, and I really, really loved this book.

  2. 5 out of 5

    Lindsi (Do You Dog-ear?)

    I received an ARC from the publisher in exchange for an honest review. My thoughts and opinions are my own. Any quotes I use are from an unpublished copy and may not reflect the finished product. For the most part, I really enjoyed Almost There and Almost Not. Unfortunately, I felt like it glazed over all of the important conversations and topics, and I wish those has been expanded on throughout the story. California talks about not liking her name - people making fun of her for it or making sexu I received an ARC from the publisher in exchange for an honest review. My thoughts and opinions are my own. Any quotes I use are from an unpublished copy and may not reflect the finished product. For the most part, I really enjoyed Almost There and Almost Not. Unfortunately, I felt like it glazed over all of the important conversations and topics, and I wish those has been expanded on throughout the story. California talks about not liking her name - people making fun of her for it or making sexualized comments - but we never learn who named her California or why. She starts referring to herself as "Callie" in some of her letters, but she never asks anyone else to call her that. California also talks about an "Official Meeting" that was held between different people at different times, and I'm assuming she has a disability of some kind based on the outcome of those meetings. (A teacher stops criticizing her handwriting, her father looks pale after another, and people generally treat her differently once there is one.) There was also one sentence that made me think something had happened to her, and then there's the fact that people have to "look for the eleven-year-old in her." (This is said all the time.) "We just talked about me cracking against the kitchen counter like the force behind that was my own." That is a really heavy sentence, yet it's never fully addressed. Did California fall? Was she pushed? Did something traumatic happen to her? I think the author wanted to explain the way California thought (the wording and organization was unusual, but not difficult to follow), but all Urban did was create more questions. Later on California mentions strange people being in her house (usually when her dad had been drinking), and there was an incident in the kitchen with an older man putting his finger in her mouth (trying to make her smile), which resulted in a hospital visit, but that was for her arm. I'm not sure what head trauma she suffered (if any), but it is something that's mentioned very early on. Obviously, something has happened to the main character, and I wish the author hadn't been so subtle about it. "When you are tall and need a bra that is not just for training, a lot of people expect you to do stuff you can't." Initially, I was going to comment on the character's voice - which isn't hard to follow, but is definitely different. California has an amazing vocabulary and remembers everything she reads, but the way she talks had me mentally reading this book with a southern accent. I'm not sure if that was intentional, or just the way the wording flowed together. Even after the Official Meetings were mentioned, we don't really get any more information on California's health. The girl sees ghosts, and I have no idea if that's related or not. There were just a lot of things California did that I questioned (like being able to walk to a grocery store, but unable to start a conversation about dirty laundry), and wish her thought process had been better explained. Several aspects of this book were unbelievable and I had to suspend my disbelief in order for this book to work. At first California didn't mention the ghost of Eleanor to her Aunt Monica, because she said she's used to strange people just showing up and being around. However, once she realized Eleanor was transparent and occasionally turned into a pile of dust, I felt like that was something worth mentioning to someone. California simply seemed content to carry on normal conversations with a dead person, and didn't really give the how and why much thought. I'm also not sure if Eleanor previously lived in the house California is now staying in, and the author's explanations for her coming and going were vague. California would simply say she didn't understand how death worked, but this is what she's learned about her personal ghosts so far. Eleanor seemed to be at home in their home, so I was curious if it used to be hers, or she was just accustomed to haunting it. Additionally, I have no idea why Eleanor was there or what she wanted, and I felt like her resolution was underwhelming. She's such a huge part of California's story, and then she's simply gone. The Dog (also a ghost) had a better ending. "Somebody can be nice and gentle to you one time and mean the next, and Dog seemed like the type to know that." That statement feels like it has a darker meaning, but we never get an explanation. Did something happen to her when she was with her dad? What about the traumatic event that makes her question a person's intentions, and also avoid men in general? Her father seemed neglectful, but never harmful, although he did allow less-than-stellar people into his home and around his daughter. Also, if he was so devastated by the loss of his wife, why did he do some of the things he did? People handle their grief in different ways, yes, but he also seemed very protective of his daughter. How could he put her in danger while simultaneously being the one to rescue her? I did like that the author chose to address feminine hygiene (videos and products), and discussed making them more accessible to people (told through the lens of an eleven-year-old). California writes letters to various people, and the president of the Playpax Corporation was one of them. She tells them her idea of letting girls "sign up in school like they do for discount lunch and put money in an account like that too and give you their address, and you could just mail some to their house every month instead of having those girls have to ask their dads to go buy pads or tampons." I also really liked her second idea, which is that boys should have to watch the "girls" video in puberty class too. "They should know about girls having periods too, because 1. that's biology, which is science, and 2. not telling is not very fair to boys, who probably would be fine if people weren't so weird about things." Speaking of letters, California can supposedly do calligraphy (and even explains what certain letters looked like), and I wish the book had shown that. (Maybe the final copy does?) There are a lot of letters in this book, and I think showing California's calligraphy writing would have been an amazing addition to the book. Instead, it's just an italicized font, which doesn't convey the beauty or talent that she's so proud of. "Dear Aunt Isabelle, See how I made that A in "Aunt"? That is modern copperplate style. This is a C. That C is the best thing about my name. In calligraphy C is always pretty, if you take care with it." I think a visual of her writing would had benefitted the overall story, since it's something she does the entire book. I always struggle to review books that I liked but found lacking. There was so much to like about Almost There and Almost Not, but a lot of the story felt too vague. Important aspects were glossed over or only briefly mentioned, and I felt like those were the things this book should have addressed and talked about in more detail. It's a sweet story about a girl finding her place when she doesn't think she has one, although I wish her budding friendship with Salma had been more prominent, but we only see California befriending the non-living. I think it offered her some closure, but if she related to Eleanor it wasn't explained very well. All in all, I thought this book had a wonderful premise, but like the author only scratched the surface of what this story could have been. The potential is there, but the execution could have been better. (★★★☆☆) Blog | Instagram | Twitter | Bloglovin' | Amazon | Pinterest

  3. 4 out of 5

    Jennifer Hottinger

    This book was accidentally left on my desk before a snowstorm and school closed. Today, I ventured back to school to get it! I just adore California’s ability to see ghosts, use writing to cope/heal during changes to her home life after losing Mom, Dad’s absence, and moving from aunt to aunt! Her letters incorporated correct writing etiquette and bring laughter, empathy, and heart to her story! A book that speaks to your heart about family, resilience, understanding and finding your place! Loved This book was accidentally left on my desk before a snowstorm and school closed. Today, I ventured back to school to get it! I just adore California’s ability to see ghosts, use writing to cope/heal during changes to her home life after losing Mom, Dad’s absence, and moving from aunt to aunt! Her letters incorporated correct writing etiquette and bring laughter, empathy, and heart to her story! A book that speaks to your heart about family, resilience, understanding and finding your place! Loved it!❤️

  4. 4 out of 5

    Leonard Kim

    I almost fell into the trap of giving this 4* because of its modesty. There are topics and themes and devices here that are in many other recent books, books that get lauded for being "unflinching" or some such. But I actually think it must be much easier to write those kinds of books (because there are rather a lot of them) than what Linda Urban does here (and in the Max books and in general) which is kind of unique - to flinch out of sensitivity and compassion, then find your own, often lumino I almost fell into the trap of giving this 4* because of its modesty. There are topics and themes and devices here that are in many other recent books, books that get lauded for being "unflinching" or some such. But I actually think it must be much easier to write those kinds of books (because there are rather a lot of them) than what Linda Urban does here (and in the Max books and in general) which is kind of unique - to flinch out of sensitivity and compassion, then find your own, often luminous, way to tell this story, seems to me more courageous than books that seem to make a point of being raw.

  5. 4 out of 5

    Jennifer Halbur

    If I could give this book 10🌟🌟, I would! I read this book on a plane from Minneapolis to Denver and the time just flew! As I closed the book, tears were streaming down my face. So many need to read this book 🏡 uncertainty, family issues, friendship question and more.👀Thanks for sharing an ARC with #bookposse @HopewellLibrary This ones a winner! @lindaurbanbooks @SimonKIDS

  6. 5 out of 5

    Ms. Yingling

    E ARC Provided by Edelweiss Plus California and her father have gotten along okay after the death of her mother, but when her father starts to struggle, he takes her to visit her Aunt Isabelle, and leaves her there, claiming there is work to be had salmon fishing in Alaska. Isabelle, in turn, takes her to Great Aunt Monica, who has recently lost her husband Milton and who has also injured her arm and needs California's "help". She doesn't know quite what to do with a young girl, so asks for her E ARC Provided by Edelweiss Plus California and her father have gotten along okay after the death of her mother, but when her father starts to struggle, he takes her to visit her Aunt Isabelle, and leaves her there, claiming there is work to be had salmon fishing in Alaska. Isabelle, in turn, takes her to Great Aunt Monica, who has recently lost her husband Milton and who has also injured her arm and needs California's "help". She doesn't know quite what to do with a young girl, so asks for her help in writing a biography of an ancestor, etiquette expert Eleanor Fontaine who wrote in the early 1900s. This was a passion project of Milton's, and encourages Aunt Monica to start moving on a bit. The two start to go through notes and cleaning the house, all while eating their way through Aunt Isabelle's stash of frozen meatloaf, but some odd things happen. California can see not only a small ghost dog, who brings her pieces of notes, but the ghost of Eleanor Fontaine herself! She has conversations with the etiquette writer about not only proper protocol, but the woman's life. Combined with the notes, California finds that there are some secrets about her ancestor that the notes will show. California does make friends with a girl she meets while running errands. Salma and her mother run a local pottery shop, ClayCation, and the two girls take to each other right away. Desperate to contact her father, California writes to her Aunt Isabelle, but after not hearing back, stops mailing them to her aunt, stashing them under her bed instead. When Aunt Monica feels a bit better, she has the house and garden cleaned, and the letters accidentally get mailed. California learns some secrets about her father as well. Strengths: This was an interesting twist on a child having to spend time with a relative because of a parent having difficulties. The ghosts were tremendously endearing; a fluffy dog and a pearl clutching arbiter of correct behavior who turns to dust when confronted with realities! Eleanor's hard scrabble backstory complements California's reality nicely. I can see young readers becoming very interested in calligraphy after reading it described as an activity at which California excels. Weaknesses: It would have been nice to see California connect a bit more to Salma and others in the community, and perhaps have a few more interactions with Monica, in order to really cement her comfort with remaining in her aunt's care. What I really think: While I would have loved this as a child (I was a BIG fan of writing letters!), it is a bit young for my readers, who are steadfast in their love of only the most gruesome, bloodthirsty ghosts. I will probably not purchase, but this is a great gentle ghost story with some family issues for younger readers.

  7. 5 out of 5

    Barbara

    Author Linda Urban has a knack for creating characters that slowly steal into readers' hearts and make them root for them to succeed. In this middle grade novel eleven-year-old California Poppy is looking for stability and a place to call home. It seems that her father has gone off the skids after her mother's death. There are hints that things weren't all that stable before her death, but now California's father has become less than reliable. While he's off salmon fishing in Alaska, he places C Author Linda Urban has a knack for creating characters that slowly steal into readers' hearts and make them root for them to succeed. In this middle grade novel eleven-year-old California Poppy is looking for stability and a place to call home. It seems that her father has gone off the skids after her mother's death. There are hints that things weren't all that stable before her death, but now California's father has become less than reliable. While he's off salmon fishing in Alaska, he places California in the hands of Aunt Isabelle in Minnesota. Preoccupied with her impending meatloaf competition, she in turn foists California off on Great-Aunt Monica. The elderly woman has injured her arm so she could use a little help around the house. Monica enlists California's services in her writing project concerning Eleanor Fontaine, a relative once known for her books on etiquette. As California tries to settle in, unsure about how long her visit will last, she finds comfort in Dog, a spirit canine who frolics in the backyard and brings California scraps of paper that turn out to be Eleanor's correspondence. Eleanor herself, who hasn't quite passed over, visits California at various points, turning to dust when certain subjects are mentioned, and growing younger in her spirit form as Elsie Cooper, whose father had hired her out as a hotel maid when she was very young. Over the decades, Elsie has reinvented herself to become the arbiter of manners and proper behavior. But it's clear that her secrets have been costly. At the behest of Monica, California begins writing thank you notes to her aunt Isabella. These notes go unanswered, and eventually they serve as a sort of confessional or diary revealing California's feelings. Except for the first ones, California has no intention of sending them since they are filled with so much truth and she's poured her heart out in them. But they eventually are mailed, and California is sure that the place that she has started to consider her home will no longer be hers. Upon first starting this book, I was unsure about how the supernatural element would work, but it is blended into the main narrative quite nicely, and I finished the book wishing that more of Eleanor's history had been told since both California and Eleanor (Elsie) were just looking for places to belong. Maybe the author will decide to flesh out her story in a companion novel. The scenes in which California says farewell to Eleanor and then to Dog are sure to bring tears to readers' eyes.

  8. 4 out of 5

    Magaly C.

    California Poppy is 11-years-old, but not everyone “sees the 11 in [her].” After an Official Meeting, her dad decides to drop her off with her Aunt Isabelle, who he believes will be better suited to help raise her as she enters her teen years. However, Aunt Isabelle is elbows deep in meat loaf prep and sends her to Aunt Monica who may find California more helpful since breaking her arm and will need help with day-to-day things as well as working on a biography for distant relative Eleanor Fontai California Poppy is 11-years-old, but not everyone “sees the 11 in [her].” After an Official Meeting, her dad decides to drop her off with her Aunt Isabelle, who he believes will be better suited to help raise her as she enters her teen years. However, Aunt Isabelle is elbows deep in meat loaf prep and sends her to Aunt Monica who may find California more helpful since breaking her arm and will need help with day-to-day things as well as working on a biography for distant relative Eleanor Fontaine. When at Aunt Monica’s, California meets a host of new friends: some there and some almost-there. This was a quick read about a lonely kid who was having to grow up too quickly while her father dealt with alcohol addiction, the death of his wife, and trying to raise his pre-teen daughter. Told from California’s perspective, the story includes letters California writes as an additional narrative tool. The only critique I have is wanting to have known more about the Official Meeting (but I’m also nosy) and more about California and her life with her dad before moving to Minnesota. This was definitely written for middle-grade where larger concepts are explained by the MC. A very sweet, heart-wrenching story with a hopeful ending.

  9. 4 out of 5

    Pam

    I received an electronic ARC from Atheneum Books for Young Readers through Edelweiss+. California has had challenges in her young life and readers get hints of them from the beginning chapter. Her dad takes her to an aunt who takes her to a great-aunt and no one lets California know these moves are happening. Not only that but she sees a dead dog and her dead great-great-great aunt - both of whom are important in this story. Loved seeing the emphasis on letter writing as a way to communicate so m I received an electronic ARC from Atheneum Books for Young Readers through Edelweiss+. California has had challenges in her young life and readers get hints of them from the beginning chapter. Her dad takes her to an aunt who takes her to a great-aunt and no one lets California know these moves are happening. Not only that but she sees a dead dog and her dead great-great-great aunt - both of whom are important in this story. Loved seeing the emphasis on letter writing as a way to communicate so many emotions. It is obvious from some of what is said and much that is not that California has issues in her past. She is afraid to believe that anyone wants her for herself and doesn't feel secure Monica's home. It is not until the final chapters that readers see the entire situation and feel the love that surrounds California. I appreciated Urban's style but am not sure that younger readers will follow the nuances. The gaps and hints were frustrating for me at time and that's why this is a 3 not a 4 star book.

  10. 5 out of 5

    Deirdre

    Review of EARC: California Poppy is a resourceful eleven year old whose height and maturity sometimes make it difficult for people "to see the eleven in her". As she begins to help Aunt Monica with her research, California learns a lot from the ghosts of Aunt Eleanor; she also begins writing letters (most of which she never intends to send) that help the reader learn more about the unfortunate circumstances that brought California to Aunt Monica's house in the first place. California's lively voi Review of EARC: California Poppy is a resourceful eleven year old whose height and maturity sometimes make it difficult for people "to see the eleven in her". As she begins to help Aunt Monica with her research, California learns a lot from the ghosts of Aunt Eleanor; she also begins writing letters (most of which she never intends to send) that help the reader learn more about the unfortunate circumstances that brought California to Aunt Monica's house in the first place. California's lively voice is endearing and believable as she begins to find her place in the world and the story moves at a quick pace that kept me engaged throughout. Highly recommend this book for younger readers - 4.5 stars.

  11. 4 out of 5

    Janice

    I really liked this sweet book and the gorgeous cover! Little California Poppy caught my heart right from the get-go. To think that her dad just left her with a relative so he could go work in Alaska (so she thought). The clues are there for the reader about what really was going on with her dad, which I really liked, but at the same time, darker things were hinted at that were never explained. Things like the unsavory people dad allowed to stay at the house, his alcoholism, troubles in school, I really liked this sweet book and the gorgeous cover! Little California Poppy caught my heart right from the get-go. To think that her dad just left her with a relative so he could go work in Alaska (so she thought). The clues are there for the reader about what really was going on with her dad, which I really liked, but at the same time, darker things were hinted at that were never explained. Things like the unsavory people dad allowed to stay at the house, his alcoholism, troubles in school, etc. I'd say this book is good for fifth and sixth graders.

  12. 4 out of 5

    Eileen Winfrey

    Either I’m randomly reading a lot of books with ghost characters in them or it’s a trend in children’s lit right now. So, slightly troublesome (but not actually trouble making - a super weird character plot hole in my opinion) California has been dumped on one aunt and then another by her good for nothing father. At aunt #2’s house she makes friends with a ghost dog and a ghost author of proper manners books from the 1920s. It’s not the most exciting story in the world. Backstory of all characte Either I’m randomly reading a lot of books with ghost characters in them or it’s a trend in children’s lit right now. So, slightly troublesome (but not actually trouble making - a super weird character plot hole in my opinion) California has been dumped on one aunt and then another by her good for nothing father. At aunt #2’s house she makes friends with a ghost dog and a ghost author of proper manners books from the 1920s. It’s not the most exciting story in the world. Backstory of all characters is slowly revealed. Slightly tear jerky at the end. Perfect for a sensitive middle grade girl.

  13. 5 out of 5

    Olivia

    This was a sweet book and I really liked it. California stole my heart. Maybe it's because I have an 11 year old right now, or maybe it's just because California is who she is. She is doing the best she can despite the helpful (and not so helpful) adults in her life. She gets help along the way from an aunt who needed her as much as she was needed, some ghosts who don't know they are ghosts and a new friendship. I think my girls (11 and 13) would like to read this. This was a sweet book and I really liked it. California stole my heart. Maybe it's because I have an 11 year old right now, or maybe it's just because California is who she is. She is doing the best she can despite the helpful (and not so helpful) adults in her life. She gets help along the way from an aunt who needed her as much as she was needed, some ghosts who don't know they are ghosts and a new friendship. I think my girls (11 and 13) would like to read this.

  14. 4 out of 5

    Sarah

    EARC provided by Edelweiss Plus California is staying with her great aunt when she encounters friendly ghosts who help her solve a mystery about the past. While doing this, California is able to learn more about the people around her- helping her figure out who is important and how she fits. This story hits just the right notes for middle grade readers.

  15. 5 out of 5

    Ron

    This is the story of a young girl who is shipped off to live with an older Aunt that she doesn't know. You don't really know why she was dropped off, and she starts to see ghosts. I thought the book was excellent and had trouble putting it down. This is the story of a young girl who is shipped off to live with an older Aunt that she doesn't know. You don't really know why she was dropped off, and she starts to see ghosts. I thought the book was excellent and had trouble putting it down.

  16. 4 out of 5

    Steph

    The letter writing, etiquette conversations, and eccentric aunts in forms of both living and ghost charmed me. I also have to give a shoutout to the manageable length of this middle grade book; helps a lot when handing it to readers! =)

  17. 5 out of 5

    Dara Yoder

    A magical tale, but not too much fantasy, about a girl looking to belong. Suddenly left by her father and moved from family to family, she finally finds a place - a place she's belonged, for quite a while. Sweet story, fast and engaging read! I will share this with my students! #bookposse A magical tale, but not too much fantasy, about a girl looking to belong. Suddenly left by her father and moved from family to family, she finally finds a place - a place she's belonged, for quite a while. Sweet story, fast and engaging read! I will share this with my students! #bookposse

  18. 4 out of 5

    Pam Page

    Oh, how I loved this book! California is an amazing young girl living with her aunt, researching another aunt who is a ghost, trying to find where she fits in. Readers will laugh, cry, and fall in love with California Poppy. This book left me with such warm feelings.

  19. 5 out of 5

    Hannah Calei

    This is a wonderfully written book with an interesting premise. While I do suppose some parts were a bit predictable yet unrealistic, I think young teen readers will find it suits them perfectly. I thought this was a well-written book that explored some very important ideas.

  20. 5 out of 5

    LS Johnson

    This was a ghost story I actually enjoyed. I think California acted her age and the adults around her were supportive. There wasn’t a deep plot but the simple storyline was pleasant and made for an easy, quick read.

  21. 4 out of 5

    Courtney

    A 3.5. I am rounding down because the description promised me an eccentric aunt and it did not deliver. Don't get me wrong, I loved both the aunts (alive and dead) but neither could have been described as eccentric. The story was sweet and I loved all her letters. A 3.5. I am rounding down because the description promised me an eccentric aunt and it did not deliver. Don't get me wrong, I loved both the aunts (alive and dead) but neither could have been described as eccentric. The story was sweet and I loved all her letters.

  22. 5 out of 5

    Tom

    A tender, intelligent and haunting story.

  23. 4 out of 5

    Jenn

    DNF.

  24. 5 out of 5

    Samantha Kolber

    This book is perfect. Linda Urban has done it again. Her books make me laugh and cry and I hope young readers get as much out of California’s quirky story as I did.

  25. 5 out of 5

    Mandy

    Great story! It’s a ghost story, but not the scary or gory type. This is a sweet ghost story about family and heartache, but also love and growth.

  26. 5 out of 5

    Laurie

    A warm, funny, poignant story with a lovable, resilient main character and two delightful ghosts. Love the letter writing and the first-person voice in this novel!

  27. 4 out of 5

    Debbie Tanner

    See my full review here. https://imtanner.blogspot.com/2021/04... See my full review here. https://imtanner.blogspot.com/2021/04...

  28. 5 out of 5

    Katie

  29. 4 out of 5

    Soup

  30. 5 out of 5

    Julie W

Add a review

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

Loading...
We use cookies to give you the best online experience. By using our website you agree to our use of cookies in accordance with our cookie policy.