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One Day All This Will Be Yours

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The bold new work from award-winning author Adrian Tchaikovsky  - a smart, funny tale of time-travel and paradox Welcome to the end of time. It’s a perfect day. Nobody remembers how the Causality War started. Really, there’s no-one to remember, and nothing for them to remember if there were; that’s sort of the point. We were time warriors, and we broke time. I was the o The bold new work from award-winning author Adrian Tchaikovsky  - a smart, funny tale of time-travel and paradox Welcome to the end of time. It’s a perfect day. Nobody remembers how the Causality War started. Really, there’s no-one to remember, and nothing for them to remember if there were; that’s sort of the point. We were time warriors, and we broke time. I was the one who ended it. Ended the fighting, tidied up the damage as much as I could. Then I came here, to the end of it all, and gave myself a mission: to never let it happen again.


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The bold new work from award-winning author Adrian Tchaikovsky  - a smart, funny tale of time-travel and paradox Welcome to the end of time. It’s a perfect day. Nobody remembers how the Causality War started. Really, there’s no-one to remember, and nothing for them to remember if there were; that’s sort of the point. We were time warriors, and we broke time. I was the o The bold new work from award-winning author Adrian Tchaikovsky  - a smart, funny tale of time-travel and paradox Welcome to the end of time. It’s a perfect day. Nobody remembers how the Causality War started. Really, there’s no-one to remember, and nothing for them to remember if there were; that’s sort of the point. We were time warriors, and we broke time. I was the one who ended it. Ended the fighting, tidied up the damage as much as I could. Then I came here, to the end of it all, and gave myself a mission: to never let it happen again.

30 review for One Day All This Will Be Yours

  1. 4 out of 5

    Nataliya

    “We were the time warriors, and we killed time.” Somewhere, no - somewhen, at the edge of Time (or whatever is left of it after the time-shredding Causality War) is a peaceful idyllic farm where the last survivor of the time war spends his days tending the crops, restoring old Soviet tractors, feeding his pet allosaurus — and murdering any remaining time travelers that come to his “when”, a bottleneck in Time. This is the only way he sees to prevent yet another Time War. “They all end up “We were the time warriors, and we killed time.” Somewhere, no - somewhen, at the edge of Time (or whatever is left of it after the time-shredding Causality War) is a peaceful idyllic farm where the last survivor of the time war spends his days tending the crops, restoring old Soviet tractors, feeding his pet allosaurus — and murdering any remaining time travelers that come to his “when”, a bottleneck in Time. This is the only way he sees to prevent yet another Time War. “They all end up here, because this is the end-time. This is all the time there is. This is the trailing edge of what comes later, after the breach in regular transmissions left by the war. A bottleneck, you understand. You want to fling yourself forwards past the badlands of the war, this is where you end up. And I’ll be waiting for you. Nobody gets by me. I have literally all the technology in the world, culled from every moment that anyone ever had a Big Idea, to make sure of exactly that. I am the ultimate surveillance state.” Except for - of fragging course! - things will not go the way they are supposed to. Many many times. Because threats don’t only come from the shattered past. There will be tractors and dinosaurs and murders and statues and unpleasant visitors and even polite tea time, and bonding over mutual misanthropy and assassination attempts, and it all will be funny and twisted and darkly humorous. “By setting up shop here where the regular passage of time recommences, and denying access to the future to all comers, I am saving the unseen future from interference. I am time’s gatekeeper, and without me the future would become the same ruin as the past.” Adrian Tchaikovsky is a guy I’d love to hang out with and pick his brain and share a drink or two with. He’s obviously brilliant and wonderfully funny and can pull the rug from out of you with a few sentences that you need to reread a few times just to understand how throughly he just messed with your expectations. All while having a blast with the sardonic and misanthropic and yet objectively funny story that comes from dark places and leads to those even darker — but chuckling along the way. Oh, and you betcha there’s going to be a grandfather paradox — but presented Tchaikovsky-style, with a fresh irreverent take on it and a healthy dose of sarcasm. “How I love the rugged outdoors life! Living out here with nothing but the fields and the animals and literally the best technological support that anyone ever invented.” I start to think that there’s nothing in SFF that Tchaikovsky cannot do. He is yet to disappoint me. His books have all been solid for me, and if he doesn’t eventually become one of SFF acknowledged classics, I will be quite baffled. And if you don’t feel a shiver of dread at hearing the word “twee” after finishing this book, then you, my friend, will need to give that last page or two another read. 4 stars. “We’ll detonate it and turn their entire postepochalyptic utopia into a wasteland of nothing, and then we’ll go build a new farm on the new broken edge of history, whenever that turns out to be, and settle down to murder time travellers and troll historical figures again. Everyone should have a retirement plan.” ————— Thanks to NetGalley and publisher for the ARC.

  2. 5 out of 5

    Tadiana ✩Night Owl☽

    How I Learned to Love the Time Travel Bomb 4.5 stars. Full review, first posted on FantasyLiterature.com: What’s a grumpy, misanthropic time traveling warrior to do? Governments and factions have misused time travel machines, each using their time machines to remake the past in the way they want it to be, over and over again. Time travel machines really are the ultimate weapon: if you go back far enough you can change history enough that your enemy never has a chance. Except that your enemy’s time How I Learned to Love the Time Travel Bomb 4.5 stars. Full review, first posted on FantasyLiterature.com: What’s a grumpy, misanthropic time traveling warrior to do? Governments and factions have misused time travel machines, each using their time machines to remake the past in the way they want it to be, over and over again. Time travel machines really are the ultimate weapon: if you go back far enough you can change history enough that your enemy never has a chance. Except that your enemy’s time traveling agents are cut off from those changes, so they’re still around to try to change history in a different way that favors them. And then there are Causality Bombs, “[f]or when regular time travel just can’t mess up continuity enough.” Now the past is irretrievably broken into shards and splinters. So our surly main character, the last survivor of the time soldiers, has set himself up as a gatekeeper in a distant future to make sure it never happens again past his point in time. His tech allows him to pull all time travelers heading to the far future to stop in his particular place and time, where he can make sure they never go any further. And when that involves murdering said time travelers — he keeps guns, poisons and a feathery Allosaurus named Miffly just for this purpose (“she is ridiculously adorable when she’s not actually eating people”) — well, that’s just the way it goes. Until one day, when he gets an unpleasant surprise … from his future. Maybe, though, with the help of Miffly, he can solve this latest problem too. One Day All This Will Be Yours, a new SF novella by Adrian Tchaikovsky, is wildly intelligent and imaginative, narrated by the main character with lots of irreverent and extremely black humor. You have to be able to enjoy a protagonist who, with no discernable regret, offs any number of innocent people in pursuit of what he views as the greater cause. One of the highlights is when he and a time-traveling antagonist engage in a battle in which each of them has pulled together an army of the worst villains they can find throughout human history: Stalin, multiple versions of Jack the Ripper, Elizabeth Báthory, Vlad the Impaler, Ching Shih, and many, many more.In the end there is only one of them left, and wouldn’t you know it, it’s Hitler. Basically because he’s been hiding in a bunker all this time. He pokes his head up, and I set Miffly on him. … It’s very therapeutic. And the thing about allosaurs is they can run really quite fast, and the thing about Hitlers is that they can’t, not really, or not for very long.Tchaikovsky’s concept of time and causality being broken is uniquely executed here in One Day All This Will Be Yours. Our main character makes the most of his access to the past, both for pleasure and to enforce his idea of keeping the far future pristine. Of course, time travel fiction is replete with paradoxes, and everything here isn’t entirely logical — at least, my brain couldn’t quite wrap itself fully around this novella’s concept of time — but Tchaikovsky commits to it completely and pulls you along with him, immersing you in this fascinating and slightly loopy world until you really don’t care any more if it doesn’t altogether make sense. My only qualm with One Day All This Will Be Yours is that its ending is remarkably abrupt, with reams of hanging threads and no real attempt at a wrap-up. I don’t think I fully get what Tchaikovsky was going for with that ending, other than (view spoiler)[that it certainly gives a “well, here we go again” type of impression (hide spoiler)] , but even after a couple of rereads I’m still not a fan of it. As a whole, though, this novella is so very funny, creative and intelligent that I have to give it my strongest recommendation … at least if you’re a fan of dark, flippant humor. Thanks to the publisher and NetGalley for the ARC!

  3. 5 out of 5

    Blaine

    That thing we did, that broke everything in the universe; which left all of history in a scatter of sharp-edged shards so that nothing led to anything—that war, that lunacy, that terrible, terrible time-to-end-all-times—must never come again. And to that end, I would set a trap. I would create a bottleneck here at the near end of the rest of time. I would ensure that anyone travelling into the future from that broken desert of glass would find only one thing: me. They would find me, and my alarm That thing we did, that broke everything in the universe; which left all of history in a scatter of sharp-edged shards so that nothing led to anything—that war, that lunacy, that terrible, terrible time-to-end-all-times—must never come again. And to that end, I would set a trap. I would create a bottleneck here at the near end of the rest of time. I would ensure that anyone travelling into the future from that broken desert of glass would find only one thing: me. They would find me, and my alarms would go off, and I would find them. And then they would die, and I would go back and ensure that nobody else would ever venture onto the seas of time to wash up on my shore. And beyond my postepochalyptic ranch, time could just stretch on forever, never to be troubled by any human presence. Never to be broken, maimed, mauled, mutilated or spindled. I was the great gatekeeper, and my watchword was You Shall Not Pass.Thanks to NetGalley and Rebellion Publishing for sending me an ARC of One Day All This Will Be Yours in exchange for an honest review. One Day All This Will Be Yours is a fairly original time travel story. In the aftermath of the Causality War—when humanity tried to use time-travel as a weapon against each other and instead wrecked our shared history—our unnamed narrator lies in wait at a quaint farm at a far distant time. Whenever some remaining time traveler arrives, he kills them and then goes back and grandfathers out of existence their culture’s very ability to time travel. Until one day, when a new group of time travelers arrive and upset his understanding of the effect of his actions. Soon, he’s engaged in a Spy v. Spy battle with Zoe, a time traveler who just might be his homicidal equal, before things get even stranger .... The plot takes a little while to get going, but once it does, the rest of the book flies. The narrator is so funny and sarcastic that you can forget for stretches that he’s responsible for an unknowable number of genocides. The plot is largely unpredictable and the story is very inventive—I can think of no other book that combines Soviet-era tractors and a pet Allosaurus. One Day All This Will Be Yours is one of those very rare books that could have been enjoyably longer. A quick, fun read. Recommended. 3/2/2021 update: reposting my review to celebrate that today is publication day!

  4. 5 out of 5

    Bradley

    So, when you just HAVE to have a really messed up, misanthropic, let's-kill-all-the-universe-right-now kind of story, this one is always available. Because, let's face it, we all sometimes need a fantastically misanthropic tale to get us through the day. Of course, if you wanted a novella that reminds you quite a bit of This Is How You Lose the Time War with the love, the constant Princess Bride feel, the murderous intent, PLUS a bunch of time-hopping that isn't quite as poetical but is still defi So, when you just HAVE to have a really messed up, misanthropic, let's-kill-all-the-universe-right-now kind of story, this one is always available. Because, let's face it, we all sometimes need a fantastically misanthropic tale to get us through the day. Of course, if you wanted a novella that reminds you quite a bit of This Is How You Lose the Time War with the love, the constant Princess Bride feel, the murderous intent, PLUS a bunch of time-hopping that isn't quite as poetical but is still definitely delicious, then this is ALSO a go-to story. And, let's also face it, it's a Tchaikovsky SF and I'm absolutely sure from here on out that I'll never read one of his SFs that I'll ever dislike. It just can't happen, now.

  5. 5 out of 5

    Jamie

    Tchaikovsky always demonstrates a flair for infusing, sparingly but deftly, some deliciously humorous elements in his writings, but with One Day All This Will Be Yours he takes it to a whole new level. This is a story of a war gone wrong - very, very wrong - after the introduction of time travel. And one man's mad quest to ensure it won't ever happen again, at any cost, morality be damned. Tchaikovsky proves, once and for all, the ultimate futility and devastation of a time war, especially once t Tchaikovsky always demonstrates a flair for infusing, sparingly but deftly, some deliciously humorous elements in his writings, but with One Day All This Will Be Yours he takes it to a whole new level. This is a story of a war gone wrong - very, very wrong - after the introduction of time travel. And one man's mad quest to ensure it won't ever happen again, at any cost, morality be damned. Tchaikovsky proves, once and for all, the ultimate futility and devastation of a time war, especially once the Causality Bombs start flying and you've shattered time into a million broken shards. A war that leaves soldiers fighting for a side that no longer exists and likely never will again. Surprisingly (although really nothing should come as a surprise in this story) somewhere or when in there, at the very end of time itself, there's some incredibly sociopathic yet also really sweet, actual romance too. Deeply sardonic, misanthropic and frequently ridiculous, this is a clear warning to you would-be time machine inventors that your technology will, despite all your benign intentions, inevitably be used for nefarious (and perhaps hilarious) purposes. It's clear Tchaikovsky really let loose and had a blast with this, as I did reading it! I received an ARC from the publisher via NetGalley in exchange for an honest review.

  6. 4 out of 5

    Lukasz

    Absolutely brilliant. The story’s narrator, the sole survivor of the War To End All Wars, lives on a farm at the end of the world. He’s a time warrior and occasional murderer of errant time travellers. Whenever someone gets there, he makes sure they’ll finish their journey in the belly of his pet Allosaurus, Miffly. And after that, he makes a time-travel to destroy his unwanted guest’s culture ability for travelling in time. He has good reasons to act this way, and he believes he’s doing it to sa Absolutely brilliant. The story’s narrator, the sole survivor of the War To End All Wars, lives on a farm at the end of the world. He’s a time warrior and occasional murderer of errant time travellers. Whenever someone gets there, he makes sure they’ll finish their journey in the belly of his pet Allosaurus, Miffly. And after that, he makes a time-travel to destroy his unwanted guest’s culture ability for travelling in time. He has good reasons to act this way, and he believes he’s doing it to save the future. But it’s also possible he’s just a misanthropic bastard who enjoys being the last surviving human being and has no intention to share the rest of history with anyone. I probably told you more about the plot than I should have, so I’ll stop right now. One Day All This Will Be Yours offers a wildly irreverent take on a time travel-gone-wrong trope. It turns the grandfather paradox inside out. It’s hilarious and clever, and Tchaikovsky’s thoughts about the destructive potential of time-travel made me rethink the coolness of the concept. People have described a lot of things as an ultimate weapon, a doomsday measure, a holiday at the final resort. None of them were, not really. Even nukes are just a better way of killing people that leaves a longer-lasting stain on the carpet. City-devouring intercontinental missiles and orbital railgun strikes: these things are on a straight line of development from slings and thrown rocks. But time machines really are the ultimate sanction. And just like the nukes of an earlier era, by the time the war started, everyone had them, and everyone had signed a lot of important pieces of paper swearing they wouldn’t use them. Because we knew that as soon as anyone actually used a time machine with hostile intent, that would be it. One Day All This Will Be Yours has a great pace, compelling (if deliberately overdrawn) characters, serious questions to ask, and tons of cynical humor that almost made me roll on the floor. It hides plenty of surprises, brilliant ideas, and quotable lines. Without spoiling much, I can mention for example that the narrator loves his farm and travels in time to pick up an older model of a tractor or, when in the right mood, to party with Jackie Onassis, Lord Byron, or Nero. I expect KJ Parker’s fans will love the flippant tone of the book and the narrator. I planned to avoid comparisons, but kept this one. I feel One Day All This Will Be Yours will resonate with a much broader audience than most of Tchaikovsky’s books. It shares Parker’s acerbic (and delightful) wit and take of human nature, but it copies nothing. It simply shows how versatile Tchaikovsky is as a writer. And here he’s in the prime form. I absolutely loved it. With its frenetic pacing, irreverent tone, and fresh ideas, it ensures a great reading experience. A true gem.

  7. 4 out of 5

    Montzalee Wittmann

    One Day All This Will Be Yours: Signed Limited Edition by Adrian Tchaikovsky Hardcover, 192 pages Expected publication date: March 2nd 2021 by Solaris This is a clever and witty look at time travel and a fellow that wants to be the last time traveler and last person on Earth. He has Miffly, his pet Allosaurus, who he feeds time travelers to. Our time traveler explains how too many travelers have broken time, fractured it beyond repair. To remedy some of the problems he picks off other travelers, goe One Day All This Will Be Yours: Signed Limited Edition by Adrian Tchaikovsky Hardcover, 192 pages Expected publication date: March 2nd 2021 by Solaris This is a clever and witty look at time travel and a fellow that wants to be the last time traveler and last person on Earth. He has Miffly, his pet Allosaurus, who he feeds time travelers to. Our time traveler explains how too many travelers have broken time, fractured it beyond repair. To remedy some of the problems he picks off other travelers, goes back to their origin point and prevents time travel knowledge from developing. He also travels himself to find them. He has his nice farm with robots to do all the work, sheep, and Miffly at the end of time and quite content with life until a young couple shows up. He is about to feed them to Miffly when they tell him their surprise for showing up. It changes his life! He gets really upset! The action really gets wild then! This is a fun, crazy book with zany characters I fell in love with! I love Miffly! It's a fun romp through history, society, and what if's! A story of sci-fi time travel and paradox. I want to thank the publisher and NetGalley for the Arc. The review is voluntary and opinions are all my own!

  8. 4 out of 5

    Dave

    "One Day All This Will Be Yours" is a prime example of why time travel stories will always be poignant, relevant, and fascinating. No matter how many time travel stories you've read, Tchaikovsky has managed to make the genre fresh and new with his new twists on the subject at hand. For we know find that time travel is the ultimate doomsday weapon. Each side with its glorious time soldiers keeps changing the timeline to their side's benefit until it all breaks with a thousand shards of time adrif "One Day All This Will Be Yours" is a prime example of why time travel stories will always be poignant, relevant, and fascinating. No matter how many time travel stories you've read, Tchaikovsky has managed to make the genre fresh and new with his new twists on the subject at hand. For we know find that time travel is the ultimate doomsday weapon. Each side with its glorious time soldiers keeps changing the timeline to their side's benefit until it all breaks with a thousand shards of time adrift in a whirlwind. One intrepid curmudgeon has survived the end of time and planted his cabin on the shores of eternity. And, he's determined never to let time shatter again. He will do whatever it takes -- by any means necessary. What, of course, makes it all work is the wry, sardonic narrative voice.

  9. 4 out of 5

    kartik narayanan

    You can listen to the review on my podcasts available on Apple Spotify Stitcher You can also watch it on Youtube Or read more like this on my blog, Digital Amrit tl;dr: 'One Day All This Will Be Yours' is a wickedly funny and inventive look at time travel. The novella's protagonist is the sole survivor of The War to End All Wars. That epithet seems unlikely given how many wars the world has seen, with each conflict being named so. But in this case, it might actually be true, since the weapons used You can listen to the review on my podcasts available on Apple Spotify Stitcher You can also watch it on Youtube Or read more like this on my blog, Digital Amrit tl;dr: 'One Day All This Will Be Yours' is a wickedly funny and inventive look at time travel. The novella's protagonist is the sole survivor of The War to End All Wars. That epithet seems unlikely given how many wars the world has seen, with each conflict being named so. But in this case, it might actually be true, since the weapons used are time travel devices. Imagine what could be done if one of the sides in the conflict could go back and change time so that their opponent never existed. What if their ideology could be rewritten or that the reason for the war is not valid any more. Now, imagine what would be the consequences if all the sides in the conflict had access to time travel, and used them indiscriminately. The sole survivor is the only person who has lived through this type of war, and remembers what has happened. And he is determined never to let this kind of war happen again. Of course, I am just glossing over the surface of the story. Even though 'One Day All This Will Be Yours' is only a novella, there is just so much happening in this short length. Adrian Tchaikovsky explores various ideas and concepts here - time travel paradoxes with a twist, the effect of wars on the human psyche, the inevitability of conflicts, a love story, and so much more. I am a huge fan of the author. I consider his 'Shadows of the Apt' decalogy to be one of the best science fiction/ fantasy series ever. So I jumped at the chance to read this novella, especially once I found out it involved time travel. 'One Day All This Will Be Yours' has everything going for it. It is a perfect 10 in every sense. The characters are brilliant, and there is plenty of dark humour. It is fast-paced and has so much contained into a small package. Tropes are turned on their head. The author's trademark existential questions lurk underneath the humour and science fiction. Is conflict inevitable? Are human beings doomed to repeat the cycle of destruction and creation? What is utopia? Adrian Tchaikovsky has explored a few of themes in other books but not with such cynical and black humour. This book is worth reading for that alone. In conclusion, I loved 'One Day All This Will Be Yours'. It is a must-read. If you liked this review, please support me on Patreon

  10. 4 out of 5

    Gabi

    A disillusioned soldier from the causality war (the war to end all wars) retired as hermit farmer at a place at the end of times. His sole goal in life is to make sure nobody is ever timetravelling again to prevent the possibility of more war. So any timetraveller arriving at the end of time is in for a very nasty surprise - involving one of the coolest pets ever. Of course his contemplative life comes to an abrupt end when one day somebody arrives he can't get rid off so easily. What a relief to A disillusioned soldier from the causality war (the war to end all wars) retired as hermit farmer at a place at the end of times. His sole goal in life is to make sure nobody is ever timetravelling again to prevent the possibility of more war. So any timetraveller arriving at the end of time is in for a very nasty surprise - involving one of the coolest pets ever. Of course his contemplative life comes to an abrupt end when one day somebody arrives he can't get rid off so easily. What a relief to read (listen to) a novella that does everything right! Every word tells, the plot concentrates on ... the plot (something that unfortunately has to be emphasised with nowadays novellas that I've read), the structure is just right, the narrator's voice is snarky, self-deprecating and relatable, the story idea is deliciously weird, but never strays into the unbelievable (well ... that's of course a large stretch when the topic is time travel ... but I hope you know what I mean), and the audioversion, read by Adrian Tchaikovsky himself, is hands down perfect. The topic is tackled with a witty prose, really good ideas and so many weird twists that it stands out among the usual travel-back-in-time-to-kill-your-own-grandfather tropes like a beacon. Even readers who can't be bothered with the timetravel trope anymore should give this one a try. It is Tchaikovsky at his best - and that says it all.

  11. 4 out of 5

    The Captain

    Ahoy there mateys!  Adrian Tchaikovsky's work is always enjoyable so when I saw time travel and dinosaur I said Arrrr!  This was exactly as expected.  It was a quick and humorous read where the mechanics of the time travel made me noggin ache a little but I had a lot of fun. The grumpy ex-soldier standing at the end of the broken world and broken time is a hoot.  How he spends his time (pun intended hardy har har!) is just delightful.  Sure he is crazy but that be part of the fun.  And the dinosa Ahoy there mateys!  Adrian Tchaikovsky's work is always enjoyable so when I saw time travel and dinosaur I said Arrrr!  This was exactly as expected.  It was a quick and humorous read where the mechanics of the time travel made me noggin ache a little but I had a lot of fun. The grumpy ex-soldier standing at the end of the broken world and broken time is a hoot.  How he spends his time (pun intended hardy har har!) is just delightful.  Sure he is crazy but that be part of the fun.  And the dinosaur is just plain awesome.  It's short at 192 pages but it was silly good.  The plot did bog down just a tad.  But that was very, very minor.  Recommended. So lastly . . . Thank ye kindly Rebellion / Solaris!

  12. 4 out of 5

    K.J. Charles

    Delightful comic romance about a battle-demented mass murderer attempting to put an end to history. You don't get many of those. Time travel shenanigans, a terrific premise, a really well done romance of the completely batshit variety, and bucketloads of snark. Just hugely enjoyable, slightly in the way Murderbot is enjoyable but without any morals at all. And there's a pet dinosaur! What's not to like? Delightful comic romance about a battle-demented mass murderer attempting to put an end to history. You don't get many of those. Time travel shenanigans, a terrific premise, a really well done romance of the completely batshit variety, and bucketloads of snark. Just hugely enjoyable, slightly in the way Murderbot is enjoyable but without any morals at all. And there's a pet dinosaur! What's not to like?

  13. 4 out of 5

    Fiona

    I have sat in the palaces of the Minoans before the Bronze Age Collapse. I have dined with the egalitarian philosophers of Harappa in the Indus Valley before the world turned and ground them to dust. I have taught whist to Archimedes shortly before a Roman soldier gutted him. Ahd yes, human achievement is a grand and splendid little candle in the great vast night of causality, but there's only so often you can watch it be snuffed out before it's easier to become the snuffer. It's not an easy thin I have sat in the palaces of the Minoans before the Bronze Age Collapse. I have dined with the egalitarian philosophers of Harappa in the Indus Valley before the world turned and ground them to dust. I have taught whist to Archimedes shortly before a Roman soldier gutted him. Ahd yes, human achievement is a grand and splendid little candle in the great vast night of causality, but there's only so often you can watch it be snuffed out before it's easier to become the snuffer. It's not an easy thing to be the only survivor of a time war, as our narrator will shortly tell you when reading this book; the novelty of jaunting about in time wears off quickly when all you can do is wait for someone to come along and blow everything up. Misanthropic? Certainly, but he owns it, and there's a degree of humour that helps to reduce the sting. Miffly is the only exception to his strictly enforced no visitors policy; I can see why, she's instantly endearing. In fact, I liked her more than said narrator, truth be told, even if there's plenty of evidence that he's probably right about humanity. I just prefer a little more light in the dark, as objectively good as this was.

  14. 5 out of 5

    Andreas

    Synopsis: The unnamed narrator is the last time soldier, surviving the War To End All Wars, and the end of causality. He created a kind of bottleneck at the end of times where everyone who wants to time travel to the future has to pass through. There, the narrator holds his grounds and kills off the trespassers, no matter if they come from the steamage, from ancient Greece, or newer times. His motivation for this is that there he wants to prevent another time war. After having killed other time Synopsis: The unnamed narrator is the last time soldier, surviving the War To End All Wars, and the end of causality. He created a kind of bottleneck at the end of times where everyone who wants to time travel to the future has to pass through. There, the narrator holds his grounds and kills off the trespassers, no matter if they come from the steamage, from ancient Greece, or newer times. His motivation for this is that there he wants to prevent another time war. After having killed other time travellers with his superior technology, he uses his own time machine, travels back to the deceased one’s time, and corrects everything there so that nothing can come up from there anymore. The personal downside for him is that he is a single, won’t ever produce offspring. He’s dumbfounded when a pair of humans arrive at his planet and call him Grandpa. Even more astonished, he finds out that his future-to-be-love-interest is quite different than expected. Review: With this hilarious novella, Tchaikovsky enters Scalzi-territory: Grand schemes waved away with a half-sentence, comical scenes, flippant tone of the grumpy, mysanthropic narrator. The last couple of books I wondered if Tchaikovsky will go into a repetitive production cycle, or find back to his creative mood again. What a joy that he’s back again. There is also an interesting romance in it, because the narrator’s relationship with his future wife is the exact opposite of romantic. The narrator wanted to fall into his arrogant trap that he will win against everyone, just because he can. But Tchaikovsky resists the easy way out and gives him an equal opponent. Just don’t expect a Hard SF explanation of the setting or proper analysis of time loops. But if you love cats or dogs, you’ll adore Miffly, the fluffy pet dinosaur. Recommended for some light, fire-and-forget reading session.

  15. 5 out of 5

    Lata

    Adrian Tchaikovsky has created a delightfully awful character and concept in this story of a time traveller living at “the end of all time” after numerous, terrible wars, tending his farm and living with his lovely, terrible pet, Miffly. (Can I just say how MUCH I loved Miffly!) Things are placid and safe, and if he wants to see a show or eat an outstanding meal, he can pop into his time machine and take a spin back to some earlier time for his experience. And everything is going so well for him, Adrian Tchaikovsky has created a delightfully awful character and concept in this story of a time traveller living at “the end of all time” after numerous, terrible wars, tending his farm and living with his lovely, terrible pet, Miffly. (Can I just say how MUCH I loved Miffly!) Things are placid and safe, and if he wants to see a show or eat an outstanding meal, he can pop into his time machine and take a spin back to some earlier time for his experience. And everything is going so well for him, till it doesn’t. The main character is both a bad person and refreshingly honest about his intentions. He’s funny, jaded, murderous, and dangerous, and he makes his decisions sound so reasonable. I liked Tchaikovsky’s take on the circularity and predictability of human behaviour, however horrible that might be. I am such a fan of this author’s work; each story tends to be different from the previous. I like time travel stories a lot, and this was a darkly humorous entry, and basically, I liked it a lot. Especially Miffly. Thank you to Netgalley and the publisher for this ARC in exchange for a review.

  16. 5 out of 5

    Tomislav

    Stories of time travel have always fascinated me – particularly ones where the author explores the nature of time and causality. The paradoxes that could be produced are nearly a proof that travel back in linear time and free will are incompatible, but when did that ever stop a science fiction writer? In Adrian Tchaikovsky’s short 2021 novel One Day All This Will Be Yours, he imagines what happens when a wartime flurry of agents is actively modifying history at odds with each other, and the whol Stories of time travel have always fascinated me – particularly ones where the author explores the nature of time and causality. The paradoxes that could be produced are nearly a proof that travel back in linear time and free will are incompatible, but when did that ever stop a science fiction writer? In Adrian Tchaikovsky’s short 2021 novel One Day All This Will Be Yours, he imagines what happens when a wartime flurry of agents is actively modifying history at odds with each other, and the whole system breaks down. The story is told in first-person by an unnamed retired soldier of a “future” ultimate time war. He has become detached from his original milieu, as have each other such soldier, which raises the question of just what reality they are attempting to restore or undermine. As they have turned on each other, eventually he found that many of the surviving agents are variations on himself. He has set himself up as the final barrier, killing anyone who attempts to pass forward in time past his line in the sand. But the challenge comes from a completely unexpected direction. Peppered with a sarcastic dialog, the tone of the novel walks the fine line between earnestness and comedy, yet manages to remain serious enough to create plot tension. I enjoyed the story, wondering all along where Tchaikovsky was going with this. The final ending is appropriate, and you will know what I mean when you get there. It seems to be a pattern with Tchaikovsky – both this and his recent Walking to Aldebaran end on existential notes. I read Adrian Tchaikovsky’s 2021 stand-alone short novel in kindle ebook, which I received from Solaris Books through netgalley in exchange for an honest review on social media platforms and on my book review blog. Adrian Tchaikovsky is the pen-name of British fantasy and science fiction writer Adrian Czajkowski. The book is scheduled for release on 2 March 2021.

  17. 5 out of 5

    Nils | nilsreviewsit

    This is only my second time reading a story by Adrian Tchaikovsky but I’ve already begun to see how versatile, bizarre and wonderfully imaginative this author is. One Day All This Will Be Yours is a post-apocalyptic novella set in a time where a war, known as the Causality War has caused much devastation, to be more precise it has ended the world. No one can be sure who started the war but we do know that it began after the invention of time travel; Causality Bombs were unleashed, and time was b This is only my second time reading a story by Adrian Tchaikovsky but I’ve already begun to see how versatile, bizarre and wonderfully imaginative this author is. One Day All This Will Be Yours is a post-apocalyptic novella set in a time where a war, known as the Causality War has caused much devastation, to be more precise it has ended the world. No one can be sure who started the war but we do know that it began after the invention of time travel; Causality Bombs were unleashed, and time was broken into a million shards. Yet there is one man who did survive, a time warrior who now lives in his own self made Eden. A man who is now hell bent on making sure the war never has the chance to happen again. So, how does one go about preventing a time war? Well, our unnamed narrator has the solution in hand, and that solution is to spend the rest of his existence travelling through time killing every single person who had either invented or even shown an inkling of being able to invent time travel. If you’re thinking that’s rather an extreme approach, then know one thing, our main protagonist is a homicidal sociopath. He’s the kind of guy who’ll invite you in for a cup of tea, feed you a hearty meal, exchange pleasantries like he longs for your companionship. and then kill you before you even suspect a thing. Now this all sounds really dark, and on a surface level it is, but what I found most surprising, and what I absolutely loved, was that this novella is delightfully hilarious. “Because it’s horrible out there, in history. It always was, even before we shattered it to bits. It’s full of war and plague, starvation, intolerance and misery. But, but, but, I hear you say. But hope, but progress, but the glory of human achievement. A candle, I tell you. And the rest of it is the hurricane.” Told in first person, in a somewhat stream of consciousness, our main protagonist views life in a cynical and mocking way. Through sharp, witty prose, we see how ridiculous us human beings can be. The pointlessness of wars, the way we have done everything over the decades to ruin our own environment. Tchaikovsky may do this through a flippant narrator but he nonetheless makes you think a lot about how we ruin the world with our own ignorance. Perhaps our main protagonist’s goal to live a solitary existence by killing any who may destroy the idyllic world he has created, isn’t such a bad idea after all. What makes this story truly special is its bizarreness - Tchaikovsky’s daring ability to let the narrative get… weird! For example there’s Miffly, our main protagonist’s pet Allosaurus, who for a gigantic prehistoric monster was actually quite adorable. Then, one of my favourite chapters which came towards the end of the book involved a confrontation with Hitler, Stalin and three Jack the Rippers! Because why the hell not?! The narrative is also full of pop culture references expanding the decades, some of which I delighted in recognising—You Shall Not Pass—and some of which I had to look up. I never expected this novella to pack such a fantastically darkly comical punch, but Tchaikovsky nailed it. “I hadn’t intended them to meet Miffly, who’s jumped the fence again, bad girl. In fact meeting Miffly is generally the last stop in the whirlwind tour of the future I have planned for people.” Throughout reading One Day All This Will Be Yours I had visions of Tchaikovsky manically laughing whilst writing certain scenes, I can see the author truly revelled in his quirky satirical style and I believe he rather enjoyed it. I never knew I needed a novella about a time travelling sociopath with a pet dinosaur in my life, but I’m damn glad Tchaikovsky provided one. ARC provided by Rebellion Publishing in exchange for an honest review. Thank you for the copy.

  18. 4 out of 5

    Elizabeth Tabler

    One Day All This Will Be yours, Adrian Tchaikovsky's newest novella releasing in early 2021, is a brilliant and witty time-channel take on what happens when you are the only one left, and you damn well want to keep it that way. Our titular narrator wakes up from his calm and untroubled clumber. He peers out onto his estate; there isn't a cloud in the sky. And, even if there was one, a little rain is good. Bring on the rain for us farmer types, he thinks. It is a beautiful day because everything One Day All This Will Be yours, Adrian Tchaikovsky's newest novella releasing in early 2021, is a brilliant and witty time-channel take on what happens when you are the only one left, and you damn well want to keep it that way. Our titular narrator wakes up from his calm and untroubled clumber. He peers out onto his estate; there isn't a cloud in the sky. And, even if there was one, a little rain is good. Bring on the rain for us farmer types, he thinks. It is a beautiful day because everything and all days are gorgeous, forever and ever amen. This beauty was hard fought for in a winner take all fight over the future, past, and every branch of possibility spread out forever—the casualty war. A war waged by many who could not remember why they were fighting. The past had been expunged, and the future was a fractured mess. The narrator, the last soldier of the causality war, and his cohorts fractured and dismantled time itself. If you don't like the current path this government is on? Go back and sew discord 200 years ago so that that government won't come into existence. Don't like that Einstein helped develop the Manhattan project, go back in time and scare him so badly about what his ideas wrought that he destroys everything around his energy formula. It takes the philosophical question of, "would you go back in time to kill Hitler as a baby" to a whole new level. The list goes on and on. So much so that there isn't much left after time has been tinkered with so much. Just pockets of reality that disintegrate in the blink of an eye when they reach a critical moment. It is as if many malicious time lords from "Doctor Who" were warring with each other had no scruples. How do we get to the point of a bright sunny day on a perfect farm? Well, if I told you that it would spoil the fun, and in the words of River Song from Doctor Who, "Spoilers!" However, know that it involves an Allosaur named Miffly, poison (occasionally), a couple of statues, and a possible sarcastic bastard of a soldier, or he just might be lonely. It's hard to tell. This soldier narrator has an excellent reason to act the way he acts and do the things he does without compunction. In his saving the future and living it up as best as possible, he faces something that challenges everything. That is the exciting part. One Day All This Will Be Yours is another brilliant science fiction novella in the sea of Tchaikovsky's deep and brilliant catalog. Tchaikovsky has proven in the last decade or so that he is a man who can write anything. Such as science fiction, as seen in his Children of Time series, where he eventually became known as the "spider guy." Walking in Aldebaran, where he smashes horror and science fiction, creating an existential take on madness. Or his huge epic Shadows of Apt series. A sprawling and immense epic story involving beings known as Kinden. You would be hard-pressed to find a story by Tchaikovsky that is not a great read. One Day This Will Be Yours, which takes the time-travel-gone-crazy trope and turns it on its ear, is another excellent read to add to his catalog. Pacing and world-building wise, Tchaikovsky understands the fundamentals needed for a tight and gripping novella. Unlike regular novel lengthed stories, novellas have a stricter economy of words. You only get so many words to work with to create world-building, dialog, and character arc. It is the same constraint that short story writers deal with but to a more extreme extent. Some writers are good at this "dialed in" type of writing style, while other writers are very good at it. I would put Tchaikovsky in the latter group. I have read three of his novellas/short novels recently, and not in a single place did I ache for some part of story creation that was lacking. Readers loathe to branch out into novella/short novels and short story length stories because some writers struggle to pare their ideas down to the minimum word count with the maximum effect. This problem isn't the case in One Day All This Will Be Yours. The humor is wry and witty; the narrator's situations are hilarious and wild but do not stray into the ridiculous or uncomfortable. The pacing is quick, a must for a novella. And, the story overall is sweet in its own twisted way. I loved this book, in case you can't tell. It will find a place of honor on my bookshelf and as a delightful reread in my future.

  19. 5 out of 5

    Vigasia

    Adrian Tchaikovsku is one of may favourites novelist, but with every new book, I can't keep wondering when he takes his ideas from. All right, I don't need to know as long as he have a new ones and makes the into stories. Thank you NetGalley for giving me an ARC copy of this glorious novella. One Day All This Will Be Yours takes us on a new level of time travel stories. Mostly because of the protagonist who lives alone at the end of times and wants to make sure that it stays like that. His main go Adrian Tchaikovsku is one of may favourites novelist, but with every new book, I can't keep wondering when he takes his ideas from. All right, I don't need to know as long as he have a new ones and makes the into stories. Thank you NetGalley for giving me an ARC copy of this glorious novella. One Day All This Will Be Yours takes us on a new level of time travel stories. Mostly because of the protagonist who lives alone at the end of times and wants to make sure that it stays like that. His main goal is to eliminate everyone who ever would think about building time machines. It is because he knows what danger such machines are. But it is not all, and saying more would be spoiler. But if you want a short story with a lot of clever humor and a sassy voice of a not-at-all hero who defys a chosen-one trope in the best way possible - read this story. I loved it.

  20. 5 out of 5

    Ola G

    8/10 stars My full review is available on my blog here. After a couple of disappointing books by Tchaikovsky I approached this novella with certain trepidation. After all, one can become too thinly spread, “sort of stretched, like butter scraped over too much bread,” even without One Ring (unless you want to confess, Mr Tchaikovsky?) I needn’t have worried, tough – this novella is short and sharp and scathing, with long pointed teeth and unrelenting snarkiness that brings to mind the best that sta 8/10 stars My full review is available on my blog here. After a couple of disappointing books by Tchaikovsky I approached this novella with certain trepidation. After all, one can become too thinly spread, “sort of stretched, like butter scraped over too much bread,” even without One Ring (unless you want to confess, Mr Tchaikovsky?) I needn’t have worried, tough – this novella is short and sharp and scathing, with long pointed teeth and unrelenting snarkiness that brings to mind the best that stand-up comedy has to offer. And this novella is indeed written very much in the style of stand-up comedy, with the protagonist wound up to the extreme, never shutting up, venting his anger and misanthropy in an unceasing torrent of words. It’s funny, it’s rabid, it’s sarcastic – but most of all, it’s to the point. You see, in Causality Wars the unnamed protagonist is the veteran of the humanity – and history – ceased to exist. With the onset of time travel rewriting the past became the favorite pastime of governments and agencies, and all the innumerable, contradictory changes to the history carried out by time soldiers resulted in shattering the past and erasing the present. It was still salvageable, more or less – until Causality bombs destroyed the substance of time. And so now, at the end of times, in the one stable point of a glorious indeterminate amount of time, our protagonist treasure hunts the sharp shards of the past, gathering farming equipment, growing veggies and killing random time travellers who inexorably land in his garden, in the farthest possible future. Until travellers from the actual, future, future turn up on his porch and call him Gramps. The gall! Gramps is not happy; he’s a nasty mean old geezer and wants to stay this way forever, so obviously the only thoughts he spared for his bride-to-be are how to most efficiently kill her before they can produce any of that horrible offspring. Yes, don’t expect this novella to be scientifically plausible. It’s not. It’s a totally absurd, tongue-in-cheek mishmash of the most popular time travel tropes, juggled with admirable deftness and self-awareness by the angry old man in the center of the story. Time travel serves here only as a literary vehicle for funny and sharp critique of our human foibles and vices and prejudices. And if we can get an adorable, feathered, man-eating dinosaur as a bonus, all the better. [...] I only have one criticism to offer, though it is twofold: the ending feels truncated and rushed; while it still delivers the payoff, it feels much more suitable to a short story than what in good (or bad, depending on your point of view) old days would’ve been a full-length novel. As for the novella itself, it never feels boring or redundant (ah, well, maybe a little, in places 😉) but I still felt it could’ve been stronger and punchier if it were shortened. Either way, though, One Day All This Will Be Yours is an observant, cutting piece of satire, which has somewhat restored my battered trust in Tchaikovsky 😉. I have received a copy of this novel from the publisher through NetGalley in exchange for an honest review. My thanks.

  21. 4 out of 5

    Dylan

    I mean, if in doubt, just generally screw up the world for everyone else, right? That's been the motto of human decision-making since Ug first hit Throg in the head with a rock, and it always seems to have gotten us through. Except for the whole Causality War and breaking everything there ever was into a million billion pieces, of course. Taking place on the very edge of time, One Day All This Will Be Yours tells the story of the last survivor of the Causality War, a war in which humanity literal I mean, if in doubt, just generally screw up the world for everyone else, right? That's been the motto of human decision-making since Ug first hit Throg in the head with a rock, and it always seems to have gotten us through. Except for the whole Causality War and breaking everything there ever was into a million billion pieces, of course. Taking place on the very edge of time, One Day All This Will Be Yours tells the story of the last survivor of the Causality War, a war in which humanity literally destroyed time. Living on an idyllic farm with the help of robots and a pet dinosaur, our protagonist protects what's left of history (and messes around with it just for funsies every once in a while) and does his best to prevent the slightest chance of another war breaking out. He's a bit of a bastard and he's certainly not a good person but he's fun to spend time with and Tchaikovsky did a great job of giving him a very distinct narrative voice. The first ~third of the novella is a fun little exercise in establishing our protagonist and the reality he lives in, and then after that we settle more into the main plot of the novella, though settle is perhaps not the right word as this novella absolutely zips along. I would expect most people who read this will read it in one sitting and have a jolly good time doing it. Anyway, I won't go into any detail because you don't want to know much more about this than the synopsis, but overall I really liked the plot. I will say, there were a couple of bits where the time travel stuff either became a tad confusing or didn't make complete sense, but for the most part I had no trouble suspending my disbelief. The only slight issue I had was that some of the humour didn't quite land for me, but that's kind of to be expected with anything that has this much humour in it, it won't all land for everyone. I actually wasn't expecting it to be as funny as it was, Children of Time is the only other work by Tchaikovsky that I've read (well, I read some of Children of Ruin, but I didn't like it). So yeah, all in all this is a really fun little novella and I'm glad I got the opportunity to read it, I'll definitely be checking out more of Tchaikovsky's books. If you're a fan of time-travel sci-fi then this is definitely worth giving a read. Thanks to NetGalley and the publisher for providing me with an advanced review copy.

  22. 5 out of 5

    Roberta R. (Offbeat YA)

    Excerpt from my review - originally published at Offbeat YA. Pros: Complex, clever, perversely funny. Packs a lot of surprises for a book so short, and even manages to pose a serious question despite reading like a politically incorrect romp. Cons: If you don't like anti-heroes and open endings, this one won't be your cup of tea. WARNING! There's talk of sex and a few F-bombs. Will appeal to: Time-travel aficionados who aren't afraid to dip their toes into dark humour. First off...DISCLAIMER: I requ Excerpt from my review - originally published at Offbeat YA. Pros: Complex, clever, perversely funny. Packs a lot of surprises for a book so short, and even manages to pose a serious question despite reading like a politically incorrect romp. Cons: If you don't like anti-heroes and open endings, this one won't be your cup of tea. WARNING! There's talk of sex and a few F-bombs. Will appeal to: Time-travel aficionados who aren't afraid to dip their toes into dark humour. First off...DISCLAIMER: I requested this title on NetGalley. Thanks to Solaris/Rebellion Publishing for providing an ecopy. This didn't influence my review in any way. Also, please note: this is a very short book (under a hundred pages), so that's why my review is shorter than usual and not broken down into sections. Since the book's blurb is enthralling (enough for me to request a review copy), but a bit cryptic, here's mine: After the war that broke time itself, the last man living in the last future goes out on a limb to preserve his never-ending peace, until an unexpected visit changes everything. But, you know - whatever. ODATWBY has got a killer premise (no pun intended) however you look at it, and one I've never encountered before. This is such a perfect little book. I mean, it knows what it wants to accomplish, and it's perfect in that regard. I usually reserve 5-star ratings for books that - among other things - sport characters who really vibe with me on some level, but the rules don't apply here. The main character is an anti-hero if you ever saw one...but the author manages to have us sympathise with him. The other characters have their own agenda as well, and will stop at nothing until they get what they want...except they're not evil. Judging from the official blurb, one would expect the lead to perform a noble act or two in order to avoid more destruction, and maybe to go back in time in order to prevent it to happen at all...but that's not the case, because after all, humanity has never been able to abstain from breaking everything that is - even time itself eventually - so why bother? Also, didn't going back in time use to be a huge chunk of the problem, until it became THE problem? And isn't time irreparably damaged anyway? Part philosopher, part misanthrope and part cynic (but with a dark humor streak), the nameless lead - supposedly the last man living in the last future - just want to keep enjoying his high-tech (mock) Arcadia and playing with all of history...or what shards of it remain...except one day (so to speak, because in the last future there aren't "days" anymore) a big, totally unexpected "something" thwarts his plans big time (or so to speak, because time...well, you know the drill). So...this novella is outrageous, over the top, entertaining and hella creative, packed with small and not-so-small twists and (mostly) never-heard-of time-travel outings, and even peppered with the cleverest spin on the grandfather paradox. On the other hand, as I said, it poses a serious question: is there anything humanity can be trusted not to break, although in good faith? Really, the best of both worlds 🙂. Whole review here.

  23. 5 out of 5

    Trish

    True love is ... when you're trying to kill each other. BWAHAHAHAHAHAHA! It's the end of times. Because the invention of time travel caused humanity to break causality. Forever. Or so the last time soldier thought. Until "someone" shows up and shows him a terribly gushing Utopia in the future. So of course he no longer just has to guard the Here and Now against the past but also against the future. (view spoiler)[And how better to do that than by preventing himself from jumpstarting said future b True love is ... when you're trying to kill each other. BWAHAHAHAHAHAHA! It's the end of times. Because the invention of time travel caused humanity to break causality. Forever. Or so the last time soldier thought. Until "someone" shows up and shows him a terribly gushing Utopia in the future. So of course he no longer just has to guard the Here and Now against the past but also against the future. (view spoiler)[And how better to do that than by preventing himself from jumpstarting said future by killing his supposed love interest. The only problem is she has a problem with her "destiny", too, and figures it best to kill her intended and be done with it. (hide spoiler)] Hilarity ensues, not least thanks to (view spoiler)[their creative ways of trying to kill each other (hide spoiler)] . This was a fast and light read but sooooo much fun. And not just because there were dinosaurs as pets and lots of timey-wimey stuff and two deliciously murderous people that must be my spirit animals. :D You see, there was also a bit of gravitas, which was highly appreciated as well. Soooo good!

  24. 4 out of 5

    Ithil

    I received an ARC from Netgalley in exchange of a review. All opinions my own. This novella was so much fun to read. You only have to mention time travels to me and I’m usually already on board, but time travel AND Tchaikovski equals to a very high hyper percentage. I was not disappointed. Ok, I literally just checked the details and saw that this is not a novella but a nearly 200 pages book. That may give you an idea of how little it took me to immerse myself in this world. The plot is quite sim I received an ARC from Netgalley in exchange of a review. All opinions my own. This novella was so much fun to read. You only have to mention time travels to me and I’m usually already on board, but time travel AND Tchaikovski equals to a very high hyper percentage. I was not disappointed. Ok, I literally just checked the details and saw that this is not a novella but a nearly 200 pages book. That may give you an idea of how little it took me to immerse myself in this world. The plot is quite simple. There was an ultimate war, known as the Causality War, where the weapons were time machines, and that nearly destroyed the world. In order for humans not to repeat history, our main character waits at the end of time to take out of the way, and from history, whoever get to him. And he has a dinosaur! And of course, we are going to get a very interesting view on the grandfather's paradox. The characters are one of the highlights of the novel, as they carry most of its humour and tone. As a lonely and bitter character, I absolutely enjoyed his interactions with people and his vision of life. I saw myself cackling out loud more than a few times. I think in this book we can approach a less “serious” Tachikovski and the result being, both the author and the reader, having a blast. On the other hand, we have the use of time as the ultimate weapon, which is in itself, terrifying, but this is what makes the book so great, from my point of view, how it mixes very serious concepts with funny or even ridiculous ideas, creating something that would not leave the reader indifferent. Although short, (for what I am used to) the book does not lack in plot twists and turns. Overall was a very fast paced read with likeable characters and compelling ideas. One that I would absolutely recommend for readers who are not yet familiar with the author or those, like me, that would read even his shopping list. P.S: I'm sorry but, for my taste, that is one ugly cover.

  25. 5 out of 5

    JasonA

    This was a fun read. It was quite a different take on the time travel genre. It kind of reminded me of How You Lose the Time War, if that had been written by a smart ass instead of a poet. The ending leaves potential for a sequel, but still wraps things up.

  26. 4 out of 5

    Bookoholic.me

    „One Day All This Will Be Yours” is a humorous, smart and fast-paced novel that will send you to the world after the War To End All Wars. One person survived the biggest war of our times. It wasn’t on sticks and stones as Einstein thought, but it was a time travel war. People kept going back to the past, trying to fix the mistakes that were made. More people were altering their mistakes, creating new ones, destroying time chain and at some point no one really knew what was in the past and what w „One Day All This Will Be Yours” is a humorous, smart and fast-paced novel that will send you to the world after the War To End All Wars. One person survived the biggest war of our times. It wasn’t on sticks and stones as Einstein thought, but it was a time travel war. People kept going back to the past, trying to fix the mistakes that were made. More people were altering their mistakes, creating new ones, destroying time chain and at some point no one really knew what was in the past and what wasn’t. Which version of the reality is the right one? And then everything was destroyed with bombs. The narrator of the book decided to make sure that there will be no more war. He created a space at the end of time where all time travellers landed, and he went on a quest to kill them all. Sometimes he fed them to his allosaurus Miffly, sometimes he shot them, with some he had very meaningful conversations. Everything was going well... until he meets travellers from the FUTURE. Twisted tale of time travel, murder, holidays in the best times of the past and dinosaurs. I’ve read it after a really exhausting week at work and I honestly couldn’t find a better book for that time. I enjoyed every page, I laughed out loud and I fell in love with Miffly! Thank you Solaris for providing me an ARC through the NetGalley.

  27. 5 out of 5

    Whisper19

    Thanks to NetGalley and Rebellion for eARC in exchange for an honest review. First I need to comment on the title. Those who know, know. In this new Adrian Tchaikovsky book, we follow the events of the end of time, or so we are repeatedly told by the Narrator. The Narrator, the last survivor of the Causality War, is defending the future from possible time travellers, accompanied by his lovable fluffy allosaurus, Miffly. He stands guard there in the future and whenever someone from the past comes Thanks to NetGalley and Rebellion for eARC in exchange for an honest review. First I need to comment on the title. Those who know, know. In this new Adrian Tchaikovsky book, we follow the events of the end of time, or so we are repeatedly told by the Narrator. The Narrator, the last survivor of the Causality War, is defending the future from possible time travellers, accompanied by his lovable fluffy allosaurus, Miffly. He stands guard there in the future and whenever someone from the past comes there, he hunts them down and feeds them to Miffly. Things change once he gets a pair of visitors not from the past, but from the future. The Narrator also tells us about the events that led him to this point in time. The War that destroyed everything and the inability of people to just leave the past well enough alone once time travel is discovered. *some very slight spoilers here* Like all time travel stories out there, this one comes with a specific set of problems: what is the technology that enables him to travel (we are never told), what happens to the “grandfather paradox” and the “butterfly effect” (we are sort of given an explanation, but it’s an offhand “it doesn’t affect those who travel” explanation), what the hell is really happening (no explanation there). What we do get is a romp through time that almost feels like a series of vignettes that touch on the nerdy historian aspect of time travel and that’s that. In reality, to be more honest, it feels like the author is trying too hard. Let's visit ALL THE POINTS IN HISTORY! But of course, only the points that are in the past relative to our time. He never visits his past that would be our future. He visits Ancient Egypt, Ancient Greece, has lunch with Caligula, parties with people in fin de siècle Paris… but never let’s say Australia in 2334. Like I said, a nerdy romp though history. And the point of this? I don’t know. Perhaps it’s a judgement on our inability to be satisfied with anything. Or it might be a way of warning us that unchecked scientific development can cause more harm than good. Or it just might be a way for Tchaikovsky to create an idiot who believes that in order to create the best group of fighters one just has to put together Elizabeth Bathory, Achilles (not the immortal one), Stalin and a bunch of other easily recognizable names and throw them into a battle. How the hell did the Narrator believe that would work? He, who’s been all over the world and has been fighting a real war for ages doesn’t know that those leaders and sadists are basically paper pushers! I’m sad this was the first Tchaikovsky read for me. I wish I’d chosen a better one. Perhaps in the future I’ll try something else from him. We’ll see. But this one gets a no from me.

  28. 5 out of 5

    Mike

    It's like if This Is How You Lose The Time War and The Rosie Project had socially awkward, homicidal baby. There's a bit of tonal whiplash here when the breezy, fun rom-com energy gives way to sudden somber musings on the nature of war and causality (which I actually didn't mind - I thought they played off each other nicely) but this feels like it's too short a story to reasonably expect its characters to be developed enough for their actions to match their motives believably, but simultaneously It's like if This Is How You Lose The Time War and The Rosie Project had socially awkward, homicidal baby. There's a bit of tonal whiplash here when the breezy, fun rom-com energy gives way to sudden somber musings on the nature of war and causality (which I actually didn't mind - I thought they played off each other nicely) but this feels like it's too short a story to reasonably expect its characters to be developed enough for their actions to match their motives believably, but simultaneously too long to be quite able to get away with it. I think if this book had been longer it would have been more satisfying, yet I can see how this is a concept that's hard to sustain for any length of time. There's nothing here you haven't seen before, but if anything gets a pass for re-visiting well trod territory its a time travel story, and Adrian puts enough of a fresh spin on things that I recommend it. Makes for a nice evening read.

  29. 5 out of 5

    Hélène Louise

    As usual with the author this read was fun and enjoyable. The main character is clearly a sociopath (I couldn't help thinking of Billie Butcher in "The Boys" series!) but interesting to follow. I really loved how the context unfold slowly, with hints that take all their full importance and reality by afterthought (Miffly!). The global reflexion about the limitations and repercussions that would have travel machines, if they did exist, is really interesting, particularly in the way it would dehuma As usual with the author this read was fun and enjoyable. The main character is clearly a sociopath (I couldn't help thinking of Billie Butcher in "The Boys" series!) but interesting to follow. I really loved how the context unfold slowly, with hints that take all their full importance and reality by afterthought (Miffly!). The global reflexion about the limitations and repercussions that would have travel machines, if they did exist, is really interesting, particularly in the way it would dehumanized people for the time-travellers and, of course the travellers themselves, would couldn't stay sane, eventually. I appreciated less the second part, as the narrator became more and more unpleasant, as we plainly realise how completely amoral he has become (had to become). The tête-à-tête "game", supposedly funny, made me somewhat uncomfortable, as this kind of toxic relationship always does (well, to be honest, toxic in a romance story, there it's plainly to be taken with a pinch - a ladleful - of salt ^-^). The end is good, I wouldn't have seen it coming. All in all a good read for me, but not a very good one, probably because I never feel that mixing very serious reflexion (about time travel there, the author has clearly given much thought about the theory of it) and this kind of tone, irreverent, sardonic and over the top, really mixed well. (I thank Netgalley and Solaris for sending me the ARC in exchange for my honest review)

  30. 4 out of 5

    Heather

    Have you ever read a book, really enjoyed it but aren’t exactly sure what happened during that book. No? Maybe its just me but I have just finished One Day All This Will Be Yours and I loved reading it though I’m not 100% sure what exactly happened. This could be due to my old brain busting nemesis Time Travel. Our narrator lives an idyllic life. He has an enormous farm with many hi tech robots to look after all the dirty jobs and on it lives his loyal pet Miffly. He spends hours just strolling a Have you ever read a book, really enjoyed it but aren’t exactly sure what happened during that book. No? Maybe its just me but I have just finished One Day All This Will Be Yours and I loved reading it though I’m not 100% sure what exactly happened. This could be due to my old brain busting nemesis Time Travel. Our narrator lives an idyllic life. He has an enormous farm with many hi tech robots to look after all the dirty jobs and on it lives his loyal pet Miffly. He spends hours just strolling about his farm or tootling about on his tractor and he has the distinction of being the last human alive. Well sort of.... Our narrator fought a war, a war of time, whole points in time where wiped out and only slithers of time remain. He has tied up the loose ends as much as he can but occasionally he gets visitors from the past and present. He greets them, shakes them down for information and then feeds them, then he literally feeds them to Miffly who I’d better mention is a dinosaur, check the front cover out, thats her. He is determined to be the last man standing but a series of visitors who don’t end up in the belly of Miffly throw a slight spanner in his works. The past and future may be catching up with him. This book was bonkers but it was also incredibly entertaining! Thank you to the publisher and NetGalley for providing me with a copy in exchange for an honest review.

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