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Becoming All Things: How Small Changes Lead To Lasting Connections Across Cultures

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Cultural identities and cross-cultural engagement are not things that anyone can choose to ignore anymore, least of all Christians. Many of us want to have diverse friends and are passionate about justice. But if we are serious about cross-cultural relationships--real relationships that lead to understanding, healing and solidarity across cultural lines--we need to be will Cultural identities and cross-cultural engagement are not things that anyone can choose to ignore anymore, least of all Christians. Many of us want to have diverse friends and are passionate about justice. But if we are serious about cross-cultural relationships--real relationships that lead to understanding, healing and solidarity across cultural lines--we need to be willing to change. And that's not something that comes easy for any of us. In Becoming All Things, Michelle Reyes offers a poignant discussion on the challenges surrounding cross-cultural relationships in America today, including the reasons for cultural difference, stereotyping, appropriation, gentrification, racism, and more. Seeking to deconstruct these things in our own lives, Reyes focuses on the concept of cultural accommodation in 1 Corinthians 9:19-23, and looks at the ways in which we need to adapt who we are in order to become all things to all people. The problems inherent in cross-cultural relationships have to do with us. We have to do better. With language that's witty, funny, and accessible, Reyes offers hope for majority and minority alike by showing what's possible when all of us are willing to try something new.


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Cultural identities and cross-cultural engagement are not things that anyone can choose to ignore anymore, least of all Christians. Many of us want to have diverse friends and are passionate about justice. But if we are serious about cross-cultural relationships--real relationships that lead to understanding, healing and solidarity across cultural lines--we need to be will Cultural identities and cross-cultural engagement are not things that anyone can choose to ignore anymore, least of all Christians. Many of us want to have diverse friends and are passionate about justice. But if we are serious about cross-cultural relationships--real relationships that lead to understanding, healing and solidarity across cultural lines--we need to be willing to change. And that's not something that comes easy for any of us. In Becoming All Things, Michelle Reyes offers a poignant discussion on the challenges surrounding cross-cultural relationships in America today, including the reasons for cultural difference, stereotyping, appropriation, gentrification, racism, and more. Seeking to deconstruct these things in our own lives, Reyes focuses on the concept of cultural accommodation in 1 Corinthians 9:19-23, and looks at the ways in which we need to adapt who we are in order to become all things to all people. The problems inherent in cross-cultural relationships have to do with us. We have to do better. With language that's witty, funny, and accessible, Reyes offers hope for majority and minority alike by showing what's possible when all of us are willing to try something new.

30 review for Becoming All Things: How Small Changes Lead To Lasting Connections Across Cultures

  1. 5 out of 5

    Shiby George

    The backdrop for this book is set on 1 Corinthians 9, and it's amazing to see how Dr. Reyes dissects those verses word by word to teach us the importance of stepping out of our comfort zones to relate with a refugee, an undocumented immigrant, Native Americans, and BIPOC people. I have had many moments of laughter and tears as I relate to a lot of what Michelle is sharing from her experience on cross-cultural relationships/interactions. In this book, Michelle prophetically and courageously chall The backdrop for this book is set on 1 Corinthians 9, and it's amazing to see how Dr. Reyes dissects those verses word by word to teach us the importance of stepping out of our comfort zones to relate with a refugee, an undocumented immigrant, Native Americans, and BIPOC people. I have had many moments of laughter and tears as I relate to a lot of what Michelle is sharing from her experience on cross-cultural relationships/interactions. In this book, Michelle prophetically and courageously challenges us to dig deep into the scriptures and reflect and reclaim our own ethnic identity to reach out to people across cultures. Through the course of reading this book, I was reminded of my own internal bias/racism towards fellow Indians/South Asians/POC groups. One of my favorite sections is when Michelle confesses her experiences of code-switching. During the course of her book, she touches on colorism, systemic injustices & cultural/social disparities we see in America today through a lot of her own personal stories. As a Christian who has been influenced by Evangelical teachings, I was always taught to find the common ground to "Win People" to Christ, and in the book, I appreciate Michelle for challenging celebrate the cultural differences. I would highly recommend this book to folks who are in a space to listen, learn & unlearn some of the systemic doctrines we have been engrained with as Christians living in the West or influenced by the West. This is definitely one of those books that I need to be re-read for the sake of accountability & actual growth in this area of embracing other BIPOC communities & honoring their lives as image-bearers. I am grateful for Michelle's boldness and vulnerability, and for the time she has carved out in acknowledging the pain & beauty in growing & expanding in our own cultural awareness as people living in the States.

  2. 5 out of 5

    Jantzen Loza

    Timely and Thoughtful Insights on How to Engage Cross-culturally After binge listening to the Reclaim Podcast with AACC’s Raymond Chang and Michelle Reyes, picking up Dr. Reyes’ Becoming All Things was an easy decision. What is different about this book from others within this topic is her approachability as a “coach” as she walks you through various facets of engaging cross culturally from her unique perspective. Through her anecdotes, I found myself nodding along as Reyes provided a language t Timely and Thoughtful Insights on How to Engage Cross-culturally After binge listening to the Reclaim Podcast with AACC’s Raymond Chang and Michelle Reyes, picking up Dr. Reyes’ Becoming All Things was an easy decision. What is different about this book from others within this topic is her approachability as a “coach” as she walks you through various facets of engaging cross culturally from her unique perspective. Through her anecdotes, I found myself nodding along as Reyes provided a language that mirrored much of my own experience as a Filipino American. Her exposition of Paul’s first letter to the Corinthians (9:19-23) is reminiscent of Ray Bakke or Brenda Salter-McNeill, so relatable and yet thought provoking. This is a book that I will be returning to again and again and one that I’ll be recommending frequently!

  3. 4 out of 5

    Hannah Blair

    It’s wonderful to read something that reflects my own story in many ways! At the same time, I think this one of those books that will speak to readers of the majority and the minority at the same time. Highly recommend as an individual read or to go through with a group.

  4. 5 out of 5

    Persis

    In 1 Corinthians, the Apostle Paul spoke of becoming all things to all people. He attended synagogues to reach his fellow Jews. He debated pagan philosophers on Mars Hill in Athens. He did not expect people to come to him but went to those outside the commonwealth of Israel. And he went knowing about the varied cultures and beliefs beforehand to be a better witness. In "Becoming All Things," author Dr. Michelle Reyes exhorts the church today to do the same - to develop cross-cultural intelligenc In 1 Corinthians, the Apostle Paul spoke of becoming all things to all people. He attended synagogues to reach his fellow Jews. He debated pagan philosophers on Mars Hill in Athens. He did not expect people to come to him but went to those outside the commonwealth of Israel. And he went knowing about the varied cultures and beliefs beforehand to be a better witness. In "Becoming All Things," author Dr. Michelle Reyes exhorts the church today to do the same - to develop cross-cultural intelligence and cross-cultural friendships for the sake of the gospel. However, this requires hard work. It requires us to see beyond ourselves, our cultures, and preferences. It requires the dismantling of stereotypes and seeing life through the eyes of others. It requires humility to not assume that our experience or culture is best or preferred and to be willing to learn from those outside our camp. This should be especially true for believers as becoming like Jesus does not entail assimilation to a particular human culture. But cross-cultural intelligence also entails appreciating our own cultures, which encompasses far more than skin color, nation of origin, or language. It entails being honest about its shortcomings too. We are a mosaic of many, even multicultural influences that have shaped our lives under God's ordering. We are not not meant to be acultural. When we rightly assess and value this in ourselves, we can then honor this complexity in others. And the beauty of diversity is that we can be very much alike, very different, and still be one in Christ all at the same time. Thanks to immigration and travel, the world is at our doorstep. We have a great opportunity as neighbors and members of local churches to appreciate the variety of humanity God has created and the beauty of the global body of Christ. But the question is, will we take this opportunity? The challenge is real, but so is the benefit - a foretaste of the throng around the throne from every tribe, tongue, and nation. I pray that the church will rise to this challenge, which is why l gladly recommend "Becoming All Things." It is convicting, eye-opening, and hopeful. And I hope it opens your eyes to the beauty of the diverse body of Christ.

  5. 4 out of 5

    Lora Kwan

    Michelle Reyes tackles the complexities and intricacies of cross-cultural connection - the hows and whats, but also the why framed in 1 Corinthians 9 through Paul. Bridging cultures and immersing yourself into others' worlds builds relationships that are enriching to you personally, but most importantly, they open opportunities for Christ to be known through you. It is especially timely in the current climate of our nation (the United States) to realize we must become all things to all people to Michelle Reyes tackles the complexities and intricacies of cross-cultural connection - the hows and whats, but also the why framed in 1 Corinthians 9 through Paul. Bridging cultures and immersing yourself into others' worlds builds relationships that are enriching to you personally, but most importantly, they open opportunities for Christ to be known through you. It is especially timely in the current climate of our nation (the United States) to realize we must become all things to all people to win some. Today loving our neighbor might mean protecting their lives from unjust killing, from being attacked for who or what they are - we must remember that all are the imago Dei regardless how different their culture or worldview is from ours. Michelle does not say we should become all things to all people in this age of propaganda and agenda from both the left and right by forsaking the real truth of Christ to be social justice warriors, rather that the truth of Christ IS that He himself became all things to all people so that they might know the good news and be saved. In other words, people will not hear or see Christ in you unless you learn what things they care about in their daily lives. Instead of centering your own experience and beliefs, center those of another culture first to build a bridge to understanding and empathy. Truly if we are centering God in our lives, then naturally we would center others before centering ourselves. Center God, Center Others. Center Yourself. This is the path to cross-cultural understanding and how true unity can be achieved in the Church. This book is a fantastic tool as a BIPOC if you feel unseen or unheard and need validation for how you have felt disregarded in the past. This book is a fantastic tool for white folks who want to be allies in creating safe cross-cultural bridges and spaces. This book is a fantastic tool for all Christ followers for how we should be navigating our lives in this fallen world, and how we can be Christ to all people to win some for His glory.

  6. 4 out of 5

    Esther

    This book adds more gold to the conversation on race! One of the things that sets it apart from other anti-racism and racial reconciliation books is how Michelle Ami Reyes emphasizes the importance of all of our ethnic/cultural heritages. And I love how she does this in both a theologically robust and practical way! Oh, how I wish I could give this book to my younger self and say, "You don't need to erase who you are to fulfill your calling!" The amount of passages I highlighted is ridiculous! H This book adds more gold to the conversation on race! One of the things that sets it apart from other anti-racism and racial reconciliation books is how Michelle Ami Reyes emphasizes the importance of all of our ethnic/cultural heritages. And I love how she does this in both a theologically robust and practical way! Oh, how I wish I could give this book to my younger self and say, "You don't need to erase who you are to fulfill your calling!" The amount of passages I highlighted is ridiculous! Here are a few to give you a sneak peek: “No matter your ethnicity, skin color, or cultural values, you have been made as a bearer of God’s image with dignity and worth equal to every other person. If you don’t value your cultural identity, you are not valuing a vital aspect of the image of God within you. If you don’t value the cultural identity of another person, you are not valuing the image of God within him or her.” “This is a common, repeated experience for many ethnic minorities: when someone attempts to make a connection, they stereotype and filter my cultural identity through what they know...I am a unique individual. Rather than assuming I can be known or understood by assumptions made on the basis of my skin color or appearance, I want people to understand how my cultural identity informs the way I see the world.” “The words of Scripture challenge us to step into other people’s histories and stories, to see through their eyes, to mourn for their pain, and to build better futures for one another. Justice is not a distraction from the gospel. It is a core message of the gospel. The life of Jesus declares this to be true, and if you want to prioritize the gospel in your life, then the pursuit of justice on behalf of others must be an essential component of your faith. Like Paul, become the weak. See the world through their eyes. Only then will people truly begin to see Christ in you.” I HIGHLY recommend this book for every Christian because it spells out a path for healing and flourishing—both for those who are BIPOC and for those who are White.

  7. 5 out of 5

    Amy

    As one might expect from a book entitled "Becoming All Things" Reyes writes a book that speaks to everyone about how we can take up the biblical challenge to make connections across cultures. She is challenging and winsome as she engages readers with scriptures and practical examples. Generous and relevant examples from her own life draw the reader in while delivering poignant commentary on an unacceptable current reality of how we enteract cross culturally. Having read several books on similar As one might expect from a book entitled "Becoming All Things" Reyes writes a book that speaks to everyone about how we can take up the biblical challenge to make connections across cultures. She is challenging and winsome as she engages readers with scriptures and practical examples. Generous and relevant examples from her own life draw the reader in while delivering poignant commentary on an unacceptable current reality of how we enteract cross culturally. Having read several books on similar topics, Reyes has a fresh and needed perspective for anyone wanting to live out the gospel. I especially appreciated/will continue to wrestle with the chapters on cultural appropriation and redefining fluency. The call to much deeper engagement than the surface level and to challenge to embrace silence are both things that will sit with me for a long time. Also, I was refreshed and encouraged by the way the Reyes spoke to BIPOC readers and those of majority culture. There was enough to challenge everyone in this book!

  8. 4 out of 5

    Linnea Boese

    As someone who has lived my life crossing cultural boundaries to connect with people -- usually by choice, and sometimes out of necessity -- I felt like I was coming home while I read this book: Becoming All Things: How Small Changes Lead To Lasting Connections Across Cultures, by Michille Reyes. Michelle is right on about how it is essential that we live out our identity in Christ by living as he did. If we had lived with him and actually followed him around, we would not have stayed in our com As someone who has lived my life crossing cultural boundaries to connect with people -- usually by choice, and sometimes out of necessity -- I felt like I was coming home while I read this book: Becoming All Things: How Small Changes Lead To Lasting Connections Across Cultures, by Michille Reyes. Michelle is right on about how it is essential that we live out our identity in Christ by living as he did. If we had lived with him and actually followed him around, we would not have stayed in our comfort zones; he did not. So when we take up our cross and follow him now, his love for all peoples will take us to places where we are not like everyone else. And to become like them, we need to be willing to change, to adapt. Yes, that is what overseas missionaries do (that has been my life). But it is also our calling when living in the United States, where diverse peoples live. The problem is that most of the time they live in different spaces. We are called to be different, to cross those lines and spend time building real relationships with people who are not like us. This is what I am learning to do in the phase of retirement: I am white, but living in a black community and learning to become truly a part of it. There are uncomfortable moments, but there is joy in building friendships, even when their is empathetic pain that comes from hearing their stories and entering their lives. Michelle gives great counsel on how to do this. She also supplies us with ways to encourage others to respond to the biblical principles that promote this, and practical ways to learn to empathize with and speak out for the oppressed and marginalized. Read the book and be challenged and affirmed!

  9. 5 out of 5

    Corrie Haffly

    Becoming All Things by Michelle Reyes is an incredibly timely book as our (American) culture grapples with increased polarization and as many more people in the evangelical church, myself included, are beginning to lean into God's call to racial reconciliation. Looking carefully at 1 Corinthians 9, Michelle gives concrete examples of how "becoming all things" is part of the Jesus-way to connect with people from other cultures - not just people of other ethnicities, but people from any way of lif Becoming All Things by Michelle Reyes is an incredibly timely book as our (American) culture grapples with increased polarization and as many more people in the evangelical church, myself included, are beginning to lean into God's call to racial reconciliation. Looking carefully at 1 Corinthians 9, Michelle gives concrete examples of how "becoming all things" is part of the Jesus-way to connect with people from other cultures - not just people of other ethnicities, but people from any way of life or thought or worldview or practice that is different than our own. This requires some self-understanding of our own culture, some Christ-like humility to give up our own ways of doing things and viewing things, and the creativity and openness to actually embrace the "other." This book is completely applicable to anyone who wants to grow in racial justice and seek cross-cultural relationships, but I also found lightbulb moments even in my everyday life of being a wife, coworker, or friend. Because ultimately, my own pride and belief in the rightness of my views and ways affect those relationships as well, whether it's how I think the dishwasher should be loaded or what kind of behavior I think is considered "respectable." I was especially challenged by her chapter about cultural appropriation as someone who enjoys different types of ethnic cuisine. "When we purchase, consume, or wear something from someone else's culture, will they feel honored or mocked, advantaged or disadvantaged? ... Consider what America might be like if people loved Mexicans as much as they loved tacos. How would our society be different if people loved the Black community as much as they loved their music (e.g. hip-hop, R&B, blues, etc.)?" Another lightbulb moment was when Michelle pointed out the distinction between the Mosaic law, which required strict conformity in culture and theology, vs. the new covenant, which "redeems all people and cultures" and in fact, encourages US to change ourselves to meet others where they are, just as Jesus did.

  10. 5 out of 5

    Morris Chang

    tldr version: It's a good book. Read it. You need it. I needed it. long(er) version: There's at least a million directions that you can go with a book like this. Tackling issues of race, culture, and church is tricky, and in many contexts, outright risky. But for those who are frustrated with the racial homogeneity of our churches and have an open heart to learn, this is an excellent, accessible guide that is firmly rooted in scriptures and presents a hopeful vision of what the church can (should!) tldr version: It's a good book. Read it. You need it. I needed it. long(er) version: There's at least a million directions that you can go with a book like this. Tackling issues of race, culture, and church is tricky, and in many contexts, outright risky. But for those who are frustrated with the racial homogeneity of our churches and have an open heart to learn, this is an excellent, accessible guide that is firmly rooted in scriptures and presents a hopeful vision of what the church can (should!) be. One of the strengths of Becoming All Things is how Dr. Reyes strikes just the right tone for each chapter through her personal experiences in order to frame the problems and situations to be addressed in that section. For the minority reader, the stories she recounts are all too familiar - uncomfortable (aka cringey) encounters with the majority culture. The clarifying explanations of why we inherently find these encounters to be awkward (hurtful, even), are invaluable, as oftentimes it is difficult and exhausting to articulate. Dr. Reyes offers helpful correctives balanced with the realism of personal discomfort and costs of pursuing meaningful cross-cultural relationships. That information is all well and good (it really is), but where Becoming All Things stood out to me was its treatment of the WHY. Rooted in Paul's writings from 1 Corinthians, and drawing from other biblical themes concerning cultures and ethnicities, Dr. Reyes makes a compelling theological case that the credibility and witness of the church is at stake. Having had many discouraging conversations with other minority Christians about experiences in American churches, it is easy to see why. And, it is easy to despair. Thankfully, while Becoming All Things is honest about frustration, anger, and hurt, the underlying message offers hope, and the reasons for that hope.

  11. 5 out of 5

    Catherine McNiel

    Dr. Michelle Reyes draws from 1 Corinthians 9, cross-cultural scholarship, and her own experience as a 2nd generation Indian American to firmly yet gently point us toward a path forward. We don't need to choose between being ourselves and accommodating others who are different from us; with small steps we can be better friends and neighbors, learn to listen, welcome, and catch a glimpse of our blind spots along the way. Dr. Michelle Reyes draws from 1 Corinthians 9, cross-cultural scholarship, and her own experience as a 2nd generation Indian American to firmly yet gently point us toward a path forward. We don't need to choose between being ourselves and accommodating others who are different from us; with small steps we can be better friends and neighbors, learn to listen, welcome, and catch a glimpse of our blind spots along the way.

  12. 4 out of 5

    Jen Keifer

    I am a different person after reading Michelle Reyes’ book Becoming All Things. It has permanently altered, for the better, my understanding of the necessity and practice of cross-cultural engagement. Using the Apostle Paul’s life example from I Corinthians 9, Michelle has taught me about the gospel imperative to deliberately engage all people in my community; she has equipped me with practical tools and insights; she has lovingly corrected me where I needed it; and she has inspired me to do it I am a different person after reading Michelle Reyes’ book Becoming All Things. It has permanently altered, for the better, my understanding of the necessity and practice of cross-cultural engagement. Using the Apostle Paul’s life example from I Corinthians 9, Michelle has taught me about the gospel imperative to deliberately engage all people in my community; she has equipped me with practical tools and insights; she has lovingly corrected me where I needed it; and she has inspired me to do it all from a starting point of love. I am so very grateful for this book. Every Christian should read it. I could write pages about the new insights I’ve gained from this book, but I’ll just share my two biggest takeaways. The first is the directional shift from the Mosaic covenant to the new covenant: I have never viewed the difference between the covenants from this explicitly cultural lens before. Wow. The author states, “The demand for conformity is one of the big differences between the Mosaic covenant of the Old Testament and the new covenant of the New Testament. The former required people to become like the Israelites both theologically and culturally. It involved numerous outward marks, like circumcision, that physically defined what it meant to be an Israelite and part of God’s people. But under the new covenant, the gospel redeems all people and cultures. God no longer asks us all to adapt to one particular culture but instead asks us to become like the people we seek to reach.” Her text for this analysis comes from 1 Corinthians 9:19-23: “For though I am free from all, I have made myself a servant to all, that I might win more of them. To the Jews I became as a Jew, in order to win Jews. To those under the law I became as one under the law (though not being myself under the law) that I might win those under the law. To those outside the law I became as one outside the law (not being outside the law of God but under the law of Christ) that I might win those outside the law. To the weak I became weak, that I might win the weak. I have become all things to all people, that by all means I might save some. I do it all for the sake of the gospel, that I may share with them in its blessings.” My other big takeaway is from her excellent chapter 5 explanation of cultural appropriation and its opposite: cultural connection. That chapter alone is worth the price of the book. The author makes the simple and powerful point that the difference between the two is loving service to neighbor. Our crossing of culture should be motivated by doing good to the people whose culture we’re appreciating, not in enriching ourselves. In I Corinthians, the Apostle Paul corrects the church for appropriating culture without loving their neighbors well. “Paul’s rebuke is based on a simple principle: the Christian life is not about what you can do—your rights and privileges—but what you’re willing to give up to lovingly serve others. In fact, he tells them twice in 1 Corinthians, ‘“I have the right to do anything,” you say—but not everything is beneficial. “I have the right to do anything” —but not everything is constructive. No one should seek their own good, but the good of others’ (6:12; 10:23–24). In other words, when addressing topics like food and other cultural activities, the principles of building up and benefiting the community are of utmost priority.” Put another way, Michelle Reyes states simply but powerfully, “love must be our defining marker.” She points out that I Corinthians 13, the famous “love chapter,” is corrective instruction that comes just a few chapters after the rebuke above. May we practice this kind of love across cultures well in Jesus’ name. This book is a must-have handbook to help us on the way.

  13. 4 out of 5

    Adriel Rose

    Ever have a book that continually makes you excited to read and learn and you don’t want it to end? Michelle Ami Reyes' new book, Becoming All Things: How Small Changes Lead To Lasting Connections Across Cultures has been one of those books for me. It was like having a light turned on in my heart and mind every time I picked it up to read another section. In a time when the dominant culture in American society and the American Church are being called to account for their myopic and harmful appro Ever have a book that continually makes you excited to read and learn and you don’t want it to end? Michelle Ami Reyes' new book, Becoming All Things: How Small Changes Lead To Lasting Connections Across Cultures has been one of those books for me. It was like having a light turned on in my heart and mind every time I picked it up to read another section. In a time when the dominant culture in American society and the American Church are being called to account for their myopic and harmful approach to the people and cultures around them, Reyes takes readers from all backgrounds on a journey towards better understanding across those cultural divides. One of the things I appreciated the most about Reyes' writing is that she helps the reader ask good questions, of themselves and of the people around them. Each chapter encourages the reader to not only join in on a conversation with genuine humility but also to put our bodies into new spaces and to deal with the discomfort that will invariably come up in a healthy way. She addresses topics like the differences between cultural appropriation and appreciation, stereotypes, privilege, justice, and so much more, guiding us towards a better approach. Becoming All Things is a book that I know I will come back to over and over again. I greatly appreciate Reyes pouring out her time, heart, and vulnerability into this book and I would recommend it to anyone who is wanting to learn how to really be a life-giving part of the beautiful multi-cultural world we live in.

  14. 5 out of 5

    Emily P

    Engaging the cultures around us means learning about those who are different than us. In "Becoming All Things," Reyes shares some of her personal experiences and what she's observed over the years. Compassion and empathy are necessary for those seeking to connect across cultures. Drawing from 1 Corinthians 9:19-23, Reyes explains how we can take cues from Paul and adapt to those around us by doing life with people who have a different heritage than our own, creating community and loving them as Engaging the cultures around us means learning about those who are different than us. In "Becoming All Things," Reyes shares some of her personal experiences and what she's observed over the years. Compassion and empathy are necessary for those seeking to connect across cultures. Drawing from 1 Corinthians 9:19-23, Reyes explains how we can take cues from Paul and adapt to those around us by doing life with people who have a different heritage than our own, creating community and loving them as the Gospel intends. This is an interesting read that challenges and encourages. Here are a few quotes that resonated with me: "Paul's actions imply a view of himself as a relative nobody. He treats himself as if he is the one on the margins, the one without power, as a way to care for everyone." "Remember that people's lives convey stories, so getting to the heart of your cultural differences means learning to see and understand what narrative the other person is communicating. That perspective should keep us humble as we strive to see what life is like through another person's eyes." Invest time to delve deep when reading this book. "Becoming All Things" is a book that would be a great discussion for a book club, too!

  15. 4 out of 5

    Karen Brown

    Dr. Michelle Ami Reyes provides a much needed perspective as a unique second generation Indian-American woman. This needs to be heard by everyone right now, the Church and Christians in particular. I think her wisdom, her journey, and knowledge is incredibly helpful for many to build discussions around cross culture engagement, connection, identity, and the difficulties surrounding navigating these issues to help bring consistent, lasting, real change. The introspective questions and insights as Dr. Michelle Ami Reyes provides a much needed perspective as a unique second generation Indian-American woman. This needs to be heard by everyone right now, the Church and Christians in particular. I think her wisdom, her journey, and knowledge is incredibly helpful for many to build discussions around cross culture engagement, connection, identity, and the difficulties surrounding navigating these issues to help bring consistent, lasting, real change. The introspective questions and insights asked in this book are also brilliant. Those really seeking change will take this to heart and ask themselves these questions. As Dr. Reyes states in her book, “Many of us want to have diverse friends and are passionate about justice. But if we are serious about cross-cultural relationships—real relationships that lead to understanding, healing, and solidarity across cultural lines—we need to be willing to change. And that’s not something that comes easy.” Becoming All Things is certainly a must read!

  16. 4 out of 5

    Justin

    By and large, there is a lack of cultural identity, awareness, and fluency training for many leaders, and especially pastors. Traditional vocational ministry training includes little if any development in these areas. As a result, many leaders lack the knowledge and resources to approach these issues well. This book by Michelle Ami Reyes is a much needed resource, for everyone, but esp leaders. As a pastor who is multi-racial/multi-cultural, so much personally resonated with me (particularly as By and large, there is a lack of cultural identity, awareness, and fluency training for many leaders, and especially pastors. Traditional vocational ministry training includes little if any development in these areas. As a result, many leaders lack the knowledge and resources to approach these issues well. This book by Michelle Ami Reyes is a much needed resource, for everyone, but esp leaders. As a pastor who is multi-racial/multi-cultural, so much personally resonated with me (particularly as an Asian American of Indian nationality descent). As a pastor of multi-racial, multi-cultural congregation, so much was helpful and practical in our continued attempts to reimagine what God is doing through that diversity. I can’t recommend this book enough, especially for leaders. Thanks so much for your transparency and work!

  17. 4 out of 5

    Given Tanri

    The book centers 1 Corinthians 9 as the primary motivator for intercultural relationship building. Reyes combines her reflections on this passage with relatable memoirs and actionable pieces of advice. This book is a very accessible primer for the everyday American Christian of any race who is trying to engage people across the racial, ethnic, and cultural lines. Furthermore, the book serves as an example that Biblically-grounded conversations on race do not have to be convoluted: they can start The book centers 1 Corinthians 9 as the primary motivator for intercultural relationship building. Reyes combines her reflections on this passage with relatable memoirs and actionable pieces of advice. This book is a very accessible primer for the everyday American Christian of any race who is trying to engage people across the racial, ethnic, and cultural lines. Furthermore, the book serves as an example that Biblically-grounded conversations on race do not have to be convoluted: they can start with small changes. Note: Reyes speaks to a US-based audience, and non-US based readers like myself may need more context to understand and recontextualize her practical advice.

  18. 5 out of 5

    Lisa

    Becoming All Things centers around 1 Corinthians 9: 19-23, Paul's challenge to become all things to all people. This book is a beautiful guide to expanding our boundaries and deepening our empathy. In our fractured world, Reyes's words encourage, champion, and push us to intentionally connect across cultures. Through practical stories, thoughtful reflection, and clear direction readers are given the tools they need to give voice to the stories of others. In those relationships, we experience the Becoming All Things centers around 1 Corinthians 9: 19-23, Paul's challenge to become all things to all people. This book is a beautiful guide to expanding our boundaries and deepening our empathy. In our fractured world, Reyes's words encourage, champion, and push us to intentionally connect across cultures. Through practical stories, thoughtful reflection, and clear direction readers are given the tools they need to give voice to the stories of others. In those relationships, we experience the fullest of Christ.

  19. 4 out of 5

    JR. Forasteros

    Dr. Reyes has given us a book that powerfully, personally and clearly leads us through the first steps in learning to form meaningful, authentic and transformative cross-cultural relationships. If you still find the evolving conversation around race and culture impenetrable, this book is for you. Dr. Reyes leads the reader through identifying cultural bias and choosing curiosity over suspicion. She shows us why things like cultural appropriation matter so much if we're going to be serious about Dr. Reyes has given us a book that powerfully, personally and clearly leads us through the first steps in learning to form meaningful, authentic and transformative cross-cultural relationships. If you still find the evolving conversation around race and culture impenetrable, this book is for you. Dr. Reyes leads the reader through identifying cultural bias and choosing curiosity over suspicion. She shows us why things like cultural appropriation matter so much if we're going to be serious about real relationships with people who don't look like us.

  20. 5 out of 5

    Shala Self Parker

    This was a wonderful book from a Christian perspective on how to stop racism and meet people with different cultures by making small changes. She talked about Paul and how he stepped out of his comfort zone to connect to everyone. She said even if you don’t speak the same language, you should find a way to connect. I love this book and will be reading it again to get things that I missed the first time.

  21. 5 out of 5

    Ashley Artavia Novalis

    This is a great primer for multicultural unity - especially for dominant culture Christians who aren’t sure what being an ally should practically look like. Reyes takes the patience to recall personal experiences that should stir humility and reflection, and takes the time and effort to explain how “small changes” can be essential in honoring people we interact with from cultures different than our own. A pretty great foundational book for understanding cultural differences with some really impo This is a great primer for multicultural unity - especially for dominant culture Christians who aren’t sure what being an ally should practically look like. Reyes takes the patience to recall personal experiences that should stir humility and reflection, and takes the time and effort to explain how “small changes” can be essential in honoring people we interact with from cultures different than our own. A pretty great foundational book for understanding cultural differences with some really important concepts for white Christians before they enter into conversations on racism and justice.

  22. 4 out of 5

    Leah

    I could not stop highlighting this book. Dr. Reyes provides tremendous insights into culture, how to form relationships with individuals from different cultures, and how we can bring about healing and change in our society. As a white woman of Scandinavian descent, I feel more equipped to make friends with people of color AND to embrace my Scandinavian background.

  23. 5 out of 5

    Amanda Johnston

    This is a timely and insightful book. Dr. Reyes proposes ways we can explore and embrace our specific cultural identities while also adapting ourselves to connect to others via their own cultural values. It's a paradox that allows us to know ourselves and others better. Highly recommend. This is a timely and insightful book. Dr. Reyes proposes ways we can explore and embrace our specific cultural identities while also adapting ourselves to connect to others via their own cultural values. It's a paradox that allows us to know ourselves and others better. Highly recommend.

  24. 4 out of 5

    Eileen Santa

    I loved the book, I have an assignment now to evaluate how have I been treating or reacting to other minority groups situations. I want to become all things.

  25. 5 out of 5

    Christine E.

    I have really enjoyed Becoming All Things, by Dr. Michelle Reyes. Now more than ever we need a helpful way forward understanding people of different cultures, backgrounds, and ethnicities than us. Dr. Reyes offers practical tools and helpful vision for choosing humility, grace, and truth. "At the heart of the Christian life is a commitment to a messy web of cross-cultural relationships that seeks the flourishing of all people, whether that be within our own families, our neighborhoods, our churc I have really enjoyed Becoming All Things, by Dr. Michelle Reyes. Now more than ever we need a helpful way forward understanding people of different cultures, backgrounds, and ethnicities than us. Dr. Reyes offers practical tools and helpful vision for choosing humility, grace, and truth. "At the heart of the Christian life is a commitment to a messy web of cross-cultural relationships that seeks the flourishing of all people, whether that be within our own families, our neighborhoods, our churches, or our society as a whole." I highly recommend this book to all people, and in particular to people of faith. We need to do better as Christ followers in this area, and this book will help us.

  26. 5 out of 5

    Fliggin4

    Becoming All Things is theologically smart, pastorally gentle, and missiologically wise. If the reader views books as conversation partners this book should have a seat at the table. The author uncovers God’s heart for beauty and inclusion through Scripture and stories of lived experience. This book can guide Christians into a deeper understanding of cultural identity, why it matters, and how the reader can humbly and compassionately engage in cross-cultural dialogue. In a society of constant di Becoming All Things is theologically smart, pastorally gentle, and missiologically wise. If the reader views books as conversation partners this book should have a seat at the table. The author uncovers God’s heart for beauty and inclusion through Scripture and stories of lived experience. This book can guide Christians into a deeper understanding of cultural identity, why it matters, and how the reader can humbly and compassionately engage in cross-cultural dialogue. In a society of constant division we need bridges. This book can help build one.

  27. 5 out of 5

    Nina

  28. 4 out of 5

    David

  29. 5 out of 5

    Daniel Lee

  30. 4 out of 5

    Herminia Esqueda

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