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As Europe buckles under Nazi occupation, Maisie Dobbs investigates a possible murder that threatens devastating repercussions for Britain's war efforts in this latest installment in the New York Times bestselling mystery series. September 1941. While on a delivery, young Freddie Hackett, a message runner for a government office, witnesses an argument that ends in murder. Cr As Europe buckles under Nazi occupation, Maisie Dobbs investigates a possible murder that threatens devastating repercussions for Britain's war efforts in this latest installment in the New York Times bestselling mystery series. September 1941. While on a delivery, young Freddie Hackett, a message runner for a government office, witnesses an argument that ends in murder. Crouching in the doorway of a bombed-out house, Freddie waits until the coast is clear. But when he arrives at the delivery address, he’s shocked to come face to face with the killer. Dismissed by the police when he attempts to report the crime, Freddie goes in search of a woman he once met when delivering a message: Maisie Dobbs. While Maisie believes the boy and wants to help, she must maintain extreme caution: she’s working secretly for the Special Operations Executive, assessing candidates for crucial work with the French resistance. Her two worlds collide when she spots the killer in a place she least expects. She soon realizes she’s been pulled into the orbit of a man who has his own reasons to kill—reasons that go back to the last war. As Maisie becomes entangled in a power struggle between Britain’s intelligence efforts in France and the work of Free French agents operating across Europe, she must also contend with the lingering question of Freddie Hackett’s state of mind. What she uncovers could hold disastrous consequences for all involved in this compelling chapter of the “series that seems to get better with every entry” (Wall Street Journal).


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As Europe buckles under Nazi occupation, Maisie Dobbs investigates a possible murder that threatens devastating repercussions for Britain's war efforts in this latest installment in the New York Times bestselling mystery series. September 1941. While on a delivery, young Freddie Hackett, a message runner for a government office, witnesses an argument that ends in murder. Cr As Europe buckles under Nazi occupation, Maisie Dobbs investigates a possible murder that threatens devastating repercussions for Britain's war efforts in this latest installment in the New York Times bestselling mystery series. September 1941. While on a delivery, young Freddie Hackett, a message runner for a government office, witnesses an argument that ends in murder. Crouching in the doorway of a bombed-out house, Freddie waits until the coast is clear. But when he arrives at the delivery address, he’s shocked to come face to face with the killer. Dismissed by the police when he attempts to report the crime, Freddie goes in search of a woman he once met when delivering a message: Maisie Dobbs. While Maisie believes the boy and wants to help, she must maintain extreme caution: she’s working secretly for the Special Operations Executive, assessing candidates for crucial work with the French resistance. Her two worlds collide when she spots the killer in a place she least expects. She soon realizes she’s been pulled into the orbit of a man who has his own reasons to kill—reasons that go back to the last war. As Maisie becomes entangled in a power struggle between Britain’s intelligence efforts in France and the work of Free French agents operating across Europe, she must also contend with the lingering question of Freddie Hackett’s state of mind. What she uncovers could hold disastrous consequences for all involved in this compelling chapter of the “series that seems to get better with every entry” (Wall Street Journal).

30 review for The Consequences of Fear

  1. 4 out of 5

    Linden

    Maisie is involved in doing some secret work for the War Department, and London is in the middle of The Blitz. Meanwhile, a local boy claims he's seen a murder--the police are skeptical, but Maisie is certain he's telling the truth. I was impressed that the author's descriptions were so vivid, it really brought home what it was like to be in London during the German bombings. In addition to her cases, Maisie has a new romance, and has adopted a war orphan. I have read and enjoyed all of the book Maisie is involved in doing some secret work for the War Department, and London is in the middle of The Blitz. Meanwhile, a local boy claims he's seen a murder--the police are skeptical, but Maisie is certain he's telling the truth. I was impressed that the author's descriptions were so vivid, it really brought home what it was like to be in London during the German bombings. In addition to her cases, Maisie has a new romance, and has adopted a war orphan. I have read and enjoyed all of the books in this series, but I think this would also work as a stand-alone. Thanks to Edelweiss and the publisher for the opportunity to review this ARC.

  2. 4 out of 5

    Literary Redhead

    SPOILER ALERT! I cried when I finished Winspear’s newest Maisie Dobbs novel, realizing how much I’ve grown to love this hf mystery series. GRACE The author once said Maisie’s character came to her in “a moment of artistic grace.” All of her books — including this 16th in the series — bear that blessing. LOVE AND HORROR This latest beams bright with kindness, the search for truth and the healing power of family amid a horrendous time. It is 1941 in Britain, the Blitz in full force in London. MURDER? A SPOILER ALERT! I cried when I finished Winspear’s newest Maisie Dobbs novel, realizing how much I’ve grown to love this hf mystery series. GRACE The author once said Maisie’s character came to her in “a moment of artistic grace.” All of her books — including this 16th in the series — bear that blessing. LOVE AND HORROR This latest beams bright with kindness, the search for truth and the healing power of family amid a horrendous time. It is 1941 in Britain, the Blitz in full force in London. MURDER? A young messenger, Freddie Hackett, tasked with delivering government missives across the city, often while bombs fall, witnesses a murder. The police don’t believe him because no body is found. SEEKING MAISIE Undaunted, Freddie goes to Miss Dobbs’ office, having delivered messages there and hoping the forensic psychologist can help. TRIPLE THREAT She has great empathy for the boy, traumatized by what he’s seen, the work he does, and the beatings he and his mother endure at the hands of his violent father. SABOTAGE Maisie attempts to uncover the truth while balancing her work with Britain’s SOE, the Secret Operations Executive Churchill founded to “set Europe ablaze” through sabotage. DEATH Then a body is found that looks like the victim Freddie saw. And a mysterious death occurs in an SOE camp in Scotland. Are the two related? And how can Maisie cope with her work interviewing potential SOE agents — two she knows —before approving them as Allied spies, knowing most die within three weeks in enemy territory? ANTIDOTE While murders and war shatter any sense of safety and fear grips Maisie’s heart, she takes strength from her extended family: her kind father and stepmother, darling adopted daughter Anna, handsome American lover Mark, loyal assistant Billy, best friend Priscilla, and the many she’s drawn close to over the years. ADORED Near the end, a brave character is buried, with the Welsh saying, “Roedd hi'n annwyl iawn” read at the funeral. During a later joyful event, with Maisie encircled by family, that saying could be applied to her too: “She was much loved.” 5 of 5 Stars (I’d give as many that fill the night sky if I could!) Pub Date 23 Mar 2021 Heartfelt thanks to the author, Harper, and NetGalley for the review copy. Opinions are mine. #TheConsequencesofFear #NetGalley

  3. 5 out of 5

    Laura Hill

    Thank you to Harper and NetGalley for providing an advance copy of this book in exchange for my honest review. The book will be published on March 23rd, 2021. Writing: 4/5 Characters: 4/5 Plot: 3.5/5 Number 16 in the Maisie Dobbs series starts in October, 1941. As Britain is well immersed in WWII, Maisie is working with the War Office to psychologically vet potential recruits for undercover work in Nazi Germany — young, determined men and women who face low survival rates. Simultaneously, Maisie Thank you to Harper and NetGalley for providing an advance copy of this book in exchange for my honest review. The book will be published on March 23rd, 2021. Writing: 4/5 Characters: 4/5 Plot: 3.5/5 Number 16 in the Maisie Dobbs series starts in October, 1941. As Britain is well immersed in WWII, Maisie is working with the War Office to psychologically vet potential recruits for undercover work in Nazi Germany — young, determined men and women who face low survival rates. Simultaneously, Maisie gets involved in a murder witnessed by a young (and disbelieved) boy that ties into high-level espionage with high-level allies. I like the Maisie Dobbs series because each book moves us forward in time. Starting in the post WWI era, each installment features challenging situations that are set in the specific events of that period of history — it reminds me of one of my favorite British mystery series: Foyle’s War. Maisie is an interesting and ever-evolving character, leading an unusual investigation practice that blends psychology, forensic science, philosophy, and compassion in approaching tangled, often avoided or ignored problem knots. An appealing cast of expanding supporting characters helps set the mood and context.

  4. 4 out of 5

    Daniel Shindler

    We currently encounter Maisie Dobbs in the fall of 1941. She had established herself as a psychological investigator in 1929 and has transitioned, fifteen books later,into a psychological profiler for Special Operations Executive. Her role involves evaluating candidates for undercover work in France with local resistance cells. She has delegated much of the day to day tasks of her investigative agency but makes time to help a young boy, Freddie Hackett, who comes to Maisie with a disturbing stor We currently encounter Maisie Dobbs in the fall of 1941. She had established herself as a psychological investigator in 1929 and has transitioned, fifteen books later,into a psychological profiler for Special Operations Executive. Her role involves evaluating candidates for undercover work in France with local resistance cells. She has delegated much of the day to day tasks of her investigative agency but makes time to help a young boy, Freddie Hackett, who comes to Maisie with a disturbing story.Freddie is a runner who delivers messages for the war office.He runs through the streets of London in the midst of bombings to deliver these important communications.During one of his night deliveries, he witnesses a man being killed.He is terrified and has informed the police but they dismiss his tale as the overactive imagination of a youngster. Maisie, always sympathetic to the anxieties of children,initiates some cursory inquiries, hoping to alleviate Freddie’s fears. Once involved, Maisie concludes that there is some substance to the youngster’s story. The pursuit of this murderer sets up a sophisticated mystery that also intersects with Maisie’s profiling efforts for the War Office. The author weaves storylines involving treachery in the Levant during the 1920s, the danger in occupied France and the terror and displacement in London. For me, a well plotted book is a springboard for introducing underlying themes central to the human condition. The core concern of this novel is an examination of how to cope with fear and anxiety under duress and difficult circumstances. Maisie discusses the concept of taking our fears and inner anxieties and converting them into a positive energy force that propels us forward. Winspear’s blend of characterization and plot results in an intriguing mystery that illustrates this precept.It prompts readers to contemplate the underpinnings of our ability to maintain composure and make difficult choices during our life journey.

  5. 5 out of 5

    Nicki

    I do love a Maisie Dobbs story and have been reading Jacqueline Winspear’s fab series for years, not always in order as it depends what the library has in stock, but one thing’s for sure, I always love catching up with Maisie. I love finding out what’s going in her personal and professional life, it’s like I’m catching up with an old friend. This is the 16th book in the series and it’s seems to get better with each book. I loved following Maisie and her assistant Billie, as they try to work out w I do love a Maisie Dobbs story and have been reading Jacqueline Winspear’s fab series for years, not always in order as it depends what the library has in stock, but one thing’s for sure, I always love catching up with Maisie. I love finding out what’s going in her personal and professional life, it’s like I’m catching up with an old friend. This is the 16th book in the series and it’s seems to get better with each book. I loved following Maisie and her assistant Billie, as they try to work out what it was that young Freddie Hackett saw. Maisie is convinced that he’s telling the truth, but her contacts at Scotland Yard and SOE want her to leave it alone, that the boy was just imagining things. Well Maisie is not one for giving up, and the more she looks into the case the more disturbing it gets. This was such a good story as there was a lot going on in the case and in Maisie’s other life, now that she’s involved with checking over recruits for SOE. Two of the new recruits are women she knows very well, and she feels dreadful at being involved in the process of sending them to occupied France, especially when her best friend Priscilla is related to both of them! As to solving the mystery? Well, as usual I didn’t have a clue and totally forgot about trying to work it out as I was so wrapped in the story, especially what was happening between Maisie and Mark Scott. He’s the American she met in the previous book and things were getting interesting between them. This book has ended on a real cliff hanger and I really hope there’s going to be a happy ending for Maisie, as she’s had so much tragedy in her life. I’m crossing my fingers that the author doesn’t make something awful happen between them in the next book. I thoroughly recommend this wonderful series to anyone who enjoys historical mysteries especially ones set in World War Two. Thanks so much to NetGalley and Allison & Busby for my digital copy via the NetGalley app.

  6. 5 out of 5

    Jessica Howard

    I just love this series. ❤️

  7. 5 out of 5

    Alissa

    Always a delight to be with Maisie and I loved the ending of the book which makes me eager for the next one!

  8. 5 out of 5

    Cathy

    I was a late arrival at the party when it comes to Jacqueline Winspear’s hugely popular series, my first introduction being The American Agent, the fifteenth outing for the intrepid and resourceful Maisie Dobbs. Ardent fans of the series will have been eagerly anticipating Maisie’s next adventure but even if – like me – you’re a recent convert, or indeed if The Consequences of Fear will be your first foray into Maisie’s world, I guarantee you’ll quickly be drawn into the story. Although there are I was a late arrival at the party when it comes to Jacqueline Winspear’s hugely popular series, my first introduction being The American Agent, the fifteenth outing for the intrepid and resourceful Maisie Dobbs. Ardent fans of the series will have been eagerly anticipating Maisie’s next adventure but even if – like me – you’re a recent convert, or indeed if The Consequences of Fear will be your first foray into Maisie’s world, I guarantee you’ll quickly be drawn into the story. Although there are brief references to Maisie’s previous cases and it may take a bit of time to sort out the various members of her extended family, The Consequences of Fear can definitely be enjoyed by readers new to the series. Those familiar with her previous adventures will be pleased to see the return of characters such as Billy Beale, Maisie’s assistant in her private investigation business, intelligence chief Robert MacFarlane and Anna, her adopted daughter. Not forgetting, of course, Maisie’s ‘gentleman friend’, Mark Scott. As well as the ever reliable Billy, Maisie has a number of resources to call upon to help with her investigation, including her friends Priscilla and Gabriella. As Maisie observes, ‘She had her worker bees, valuable contacts who would seek whatever information she needed, buzzing around their gardens of endeavour until they found the pockets of intelligence she had requested.’ Unfortunately, being one of Maisie’s ‘worker bees’ can sometimes be a risky business. And when all else fails, Maisie can call on her memories of the wise advice of her former mentor, Maurice Blanche. The book’s title is cleverly explored in various ways. For example, as one character remarks early on in the book, “where secrets reside, so does fear – it’s the unknown.” It transpires there are indeed secrets to be revealed some of which go longer back in time than anyone might imagine. Whilst fear can be ‘the scariest of emotions…a seed in the fertile seed of doubt’, it can also bring much-needed alertness. ‘Fear had to be handled with care, managed so it became a tool, not a weight.’ Increasingly, Maisie feels the tension between the important but secret work she undertakes alongside the cases that come to her private investigation business, and her new caring responsibilities. It doesn’t help that her secret work involves potentially life or death decisions about others, or that Mark Scott’s equally confidential work takes him away frequently. Naturally, like the rest of the population, she’s also concerned about her family’s safety –  the threat of further bombing raids and the possibility of invasion. ‘She realised that she had never trusted the world to keep herself or those she loved safe.’ It all leads at one point to Maisie concluding, “I think I’ve had enough”. By the end of the book, I think even new readers will have come to the conclusion that Maisie doesn’t easily give in to fear when it comes to pursuing her investigations. But what about fear of commitment in her personal relationships? Should Maisie heed the advice that ‘Love is always worth the leap’? (I know my answer in Maisie’s case!) The backdrop of wartime of London is vividly evoked: checking the blackout curtains as darkness falls, listening to the rumble of bombers overhead, navigating streets of bombed out houses, seeing young boys like Freddie Hackett running through the dark streets carrying messages between Air Raid Precautions depots. The book’s conclusion sees scenes of both sorrow and joy, and – tantalizingly – a world on the brink of a new phase of the war.  As a now committed Maisie fan, I say roll on the next book!

  9. 5 out of 5

    TXGAL1

    “Fear, she thought, had a viscous quality to it, to the extent that you could even feel your feet as you were running to the shelter; a burden slowing you down, despite the fact that you were moving as fast as your legs could carry you. Fear was sticky, like flypaper, something to steer clear of as you went about your business, because if you were sucked into that long banner of worry, you would be like an insect with wings adhered and feet stuck, never to escape. Fear was the scariest of emotio “Fear, she thought, had a viscous quality to it, to the extent that you could even feel your feet as you were running to the shelter; a burden slowing you down, despite the fact that you were moving as fast as your legs could carry you. Fear was sticky, like flypaper, something to steer clear of as you went about your business, because if you were sucked into that long banner of worry, you would be like an insect with wings adhered and feet stuck, never to escape. Fear was the scariest of emotions and it nestled there, growing ever stronger and sprouting shoots, a seed in the fertile soil of doubt.” I dare say all of us has felt the cold finger of fear on our shoulder at some time in our life. Some maybe more than others. The reasons for the fear vary, but we each of us know it. Imagine being a young school boy selected to run messages, from point A to point B and possibly back again, through the bombed streets of London during the day and at night when the only light to see by is provided by exploding bombs courtesy of the German Luftwaffe—done to earn just a few pennies to help feed your family. Envision what one might see on the path of destruction that must be run. Jacqueline Winspear has spun such a mystery with her latest installment featuring Maisie Dobbs, psychologist/investigator extraordinaire. The young messenger is Freddie Hackett and he has come to Maisie to help him with what he has seen after being rebuffed by the police. Maisie takes up the case and brings us along to witness its progression. Winspear has written another sophisticated mystery that causes us to contemplate how we might handle such circumstances. “In the aftermath, actions taken in wartime aren’t necessarily looked upon kindly. Those who have never been to war can be the harshest of judges—their sense of what is right taking comfort in the soft pillow of peace rather than the bed of nails that is conflict.” I highly recommend this read to everyone.

  10. 4 out of 5

    Pam

    Don't know what is up with the rating stars but this is a 4 star Don't know what is up with the rating stars but this is a 4 star

  11. 4 out of 5

    Andrea

    As always, Maisie Dobbs never disappoints! I love how Maisie gets a little more assertive & sassy in this book but also keeps her sensitive and gentle side.

  12. 5 out of 5

    Marlene

    Originally published at Reading Reality In London, in September of 1941, fear was a constant companion. Every person old enough to be aware, including any children past toddlerhood, has to have felt at least some level of fear every waking minute. Fear of bombs, fear of losing someone dear to them – likely because of a bomb, fear of being made homeless and losing everything they owned – due to a bomb. Fear that Hitler would invade Britain after softening up the target with – yet more bombs. Fear t Originally published at Reading Reality In London, in September of 1941, fear was a constant companion. Every person old enough to be aware, including any children past toddlerhood, has to have felt at least some level of fear every waking minute. Fear of bombs, fear of losing someone dear to them – likely because of a bomb, fear of being made homeless and losing everything they owned – due to a bomb. Fear that Hitler would invade Britain after softening up the target with – yet more bombs. Fear that Britain, standing alone, wouldn’t be able to hold back the tide of Nazi Germany any more than King Canute could hold back the ocean’s tide by ordering it so. Maisie Dobbs, once upon a time a battlefield nurse in World War I, now serves as part of the checks and balances at the Special Operations Executive, vetting agents who are about to be sent to infiltrate occupied Europe as secret radio operators, saboteurs – and spies. She did her bit in the first war, and she’s doing it again. Just not quite as near the front lines, although every bit as heartbreaking. Maisie has spent the years between the wars as a private investigator, trained by her mentor Maurice Blanche, to ferret out the secrets that people have been keeping, sometimes even from themselves, in order to resolve personal issues they bring to her, and crimes brought to her by the police, or, in the case of her interviewing for the SOE, by the government. The story here is about Maisie attempting, not always successfully, to balance her government work, her private clients, her family out in the country, and her American lover in the Diplomatic Corps of his own country. It is also a story about the ways in which those responsibilities come into conflict. A country that expects her to drop everything at a moment’s notice in order to send people into situations where death is almost certain. A country that expects her to keep its secrets even from those she loves. A country that expects her to help cover up a murder in order to protect an alliance that it considers strategic. It’s that last stress that proves to be more than Maisie can live with. The question becomes whether or not she, or anyone else involved, will die for it. Escape Rating A: This is Mystery & Thriller week on Goodreads, and the image being used looks a lot like a piece of the cover for this book. I fully admit that I had no idea when I was picking out this week’s books that I would be echoing this theme, I just wanted books that I knew would be good and it turned out I struck a theme. It took me most of the book to get how the title related to this particular story. Everyone is afraid at this point in the war. Things are pretty dark, and in spite of the famous British “stiff upper lip” the situation does not look hopeful. But the fears that drive this story are not all about the war, even though they circle back to it. There’s a murder in this mystery, and everything about that murder is a result of fear. The murderer fears the loss of his honor, and the exposure of that loss. The witness fears that the killer knows he is a witness, and that the murderer is out to get him as well. And Maisie fears that her emotions are clouding her judgment, and most importantly, fears that the war will rob her of her second chance at happiness. All three act out because of their fear, and act on their fear at the same time. This entire case and its outcomes are all consequences of those fears. The ending is not all heartbreak as one might expect from the beginning, although the piper does get paid. The story closes on December 8, 1941, the day after Pearl Harbor. The Americans, including Maisie’s lover, are scrambling to prepare America’s response to the attack. The entire war has changed irrevocably, along with Maisie’s life. I’ve followed Maisie’s adventures from her very first story, fittingly named after this singular character. This is a series that follows the history of both its character and the world she inhabits, and sincerely rewards readers who get involved at the very beginning. This is not a series to pick up in the middle, especially as the last few books in the series, from A Dangerous Place onwards, show the shadows darkening over Europe as Britain prepares for the inevitable that no one wants to see. This turned out to be a fitting close for the theme of this Blogo-Birthday Celebration Week as well. Both Maisie Dobbs and Sebastian St. Cyr are coincidentally at the 16th book in their respective series, but more importantly, both are atmospheric historical mysteries set in periods of great upheaval featuring compelling and fascinating protagonists. Maisie also links back to, not Susan Ryeland or Atticus Pünd in Moonflower Murders, but rather to the author of the series, Anthony Horowitz, and the TV character he created, Christopher Foyle of Foyle’s War. Although a police detective rather than a private investigator, Foyle is another compelling character who served in WW1 and is now, in the second war, investigating crimes on the homefront – and occasionally working for the government – just as Maisie is. I expect Maisie’s war to be every bit as dangerous, and to include every bit as much crime and punishment as her between the wars life has done. And I’m certainly looking forward to reading about Maisie’s war now that it is finally and officially here.

  13. 4 out of 5

    Alex Baugh

    It's October 1941, Britain has been at war with Germany for two years with no end in sight, and Londoners are still being bombed and dealing with the aftermath. For 12-year-old Freddie Hackett, the fastest runner in school, it means running messages to and from agents all over London, to earn a few shillings that his cruel father will spend in the local pub. But when Freddie witnesses a murder one night while running a message, only to deliver the message to the man who had done the killing, he' It's October 1941, Britain has been at war with Germany for two years with no end in sight, and Londoners are still being bombed and dealing with the aftermath. For 12-year-old Freddie Hackett, the fastest runner in school, it means running messages to and from agents all over London, to earn a few shillings that his cruel father will spend in the local pub. But when Freddie witnesses a murder one night while running a message, only to deliver the message to the man who had done the killing, he's terrified and needs to tell someone about what he saw. And he knows just who to talk to. Meanwhile, Maisie Dobbs has been enjoying motherhood ever since adopting Anna, the young evacuee who has been staying with Maisie's father and stepmother in Kent. But Maisie is also realizing that she has fallen in love with Mark Scott, the American agent from the Department of Justice that she worked with for the British Intelligence services under Robbie MacFarlane, senior detective with Scotland Yard's Special Branch. Yet, as much as Maisie might want to spend most of her life in Kent taking care of Anna, she decides to take Freddie Hackett's case pro bono, after finding out that Scotland Yard doesn't believe him and discovering blood at the site of the murder. In the midst of her investigation, Maisie accompanies MacFarlane to Scotland where they are to test and evaluate twenty British recruits and a few French volunteers, all wanting to become overseas intelligence agents. But when Maisie meets Major André Chaput, there to observe the French recruits, she is sure that he is the murderer that Freddie Hackett described in such detail, including the deep ridges on either side of his face and the patch of pale skin under his eye. Could it possibly be a coincidence? MacFarlane has been annoyed at Maisie for taking on the Freddie Hackett case to begin with, but when she brings up her thoughts about Major Chaput, he immediately sends her back to London. Once again, Maisie has a lot on her plate, but now that Anna and Mark have come into her life, you can really feel how torn she is between them and the happiness they bring her and her work, which brings its own satisfaction. Added to all that is Freddie Hackett, a child with a cruel alcoholic father who has had to grow up to fast in order to take care of his mother and younger sister, Grace, who has Down Syndrome. We all know Maisie is a softy when it comes to children and so, not surprisingly, she also manages to find the Hackett family a safe place to live away from Mr. Hackett while things are sorted out. I have a feeling this may be a pivotal novel in the life and career of Maisie Dobbs. Throughout the novel, she contemplates the possibility of turning her business over to Billy, her right hand man, marrying Mark Scott and being a full-time mother to Anna. Maybe that's why this novel wasn't as exciting as previous novels. Which is fine, I still enjoyed reading it. But now I really wonder what's in store for Maisie. I have to admit, I was crushed when Alan Bradley ended his Flavia de Luce series, but there are a few more war years left, so hopefully we aren't that close to saying good-bye to Maisie. This book is recommended for readers age 14+ This book was an eARC gratefully received from Edelweiss+

  14. 5 out of 5

    Daniel

    This review originally published This review originally published

  15. 5 out of 5

    Barbara Rogers

    Series: Maisie Dobbs #16 Publication Date: 3/23/21 Number of Pages: 352 WOW! What a wonderful new-to-me series to find. I had been reading the book blurbs on each new book as it was released – and they sounded like great stories – but I put off trying one because I thought it was still too close to ‘contemporary’ to suit me. I read very little that isn’t set in the Victorian or earlier eras. As I am becoming more and more disillusioned with the ‘woke’ historical romance books that are being written Series: Maisie Dobbs #16 Publication Date: 3/23/21 Number of Pages: 352 WOW! What a wonderful new-to-me series to find. I had been reading the book blurbs on each new book as it was released – and they sounded like great stories – but I put off trying one because I thought it was still too close to ‘contemporary’ to suit me. I read very little that isn’t set in the Victorian or earlier eras. As I am becoming more and more disillusioned with the ‘woke’ historical romance books that are being written, I decided to branch out with more and more historical mysteries. This one is absolutely wonderful. I loved Maisie Dobbs – and YAY for me – I started with the book where Maisie gets married. The writing is excellent and the story and plotting are near perfect. What really brings the story home though, is the descriptions of life in WWII London during the blitzes. I absolutely felt as if I was running right along with Freddie as the bombs were dropping. Freddie Hackett is twelve-years-old and is proud that he has been chosen as a message runner for the government. He is, of course, afraid of the bombs dropping, but those aren’t any scarier than his home life. If he keeps his father in enough coins to stay at the bar, maybe he and his mother won’t be beaten tonight. Freddie is a gifted runner who might be in the Olympics someday and as his feet are flying and he turns a corner toward his destination, he sees something unthinkable. Two men are in a fight, so he backs into a small doorway of a bombed-out home so the men cannot see him. When one takes a knife out and murders the other, Freddie loses his stomach contents. He remains quiet and still long after it is over – and then, shaking, he goes on his way to the delivery. He gets a really good look at the murderer – and guess who answers the door. The police aren’t particularly interested in the murder Freddie reports, but Freddie is frightened, so he looks elsewhere for someone to help. That person is Maisie Dobbs. Maisie immediately believes the story Freddie is telling and begins an investigation despite her government office boss telling her to leave it be. As Maisie digs deeper and deeper into the case, she comes to learn that there are political implications to solving the crime. That, of course, doesn’t deter Maisie and she keeps going. She not only has to find the murderer, but she also has to keep Freddie, his mom, and his sister safe. I thoroughly enjoyed this book and I’m so sorry I took so long to decide to give the series a try. Now, I just have to make time in my schedule to go back and read the first fifteen books. I can’t think of a single thing I’d change about the book – except I think it might be fun to have Mark more involved in Maisie’s case. I’m very happy to recommend this book! I voluntarily read and reviewed an Advanced Reader Copy of this book. All thoughts and opinions are my own.

  16. 4 out of 5

    Barbara Rogers

    Series: Maisie Dobbs #16 Publication Date: 3/23/21 Number of Pages: 352 WOW! What a wonderful new-to-me series to find. I had been reading the book blurbs on each new book as it was released – and they sounded like great stories – but I put off trying one because I thought it was still too close to ‘contemporary’ to suit me. I read very little that isn’t set in the Victorian or earlier eras. As I am becoming more and more disillusioned with the ‘woke’ historical romance books that are being written Series: Maisie Dobbs #16 Publication Date: 3/23/21 Number of Pages: 352 WOW! What a wonderful new-to-me series to find. I had been reading the book blurbs on each new book as it was released – and they sounded like great stories – but I put off trying one because I thought it was still too close to ‘contemporary’ to suit me. I read very little that isn’t set in the Victorian or earlier eras. As I am becoming more and more disillusioned with the ‘woke’ historical romance books that are being written, I decided to branch out with more and more historical mysteries. This one is absolutely wonderful. I loved Maisie Dobbs – and YAY for me – I started with the book where Maisie gets married. The writing is excellent and the story and plotting are near perfect. What really brings the story home though, is the descriptions of life in WWII London during the blitzes. I absolutely felt as if I was running right along with Freddie as the bombs were dropping. Freddie Hackett is twelve-years-old and is proud that he has been chosen as a message runner for the government. He is, of course, afraid of the bombs dropping, but those aren’t any scarier than his home life. If he keeps his father in enough coins to stay at the bar, maybe he and his mother won’t be beaten tonight. Freddie is a gifted runner who might be in the Olympics someday and as his feet are flying and he turns a corner toward his destination, he sees something unthinkable. Two men are in a fight, so he backs into a small doorway of a bombed-out home so the men cannot see him. When one takes a knife out and murders the other, Freddie loses his stomach contents. He remains quiet and still long after it is over – and then, shaking, he goes on his way to the delivery. He gets a really good look at the murderer – and guess who answers the door. The police aren’t particularly interested in the murder Freddie reports, but Freddie is frightened, so he looks elsewhere for someone to help. That person is Maisie Dobbs. Maisie immediately believes the story Freddie is telling and begins an investigation despite her government office boss telling her to leave it be. As Maisie digs deeper and deeper into the case, she comes to learn that there are political implications to solving the crime. That, of course, doesn’t deter Maisie and she keeps going. She not only has to find the murderer, but she also has to keep Freddie, his mom, and his sister safe. I thoroughly enjoyed this book and I’m so sorry I took so long to decide to give the series a try. Now, I just have to make time in my schedule to go back and read the first fifteen books. I can’t think of a single thing I’d change about the book – except I think it might be fun to have Mark more involved in Maisie’s case. I’m very happy to recommend this book! I voluntarily read and reviewed an Advanced Reader Copy of this book. All thoughts and opinions are my own.

  17. 5 out of 5

    Elaine Tomasso

    I would like to thank Netgalley and Allison & Busby for an advance copy of The Consequences of Fear, the sixteenth novel to feature private investigator Maisie Dobbs. September 1941 and the Blitz is in full swing. 12 year old Freddie Harkett spends his evenings running about London, dodging bombs and delivering top secret messages. On one such errand he thinks he sees a man being murdered, but when he reports it to the police there is no body and they think he made it up. In despair he tells his I would like to thank Netgalley and Allison & Busby for an advance copy of The Consequences of Fear, the sixteenth novel to feature private investigator Maisie Dobbs. September 1941 and the Blitz is in full swing. 12 year old Freddie Harkett spends his evenings running about London, dodging bombs and delivering top secret messages. On one such errand he thinks he sees a man being murdered, but when he reports it to the police there is no body and they think he made it up. In despair he tells his story to Maisie Dobbs who not only believes him but finds a certain amount of proof and a suspect. The problem with this is that she found her suspect doing her other job of working for the SOE, in a secret capacity and they want her to stop investigating. I thoroughly enjoyed The Consequences of Fear, which is an interesting mix of fact and fiction with a good mystery attached. The novel takes an unusual tack, presenting a suspect early on, but no victim. This makes the investigation about finding proof and a motive, if, of course, young Freddie is to be believed and there’s some doubt about that. Throw wartime politics and the murky business of espionage and there is an engrossing tale to be told. I like that the novel is told entirely from Maisie’s point of view as it allows the reader to identify with her and get stuck in to the tale she has to tell. I found it slightly frustrating that politics got in the way of a clean investigation but that is probably an accurate reflection of the era, where desperate times call for desperate solutions. Otherwise I was hanging on to every reveal to see what was coming next. I wasn’t overly impressed by the motive, but again it was desperate times and it reflects the title well. Much is made in the novel of the work of the SOE, which sent agents into occupied France to sabotage the Nazi war effort. Vetting these agents is Maisie’s classified war work. I think the author managed to convey a good sense of the danger it involved and the agents’ bravery. I found it fascinating. Maisie does what she does well but it’s not without its troubling aspects and now that she has an adopted daughter she’s thinking about walking away. Her relationship with American “diplomat” (spy, if ever I saw one) Mark Scott is foundering on miscommunication, her work causes real heartbreak for her and those closest to her and she’s upset about the politics surrounding her investigation. The Consequences of Fear is a good read that I have no hesitation in recommending.

  18. 5 out of 5

    Bookreporter.com Historical Fiction

    At this point, I’ve lost track of how many Maisie Dobbs historical mysteries I’ve reviewed. But it’s a testament to Jacqueline Winspear’s talents as a writer that I continue to anticipate each new installment in the series and look forward to reading and writing about her ongoing adventures. In Winspear’s latest novel, THE CONSEQUENCES OF FEAR, Maisie is juggling many different --- and, in some cases, competing --- pressures, all while World War II rages on. Maisie has (more or less) safely ensco At this point, I’ve lost track of how many Maisie Dobbs historical mysteries I’ve reviewed. But it’s a testament to Jacqueline Winspear’s talents as a writer that I continue to anticipate each new installment in the series and look forward to reading and writing about her ongoing adventures. In Winspear’s latest novel, THE CONSEQUENCES OF FEAR, Maisie is juggling many different --- and, in some cases, competing --- pressures, all while World War II rages on. Maisie has (more or less) safely ensconced her closest friends and family in the Kent countryside, including her recently adopted daughter Anna, who has taken to country life and horseback riding. But Maisie still must travel back and forth to her London flat and office regularly, not only to oversee her own private investigation business, but also for her top-secret war intelligence duties for which she’s been recruited. In this case, both types of work may be related. The novel opens with a young message runner, Freddie Hackett, witnessing a brutal fight and murder on his way to deliver a letter to a man whom he believes may be the murderer. By the time he reports the crime to Scotland Yard, the body is gone, and the police chalk it up to the imaginings of a traumatized boy. But when Maisie is brought into the case, she suspects something more complicated might be going on, especially when a body matching Freddie’s description of the victim is dragged out of the Thames. What’s more, Maisie encounters a man matching Freddie’s description of the killer when she’s in Scotland helping to screen potential agents for the resistance. Some have a personal connection to Maisie and her close friends, making it especially harrowing when she knows she’s sending them into danger. And to top it all off, she is trying hard to maintain her romantic relationship with Mark Scott, an American agent. Like Maisie, he has a lot of demands on his time, but they are doing their best to make a go of it. Maisie’s stepmother wishes he would put a ring on it, but Maisie is just trying to navigate her first serious relationship since the untimely death of her first husband. Jacqueline Winspear clearly isn’t slowing down one iota in her 16th novel about Maisie Dobbs, and neither is her protagonist. And (without giving too much away), as the book closes, both Maisie’s life and World War II are about to enter interesting new phases. I certainly will look forward to more stories about Maisie, and I imagine I’m not the only one. Reviewed by Norah Piehl

  19. 4 out of 5

    Bookreporter.com Mystery & Thriller

    At this point, I’ve lost track of how many Maisie Dobbs historical mysteries I’ve reviewed. But it’s a testament to Jacqueline Winspear’s talents as a writer that I continue to anticipate each new installment in the series and look forward to reading and writing about her ongoing adventures. In Winspear’s latest novel, THE CONSEQUENCES OF FEAR, Maisie is juggling many different --- and, in some cases, competing --- pressures, all while World War II rages on. Maisie has (more or less) safely ensco At this point, I’ve lost track of how many Maisie Dobbs historical mysteries I’ve reviewed. But it’s a testament to Jacqueline Winspear’s talents as a writer that I continue to anticipate each new installment in the series and look forward to reading and writing about her ongoing adventures. In Winspear’s latest novel, THE CONSEQUENCES OF FEAR, Maisie is juggling many different --- and, in some cases, competing --- pressures, all while World War II rages on. Maisie has (more or less) safely ensconced her closest friends and family in the Kent countryside, including her recently adopted daughter Anna, who has taken to country life and horseback riding. But Maisie still must travel back and forth to her London flat and office regularly, not only to oversee her own private investigation business, but also for her top-secret war intelligence duties for which she’s been recruited. In this case, both types of work may be related. The novel opens with a young message runner, Freddie Hackett, witnessing a brutal fight and murder on his way to deliver a letter to a man whom he believes may be the murderer. By the time he reports the crime to Scotland Yard, the body is gone, and the police chalk it up to the imaginings of a traumatized boy. But when Maisie is brought into the case, she suspects something more complicated might be going on, especially when a body matching Freddie’s description of the victim is dragged out of the Thames. What’s more, Maisie encounters a man matching Freddie’s description of the killer when she’s in Scotland helping to screen potential agents for the resistance. Some have a personal connection to Maisie and her close friends, making it especially harrowing when she knows she’s sending them into danger. And to top it all off, she is trying hard to maintain her romantic relationship with Mark Scott, an American agent. Like Maisie, he has a lot of demands on his time, but they are doing their best to make a go of it. Maisie’s stepmother wishes he would put a ring on it, but Maisie is just trying to navigate her first serious relationship since the untimely death of her first husband. Jacqueline Winspear clearly isn’t slowing down one iota in her 16th novel about Maisie Dobbs, and neither is her protagonist. And (without giving too much away), as the book closes, both Maisie’s life and World War II are about to enter interesting new phases. I certainly will look forward to more stories about Maisie, and I imagine I’m not the only one. Reviewed by Norah Piehl

  20. 4 out of 5

    Maggie Boyd

    The Consequences of Fear is the sixteenth novel in the Maisie Dobbs series. This latest volume shows our titular heroine contemplating the vagaries of war-time justice as she tries to find a murderer in an England bombarded with death due to incessant Nazi aggression. While the mystery portion might work fine as a standalone, the book is definitely best read in sequence with the rest of the series since there is a lot of background information pertaining to Maisie’s personal life the reader woul The Consequences of Fear is the sixteenth novel in the Maisie Dobbs series. This latest volume shows our titular heroine contemplating the vagaries of war-time justice as she tries to find a murderer in an England bombarded with death due to incessant Nazi aggression. While the mystery portion might work fine as a standalone, the book is definitely best read in sequence with the rest of the series since there is a lot of background information pertaining to Maisie’s personal life the reader would benefit from knowing before jumping in. As a nighttime delivery runner in the London of October 1941, young Freddie Hackett is used to experiencing things a boy his age should never be exposed to. The whistle of falling bombs, explosions in the dark, dead bodies, dismembered corpses, fires, debris hurtling through the air – his job racing important government communiques from one spot to another means he’s seen them all. But he typically doesn’t witness actual murders – nor does he regularly find himself fleeing the crime scene only to deliver his important missive into the hands of the killer he thought he’d escaped. Fortunately, the wreckage he had hidden behind did its job well enough that the man doesn’t recognize him. Being an upstanding citizen, Freddie reports the incident to the police but when they arrive at the scene there is no body and no evidence amidst the abundant rubble that anything untoward (beyond a German bomb) has happened in the area. But Freddie knows what he saw, and having delivered messages to Maisie before, he’s aware she runs a private detective agency. He takes the case to her. Maisie and her assistant Billy are familiar with Freddie and prone to believe him. When they check out the scene of the crime, they uncover evidence the police overlooked, and Maisie takes the information to her contact at Scotland Yard. She quickly discovers, however, that no one wants her looking into what happened and pursuing this inquiry could easily lead her into trouble with the Special Operations Executive and her sometimes boss, Robbie Mcfarlane. Like any long running series, the Maisie Dobbs lexicon contains great books, good books, not-so-good books and everything in between. The Consequences of Fear falls somewhere between good and great for me. See the rest of my review at https://allaboutromance.com/book-revi...

  21. 4 out of 5

    Kathryn in FL

    Jacqueline Winspear is her earned her popularity as contemporary author . I've not previously read anything by her, so I was pleased to win this newest installment of the Maisie Dobbs series. Maisie is a recent widow, who despite the many challenges in her life (loss of spouse, and having recently adopted a young orphan) and her busy career as a private investigator, using her talents from her education in psychology (she is a doctor) and her war experience as a spy and ambulance driver in the f Jacqueline Winspear is her earned her popularity as contemporary author . I've not previously read anything by her, so I was pleased to win this newest installment of the Maisie Dobbs series. Maisie is a recent widow, who despite the many challenges in her life (loss of spouse, and having recently adopted a young orphan) and her busy career as a private investigator, using her talents from her education in psychology (she is a doctor) and her war experience as a spy and ambulance driver in the first World War. She is now doing "government" work on the qt. Though friends and family alike are pretty certain she is doing things they are not privy too, they are supportive of her "doing her bit" for the war effort in 1941. There are several different matters that this story focuses upon. Her efforts in helping the government screen candidates for highly dangerous spy missions. She is also working a case of a murder witnessed by a young boy with no body after the fact. Add to that his description of the murderer places a high government agent as the chief suspect makes the story seem even more unlikely. Did he see a murder? Maisie really doesn't know and the police dismiss his story as attention seeking. Meanwhile, Maisie must navigate politics and the less than supportive coworkers, she bumps up against. All these issues make for a modestly passed story with several plots that connect and cross over each other and curious ways. This can be read as a standalone, the author made sure that the reader had sufficient information to follow the characters, relationships and plot lines without any prior knowledge. I did think I may have been even more engaged had I known the characters better. There were quite of minor characters in the story and at times this challenged me (my memory is poor due to an injury). This may not be concern for other readers. Winspear delivers an excellent characterizations especially with Maisie, who uses her intellect and observation to achieve great things in her cases and for England. Maisie was a feminist before that was a term. She excels at supporting her theories without coming off as bitchy. I found myself smiling at certain observations and didn't find the details of murder or the war to be graphic. I will definitely look to read more by this author. Thank you to Goodreads, the publisher and the author, Ms. Winspear for an advanced reading copy in return for my honest review.

  22. 5 out of 5

    jammaster_mom

    This is an excellent historical fiction series set in England from the end of WWI through, in this book, the end of 1941. Through the series we have seen Maisie grow up from an intelligent young woman into a confident and successful psychologist and investigator. She has loved and lost throughout the series. Maisie has also gathered around herself a motley crew of individuals that she is proud to care for and call family of her heart. During a time of war this intense the desire to protect her l This is an excellent historical fiction series set in England from the end of WWI through, in this book, the end of 1941. Through the series we have seen Maisie grow up from an intelligent young woman into a confident and successful psychologist and investigator. She has loved and lost throughout the series. Maisie has also gathered around herself a motley crew of individuals that she is proud to care for and call family of her heart. During a time of war this intense the desire to protect her loved ones at all times no matter what the cost is huge. This book finds Maisie employed by a very secret branch of the military. She is unable to disclose the details of her job evaluating agents before they are sent to France. Her family all know that she does something and it is of great importance for the war effort. She also splits her time between her house in Kent, where her daughter is, and her flat in London where she stays for work. While in London her American boyfriend, Mark Scott, also stays with her but neither of them can speak of the work they do. He is attached to the American Embassy in London and can by pulled away to fly to American at any moment. How do you make a relationship work when you can not speak to each other about one of the biggest parts of your lives? In this book Maisie finds herself drawn to a case for her private investigations business. Her assistant, Billy, has taken over most of the work but she still returns on occasion. A young boy who has been running messages for the government claims to have seen a murder one night while on a delivery. He then says that he delivered the message he had to the murderer. No one believes the boy except for Maisie. As she digs she finds connections to the Free French, her government work and events going all the way back to WWI. I really enjoyed this book. It was much more about Maisie and her personal journey than about her case this time. I think we really needed this in the series because she has had some big decisions hanging over her head for a few books now. I don't know that everyone will be happy with her decisions but I am happy for her to move forward on a personal level and to see where the next book takes her both personally and professionally. Great series and well worth reading from the beginning!

  23. 4 out of 5

    Q

    The book started with this quote: “Fear makes us feel our humanity”. Disraeli. I don’t usually rate this series any more. I, however, continue to enjoy the series year after year because of the humanity of it. I was surprised by the avenue she took in this book. Knew it would be about WWII and the blitz but this was not what I expected. It raised a lot of issues pertinent to today’s world. First is the main theme of her series - the effect of war on people and countries. She is always widening our The book started with this quote: “Fear makes us feel our humanity”. Disraeli. I don’t usually rate this series any more. I, however, continue to enjoy the series year after year because of the humanity of it. I was surprised by the avenue she took in this book. Knew it would be about WWII and the blitz but this was not what I expected. It raised a lot of issues pertinent to today’s world. First is the main theme of her series - the effect of war on people and countries. She is always widening our understanding of war by widening the circles. Here she explores the effects of war on a young boy - a message runner. He’s fast and reliable. His father had been in WWI and the story talks to how his behavior and alcoholism impacted his son and family. Another avenue is the beliefs people hold. And how grudges, shame, honor, trauma and/or love of one’s country play out for some of the characters. This time we get to re-meet female characters from previous books in the series. She focuses more on the different direct roles women played in WWII’s war effort then she has in past books. The familiar cast are back: Maisie and her family and her American diplomat beau; her best friend Priscilla and her extended family; Lord and Lady Compton; her assistants Billy and Sandra; Caldwell from Scotland Yard; and her old Scottish colleague from the Secret Service and his malt liquor too. A colleague and/or ex-lover??? of Maisie’s mentor Maurice who was an active spy in France in WWI is back. From Maisie’s interactions with her there was a foreshadow of things to come in the series. Though, you never know with our author if that’s exactly where she will go. Change is abreast. People connected to Maisie moved out of London to Kent. Brenda, grandmother of Maisie’s daughter Anna, has really come into her own as her relationship to Maisie has changed more and more over the last years. It’s no longer upstairs-downstairs. It’s family. And it feels right. Upstairs- downstairs has been a theme in Maisie’s life since the first book. Brenda is much more outspoken with her opinions. Was surprised at first to hear her new voice but glad for it. Maisie’s dad and the Compton’s are elders -in their 80’s now and have slowed down a lot. All the elders enjoy having Anna in their lives. Maisie in early mid-life is changing too. I’ll leave the other surprises for you to find for yourself.

  24. 5 out of 5

    Melody Schwarting

    It was just so good to be back with Maisie. I didn't realize how much I'd missed being in her world, after reading the previous 15 books in the series in 2019 and waiting until 2021 for this one. All the good things we expect of a Maisie Dobbs novel are here: tight plotting, interiority, gentleness (even during wartime), and an honest look at a fractured world. I used to think mysteries weren't for me. Sherlock Holmes (in Doyle's books) and I just don't get along. He's so cerebral, and his person It was just so good to be back with Maisie. I didn't realize how much I'd missed being in her world, after reading the previous 15 books in the series in 2019 and waiting until 2021 for this one. All the good things we expect of a Maisie Dobbs novel are here: tight plotting, interiority, gentleness (even during wartime), and an honest look at a fractured world. I used to think mysteries weren't for me. Sherlock Holmes (in Doyle's books) and I just don't get along. He's so cerebral, and his personality reads as cruel to me, despite his intent. It wasn't until I took a chance on Maisie that I learned the mystery genre could work for me, and if not for her, I'd never have tried a Gamache novel. Maisie is a very feminine detective, for one. Yes, she is highly intelligent, Cambridge-trained, blah blah blah. But it's not all about showy wits and raw intelligence, which sometimes seemed to me all that Holmes had going for him. Maisie thrives on emotional intelligence rather than the obscurest of clues, seeing whole persons and not assemblages of shoe tread dirt and dog hairs. Science is beginning to back up her reliance on body language and intuition, and in the books' time period, she always stays on the cutting edge of psychology. This just works with my own contemplative personality in a way Holmesian detectives don't. Winspear takes death seriously, not manipulating it for plot or brushing it off since the victim is unknown to the detective. Few mystery series of any stripe handle death so responsibly. Given my propensity to binge mystery series, I should probably wait a while to reread the series after I've checked a few more mystery novels off my list, but I just want to be back with Maisie. Reading a snippet of a Father Brown mystery today in Sarah Arthur's Between Midnight and Dawn makes me wonder if Chesterton's doughty priest will be my next favorite. With my longtime love of religion and literature, and a newfound love of mysteries, Father Brown seems written just for me.

  25. 5 out of 5

    joyce w. laudon

    have loved the Maisie Dobbs series since the very first named title that was simply called Maisie Dobbs. That first in the series took place during WWI. By the time of the newest novel, Britain is heavily involved in WWII and Maisie is involved in her sixteenth investigation. Over the course of the books, all of which are excellent, Maisie evolves and grows. She goes from being a very bright housemaid to an independent woman who investigates a wide variety of cases, both those that are private a have loved the Maisie Dobbs series since the very first named title that was simply called Maisie Dobbs. That first in the series took place during WWI. By the time of the newest novel, Britain is heavily involved in WWII and Maisie is involved in her sixteenth investigation. Over the course of the books, all of which are excellent, Maisie evolves and grows. She goes from being a very bright housemaid to an independent woman who investigates a wide variety of cases, both those that are private and those that are for the government. While most of the books take place in England, Maisie has also been to Gibraltar and Germany. Her relationships deepen and grow and this is one facet of the stories that always brings me back. There are also love, loss and a little girl called Anna as one makes their way through the series. In this entry, a young boy witnesses a murder. However, he is not believed by everyone. Maisie becomes involved in trying to determine what exactly happened. The concept of honor becomes important to the solving of the case. At the same time, Maisie is interviewing potential agents who, if approved, will be dropped into France as saboteurs and intelligence agents. How will she make decisions when some of the candidates are people she knows? How strained will she be by the constraints of the official secrets act? What will happen with the romantic relationship that has more recently come into her life? Ms. Winspear has a talent for creating engaging characters. The setting of wartime London also is quite evocative. These are just some of the pleasures that are here for the reader. This title will be eagerly welcomed by fans of Ms. Dobbs. New readers can jump in too but they may then want to go back to the beginning to see how Maisie evolves and to fully enjoy and engage in her life. I very much enjoyed this novel. Thanks to NetGalley and the publisher. All opinions are my own.

  26. 5 out of 5

    M Yeazel

    Maisie’s new job is to help profile and screen agents who volunteer to work in support of the French Resistance while evacuees, adults and children, are being hurried off to the country, while her dearest friend lives on pins and needles always awaiting news of her sons who are in the service, while her new daughter is growing up under the safe harbor of her father, stepmother and in-laws, while she’s wondering about her relationship with that American, and while Germany is bombing the dickens o Maisie’s new job is to help profile and screen agents who volunteer to work in support of the French Resistance while evacuees, adults and children, are being hurried off to the country, while her dearest friend lives on pins and needles always awaiting news of her sons who are in the service, while her new daughter is growing up under the safe harbor of her father, stepmother and in-laws, while she’s wondering about her relationship with that American, and while Germany is bombing the dickens out of London day after day. Billy takes on more and more of the investigations for the business because Maisie is pulled in to do official war work. But they work very closely together, just like in some of the earlier stories, when young Freddy, a messenger, witnesses a murder and then has to deliver a message to the actual murderer. Of course, the police don’t believe he actually saw what he says he saw, but also, of course, Maisie believes him. There’s a very interesting side story about the ptsd that children suffer during the events of the war. In normal Maisie fashion, she uses her wealth and the freedom it brings her to help others, so many others. By this time, everyone she cares about is living in relative safety in Kent, in a dwelling that Maisie either owns or has provided. She also saves Freddy and his family from an abusive father by tucking them away in the first flat she ever bought on her own. This story is heavy with the good works that Maisie does and the emotional, personal and professional conflicts she faces now that war is in full swing and her life is on the line daily. I love the cover art for this book! I also listened to this and Orlagh Cassidy is at her finest. She gives you Maisie’s educated accent, Billy’s working man tone and her boss’s Scottish burr in one conversation without missing a beat or dropping an haitch! It’s definitely the best way to get the full flavor of the story! I hope you enjoy. I definitely recommend.

  27. 5 out of 5

    Greg Strom

    This review has been hidden because it contains spoilers. To view it, click here. I am such a sucker for the comfortable environs of Miss Dobbs, Margaret, Countess WTF, or future Mark Scott s wife. Orleah does an admirable job with the voices as always, though the name Tarkin and his voice Tantie Maisie is always annoying I look forwards to Billie chatting about his nippers and counting up the times they drink tea with various descriptors of the circumstances. I was almost worried the old case map was going to go by wayside but low and behold there it is. She did a nice job b I am such a sucker for the comfortable environs of Miss Dobbs, Margaret, Countess WTF, or future Mark Scott s wife. Orleah does an admirable job with the voices as always, though the name Tarkin and his voice Tantie Maisie is always annoying I look forwards to Billie chatting about his nippers and counting up the times they drink tea with various descriptors of the circumstances. I was almost worried the old case map was going to go by wayside but low and behold there it is. She did a nice job bringing back some old favorites to visit again, though one died as war is hell after all. Her kid bounced back from the dying dog episode and she did a nice job protecting family from asshole pretend husband (who should have been locked up the whole time....we'll lock him up now, as an after thought). I must say the main plot was pretty weak, honor killing of some loose lipped loser who was going to out commanding officers cowardly act? Oh yeah, just stab the guy a couple times and throw him in the Thames, all good since it is war time and he was Canadien and not really French so...... Really had a lot going on there for a bit, couldn't blame old dorky American Mark (who's dialogue really is weak, like out of a bad 40s recruiting film, sorry Orleah, American not your strong suit) is he said C YA Maisey since she blew him off more than once whist running around looking for loose ends to tie with her true love Robbie. Driver very cool character indeed, am sure we will see more of her, and of course she picked December 7th for wedding day, infamy or bust! See you next time Miss Dobbs, stiff upper lip, and get a car so you can drive yourself unless that is illegal or something, really more your style. PS nice disclaimer at the end fussing up to changing some dates to make a cherished song "I'll be Seeing you?" fit as well as some other detail that I am sure someone would have googled and called her on....preemptive strike that!

  28. 4 out of 5

    BOOKLOVER EB

    "The Consequences of Fear" is set in England in 1941. Maisie Dobbs is a brilliant and capable woman whose areas of expertise include psychology, medicine, and forensics. Too often, Maisie has exhausted herself running her private enquiry agency, solving crimes, and fulfilling her responsibilities as an operative for the British government. In addition, when people she cares about are short of funds, require a place to stay, or have problems at home, Maisie marshals the resources at her disposal "The Consequences of Fear" is set in England in 1941. Maisie Dobbs is a brilliant and capable woman whose areas of expertise include psychology, medicine, and forensics. Too often, Maisie has exhausted herself running her private enquiry agency, solving crimes, and fulfilling her responsibilities as an operative for the British government. In addition, when people she cares about are short of funds, require a place to stay, or have problems at home, Maisie marshals the resources at her disposal to give them the support that they need. Unfortunately, her hectic schedule makes it difficult for Maisie to enjoy a fulfilling personal life. She is beginning to realize that it may be time to reorder her priorities. The author updates us on the characters we have followed for so long, some of whom are grief-stricken after experiencing tragic losses. Much to Maisie's delight, her daughter, Anna, is thriving in school and basking in the attention of her doting grandparents. Furthermore, Maisie's beau, a handsome American named Mark Scott, is a good-hearted, well-spoken, and thoughtful man who not only adores Maisie, but also understands her. In this richly detailed, evocative, and engrossing work of fiction, Germans bombs are killing British men, women, and children and reducing buildings to rubble. Meanwhile, Maisie is investigating an ugly case that the authorities have little interest in pursuing. "The Consequences of Fear" incorporates a number of intriguing themes: Maisie's promising romance; daring exploits by members of the resistance; brutal acts of vengeance; and an exploration of how war affects the soldiers at the front and those they leave behind to wait, worry, and pray. Jacqueline Winspear's latest novel is insightful, poignant, poetic, and thoroughly entertaining.

  29. 4 out of 5

    Bridget

    The Consequences of Fear by Jacqueline Winspear is the sixteenth novel to feature private investigator Maisie Dobbs. It's September 1941 and the Blitz is in full swing. Young Freddie Hackett is a runner of messages for the Special Operations Executive (SOE) in London. On one errand the twelve-year-old sees two men fighting, a knife blade flash, and a man fall to the street. He notices that the other man who flees has a scarred face and recognises him when he delivers his message a bit later. Repo The Consequences of Fear by Jacqueline Winspear is the sixteenth novel to feature private investigator Maisie Dobbs. It's September 1941 and the Blitz is in full swing. Young Freddie Hackett is a runner of messages for the Special Operations Executive (SOE) in London. On one errand the twelve-year-old sees two men fighting, a knife blade flash, and a man fall to the street. He notices that the other man who flees has a scarred face and recognises him when he delivers his message a bit later. Reporting the occurrence at Scotland Yard, he isn't believed as there is no evidence of murder nor a dead body. He has delivered messages to Maisie Dobbs in the past so goes to her office and tells his story to Billy Beale, Maisie's assistant who reports to Maisie. Maisie begins investigating and finds a suspect but there's a problem: the suspect is someone she found whilst working secretly for the SOE. This is my first read in the Maisie Dobbs series even though it is book 16, however, I know it won't be my last. As Maisie runs between Dower House at Chelstone Manor, Kent and London in her valiant efforts to solve the case, she involves as many of her friends and allies as possible many of whom are clearly recurring characters. The story is steeped in the history of the period, and I think Maisie will be a fascinating character to uncover in the earlier books. Certainly in The Consequences of Fear I enjoyed her determination, empathy, calmness, and competence as well as admiring her analytical skills. An intelligent and well-told mystery. I received a complimentary copy of this novel at my request from Allison & Busby via NetGalley and this review is my own unbiased opinion.

  30. 4 out of 5

    Chris

    Among the many things to look forward to each spring is a new Maisie Dobbs books, and this year's installment does not disappoint. Over the past 17 years we've watched Maisie grow from a young woman scarred literally and figuratively by war to a young widow to a wealthy, independent woman who is willing to take on Scotland Yard and Special Operations if she things it's the right thing to do. It is now 1941 and England has survived more than a year of Nazi bombing. Maisie is working with the gove Among the many things to look forward to each spring is a new Maisie Dobbs books, and this year's installment does not disappoint. Over the past 17 years we've watched Maisie grow from a young woman scarred literally and figuratively by war to a young widow to a wealthy, independent woman who is willing to take on Scotland Yard and Special Operations if she things it's the right thing to do. It is now 1941 and England has survived more than a year of Nazi bombing. Maisie is working with the government, using her psychological expertise to examine recruits training to infiltrate occupied France. She's loving being a mother to Anna, the war orphan she has adopted, and is again finding happiness in the arms of an American diplomat. But then a young boy comes to her and tells her he has seen a murder, what's more he has seen the murdered again. No one else in authority will believe him - but Maisie does. Eventually the boy's story and Maisie's work with the government begin to get tangled up. While there is a mystery there, the central theme of the book is fear. Londoner's face the fear of being blown to bits every night. The young men and women being dropped into France have to overcome their fears to do their bit for their country. The boy needs to face his fears of living with a brute of a father. And Maisie must face her fears of taking another chance on love. It's a well-wrapped story. It is good to watch the timeline unfold. Maisie is getting older - as are all the other regular characters in the story. And as one character points out - Maisie has tremendous insight into everyone else's problems and can be completely clueless about her own. That makes her a little bit like the rest of us.

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