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Tony Chu is a cibopath, able to get psychic impressions from what he eats. Saffron Chu is a cibopars, able to learn secrets from who she eats with. Tony is a cop. Saffron is a criminal. They are brother and sister, and they are on a collusion course. Spinning out of the Eisner awarding winning and New York Times best-selling series CHEW comes CHU, a felonious new food-noir Tony Chu is a cibopath, able to get psychic impressions from what he eats. Saffron Chu is a cibopars, able to learn secrets from who she eats with. Tony is a cop. Saffron is a criminal. They are brother and sister, and they are on a collusion course. Spinning out of the Eisner awarding winning and New York Times best-selling series CHEW comes CHU, a felonious new food-noir about cops, crooks, cooks, & clairvoyants.


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Tony Chu is a cibopath, able to get psychic impressions from what he eats. Saffron Chu is a cibopars, able to learn secrets from who she eats with. Tony is a cop. Saffron is a criminal. They are brother and sister, and they are on a collusion course. Spinning out of the Eisner awarding winning and New York Times best-selling series CHEW comes CHU, a felonious new food-noir Tony Chu is a cibopath, able to get psychic impressions from what he eats. Saffron Chu is a cibopars, able to learn secrets from who she eats with. Tony is a cop. Saffron is a criminal. They are brother and sister, and they are on a collusion course. Spinning out of the Eisner awarding winning and New York Times best-selling series CHEW comes CHU, a felonious new food-noir about cops, crooks, cooks, & clairvoyants.

30 review for Chu, Vol. 1: First Course

  1. 5 out of 5

    karen

    TELL ME MORE ABOUT THIS PLEASE

  2. 5 out of 5

    Artemy

    Oh hey, a Chew spin-off! Remember Chew? It seems like hardly anybody does at this point, but it was a good book while it lasted, and then it lasted some more. Chu, though — Chu’s pretty alright so far. This time the story follows Saffron Chu, Tony’s sister who I honestly can’t remember if she ever appeared or was mentioned in the main book, it’s been a while since I read it. But anyway, Saffron is a bit of a problem child — she does some shady stuff, she messes with some wrong people and just gen Oh hey, a Chew spin-off! Remember Chew? It seems like hardly anybody does at this point, but it was a good book while it lasted, and then it lasted some more. Chu, though — Chu’s pretty alright so far. This time the story follows Saffron Chu, Tony’s sister who I honestly can’t remember if she ever appeared or was mentioned in the main book, it’s been a while since I read it. But anyway, Saffron is a bit of a problem child — she does some shady stuff, she messes with some wrong people and just generally gets into all kinds of trouble, and of course she does all that with the help of a food-related superpower. Saffron is a cibopars, which means she can read people’s minds when she eats exactly the same food as them! The book shares some of that sense of humor and chaotic energy of its predecessor, though the story and the tone are quite different. The plot‘s fun from beginning to end, though occasionally the pacing felt a bit off, and some explanations have gotten wordier than I would prefer. Still, those are small nitpicks that didn’t detract too much from my overall enjoyment of the book. The final issue also managed to pull an absolutely brilliant stunt that‘s so very reminiscent of those Chew end-volume cappers, proving that Layman still has it where it counts. Art-wise, Dan Boultwood does a fantastic job in Rob Guillory’s absence. His style is similar to Guillory’s and yet with its own individuality, it’s a bit more slick and refined, and it fits the story perfectly. I was skeptical at first when I heard about Chew getting a spin-off, but the first volume of Chu turned out really well and left me hopeful for the book’s future — I only hope it won’t get artificially stretched out for the sake of a running gag. No “Issue #60” flash-forwards this time, please, John?

  3. 5 out of 5

    Adriana

    First of all, this is one of the most insane books I've ever read but it still makes perfect sense and that's why I enjoyed it so much. There are a ton of plot holes and things that seriously do not make any sense, but John Layman and Dan Boultwood made it so that you don't even care because you're having so much fun. The story of CHEW is one of my favorites and getting a glimpse at the events that happened before that fantastic series even started is a treat. That the glimpse is through Tony Chu First of all, this is one of the most insane books I've ever read but it still makes perfect sense and that's why I enjoyed it so much. There are a ton of plot holes and things that seriously do not make any sense, but John Layman and Dan Boultwood made it so that you don't even care because you're having so much fun. The story of CHEW is one of my favorites and getting a glimpse at the events that happened before that fantastic series even started is a treat. That the glimpse is through Tony Chu's sister made it double better. And all the sight gags and non-sequiturs in the background make it an excellent reread as well. I actually went back right after I finished the story to look for all the things I had missed and enjoyed that almost as much as I'd enjoyed the story itself. The only reason I'm not rating this as high as it can be is that, as much as I enjoyed it, I was constantly aware that a large part of my enjoyment came directly from how much I enjoyed CHEW. I'd be interested in seeing how someone completely new to the story would react to it.

  4. 4 out of 5

    Todd Glaeser

    A sequel that matches the previous series. I look forward to more. I would imagine if you liked Chew, Vol. 1: Taster's Choice, like I did, you will like this too. A sequel that matches the previous series. I look forward to more. I would imagine if you liked Chew, Vol. 1: Taster's Choice, like I did, you will like this too.

  5. 5 out of 5

    Amber

    Well shit. I was worried about how this would fit in the Chew timeline, but it was actually a perfect addition to the world.

  6. 5 out of 5

    Anette Garcia

    If you've read Chew, you have to have an unbiased clear mind. Can't wait to read the next one. If you've read Chew, you have to have an unbiased clear mind. Can't wait to read the next one.

  7. 5 out of 5

    Chris Lemmerman

    Chu is a spin-off of John Layman and Rob Guillory's Chew, about a detective who gets psychic impressions from anything he eats - including dead bodies. Chu focuses on his sister, who can read the memories of anyone she shares a meal with (as long as it's an identical meal). The Chew-niverse was always fun. It was wacky and mad, but it was grounded in reality and had a strong mystery that kept it going all the way through. Chu doesn't capture the humour quite so well just yet, but this prequel/in Chu is a spin-off of John Layman and Rob Guillory's Chew, about a detective who gets psychic impressions from anything he eats - including dead bodies. Chu focuses on his sister, who can read the memories of anyone she shares a meal with (as long as it's an identical meal). The Chew-niverse was always fun. It was wacky and mad, but it was grounded in reality and had a strong mystery that kept it going all the way through. Chu doesn't capture the humour quite so well just yet, but this prequel/interquel arc is off to a good start. Saffron Chu isn't an entirely likeable protagonist as yet either - she's trying to do the right thing, but it's never going to end well (there's a reason she wasn't around during the main Chew book, after all). So sometimes she comes off a little selfish, even while her hijinks are entertaining. Dan Boultwood's artwork is also doing its best, but the visual style and background jokes that Rob Guillory gave Chew are definitely missed. It's nice that this book looks different, since it's definitely a different animal, and there are enough similarities that you can tell it's all meant to sit in the same world even if it's not exactly the same. Chu sets the table for what is hopefully a gourmet course in comics, but the appetizer isn't really filling enough to know whether the meal itself is going to live up to its predecessor just yet. (The real reason Chew ended was because they got sick of my awful food metaphors while I was reviewing it.)

  8. 4 out of 5

    Alex Sarll

    Chew was a comic about detective Tony Chu, who has the power to learn the history of anything he eats (except beets). Chu is a belated spin-off following his sister Saffron Chu, who if she has ever been mentioned before, is certainly not one of the siblings I remember featuring in the original series, and who has the power to learn things by eating with people instead. Now, part of the beauty of Chew was the increasingly silly food-related powers which got introduced as the series went along, bu Chew was a comic about detective Tony Chu, who has the power to learn the history of anything he eats (except beets). Chu is a belated spin-off following his sister Saffron Chu, who if she has ever been mentioned before, is certainly not one of the siblings I remember featuring in the original series, and who has the power to learn things by eating with people instead. Now, part of the beauty of Chew was the increasingly silly food-related powers which got introduced as the series went along, but this sudden interest in various relatives who you'd think might have played a bigger part in that previous saga can't help feeling a little forced. More than that, although John Layman is still writing, Rob Guillory is now too busy to do the art, and for me that was always a big part of the appeal. The way Guillory rides the edge between comic and grotesque, the little details he sneaks in, feel to me like a more adult version of the best Beano artists, and that's something he's carried across from Chew to his own series Farmhand, which captures much of the same queasily amusing tone. I'm convinced this is the reason none of the attempts to bring Chew to screens have worked; what looks yucky but fun while Guillory is drawing would just be gross done as live action. Chu doesn't exactly have that problem, but instead it feels, despite all the blood and barf, like the ill-advised Saturday morning cartoon version of Chew. The artist now is Dan Boultwood, and while I'm glad to see him working with someone other than frequent but rubbish collaborator Tony Lee, and have fond memories of the ridiculous evening on which I met him back in the days when one might casually meet friends of friends in pubs with no thought for the size of the group, he ain't Rob Guillory. The slightly flat look and lurid colours of the art exacerbate a sense that this series has all the pace of its sibling, but lacks the grain which made it feel substantial as well as silly. And then there's the bit where the Chew backstory was already built around a pandemic, which inevitably serves as more of a downer nowadays. Especially when that one, supposedly spread by chicken, led to a world where years later chicken is still forbidden – and ours is spread by human interaction. Of course, I wasn't that taken with the first volume of Chew either, so despite all of this, I'd still feel obliged to check out the second volume of Chu if I came across it cheap. (Edelweiss ARC)

  9. 4 out of 5

    Carrie-Anne

    This was a fun start to a new series in the Chew-niverse. I think the total flip of following a criminal rather than a detective is going to bring a lot of great adventures, volume one is already full of dead bodies and the criminal underworld. The first big change that could have lead to disaster is the lack of Rob Guillory. Guillory's art style is such an iconic part of Chew, so I had teeny doubts about a totally different artist taking the reins. Fortunately Dan Boultwood fits in perfectly wit This was a fun start to a new series in the Chew-niverse. I think the total flip of following a criminal rather than a detective is going to bring a lot of great adventures, volume one is already full of dead bodies and the criminal underworld. The first big change that could have lead to disaster is the lack of Rob Guillory. Guillory's art style is such an iconic part of Chew, so I had teeny doubts about a totally different artist taking the reins. Fortunately Dan Boultwood fits in perfectly with the Chew gang. His art isn't too dissimilar to Guillory's style that it disconnects from the world, but it also brings a fresh, more youthful look to the characters. The colours seem bolder, the characters prettier, and the world is not so grim - which totally makes sense considering this is pre chicken prohibition / millions dying! Seeing characters we know and love in this new style is a little jolting - I didn't realise just how different the styles were until Tony made his first appearance - but because future volumes will be filled with new characters, I don't think the new change in direction will be too noticeable as the series continues. First Course is set quite a few years before Chew. Tony is still a small time detective, the chicken pandemic is only at it's grassroots and the events that take place in Chew aren't even a possibility in the minds of the most paranoid. This does lead to a little bit of an awkward beginning though, because a lot of things have had to be retconned. For example, our main character Saffron isn't even mentioned in Chew, so First Course is used as a bit of a backstory to give us a reason why she was erased from her family. The most prominent retconning though was Tony using his cibopath powers in his line of work to find criminals. This is set before Olive is even born, and we know from the first volume of Chew that this use of his powers was kind of found out by accident. So that did take a while to settle for me. Years and years ago he is using it casually with his old partner, but the very start of Chew volume 1 his boss is baffled at why he knew so much about the murderer and why he was chomping on him? Definitely a hard brain flip. This is a transitional volume though, so I don't think Tony will play a prominent part - or any part - of the rest of this series, so the retconning isn't going to be something we will have to keep in mind, or even remember, to enjoy the adventures of Saffron in Chu. This volume was an origins story of sorts, but right at the end we are given a little taste of what crazy antics are coming for volume two, and I for one cannot wait to dive in.

  10. 4 out of 5

    Chris

    This series is a prequel to the excellent "Chew" written by John Layman and illustrated by Rob Guillory. "Chew" starred Tony Chu, a detective for the FDA who is also a cibopath, someone who gets psychic visions from whatever he eats. If he eats an apple he can see it's journey from tree to store, if he bites a dead body he can see that journey too. It's a weird and unique series that I loved, so I approached this book with some trepidation. "Chu" that shows us a young Tony Chu and his less than la This series is a prequel to the excellent "Chew" written by John Layman and illustrated by Rob Guillory. "Chew" starred Tony Chu, a detective for the FDA who is also a cibopath, someone who gets psychic visions from whatever he eats. If he eats an apple he can see it's journey from tree to store, if he bites a dead body he can see that journey too. It's a weird and unique series that I loved, so I approached this book with some trepidation. "Chu" that shows us a young Tony Chu and his less than law abiding sister Saffron who has the ability to learn secrets from whatever she eats. The risk of a prequel is that they often retread the same old ground or end up ruining what came before through a series of retcons. Or often simply don't add anything of value and seem to exist just to sell to people who enjoyed the original. So I'm not really sure where "Chu" sits in all of this. I didn't dislike it, but it did leave me wondering if I really need to know more of this story? The original series is so great as a stand-alone story that I don't know if I really need to see how it all came about. I honestly can't even remember if Saffron appears in the original series, so at least that gives me one element of suspense. I don't know where her character is going. And while I know Tony's future, there are questions about his past that are unanswered I don't know if I need them to be. While Layman writes this series Dan Boultwood takes over as artist on this series and he had big shoes to fill. And he does an excellent job. He takes the existing characters and gives them his own spin, while keeping them and the world recognisable. I appreciate that he doesn't try to replicate Guillory's style, and it works. It's definitely the highlight of the book. I suspect this first volume is setting the groundwork for what's to follow, so I'll keep reading, but right now I'm kind of at "it was okay" state of mind.

  11. 4 out of 5

    Peter Derk

    It's a prequel to Chew, and there are some things I do not like about prequels. I think these are the things some people appreciate about them, so take it for what it's worth. I loved Chew, and I hate to admit that peak Chew for me was the time Tony had to solve a case by detective work so that he didn't have to use his powers by eating a piece of shit. Amazing setup. Simultaneously brilliant and for snickering children, which is exactly where I likes my books. That should tell you everything you It's a prequel to Chew, and there are some things I do not like about prequels. I think these are the things some people appreciate about them, so take it for what it's worth. I loved Chew, and I hate to admit that peak Chew for me was the time Tony had to solve a case by detective work so that he didn't have to use his powers by eating a piece of shit. Amazing setup. Simultaneously brilliant and for snickering children, which is exactly where I likes my books. That should tell you everything you need to know about my tastes, and if you're still following my reviews at this point, you should really be questioning your life choices.

  12. 5 out of 5

    Jennifer

    Read as a digital review copy I enjoyed reading this and revisiting the setting of Chew and the Chu family. This was entertaining, but I didn't enjoy the art as much as that of Rob Guillory, though Dan Boultwood maintains a similar vibe. The writing and little details in the background of panels weren't as witty as in the original Chew series. I love the concept that this sets up, and I'm looking forward to reading more, because who doesn't love a thief and cop cat and mouse? Plus, this one will Read as a digital review copy I enjoyed reading this and revisiting the setting of Chew and the Chu family. This was entertaining, but I didn't enjoy the art as much as that of Rob Guillory, though Dan Boultwood maintains a similar vibe. The writing and little details in the background of panels weren't as witty as in the original Chew series. I love the concept that this sets up, and I'm looking forward to reading more, because who doesn't love a thief and cop cat and mouse? Plus, this one will have brother-sister dynamics with people who have magical eating abilities!

  13. 5 out of 5

    Theediscerning

    Lively comedy thriller adventure comic, that would appear pitched perfectly at teens if it weren't for the swearing, barfing and exposed brains. Or perhaps that should read, BECAUSE of the swearing, barfing and exposed brains. I didn't know the first cycle of books this spins off from, but this was a perfect jumping-on point, the voice-over narrator has a nice touch of levity, and if you can cope with the bright colouring, funky design and the delight it takes in splatter and gross-out black com Lively comedy thriller adventure comic, that would appear pitched perfectly at teens if it weren't for the swearing, barfing and exposed brains. Or perhaps that should read, BECAUSE of the swearing, barfing and exposed brains. I didn't know the first cycle of books this spins off from, but this was a perfect jumping-on point, the voice-over narrator has a nice touch of levity, and if you can cope with the bright colouring, funky design and the delight it takes in splatter and gross-out black comedy, this is a success.

  14. 5 out of 5

    Betsy

    An enjoyable prequel to Chew. Not as deeply bonkers as Chew, and I didn't see so much in the drawings by this artist. An enjoyable prequel to Chew. Not as deeply bonkers as Chew, and I didn't see so much in the drawings by this artist.

  15. 4 out of 5

    Adam Stone

    John Layman and Rob Guillory's Chew, Vol. 1: Taster's Choice is one of my favorite 21st century comic series. It was fun, moderately consistent (apart from a few speedbumps near the end), and unlike any other story in comics. When I heard Layman was coming back to play around in the Chew Universe, I was excited. I thought it might focus on his daughter, his sister's perspective of the original story, or just focus on different moments that we may have missed out on in the original run. Instead, w John Layman and Rob Guillory's Chew, Vol. 1: Taster's Choice is one of my favorite 21st century comic series. It was fun, moderately consistent (apart from a few speedbumps near the end), and unlike any other story in comics. When I heard Layman was coming back to play around in the Chew Universe, I was excited. I thought it might focus on his daughter, his sister's perspective of the original story, or just focus on different moments that we may have missed out on in the original run. Instead, we have an alternate retelling with many familiar characters, and then a sibling who didn't appear in the original volume. I wish I found this intriguing and cool, but apart from really enjoying the one page revisiting of the early Chew trope of "This is Tony Chu....", this didn't feel at all like the series I loved a few years ago. With no disrespect to Dan Boultwood, whose art is vibrant and striking, and works really well with Saffron being the focus character, I think the reason I enjoyed "Chew" so much wasn't John Layman, but Rob Guillory. While Layman's "Chu" doesn't have the same magic that "Chew" did, Guillory's Farmhand, Vol. 1: Reap What Was Sown feels exactly the same. The use of flashbacks, the Easter eggs, the unbridled joy, everything I loved in "Chew" is present there. If you loved "Chew", I highly recommend picking "Farmhand" up. And while you should also probably pick up "Chu" and see if it speaks to you, don't be surprised if the first volume leaves a weird aftertaste in your mouth.

  16. 5 out of 5

    Bernie Gourley

    The unique element of this book is its food-centric premise, and – in particular – the existence of food-based extrasensory perception. The central character, Saffron Chu, is able to read the mind of anyone nearby, if she eats the exact same thing that person is consuming as he or she consumes it. Saffron is part of a criminal gang that conducts high-value burglaries. Saffron’s brother, Tony, has a different (and much grosser) food ESP in that he can get psychic impressions from sampling the dec The unique element of this book is its food-centric premise, and – in particular – the existence of food-based extrasensory perception. The central character, Saffron Chu, is able to read the mind of anyone nearby, if she eats the exact same thing that person is consuming as he or she consumes it. Saffron is part of a criminal gang that conducts high-value burglaries. Saffron’s brother, Tony, has a different (and much grosser) food ESP in that he can get psychic impressions from sampling the deceased at crime scenes (i.e. a bit like “iZombie” but he doesn’t have to eat brains; it can be blood or viscera that he tastes.) [Actually, his power is broader than that in that he can get impressions off of anything he eats, except – for some reason – beets, but the tasting of blood and gore is most relevant to his role in this story.] Tony is a police detective. The story begins with the crew that Saffron belongs to bungling the burglary of a powerful crime boss. Keeping with the critical role of food, the burglary fails because a city-wide outbreak of food poisoning attributable to tainted chicken strikes part of the crew, and only Saffron and her charming, if douchey, Dick Dastardly-looking boyfriend – Eddie Molay – escape. The rest of the story revolves around Saffron and Eddie trying to survive and escape revenge attacks from the crime-lord who they attempted to rob. As the couple is doing so, Tony and his partner are assigned to solve the murders of the burglary-gone-awry from which Saffron and Eddie escaped, as well as some of the subsequent cases that ensue. Family is a major element of the story’ tension. The cat-and-mouse between Tony and Saffron is only part of this, though it is a central element of the story. These characters are also put in situations in which they must determine if family comes before the other things they value, and they must cope with the fact that whatever they do happens within a familial context – i.e. they each have to face the shame of the family knowing who they truly are. The art is whimsical, colorful, and easy to follow. The classic cartoony nature of the drawings is beneficial in maintaining a tone that is lighthearted, despite the many gruesome deaths that are depicted in graphic, but comically absurd ways. This volume collects the first five issues (#1-5) of the series. I enjoyed the story, which was straightforward and entertaining. The premise of the book is unique, if odd -- but better bizarre than cliché.

  17. 4 out of 5

    April Gray

    I'm not familiar with Chew, a series John Layman and Rob Guillory created, about Tony Chu, an agent for the FDA, who is a cibopath- a person who receives psychic impressions from the food he eats, an ability he uses to help solve crimes. Chu is a spin-off series, created by Layman with Dan Boultwood, about Tony's sister Saffron, a cibopar who can learn secrets from people she eats with, as long as she eats what they're eating. Saffron has gone a different direction than Tony; she uses her abilit I'm not familiar with Chew, a series John Layman and Rob Guillory created, about Tony Chu, an agent for the FDA, who is a cibopath- a person who receives psychic impressions from the food he eats, an ability he uses to help solve crimes. Chu is a spin-off series, created by Layman with Dan Boultwood, about Tony's sister Saffron, a cibopar who can learn secrets from people she eats with, as long as she eats what they're eating. Saffron has gone a different direction than Tony; she uses her ability for more nefarious purposes, committing crimes with her dick of a boyfriend Eddie. When a job they're doing with other criminals with odd food related powers goes horribly wrong due to an outbreak of some weird chicken flu, Saffron and Eddie get a hit put on them by the mafia boss that hired them, and shit starts to hit the fan, ending in a dramatic family showdown. I enjoyed the story quite a bit; while the abilities were confusing at first (I'm sure if I'd read Chew beforehand, it wouldn't have been confusing), I picked it up pretty quickly, so that didn't detract from the story for me. I did wanna shake some sense into Saffron, however- Eddie is clearly a jerk, and she really does deserve better. The action was fun, and there's some gore and epic puking, but it's cartoony enough to not be too disturbing. The artwork was great- bright, bold, and full of quirky little details in the background to make things interesting. I mostly liked the ending- it would've been better minus the jerk, though- curse you, Eddie! It ends in such a way that there could be more, but is satisfying if there isn't. Overall, a really entertaining read.

  18. 4 out of 5

    Jake

    This series isn't just a prequel to a popular franchise and lead into an interquel. Chu stands out from Chew by focusing on a character from never before. In this case it's Saffron Chu, a character on her way to being a career criminal. The nature of Saffron's powers make her a great information gatherer and manipulator. While the reader doesn't get much in terms of motive, they do see Saffron as a character. She's made a number of decisions off panel that seem bad including a choice of boyfriend This series isn't just a prequel to a popular franchise and lead into an interquel. Chu stands out from Chew by focusing on a character from never before. In this case it's Saffron Chu, a character on her way to being a career criminal. The nature of Saffron's powers make her a great information gatherer and manipulator. While the reader doesn't get much in terms of motive, they do see Saffron as a character. She's made a number of decisions off panel that seem bad including a choice of boyfriends but still values her family times. Saffron is not above manipulating the people closest to her like her twin Sage to get what she wants either. In all consideration, Saffron really likes being in control and panics when things don't go her way. Having a boyfriend that snaps at her every so often makes this a relatable feeling. It's this feeling of needing control in life that makes Chu such a black comedy. Readers feel a sense of what kind of series this can be when they get introduced to a heist. But when everything goes sideways due to a factor out of everyone's control, it feels like just desserts. Everyone discluding a minor character that brings the reader to Tony Chu, protagonist of the original series. Not only does everybody remain in character, they also give a little insight into what goes into and out of Chu and Chew. After the ending of this arc, I'm hopeful I get to see the less utilized parts of Chew end up in Chu.

  19. 5 out of 5

    Bexa

    Continuing to dive deep into the Chu family, this series starts with the lovable Saffron Chu. Saffron is the family Cibopars, which means that if she eats the exact same thing as another person, at the exact same time, she can see what they're thinking. Unlike her brother Tony Chu, who can eat something and learns the history of what happened to it (except beets). Also, unlike Tony, Saffron isn't exactly on the right side of the law. Caught in a mess with her boyfriend Eddie, Saffron gets into a Continuing to dive deep into the Chu family, this series starts with the lovable Saffron Chu. Saffron is the family Cibopars, which means that if she eats the exact same thing as another person, at the exact same time, she can see what they're thinking. Unlike her brother Tony Chu, who can eat something and learns the history of what happened to it (except beets). Also, unlike Tony, Saffron isn't exactly on the right side of the law. Caught in a mess with her boyfriend Eddie, Saffron gets into a lot of trouble, and then into some more trouble, and by the end of it, she plans on getting into more trouble. With bright, colorful, and often gruesome images, this is such a fun and unique series and I can't wait for more of the Chu family.

  20. 5 out of 5

    Nessa

    Thank you Edelweiss and Image Comics for the free eARC! I didn't know this was a kind of spinoff from the other comic series 'Chew' but you can totally read this without reading the previous series. Anyhoo, I loved the graphics and art style and how gory it was 😂 I thought the concept was pretty cool with powers being attached to food. Character-wise, I thought Saffron's brother was a bit of a self righteous butt. Also her bf Eddie is so lame I really hope she leaves him in the next volume 😅 She Thank you Edelweiss and Image Comics for the free eARC! I didn't know this was a kind of spinoff from the other comic series 'Chew' but you can totally read this without reading the previous series. Anyhoo, I loved the graphics and art style and how gory it was 😂 I thought the concept was pretty cool with powers being attached to food. Character-wise, I thought Saffron's brother was a bit of a self righteous butt. Also her bf Eddie is so lame I really hope she leaves him in the next volume 😅 She's such a strong woman and is totally brought down by having to deal with Eddie. I love the ending though and can't wait to see what happens in the next volume!

  21. 5 out of 5

    Chris Thompson

    I actually enjoyed this more than the couple of Chew books I have read, and I think it’s because Saffron is a much more entertaining character than her brother, Tony. She has a livelier personality, and she’s a villain, who are generally more entertaining than the good guys. I don’t think you need to have read Chew to jump into this one, but now I might go back and read the other books in the Chew series.

  22. 4 out of 5

    Karin

    Excited to see what the future of the Chu clan has in store.

  23. 5 out of 5

    Imogene

    It was a little strange going back in time after the epic ness of Chew, but interesting.

  24. 4 out of 5

    Maja

    I read this in single issue format! It was a fun find since I was missing the original Chew series.

  25. 4 out of 5

    Caleb Bollenbacher

    Geez it’s fun to be back in the Chew-niverse!

  26. 4 out of 5

    Calvin Daniels

    2.5 Very average. Nothing to set it apart, no excitement to make you look forward to a Vol 2.

  27. 4 out of 5

    Deane Hariss

    As with Chew, I love the artwork, the outlined “comedy” of it all even in serious situations. Just a quick fun as hell read.

  28. 4 out of 5

    Andrew Seaton

    Boultwood is fine, but he’s no Rob Guillory. Still, story was interesting enough. I’m sure I’ll grab the next book.

  29. 4 out of 5

    John

    Not as tasty as the original.

  30. 5 out of 5

    David Wilson

    So happy this series is back!!

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