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Classified: The Secret Career of Mary Golda Ross, Cherokee Aerospace Engineer

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Mary Golda Ross designed classified airplanes and spacecraft as Lockheed Aircraft Corporation's first female engineer. Find out how her passion for math and the Cherokee values she was raised with shaped her life and work. Cherokee author Traci Sorell and Métis illustrator Natasha Donovan trace Ross's journey from being the only girl in a high school math class to becomin Mary Golda Ross designed classified airplanes and spacecraft as Lockheed Aircraft Corporation's first female engineer. Find out how her passion for math and the Cherokee values she was raised with shaped her life and work. Cherokee author Traci Sorell and Métis illustrator Natasha Donovan trace Ross's journey from being the only girl in a high school math class to becoming a teacher to pursuing an engineering degree, joining the top-secret Skunk Works division of Lockheed, and being a mentor for Native Americans and young women interested in engineering. In addition, the narrative highlights Cherokee values including education, working cooperatively, remaining humble, and helping ensure equal opportunity and education for all.


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Mary Golda Ross designed classified airplanes and spacecraft as Lockheed Aircraft Corporation's first female engineer. Find out how her passion for math and the Cherokee values she was raised with shaped her life and work. Cherokee author Traci Sorell and Métis illustrator Natasha Donovan trace Ross's journey from being the only girl in a high school math class to becomin Mary Golda Ross designed classified airplanes and spacecraft as Lockheed Aircraft Corporation's first female engineer. Find out how her passion for math and the Cherokee values she was raised with shaped her life and work. Cherokee author Traci Sorell and Métis illustrator Natasha Donovan trace Ross's journey from being the only girl in a high school math class to becoming a teacher to pursuing an engineering degree, joining the top-secret Skunk Works division of Lockheed, and being a mentor for Native Americans and young women interested in engineering. In addition, the narrative highlights Cherokee values including education, working cooperatively, remaining humble, and helping ensure equal opportunity and education for all.

30 review for Classified: The Secret Career of Mary Golda Ross, Cherokee Aerospace Engineer

  1. 5 out of 5

    Dennis

    A brief illustrated biography of Mary Golda Ross, who was the first known Native American female engineer and in 1950 became the first female engineer in the history of Lockheed. The book shows the Cherokee values with which Mary was brought up and how she stayed true to them throughout her amazing career. At Lockheed she not only worked on aircraft but later was also selected as one of forty engineers for the Skunk Works division. It meant Mary worked on projects that people had only imagined A brief illustrated biography of Mary Golda Ross, who was the first known Native American female engineer and in 1950 became the first female engineer in the history of Lockheed. The book shows the Cherokee values with which Mary was brought up and how she stayed true to them throughout her amazing career. At Lockheed she not only worked on aircraft but later was also selected as one of forty engineers for the Skunk Works division. It meant Mary worked on projects that people had only imagined and some no one had ever thought of before. No vessel had ever flown nonstop around Earth—with or without a pilot. Flying beyond Earth? That seemed impossible. Lots of what Mary and her fellow engineers did there is still classified, but it is known that she helped put men into space and on the moon. She's one of those hidden figures that are not talked about enough. Therefore, this book is very much appreciated. Unfortunately, though, it stays too much on the surface and reads like a simple listing of Mary Golda Ross' achievements rather than something that can and will inspire children to reach for the stars. It is an inspiring story and I like how it always comes back to the Cherokee values that it stated at the beginning. But that's the problem really, it states things rather than infuse them with something more. Something that will draw children in. Alas. 2.5 stars Thank you to NetGalley and Millbrook Press for providing me with a digital ARC in exchange for an honest review. All thoughts are my own and in no way influenced by the aforementioned.

  2. 4 out of 5

    Dave Schaafsma

    I was recommended to read this book, which I like for letting me know about a Cherokee woman in the first half of the twentieth century, facing severe racism and sexism, who worked for Lockheed designing (classified) planes and astronomical systems, to make a major contribution to the development of the field of astrophysics. The art is not great, the story is pretty wooden, but making the information available to younger people is great. I just happen to have a nephew in high school who is plan I was recommended to read this book, which I like for letting me know about a Cherokee woman in the first half of the twentieth century, facing severe racism and sexism, who worked for Lockheed designing (classified) planes and astronomical systems, to make a major contribution to the development of the field of astrophysics. The art is not great, the story is pretty wooden, but making the information available to younger people is great. I just happen to have a nephew in high school who is planning on majoring in astrophysics, so I put it in his hands. “Very interesting,” the math whiz says to me. That’s what I thought, too.

  3. 5 out of 5

    Reading_ Tam_ Ishly

    This illustrated short biography is exceptional celebrating the genius of the only girl who loved mathematics when girls weren't expected to even like the subject, Mary Golda Ross who made groundbreaking inventions and development in her field as well as in the education world. Also, this book is a celebration of the award winning artist, Natasha Donovan. The artwork is amazing! I love how the whole story has been presented in just a few pages. But it's so worth it. Truly inspirational. Thank you, This illustrated short biography is exceptional celebrating the genius of the only girl who loved mathematics when girls weren't expected to even like the subject, Mary Golda Ross who made groundbreaking inventions and development in her field as well as in the education world. Also, this book is a celebration of the award winning artist, Natasha Donovan. The artwork is amazing! I love how the whole story has been presented in just a few pages. But it's so worth it. Truly inspirational. Thank you, authors and the publisher for the advance reading copy.

  4. 5 out of 5

    Barbara

    Given the stereotypes that still exist concerning girls and women and math, it astonishes me that Mary Golda Ross was able to take challenging math courses in high school in the 1920s and even dreamed of a career that would allow her to use her math and critical thinking skills. This biography introduces readers to yet another groundbreaking individual whose contributions to the field have been lost to history. The great-great granddaughter of Principal Chief of the Cherokee Nation, Mary lived h Given the stereotypes that still exist concerning girls and women and math, it astonishes me that Mary Golda Ross was able to take challenging math courses in high school in the 1920s and even dreamed of a career that would allow her to use her math and critical thinking skills. This biography introduces readers to yet another groundbreaking individual whose contributions to the field have been lost to history. The great-great granddaughter of Principal Chief of the Cherokee Nation, Mary lived her life according to the Cherokee values instilled in her by her family and the examples around her. Not only did she become a teacher, but she eventually was hired by Lockheed Aircraft Corporation where she solved tough mathematical problems and worked as an engineer, the first female to hold that job. Not only is it clear just how unusual she was for her times, but the author also makes sure to point out how she paved the way for other women and supported their efforts, attributing her behavior in this and other matters to her upbringing and awareness of her people's values. In today's media savvy, selfie-posting world, it's refreshing to read about someone who didn't seek the limelight or fame; instead, as the text states, "In her quiet, steadfast way, Mary kept right on blazing a trail for others to follow for the rest of her life" (unpaged). Created with pencil, ink, and Procreate, the illustrations show those attributes, including her humbleness and her steadiness over her lifetime. While I might have wished to have more of her words included in the text, I finished the book and marveled at her courage and determination and wondering at how lonely it must have been for her at Lockheed during those early years. This book will surely be a worthy addition to a classroom collection about groundbreakers and women in STEM.

  5. 4 out of 5

    Theediscerning

    I think the story in this biography would have been quite interesting enough without one of the many aspects that made its subject so notable. A young lady, born before WWI, mastering STEM subjects, and growing to teach them when her classmates had been racing to be the first to not sit alongside her in ignominy at her very presence. A female scientist of note that was the only one of her gender to feature among the 40 boffins at Skunk Works, where they used satellite and rocket science to do – I think the story in this biography would have been quite interesting enough without one of the many aspects that made its subject so notable. A young lady, born before WWI, mastering STEM subjects, and growing to teach them when her classmates had been racing to be the first to not sit alongside her in ignominy at her very presence. A female scientist of note that was the only one of her gender to feature among the 40 boffins at Skunk Works, where they used satellite and rocket science to do – well, it's still classified. Oh, and all that while being a Native American, and needing to press on everyone that just because she was the first she was dang well not going to be the last. Yes, this book needn't have been so specific about the Cherokee aspects of the subject – it was doing perfectly well in filling in a gap in everyone's knowledge of science history, and getting just one more of the Hidden Figures out into the spotlight. Still, it doesn't really over-labour the ethnicity of our lead, and it will definitely do what she herself would wish, and empower First Nations girls to aspire to her heights. The design can't quite settle between nicely straightforward narrative illustration and the more technical aspects of things, so it doesn't appear quite as pleasantly coherent as it might have, but this is a definite possibility for many a school library.

  6. 5 out of 5

    Laura

    This picture book biography of Mary Golda Ross is absolutely amazing. I love learning about women who did great things, and it is especially good to hear about women in STEM who managed to get as far as they did, despite being born when most women were not encouraged to pursue a career at all. I was very impressed that the author, who is also Cherokee, brought up the four values to explain why Mary did the things she did. 1 Gaining skills in all areas of life. 2. Working cooperatively with others 3 This picture book biography of Mary Golda Ross is absolutely amazing. I love learning about women who did great things, and it is especially good to hear about women in STEM who managed to get as far as they did, despite being born when most women were not encouraged to pursue a career at all. I was very impressed that the author, who is also Cherokee, brought up the four values to explain why Mary did the things she did. 1 Gaining skills in all areas of life. 2. Working cooperatively with others 3. Remaining humble when others recognize your talents 4. Helping ensure equal education and opportunity for all. Because she followed these values, she also made it a point to life up others so they too could follow in her footsteps. Because she followed these teachings she gained the math skills that she did, and was able to work with others. Mary Gold Ross was an amzasing woman, and I'm glad that this informative book is in picture book form so that young women can learn from her. Thanks to Netgalley for making this book available for an honest review.

  7. 5 out of 5

    Jessica Haider

    This is a great picture book for any diverse collection. The book is written by a member of the Cherokee Nation and tells the true story of a female innovator who was also from the Cherokee Nation. Mary Gold Ross was born in the early 20th century and excelled at math at an early age. She was often the only girl in her class. She went on to study math at college. Eventually she was hired as the first female engineer at Lockheed Martin. She was later selected to be part of a team working on a top This is a great picture book for any diverse collection. The book is written by a member of the Cherokee Nation and tells the true story of a female innovator who was also from the Cherokee Nation. Mary Gold Ross was born in the early 20th century and excelled at math at an early age. She was often the only girl in her class. She went on to study math at college. Eventually she was hired as the first female engineer at Lockheed Martin. She was later selected to be part of a team working on a top secret project. Through it all Mary continued to advocate for indigenous people and females to pursue interests in math & science. This is a story sure to inspire elementary aged children. It is a classic story of pushing against the status quo to open up new paths and possibilities. Thank you to the publisher for the review copy!

  8. 4 out of 5

    Lorie Barber

    Wow. I love learning about people that I don’t expect, then feel a bit angry that I don’t expect them. Stories like the one of Mary Golda Ross, Cherokee Native and mathematician/engineer, should be as commonplace as those of Thomas Edison and Neil Armstrong. But they’re not. Whiteness seeks to elevate the stories of people within its race and Euro-centric ethnicity; therefore, the stories of Natives and other people of color are often erased. I am grateful to women like Traci Sorell, who seeks t Wow. I love learning about people that I don’t expect, then feel a bit angry that I don’t expect them. Stories like the one of Mary Golda Ross, Cherokee Native and mathematician/engineer, should be as commonplace as those of Thomas Edison and Neil Armstrong. But they’re not. Whiteness seeks to elevate the stories of people within its race and Euro-centric ethnicity; therefore, the stories of Natives and other people of color are often erased. I am grateful to women like Traci Sorell, who seeks to share the lives of Natives like Ross, so we can all learn about the contributions of incredible people - of all races - to our society. It’s up to us as teachers and librarians who curate these narratives, to be intentional about what we include. Buy it. Share it. It’s brilliant.

  9. 5 out of 5

    Britt

    Thank you to Millibrook Press and NetGalley for providing me with the e-ARC. All opinions in this review are my own. Classified: The Secret Career of Mary Golda Ross, Cherokee Aerospace Engineer is a gorgeously illustrated picture book which tells the story of Mary Golda Ross. Ross is another hidden figure in the Space Race. This book tells her story in such a way that children can find a new role model in Mary Golda Ross.

  10. 4 out of 5

    Mimi

    Short biography of Mary Golda Ross, tailored for children, with very nice artwork. Mary G. Ross was an amazing, inspiring woman, paving the way for so many (but still not enough) women in engineering and math-related jobs. I received a copy for review through Netgalley, this did not influence my opinion.

  11. 5 out of 5

    Virginia McGee Butler

    In Classified: The Secret Career of Mary Golda Ross, Cherokee Aeorspace Engineer by Traci Sorell, Mary Golda Ross ignores expectations and plunges right into a mathematical world. Beginning when boys refused to sit next to her as the only girl in math class, she created a pattern of determination by getting better grades than they did. Natasha Donovan enhances the text with an appropriate mathematical arrangement of her illustrations and graphic designs. Mary follows her excellence as a student In Classified: The Secret Career of Mary Golda Ross, Cherokee Aeorspace Engineer by Traci Sorell, Mary Golda Ross ignores expectations and plunges right into a mathematical world. Beginning when boys refused to sit next to her as the only girl in math class, she created a pattern of determination by getting better grades than they did. Natasha Donovan enhances the text with an appropriate mathematical arrangement of her illustrations and graphic designs. Mary follows her excellence as a student in the classroom through her college career and on into teaching for several years. When she becomes a mathematician for Lockheed Aircraft Corporation, they send her for more training, and she becomes the company’s first female engineer. A team player with her male colleagues and an encourager and mentor to other women who join the group, she worked on space projects that often still remain classified. Mary held to four important beliefs instilled into her in her Cherokee heritage: (1) gaining skills in all areas of life, (2) working cooperatively with others, (3) remaining humble when others recognize your talents, and (4) helping ensure equal education and opportunity for all. Traci Sorell shows each of these as she navigates Mary’s life journey. There are hints of the difficulties Mary deals with as a woman and a Cherokee, but her accomplishments are the primary focus of the account. Back matter includes a timeline; photographs; an author’s note; the four Cherokee values with a syllabary, transliteration, pronunciation, and English translation; source notes; and a bibliography. This is a great book for dispelling the notion that girls and math are incompatible and for those with interest in space exploration. Written for middle grade, it enlightens both boys and girls to the fact that your sexual identity has no connection to the ability to learn and practice math and science.

  12. 5 out of 5

    Ben Truong

    Classified: The Secret Career of Mary Golda Ross, Cherokee Aerospace Engineer is a children's picture book written by Traci Sorell and illustrated by Natasha Donovan. It highlights the life and secret work of Cherokee aerospace engineer Mary Golda Ross. Mary Golda Ross was the first known Native American female engineer, and the first female engineer in the history of Lockheed. She was one of the 40 founding engineers of the renowned and highly secretive Skunk Works project at Lockheed Corporatio Classified: The Secret Career of Mary Golda Ross, Cherokee Aerospace Engineer is a children's picture book written by Traci Sorell and illustrated by Natasha Donovan. It highlights the life and secret work of Cherokee aerospace engineer Mary Golda Ross. Mary Golda Ross was the first known Native American female engineer, and the first female engineer in the history of Lockheed. She was one of the 40 founding engineers of the renowned and highly secretive Skunk Works project at Lockheed Corporation. She worked at Lockheed from 1942 until her retirement in 1973, where she was best remembered for her work on aerospace design. Sorell's text is rather simplistic, straightforward, and informative. Meticulously researched and subtly framed according to the Cherokee beliefs that piloted Ross, page-turning prose elevates this Indigenous hidden figure to her rightful place in history. Backmatter includes a timeline, author's note, four Cherokee values, source notes, and bibliography. Donovan's bold, classic-comics–like illustrations and colors reminiscent of 1950s advertisements give an appropriately retro vibe. The premise of the book is rather straightforward. As a teen in the 1920s, Mary Golda Ross loves puzzling out math equations despite expectations of the times. At sixteen, she finds being the only girl in a college math class means working extra hard to prove herself to the boys who refused to sit next to her. Guided by her Cherokee belief that gaining life skills in all areas is important, Ross not only strives for better grades, she aims for loftier goals. Ultimately, her passion for math and her commitment to those deeply rooted values result in her selection to a super-secret work team that promises to take her career, and the world, further than ever before. All in all, Classified: The Secret Career of Mary Golda Ross, Cherokee Aerospace Engineer is a stellar biography of a little known Cherokee aerospace engineer in Mary Golda Ross.

  13. 5 out of 5

    Sunday

    Honored to have learned about Mary Golda Ross--a Cherokee aerospace engineer. Sorell frames the life of Ross with the Cherokee values of gaining skills in all areas of life, working cooperatively with others, being humble when recognized for achievements, helping ensure access and equity in education and opportunity for all. A little disappointed that Sorrell is so explicit about how Ross revealed these values (e.g., "She modeled the Cherokee value of working together in mind and heart") instead Honored to have learned about Mary Golda Ross--a Cherokee aerospace engineer. Sorell frames the life of Ross with the Cherokee values of gaining skills in all areas of life, working cooperatively with others, being humble when recognized for achievements, helping ensure access and equity in education and opportunity for all. A little disappointed that Sorrell is so explicit about how Ross revealed these values (e.g., "She modeled the Cherokee value of working together in mind and heart") instead of trusting the reader to draw these conclusions. Not a deal break, though. Natasha Donovan's illustrations are vivid and colorful, extending and adding to Sorrell's narrative. (I'm new to Donovan's and interested to see what else she has illustrated!) Both Sorrell and Donovan are members of tribal nations. Appreciate that Millbrook Press made this happen! Lends authority and accuracy to the text. TEXT SET - A new addition to a growing list of picture books about women in STEM. What might happen if we emerge our k-5 students in books about these women? :) Queen of Physics: How Wu Chien Shiung Helped Unlock the Secrets of the Atom (Robeson, 2019), Nothing Stopped Sophie: The Story of Unshakable Mathematician Sophie Germain (Bardoe, 2018), Joan Proctor, Dragon Doctor: The Woman Who Loved Reptiles (Valdez, 2018), Caroline's Comet (McCully, 2017) Who Says Women Can't Be Doctors? (2013) Guiding questions for thinking across these titles might be, "How did these women persevere?" and "Why was it important that they persevered? How was the world changed as a result?" I've also reviewed each of these. Look for these titles on my goodreads shelf "bio women in STEM" - https://www.goodreads.com/review/list....

  14. 5 out of 5

    Elizabeth

    I'm a simple woman, and if I hear that either Traci Sorell is authoring a new picture book or that Natasha Donovan is illustrating a new picture book, I'm willing to read it. That they did a picture book together absolutely thrills me. That picture book being about Mary Gold Ross, a Cherokee aerospace engineer from the mid 20th century? I'm sold on every level before even cracking the spine on a book like this. I have to say that despite my sky-high expectations, I was not disappointed. Classifi I'm a simple woman, and if I hear that either Traci Sorell is authoring a new picture book or that Natasha Donovan is illustrating a new picture book, I'm willing to read it. That they did a picture book together absolutely thrills me. That picture book being about Mary Gold Ross, a Cherokee aerospace engineer from the mid 20th century? I'm sold on every level before even cracking the spine on a book like this. I have to say that despite my sky-high expectations, I was not disappointed. Classified uses simple and straightforward prose to cover many points throughout Ross's long life and career, giving us the chance to see who she was as a person and the incredible things she achieved. The story is engaging and informative, and it gives us the chance to explore a side of history that is, unfortunately, far too little known. Donovan's art is absolutely on point, bringing Ross and her work to life in beautiful images that really add to Sorell's narration. I love reading picture books about STEM history, and this is immediately among my favourites. I highly recommend Classified: The Secret Career of Mary Golda Ross, Cherokee Aerospace Engineer. This was a story that needed telling, and I'm so glad that it was Sorell and Donovan who got to do that telling.

  15. 5 out of 5

    joyce w. laudon

    One thing that I love about kids’ non-fiction titles is that I often learn about something or someone previously unknown to me. That was certainly true with this book. I had not heard of Mary Golda Rose who was a twentieth century aerospace engineer. This Native American’s story is told here and it is intriguing. Young reader’s learn that Mary’s Cherokee values shaped the person that she was. Her love of Math and Science led her to a successful career. From teacher to becoming an engineer at Lock One thing that I love about kids’ non-fiction titles is that I often learn about something or someone previously unknown to me. That was certainly true with this book. I had not heard of Mary Golda Rose who was a twentieth century aerospace engineer. This Native American’s story is told here and it is intriguing. Young reader’s learn that Mary’s Cherokee values shaped the person that she was. Her love of Math and Science led her to a successful career. From teacher to becoming an engineer at Lockheed, Mary worked hard and accomplished much. This title includes helpful sections including a time line, a list of Cherokee values, source notes and a bibliography. Interested readers can thus look deeper into the life and times of this remarkable woman. STEM education is a focus now. This book will encourage students, especially girls, to reach for the careers that they want. They will be impressed by what Mary achieved and, hopefully, will learn that they, too, can be successful. Many thanks to NetGalley and the publisher for this title. All opinions are my own.

  16. 5 out of 5

    Debra

    Women's History Month seemed a perfect time to add this book to my school collection. I have few biographies of women and even fewer of Native women. I am not sure my students in elementary school will have the experience or knowledge to understand how amazing this biography of an engineer is, but I sure did. This book is very simply written and entwined with Native Cherokee values as it explains the Native schools, progress beyond an 8th grade education, and steps to a career helping in the Spa Women's History Month seemed a perfect time to add this book to my school collection. I have few biographies of women and even fewer of Native women. I am not sure my students in elementary school will have the experience or knowledge to understand how amazing this biography of an engineer is, but I sure did. This book is very simply written and entwined with Native Cherokee values as it explains the Native schools, progress beyond an 8th grade education, and steps to a career helping in the Space Race as one of the engineers who helped Americans get to the moon. The title is well suited to the mysterious and still classified information that Mary Golda Ross and her team were a part of as the race to get our then NACA and now NASA astronauts into space and back home safely. This is quite literally NEEDED in our library collections. There were so many trailblazers we have yet to learn about and NOW is the TIME!

  17. 5 out of 5

    Lisa

    Mary Golda Ross was Lockheed Aircraft's first female engineer. Interested in and very good at math, Mary was the only girl in her math class. She excelled in the sciences all through school, eventually teaching and then becoming an engineer. She used the Cherokee values of cooperative work, education, humility and equal opportunity to guide her decisions and work. Oh. my. goodness! I continue to be amazed by these great, short picture book biographies of amazing women. I had no idea there were m Mary Golda Ross was Lockheed Aircraft's first female engineer. Interested in and very good at math, Mary was the only girl in her math class. She excelled in the sciences all through school, eventually teaching and then becoming an engineer. She used the Cherokee values of cooperative work, education, humility and equal opportunity to guide her decisions and work. Oh. my. goodness! I continue to be amazed by these great, short picture book biographies of amazing women. I had no idea there were more hidden women in the space program! Although much of her work is still classified, I'm so glad that my patrons can read about Mary Golda Ross and be inspired. Natasha Donovans illustrations are great - many of the pictures have complicated math problems in the back ground, and Traci Sorell has told a concise story, and included a great timeline as well. Cross posted to https://kissthebookjr.blogspot.com/20...

  18. 5 out of 5

    Nick

    Really more math and engineering than science, but her field was heavily applied math for the purposes of aeronautics. The only weakness of this book is that it is so short that it becomes frustrating, because so many stories had to be left out or abridged. That said, I enjoyed the fact that it focused on a woman whose many contributions have been somewhat overlooked. I have lived and worked within a few miles of where her main achievements were made, but had never heard her name before this boo Really more math and engineering than science, but her field was heavily applied math for the purposes of aeronautics. The only weakness of this book is that it is so short that it becomes frustrating, because so many stories had to be left out or abridged. That said, I enjoyed the fact that it focused on a woman whose many contributions have been somewhat overlooked. I have lived and worked within a few miles of where her main achievements were made, but had never heard her name before this book came out. Among other things, there were wonderful little snippets, like the origin of the "Skunk Works" name for the Lockheed secret projects section. The main thing about the book, though, is the story of a talented and determined woman.

  19. 5 out of 5

    Gxianfranko

    The world we live in is inhabited by many outstanding people, of whom we often know nothing. One of these people is Mary Golda Ross. I "met" her in "Classified", the beautiful book written by Tracy Sorell, with illustrations by Natasha Donovan. Who was Mary G. R.? Briefly, she was a member of the Cherokee community, a mathematician, a mechanical, aeronautical and aerospace engineer, a teacher, a mentor... above all, a humble and resilient person, with an burning desire to learn, and a taste for wo The world we live in is inhabited by many outstanding people, of whom we often know nothing. One of these people is Mary Golda Ross. I "met" her in "Classified", the beautiful book written by Tracy Sorell, with illustrations by Natasha Donovan. Who was Mary G. R.? Briefly, she was a member of the Cherokee community, a mathematician, a mechanical, aeronautical and aerospace engineer, a teacher, a mentor... above all, a humble and resilient person, with an burning desire to learn, and a taste for working with others, on equal foot... She is a really good example for kids, first recipients of this book; but adults, too, will discover one of the many nice people of our world.

  20. 4 out of 5

    Vicki

    This was a very interesting book. I love any story that teaches as well as entertains and this book did just that. Mary Golda Ross was a female Cherokee aerospace engineer in a time when women were never encouraged to pursue math or science careers. As a women who grew up in the 80's and 90's I remember being told that "girls aren't good at math". (This girl was!) I love any story that involves breaking down sexist or racist barriers. I also enjoyed learning about four Cherokee values. Definitel This was a very interesting book. I love any story that teaches as well as entertains and this book did just that. Mary Golda Ross was a female Cherokee aerospace engineer in a time when women were never encouraged to pursue math or science careers. As a women who grew up in the 80's and 90's I remember being told that "girls aren't good at math". (This girl was!) I love any story that involves breaking down sexist or racist barriers. I also enjoyed learning about four Cherokee values. Definitely will be adding this book to my library's collection. Thank you to NetGalley for this eARC.

  21. 5 out of 5

    Zaba Cita Novine

    I expected this to be superb, and now I'm sad to say that it was less than okay. The illustrations are cute, all right, but the story is so shallow and lacking information. I felt that all the information I got out of this book was that Mary liked mathematics at school. And that she had Cherokee values. That's all! I understand that this is a children's book, but still, I wish there was more to learn from it. A big thank you to Lerner Publishing Group and NetGalley for providing me with an early ve I expected this to be superb, and now I'm sad to say that it was less than okay. The illustrations are cute, all right, but the story is so shallow and lacking information. I felt that all the information I got out of this book was that Mary liked mathematics at school. And that she had Cherokee values. That's all! I understand that this is a children's book, but still, I wish there was more to learn from it. A big thank you to Lerner Publishing Group and NetGalley for providing me with an early version of this book in exchange for an honest review.

  22. 4 out of 5

    Alissa Tsaparikos

    This book is a thoughtful, detailed, and well researched #OwnVoices biography of the career of Mary Golda Ross. I have really enjoyed Sorell's previous works and this does not disappoint. It both covers Ross's accomplishments as well as commenting at length the importance and values of Ross's Cherokee heritage and how she pushed against society norms that would block her both as a woman and as an indigenous person. I also appreciated that the illustrator, Natasha Donovan, is also an #OwnVoices c This book is a thoughtful, detailed, and well researched #OwnVoices biography of the career of Mary Golda Ross. I have really enjoyed Sorell's previous works and this does not disappoint. It both covers Ross's accomplishments as well as commenting at length the importance and values of Ross's Cherokee heritage and how she pushed against society norms that would block her both as a woman and as an indigenous person. I also appreciated that the illustrator, Natasha Donovan, is also an #OwnVoices contribution. I highly recommend this for all public and school libraries.

  23. 4 out of 5

    Andreea

    Disclaimer: I received this book in exchange of my honest opinion. This is a short and nice biography of Mary Golda Ross, written for children. It will spark some inspiration in adults too, so don't put it down just because you might not be the target audience. While I did like it a lot, I have to say that it was hard to focus on the story - hence why it took me two days to read a kids short biography. I feel like the illustrations were also a bit outdated and may not spark interest, but it's defi Disclaimer: I received this book in exchange of my honest opinion. This is a short and nice biography of Mary Golda Ross, written for children. It will spark some inspiration in adults too, so don't put it down just because you might not be the target audience. While I did like it a lot, I have to say that it was hard to focus on the story - hence why it took me two days to read a kids short biography. I feel like the illustrations were also a bit outdated and may not spark interest, but it's definitely worth reading.

  24. 5 out of 5

    Libby

    This is a book I wanted like more than I did. I think Mary Golda Ross could be a fascinating subject, and we need more stories about diverse women in STEM careers. The problem is the text reads a bit like an extended encyclopedia article. The content is good, but there's nothing to draw kids in. This will be useful for school projects, but I don't recommend it for leisure reading. Review based on an ARC received through NetGalley. This is a book I wanted like more than I did. I think Mary Golda Ross could be a fascinating subject, and we need more stories about diverse women in STEM careers. The problem is the text reads a bit like an extended encyclopedia article. The content is good, but there's nothing to draw kids in. This will be useful for school projects, but I don't recommend it for leisure reading. Review based on an ARC received through NetGalley.

  25. 4 out of 5

    Dylan Miller

    Classified provides an excellent introduction to an important figure of scientific history who has gone largely unnoticed. Not only was Mary Golda Ross a female scientist in an era of masculine-led science, but she was also a Native American engineer - something largely unheard of even today. The format of graphic novel to tell this story is a great way to pull younger audiences in to learn about the diverse figures who helped build the scientific community.

  26. 4 out of 5

    Aldara

    This is a middle grey/ kids book about Mary Golda Ross and her story, if you like me doesn’t know her and What she did, this books is perfect and if you do know, this story reminds you that stories about women in STEM areas are so hard to find, and way more hard histories of BIPOC women, once you find one, we need to give it more publicity and make them know so we can inspire every single person want to join the field, and see that there is nothing impossible

  27. 5 out of 5

    Emilee (emileereadsbooks)

    Thank to Netgalley and Lerner Publishing Group, Millbrook Press for a free digital copy for my review. An inspiring story of a Cherokee girl then a woman rising through the ranks of male dominated spaces. I love a good woman in STEM story and Mary Golda Ross is a woman that we want young girls to be inspired by and to emulate.

  28. 4 out of 5

    Rod Brown

    An inspirational person -- as outlined pretty fully in the title -- is given a dry and wooden picture book biography. Tying the narrative structure to demonstrating a list of Cherokee values gives it a preachy, moral tone. It's great to see a Cherokee woman honored for her accomplishments, but I don't see this getting kids excited about math or engineering. An inspirational person -- as outlined pretty fully in the title -- is given a dry and wooden picture book biography. Tying the narrative structure to demonstrating a list of Cherokee values gives it a preachy, moral tone. It's great to see a Cherokee woman honored for her accomplishments, but I don't see this getting kids excited about math or engineering.

  29. 4 out of 5

    Gabi

    Fascinating biography of Mary Golda Ross, the trailblazing Cherokee aerospace engineer who broke barriers and worked on top-secret projects. I love how the text makes connections between Cherokee values (such as working cooperatively and remaining humble) and Ms. Ross's journey from math-loving girl to world-changing engineer. Highly recommended! Fascinating biography of Mary Golda Ross, the trailblazing Cherokee aerospace engineer who broke barriers and worked on top-secret projects. I love how the text makes connections between Cherokee values (such as working cooperatively and remaining humble) and Ms. Ross's journey from math-loving girl to world-changing engineer. Highly recommended!

  30. 5 out of 5

    Ellon

    Just as the author says in her author notes, I love reading biographies (especially of people I hadn't heard of before). Mary Golda Ross has an amazing and inspiring story! She accomplished so much and impacted so many things. My only complaint with the book is that it's kind of dry/straight forward (like here are the facts...). I wanted it to be a little bit more of a narrative style. Just as the author says in her author notes, I love reading biographies (especially of people I hadn't heard of before). Mary Golda Ross has an amazing and inspiring story! She accomplished so much and impacted so many things. My only complaint with the book is that it's kind of dry/straight forward (like here are the facts...). I wanted it to be a little bit more of a narrative style.

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