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A Man Betrayed

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At Castle Harvell demented Prince Kylock grabs the reins of power and hate by murdering his father. Harvell's two young refugees are torn apart by the storms of war: Headstrong young Melliandra is captured by brutal slavers and Jack, whose wild power works miracles, falls prey to a smuggler's lying charms and a woman's seductive schemes. Meanwhile, in the distant stronghold At Castle Harvell demented Prince Kylock grabs the reins of power and hate by murdering his father. Harvell's two young refugees are torn apart by the storms of war: Headstrong young Melliandra is captured by brutal slavers and Jack, whose wild power works miracles, falls prey to a smuggler's lying charms and a woman's seductive schemes. Meanwhile, in the distant stronghold of Bren, Kylock's betrothed, beautiful, mad Catherine, dabbles with darkest sorceries. A knight's shattered destiny is about to lead from death-sport pits to the blood-strewn creation of an empire--and a wondrous epic of grandeur and magic continues...


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At Castle Harvell demented Prince Kylock grabs the reins of power and hate by murdering his father. Harvell's two young refugees are torn apart by the storms of war: Headstrong young Melliandra is captured by brutal slavers and Jack, whose wild power works miracles, falls prey to a smuggler's lying charms and a woman's seductive schemes. Meanwhile, in the distant stronghold At Castle Harvell demented Prince Kylock grabs the reins of power and hate by murdering his father. Harvell's two young refugees are torn apart by the storms of war: Headstrong young Melliandra is captured by brutal slavers and Jack, whose wild power works miracles, falls prey to a smuggler's lying charms and a woman's seductive schemes. Meanwhile, in the distant stronghold of Bren, Kylock's betrothed, beautiful, mad Catherine, dabbles with darkest sorceries. A knight's shattered destiny is about to lead from death-sport pits to the blood-strewn creation of an empire--and a wondrous epic of grandeur and magic continues...

30 review for A Man Betrayed

  1. 4 out of 5

    Kyle

    The epic fantasy continues. The story continues as it did in book one, bouncing back and forth between the main characters' story lines. Though this book had more of a build to it's own climax, it still has all the earmarks of building up to something much, much bigger. This slow building process is a bit frustrating at times because it makes the book progress at a snails pace. It makes you really need to invest the time into the book with the hopes that it won't disappoint when you finally The epic fantasy continues. The story continues as it did in book one, bouncing back and forth between the main characters' story lines. Though this book had more of a build to it's own climax, it still has all the earmarks of building up to something much, much bigger. This slow building process is a bit frustrating at times because it makes the book progress at a snails pace. It makes you really need to invest the time into the book with the hopes that it won't disappoint when you finally get to the end of the third book. The characters are still great and I became I bit more invested in some of them. I was a bit disappointed that there wasn't more character building than there was. Most of the book was spend furthering the plot. Jack remains my favorite character. I just wish more time was spent on his character. If you enjoy "epic" fantasy novels than this is shaping up to be a good one. Looking forward to seeing how it all turns out in the last book.

  2. 5 out of 5

    Evgeny

    Almost everybody and their brother came to the city of Bren. This seems to create an explosive combination, but to my great surprise did not. Nothing significant happened in the book (think middle books of the Wheel of Time). Maybor and Baralis seems to lost their edge in behind-the-scenes manipulations and their attempts to kill each other; what they do seems practically like a routine which bored them out of the sculls, and not the way of life it was in the first book. Both Jack and Melli sudde Almost everybody and their brother came to the city of Bren. This seems to create an explosive combination, but to my great surprise did not. Nothing significant happened in the book (think middle books of the Wheel of Time). Maybor and Baralis seems to lost their edge in behind-the-scenes manipulations and their attempts to kill each other; what they do seems practically like a routine which bored them out of the sculls, and not the way of life it was in the first book. Both Jack and Melli suddenly became little brats - and this is after they matured a lot in the first book. Speaking of Jack, his plot line was the most boring in the book as he spent most of his time being manipulated and not using his head. In case of both of them it is safe to say instead of character development they have character degeneration. Tawl is on non-stop guilt trip, but his friend/sidekick Nabber is the only really bright spot in the whole book; his economic justification of pickpocketing is hilarious, as well as his outlook on life. I forgot to mention that one person has a huge bullseye painted on his/her (I do not want to give big spoilers here) back which makes it fairly easy to guess his/her fate. Having said all of this I have to state that this is a good book on its own, but it does not quite rise to the standards of the first one. I still want to see how the tale is going to end, and it is still not clear what kind of end there will be. I am off to read last book.

  3. 4 out of 5

    Kevin Xu

    Wow what a cliffhanger ending. Can't wait to read the third book in the trilogy to find out how the whole trilogy/plot ends and gets resolved. Wow what a cliffhanger ending. Can't wait to read the third book in the trilogy to find out how the whole trilogy/plot ends and gets resolved.

  4. 4 out of 5

    Dave

    Series really moves on at this point. A good example of a middle book that leaves you wanting more. DO NOT START THIS BOOK UNLESS YOU HAVE "Master and Fool" IN HAND! Series really moves on at this point. A good example of a middle book that leaves you wanting more. DO NOT START THIS BOOK UNLESS YOU HAVE "Master and Fool" IN HAND!

  5. 4 out of 5

    Michael

    Yes! This is the second book of three, following "The Baker's Boy", which was also great. This story moves, and is full of great characters. Especially the villians. It would be tough to imagine someone nastier than Lord Baralis or the Archbishop. And even the heroes are dark and moved to whatever action is necessary, (or realistic- depends how you look at it.) For some reason I am a big fan of Lord Maybor, the vain, opportunistic, and clever boss of the Eastlands. I find his unsaid background t Yes! This is the second book of three, following "The Baker's Boy", which was also great. This story moves, and is full of great characters. Especially the villians. It would be tough to imagine someone nastier than Lord Baralis or the Archbishop. And even the heroes are dark and moved to whatever action is necessary, (or realistic- depends how you look at it.) For some reason I am a big fan of Lord Maybor, the vain, opportunistic, and clever boss of the Eastlands. I find his unsaid background thoughts hilarious and insightful. Hopefully he is able to have Baralis killed in the third book. Finishing the third now. These are going on the "classic" shelf of stories that I will probably read again someday. I found the first one randomly at the library a couple of years ago, and had always meant to buy the other two.

  6. 4 out of 5

    Caroline Mersey

    One of the exclusive club of books I haven't finished. I threw it across the room not for the astonishingly poor characterisation and world-building, but for the bit that read like nothing more than the author's own rape fantasies. One of the exclusive club of books I haven't finished. I threw it across the room not for the astonishingly poor characterisation and world-building, but for the bit that read like nothing more than the author's own rape fantasies.

  7. 5 out of 5

    Lauretta Cocke

    Damn it! I want to know what is in Crope's box.... >.<' Damn it! I want to know what is in Crope's box.... >.<'

  8. 4 out of 5

    Dan

    Another good read in this really enjoyable series.

  9. 5 out of 5

    Barry Mulvany

    Similar issues to the first book but better. We start off pretty much where we left off in the last book. Jack and Melli are on the run again, Maybor and Baralis are heading off to Bren, and so are Tawl and Nabber. Most of the action in this book centers on Bren, except for Jack who gets involved with a mysterious family. Tavalisk is still in Rorn sensually eating food and tormenting his aide. I still don't know what to make of these books! I am definitely interested in them but they are so slow Similar issues to the first book but better. We start off pretty much where we left off in the last book. Jack and Melli are on the run again, Maybor and Baralis are heading off to Bren, and so are Tawl and Nabber. Most of the action in this book centers on Bren, except for Jack who gets involved with a mysterious family. Tavalisk is still in Rorn sensually eating food and tormenting his aide. I still don't know what to make of these books! I am definitely interested in them but they are so slow paced. That is not a problem in and of itself but there is not much growth of characters and it really doesn't seem like much happens. Nearly all the action happens off screen except for a few moments. Maybe it's because they are billed as epic fantasy whereas they are probably more low or political fantasy. Like if the much vaunted prophecy actually comes to pass it will create a new empire in one small part of the world, yes it would be bad for the people living there but it is definitely not the end of the world type of event. Jack is one of the most annoying main characters I have ever come across, though Melli is not far behind. He is constantly being helped out by people, given things but learns absolutely nothing and just bungles his way from one dire situation to another. Melli is practically the same but I have some more sympathy for her, though that evaporated towards the end of the book. The villains are best, and some of the other random POV's we get. Yes they are pretty caricaturesque but I still enjoy reading about them, Maybor is actually growing on me. They have almost a tongue in cheek villainous to them which actually makes them interesting to read about. Nabber is probably the only actual nice person in the book and he is a thief! If this book wasn't written by a woman I would also wonder if the author was slightly misogynistic. Pretty much all the women in the book are tavern wenches or maids who are willing to sleep with anybody for a bit of money. All the men have no problem with hitting women, Jack raises his hand to a girl because she angers him and Tawl our white knight actually slaps one. We won't talk about the villains. Now it could be the author trying to show a very chauvinist world but it could be off putting for some people. Like the previous book even though I have quite a few issues with it I am enjoying the series overall, it could be the author's writing even though nothing has stood out for me but I do tend to miss such things. Looking forward to the final volume and hopefully things might start happening. Please see this and other reviews at https://barrysbloodybooks.home.blog/

  10. 4 out of 5

    M.A. Kropp

    Part 2 of J.V. Jones’ Book of Words trilogy is pretty much on a par with the first one. That is to say, I read it and basically enjoyed it, but still wish I hadn’t read her later stand alone, The Barbed Coil, first. To be fair, this trilogy were Ms. Jones first published works, and it is good to see that she got better with later stories. The storyline continues from The Baker’s Boy, with Jack and Melli still on the run from their respective troubles at Castle Harvell, the evil Prince Kylock st Part 2 of J.V. Jones’ Book of Words trilogy is pretty much on a par with the first one. That is to say, I read it and basically enjoyed it, but still wish I hadn’t read her later stand alone, The Barbed Coil, first. To be fair, this trilogy were Ms. Jones first published works, and it is good to see that she got better with later stories. The storyline continues from The Baker’s Boy, with Jack and Melli still on the run from their respective troubles at Castle Harvell, the evil Prince Kylock still maneuvering to take control of the kingdom, and various other nobles and clergy adding to the political machinations. It is the political intrigue that keeps this book interesting. There is a lot of backstage intrigue, alliances made and betrayed, and no one is completely who they seem to be. Unfortunately, the characters are still a bit flat and clichéd- Jack is the innocent youth with potential he doesn’t quite grasp, Melli is the spoiled young noblewoman who discovers a strength and resolve no one gave her credit for, and Prince Kylock is the cold and ambitious heir who kills the ill and bedridden king in order to take over the throne. There is some growth in a few characters, but nothing too far outside the expected. I still find the interspersed fill-in-the-blanks scenes with Bodger and Grift a bit on the annoying side, despite the humor in their exchanges. The one character I do enjoy is the boy, Nabber. He is fun and interesting, with a bit more personality than some others, even though his is not a main plot line. There is not a lot of in-depth world building in the book, as well. The world is made up of the usual rival kingdoms, each vying for dominance. It’s a decent setting and serves the story well. All that aside, A Man Betrayed is still not a bad read, even with its shortcomings. The plotlines around the various major characters, as well as some minor ones, are drawn rather nicely together, pulling the story to its climax. It reads fairly quickly with good pacing. I would recommend the two I have read so far (and I will go on to the third to see how the whole picture plays out) for those looking for a decent, but not extremely deep, fantasy series.

  11. 4 out of 5

    Benjamin Thomas

    I always worry about the middle book of a trilogy, especially a traditional high fantasy trilogy. While the first book can be used for introducing characters, developing plot, world building, etc. and the third book contains the final build-up to the hopefully awesome climax, the middle book is often left with the task of bridging the two. Movie trilogies are sometimes successful (Empire Strikes Back and Godfather II come to mind) but it seems rare that a trilogy of novels can pull it off. JV Jon I always worry about the middle book of a trilogy, especially a traditional high fantasy trilogy. While the first book can be used for introducing characters, developing plot, world building, etc. and the third book contains the final build-up to the hopefully awesome climax, the middle book is often left with the task of bridging the two. Movie trilogies are sometimes successful (Empire Strikes Back and Godfather II come to mind) but it seems rare that a trilogy of novels can pull it off. JV Jones has done it. While I enjoyed the first novel in this trilogy, The Baker's Boy, I thought this one was quite a bit better. It's also the second published by the author and her progress as a writer is a delight to behold. It certainly promises great things for the third book of the series. As for the book itself, I was pleased to see that this was not merely a bridge to a final book but rather had a nicely developed structure and plot as well as further character development. Several sub plots are hatched and completed within this volume, all serving to move the larger story along. We get to learn much more about the main characters from the first book and are introduced to new characters as well. Especially noteworthy are the introduction of the two guards, Grift and Bodger. They have minor roles (but one critical role) and really serve as a sort of comic relief between chapters. Guards are usually relegated to the background color in fantasy novels so it's nice to see what a couple of bored guardsmen talk about to pass the time. I was also pleasantly surprised to see how far Ms. Jones has deviated from the traditional and predictable "assistant pig-keeper" plot that the first book suffered from. Lots of palace intrigue here, political maneuvering, romantic maneuvering, all in the name of power. The stakes are getting higher and the end of this book definitely sets us up for a rousing climax in the third book. I was very close to a 5-star rating for this one and expect the third book might just do it.

  12. 4 out of 5

    Jenni

    This book is full of protagonists that murder, sleep around, betray, and pretty much do nothing useful. In this book though, the villan Prince Krylock finally makes his move. It becomes clear that the man is completely crazy and needs to be stopped. So while the good guys are not all that good, the bad guy is enough worse that he definately needs to be stopped. Barallis, who appeared to be the bad guy in the first book has completely lost his grip on controlling events. Sure he does some damage, This book is full of protagonists that murder, sleep around, betray, and pretty much do nothing useful. In this book though, the villan Prince Krylock finally makes his move. It becomes clear that the man is completely crazy and needs to be stopped. So while the good guys are not all that good, the bad guy is enough worse that he definately needs to be stopped. Barallis, who appeared to be the bad guy in the first book has completely lost his grip on controlling events. Sure he does some damage, but he no longer is a main player in the downfall of the north. I find the storyline still mostly boring, but at least the characters are interesting. I still think that Baralis and Maybor are the best part of the book. I am also still waiting for Jack to be anything but a complete bore.

  13. 5 out of 5

    Laura

    I love these books!! The plot and subplots are amazing! I <3 Tawl :p In this book basically Melli is seperated by Jack, and taken to be sold, but gets sold to the duke of Bren. Meanwhile Tawl has lost his ways and is becoming dodge in the city of Bren while Nabber tries to help him. Kylock is envading countries causing war, while Baralis is overseeing that the mariage will come through. Then Jack is taken to a family that decieves him and at teh very end he is being taught by a real man who can te I love these books!! The plot and subplots are amazing! I <3 Tawl :p In this book basically Melli is seperated by Jack, and taken to be sold, but gets sold to the duke of Bren. Meanwhile Tawl has lost his ways and is becoming dodge in the city of Bren while Nabber tries to help him. Kylock is envading countries causing war, while Baralis is overseeing that the mariage will come through. Then Jack is taken to a family that decieves him and at teh very end he is being taught by a real man who can teach him how to control the socerey.

  14. 5 out of 5

    Mike (the Paladin)

    The story continues and it holds the reader's interest, or it did mine. The second volume in a trilogy often slows down a bit to "tie things together". Not so much here. Ms. Jones takes familiar character "types" and (I think) weaves a good story. The story continues and it holds the reader's interest, or it did mine. The second volume in a trilogy often slows down a bit to "tie things together". Not so much here. Ms. Jones takes familiar character "types" and (I think) weaves a good story.

  15. 4 out of 5

    Jon

    Further build-up, nothing earth shattering but still a fun and fast read.

  16. 4 out of 5

    Harrison Delahunty

    After having read both The Baker's Boy and A Man Betrayed, I can say this with certainty: J.V. Jones in an author I'd love to have coffee with. A Man Betrayed picks up where The Baker's Boy left off. Jack and Melli are travelling together; Tawl is disgraced after his murder of Bevlin; Tavalisk, Barallis, and Maybor are all very confident that they have the upper hand over one another; and Nabber is looking for his lost friend Tawl. When Jack and Melli take shelter in the wrong place, they are bot After having read both The Baker's Boy and A Man Betrayed, I can say this with certainty: J.V. Jones in an author I'd love to have coffee with. A Man Betrayed picks up where The Baker's Boy left off. Jack and Melli are travelling together; Tawl is disgraced after his murder of Bevlin; Tavalisk, Barallis, and Maybor are all very confident that they have the upper hand over one another; and Nabber is looking for his lost friend Tawl. When Jack and Melli take shelter in the wrong place, they are both captured for wildly different reasons: Jack is to play assassin for a slimy merchant, whilst Melli is to be sold to a flesh-trader. The way Jones writes is nothing short of brilliant. Cleverness and warmth radiate off the page even during passages that have no right to be anything but boring. Nevertheless, Jones manages to make such unimportant characters as the guards Bodger and Griff, Moth and Clem, and Tavalisk and his assistant, all fun to read about. That's not to say that her principal characters are uninteresting, of course. Jack, Melli, and Nabber are all particularly invigorating to read from the point of view of, and there are some strong passages from characters like Maybor and Baralis, as scheming and manipulative as they may be. In fact, I would argue that much of the puppeteering and blunders from all sides are what make A Man Betrayed such a delight to read. While the Book of Words trilogy is certainly rife with very common sword-and-sorcery tropes, it's Jones's writing that truly elevates her story. I look forward quite eagerly to book three, Master and Fool.

  17. 4 out of 5

    Adam Whitehead

    Jack and Melliandra continue their flight through the lands of Halcus, seeking refuge in the distant city of Bren. Meanwhile, the mad Prince Kylock has seized his father's throne and embarked on a bloody invasion of Halcus, committing atrocity after atrocity. In Bren, Chancellor Baralis and Lord Maybor have arrived to arrange the marriage between Kylock and the Duke's daughter, to the Duke's disquiet, as well as continuing their own bitter feud. And in the fighting pits of the city, a disgraced Jack and Melliandra continue their flight through the lands of Halcus, seeking refuge in the distant city of Bren. Meanwhile, the mad Prince Kylock has seized his father's throne and embarked on a bloody invasion of Halcus, committing atrocity after atrocity. In Bren, Chancellor Baralis and Lord Maybor have arrived to arrange the marriage between Kylock and the Duke's daughter, to the Duke's disquiet, as well as continuing their own bitter feud. And in the fighting pits of the city, a disgraced knight struggles to find his redemption. A Man Betrayed is the middle volume of the Book of Words trilogy and is a prime example of a novel that falls foul of 'middle book syndrome'. The book has no real opening and no real end (though there's a hell of a cliffhanger) and the plot is a mixture of dynamic forward movement in some storylines and some slightly tedious wheel-spinning in others. In one of the more successful storylines, Melliandra is kidnapped (again), but this time around is able to turn her circumstances to her favour. She goes from victim to political player over the course of the novel in a transition that is convincingly-handled by the author. On the other hand, Jack's storyline becomes seriously bogged down. Jones clearly had to find something to do to prevent him from travelling straight to Bren and getting involved in events there, and somewhat unconvincingly lands him with a screwed-up family unit living in the backwoods and getting involved in a murder plot. There's some attempts to turn it into important character-building material for Jack but, aside from the titular betrayal at the subplot's climax, it fails to resonate. More successful is Tawl's storyline, which is a more traditional arc of seeking redemption following the heinous crime he commits (though unwillingly) at the end of the first volume. Though there is little surprising in this storyline, it's handled well by the author, particularly in the use of the previously tedious 'lovable rogue' Nabber to help Tawl along his path. Elsewhere, Baralis is as fiendishly (if occasionally cartoonishly) evil and Machivellian as ever, Maybor becomes a more interesting character and Tavalisk's observations-from-afar of the main plot remain amusing. Bodger and Grift (the trilogy's answer to Rosencrantz and Guildenstern) also get a bit more involved in the plot as well as providing the book's more comical moments. Overall, A Man Betrayed (***½) is not without its shortcomings but is a stronger book than The Baker's Boy. Jones's writing has improved, and she juggles the multiple character arcs with confidence. Aside from Jack's repetitive storyline, this is an entertaining fantasy novel, though one that does not stray far from familiar ground.

  18. 5 out of 5

    Lanica

    The second time reading through this book I am finding that I have forgotten enough details that I am getting surprised more than I expected. I am engrossed in the plot and enjoying the intrigues. There are characters I like and a few I hate. The writing is good, and the tropes that were slightly annoying in the first book are getting more interesting in this book. Dark epic fantasy...and I forget how it ends...although I keep remembering a few pages before I get to some of the main points. I am The second time reading through this book I am finding that I have forgotten enough details that I am getting surprised more than I expected. I am engrossed in the plot and enjoying the intrigues. There are characters I like and a few I hate. The writing is good, and the tropes that were slightly annoying in the first book are getting more interesting in this book. Dark epic fantasy...and I forget how it ends...although I keep remembering a few pages before I get to some of the main points. I am glad that I have time to re-read one of the my favorite fantasy series from twenty years ago.

  19. 5 out of 5

    George Clingerman

    Just not my cup of tea. I always wondered why I never finished this series when I was younger and reading book two reminded me. The sexual/rapey vibe is just too much for me and just made me uncomfortable and unable to enjoy the story. I'm sure it would be fine for others, just not a book/series I can get into. Just not my cup of tea. I always wondered why I never finished this series when I was younger and reading book two reminded me. The sexual/rapey vibe is just too much for me and just made me uncomfortable and unable to enjoy the story. I'm sure it would be fine for others, just not a book/series I can get into.

  20. 4 out of 5

    Katrina Pittman

    This review has been hidden because it contains spoilers. To view it, click here. I couldn't finish the book. The writing is amateur at best. No lord with any amount of common sense would have a "no I'm more of a murderer" argument with another lord. And what assassin would ask for land as payment for an assassination of an extremely powerful man? None! The storyline is as ridiculous as its writing. I couldn't finish the book. The writing is amateur at best. No lord with any amount of common sense would have a "no I'm more of a murderer" argument with another lord. And what assassin would ask for land as payment for an assassination of an extremely powerful man? None! The storyline is as ridiculous as its writing.

  21. 4 out of 5

    Zaryna

    I great read! I love finding books that aren't very well known and learning that they are gems! I am so in love with the world that Jones has created in The Baker's Boy and A Man Betrayed I can think of few books I have read faster. I am onto the next one already and very eggar to read on! I great read! I love finding books that aren't very well known and learning that they are gems! I am so in love with the world that Jones has created in The Baker's Boy and A Man Betrayed I can think of few books I have read faster. I am onto the next one already and very eggar to read on!

  22. 4 out of 5

    Arivard1214

    The way Book 2 finishes, you want to read book3 Many surprising plots

  23. 5 out of 5

    James Frame

    Enjoyed this book strange but true!

  24. 5 out of 5

    Sara Kellogg

    Starts slow, improves. Not as good as the first book until halfway through and then WHOOSH it picks you up and flies you to the end. It was worth it. I can't wait til book 3! Starts slow, improves. Not as good as the first book until halfway through and then WHOOSH it picks you up and flies you to the end. It was worth it. I can't wait til book 3!

  25. 4 out of 5

    Fran Santiago

    A sequel even better than the first book!!! Simply excellent!!!

  26. 4 out of 5

    Kiro Selanor

    This is getting better. The book is quite interesting this time, the protagonists are not as foolish as in the first book in the trilogy, and the plot moves quicker.

  27. 4 out of 5

    BelleAnne

    I really liked the first half, but was underwhelmed by the directions that the plot went.

  28. 4 out of 5

    Rich Taylor

    This is the second book of the Book of Words trilogy. The main focus of the story shifts from Jack, The Bakers Boy, to Tawl, The Knight of Valdis (The Man Betrayed). Jack is still around and we get updates enough to keep us interested so that when the two join back together in book 3 we still care. As with the first book in the trilogy, I really enjoy these books, but I find the habit of Ms. Jones to introduce an interesting character (Traff in this case) and then have that character disappear fo This is the second book of the Book of Words trilogy. The main focus of the story shifts from Jack, The Bakers Boy, to Tawl, The Knight of Valdis (The Man Betrayed). Jack is still around and we get updates enough to keep us interested so that when the two join back together in book 3 we still care. As with the first book in the trilogy, I really enjoy these books, but I find the habit of Ms. Jones to introduce an interesting character (Traff in this case) and then have that character disappear for large stretches and then reappear to move the story forward and then disappear again, (view spoiler)[ in this case he dies in the assassination of the duke (hide spoiler)] , never to be heard from again, really annoying. I know some like her ability to interweave a lot of characters together, but I don't like how loosely everything is thrown together. Overall - I liked this book and I like this author. Read this book if you are looking for a fairly generic fantasy story with some interesting characters (the main ones) and an overall interesting story-line.

  29. 5 out of 5

    Adam Koerner

    I've read it before, but this series has long been on my "must reread" list. Where the first book in this series basically introduces you to all of the players, this book effectively throws them all in a mixer to see what comes out the other side. In the first book it's safe to say that not much really happened. In this book, pretty much everything evolves and changes. Melli meets the Duke and is freed from slavery and Jack grows into his power. I'm not sure what it is about this author, but she I've read it before, but this series has long been on my "must reread" list. Where the first book in this series basically introduces you to all of the players, this book effectively throws them all in a mixer to see what comes out the other side. In the first book it's safe to say that not much really happened. In this book, pretty much everything evolves and changes. Melli meets the Duke and is freed from slavery and Jack grows into his power. I'm not sure what it is about this author, but she really manages to evict strong connections with the characters. I do have one problem with this series so far (particularly this book). An omnipresent recurring theme is for the author to torture the characters, Deus Ex Machina them a friendly person or person to nurse them back to health, then rinse and repeat the cycle. Between the two main characters, Jack and Melli, I swear this has happened at least a dozen times so far.

  30. 5 out of 5

    Sarah

    This book has made up for the first in the series. Here we get to know characters like Nabber better, and Tawl, and yet - Maybor, who I thought was kind of a slime ball in the first book, turns out to be one of those characters the author just changes to match whatever thread of the plot he should be a part of. I mean - one minute he seems fine to be without his daughter. The next he's thrilled to see her. First he's thinking how his sons are enough, and then he's thinking of offering a reward f This book has made up for the first in the series. Here we get to know characters like Nabber better, and Tawl, and yet - Maybor, who I thought was kind of a slime ball in the first book, turns out to be one of those characters the author just changes to match whatever thread of the plot he should be a part of. I mean - one minute he seems fine to be without his daughter. The next he's thrilled to see her. First he's thinking how his sons are enough, and then he's thinking of offering a reward for Melli's return. What? Tawl and Nabber are wonderful, I must say, and Jack, when not throwing himself into senseless beatings and wounds, is much more likeable. The plot is fleshed out nicely in this one, and I finally started believing in the world. So I'd say this makes up for the first one, and I'm on to the next.

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