web site hit counter In the Quick - Ebooks PDF Online
Hot Best Seller

In the Quick

Availability: Ready to download

GOOD MORNING AMERICA BUZZ PICK • A young, ambitious female astronaut’s life is upended by a love affair that threatens the rescue of a lost crew in this brilliantly imagined novel “with echoes of Station Eleven, The Martian, and, yes, Jane Eyre” (Observer). “The female astronaut novel we never knew we needed.”—Entertainment Weekly (Must-read books coming out in March) June i GOOD MORNING AMERICA BUZZ PICK • A young, ambitious female astronaut’s life is upended by a love affair that threatens the rescue of a lost crew in this brilliantly imagined novel “with echoes of Station Eleven, The Martian, and, yes, Jane Eyre” (Observer). “The female astronaut novel we never knew we needed.”—Entertainment Weekly (Must-read books coming out in March) June is a brilliant but difficult girl with a gift for mechanical invention who leaves home to begin grueling astronaut training at the National Space Program. Younger by two years than her classmates at Peter Reed, the school on campus named for her uncle, she flourishes in her classes but struggles to make friends and find true intellectual peers. Six years later, she has gained a coveted post as an engineer on a space station—and a hard-won sense of belonging—but is haunted by the mystery of Inquiry, a revolutionary spacecraft powered by her beloved late uncle’s fuel cells. The spacecraft went missing when June was twelve years old, and while the rest of the world seems to have forgotten the crew, June alone has evidence that makes her believe they are still alive. She seeks out James, her uncle’s former protégé, also brilliant, also difficult, who has been trying to discover why Inquiry’s fuel cells failed. James and June forge an intense intellectual bond that becomes an electric attraction. But the relationship that develops between them as they work to solve the fuel cell’s fatal flaw threatens to destroy everything they’ve worked so hard to create—and any chance of bringing the Inquiry crew home alive. A propulsive narrative of one woman’s persistence and journey to self-discovery, In the Quick is an exploration of the strengths and limits of human ability in the face of hardship, and the costs of human ingenuity.


Compare

GOOD MORNING AMERICA BUZZ PICK • A young, ambitious female astronaut’s life is upended by a love affair that threatens the rescue of a lost crew in this brilliantly imagined novel “with echoes of Station Eleven, The Martian, and, yes, Jane Eyre” (Observer). “The female astronaut novel we never knew we needed.”—Entertainment Weekly (Must-read books coming out in March) June i GOOD MORNING AMERICA BUZZ PICK • A young, ambitious female astronaut’s life is upended by a love affair that threatens the rescue of a lost crew in this brilliantly imagined novel “with echoes of Station Eleven, The Martian, and, yes, Jane Eyre” (Observer). “The female astronaut novel we never knew we needed.”—Entertainment Weekly (Must-read books coming out in March) June is a brilliant but difficult girl with a gift for mechanical invention who leaves home to begin grueling astronaut training at the National Space Program. Younger by two years than her classmates at Peter Reed, the school on campus named for her uncle, she flourishes in her classes but struggles to make friends and find true intellectual peers. Six years later, she has gained a coveted post as an engineer on a space station—and a hard-won sense of belonging—but is haunted by the mystery of Inquiry, a revolutionary spacecraft powered by her beloved late uncle’s fuel cells. The spacecraft went missing when June was twelve years old, and while the rest of the world seems to have forgotten the crew, June alone has evidence that makes her believe they are still alive. She seeks out James, her uncle’s former protégé, also brilliant, also difficult, who has been trying to discover why Inquiry’s fuel cells failed. James and June forge an intense intellectual bond that becomes an electric attraction. But the relationship that develops between them as they work to solve the fuel cell’s fatal flaw threatens to destroy everything they’ve worked so hard to create—and any chance of bringing the Inquiry crew home alive. A propulsive narrative of one woman’s persistence and journey to self-discovery, In the Quick is an exploration of the strengths and limits of human ability in the face of hardship, and the costs of human ingenuity.

30 review for In the Quick

  1. 4 out of 5

    h o l l i s

    The best part of this story is the synopsis. The worst part? The dialogue has no quotation marks. You have to pay attention and filter out action from words and all I'll say is I'm glad this was a short read. But if that's a deal breaker for you, now you know. This would probably make a great movie as there is some THE MARTIAN-esque similarities as far as disaster and thinking on your feet but in space. But where I hear the book THE MARTIAN is as good as the movie, in this case, were this ever to The best part of this story is the synopsis. The worst part? The dialogue has no quotation marks. You have to pay attention and filter out action from words and all I'll say is I'm glad this was a short read. But if that's a deal breaker for you, now you know. This would probably make a great movie as there is some THE MARTIAN-esque similarities as far as disaster and thinking on your feet but in space. But where I hear the book THE MARTIAN is as good as the movie, in this case, were this ever to be adapted, the same would not be said. What I did find interesting were the literary paralells to a beloved classic, which I did not pick up on until quite far into the story, but once I saw I couldn't unsee. It doesn't stick to said plot 100% -- it couldn't -- but where it can, it does. I didn't hate it but it didn't salvage this, either. This is a story I wish I could've loved because of the interesting plot/themes but the execution, and main character, and lack of punctuation, really dragged down. ** I received an ARC from NetGalley and the publisher (thank you!) in exchange for an honest review. ** ---- This review can also be found at A Take From Two Cities.

  2. 4 out of 5

    Jypsy

    Thank you Random House for a complimentary copy. I voluntarily reviewed this book. All opinions expressed are my own. In The Quick By: Kate Hope Day REVIEW ☆☆☆☆ Synopsis A young, ambitious female astronaut’s life is upended by a love affair that threatens the rescue of a lost crew in this brilliantly imagined novel, in the tradition of Station Eleven and The Martian. ***** I loved Kate Hope Day's previous novel, If, Then, so my expectations for In The Quick were high indeed. First of all, I seriousl Thank you Random House for a complimentary copy. I voluntarily reviewed this book. All opinions expressed are my own. In The Quick By: Kate Hope Day REVIEW ☆☆☆☆ Synopsis A young, ambitious female astronaut’s life is upended by a love affair that threatens the rescue of a lost crew in this brilliantly imagined novel, in the tradition of Station Eleven and The Martian. ***** I loved Kate Hope Day's previous novel, If, Then, so my expectations for In The Quick were high indeed. First of all, I seriously love the cover. I mean, it's all about space, and it's pink. What's not to love? As for the story, you should know the synopsis doesn't truly describe the book because it is neither a romance nor a rescue mission. The heroine, June, possesses a brilliant mind for mechanics, etc., but she is sorely lacking in people skills. Awkward and misunderstood by everyone except her intellectually gifted uncle, he alone encourages June, and she, in his shadow, often, covertly, learns about spacecraft engineering. Specifically, the Inquiry, a spacecraft powered by fuel cells designed by her uncle that, regrettably, goes missing when June is twelve. The first part of the book addresses June's childhood. You get a sense of her thought process, personality and the origin of her desire to work in outer space. June begins astronaut training. This is a difficult program, made more so by being two years younger than her peers. Intellectually, however, June is already beyond them. Six years on, June is finally, as she always dreamed, a space station engineer. Here, after years of hard work, June finds true commonality and belonging. Imagine always feeling outcast, then, finally, finding your people. June does well at her job, but the missing Inquiry lingers at the back of her mind. After years gone everyone has forgotten it, except June. While working, June makes a discovery, reaffirming her belief that the Inquiry crew are, in fact, alive. June's time on the space station is the most engaging fast paced section in the book. With witty dialogue, meaningful interactions and complex problems, the story progresses quickly. Circumstances lead June to James, a guy who studied under her uncle. James has been trying to understand why the Inquiry's fuel cells, designed by June's uncle, failed. He and June are well matched intellectually and might be able to solve this mystery together. June cannot ignore her gut feeling about the missing spacecraft. She intuitively knows her life's direction, and with every turn of a new corner, June's resolve further hardens into a quickly approaching reality. June and James are odd ones-highly intelligent-with a strange and evolving, perhaps from loneliness, relationship that lacks any substantial emotion. Additionally, the environment surrounding June and James is eerily weird. Everything here feels dark, bleak, harsh and isolated. Atmospherically speaking, the set up is perfect with slower pacing that subsequently matches both mood and tone. I won't disclose the various twists giving chase to the last page. My biggest issue is the abrupt inconclusive end. The story is going in this direction, and now, it is going in that direction. In the meantime, I am aimlessly floating away into deep space.... Overall, I found In The Quick quintessentially inspiring, defiantely feminist and quietly terrifying. It was also reminiscent of The Martian in some ways. Both project a vast sense of nothingness, yet encompass everything at once. The feelings of utter despair and fledgling hope continually battle for dominance of an abstraction that neither can ever claim-the human mind scape. As long as horizons exist, despair will not triumph over the human spirit of ingenuity and progress. Hope will ignite, given even the tiniest pinprick of light, from a fragile spark into an unextinguishable flame.

  3. 5 out of 5

    Sheri

    This was an absolutely stellar read! It is filled with multiple elements; it has romance, mystery, suspense, space/aeronautical theme and a science fiction feel to everything. The book completely held my attention through the entire reading and I must admit that I had difficulty putting it down. I initially expected the book to be a certain read and yet finished the book completely surprised. June is a fascinating character. She is one part child and one part of adult. She is a bold, difficult, b This was an absolutely stellar read! It is filled with multiple elements; it has romance, mystery, suspense, space/aeronautical theme and a science fiction feel to everything. The book completely held my attention through the entire reading and I must admit that I had difficulty putting it down. I initially expected the book to be a certain read and yet finished the book completely surprised. June is a fascinating character. She is one part child and one part of adult. She is a bold, difficult, brave and yet simplistic main character. She was intriguing and complex. I found the story to be absolutely enthralling. Watching the plot develop was amazing. This book isn't in my typical genre, but I'm so very thrilled that I read it. It was a complete pleasure. You should run, not walk, to read this book! I would like to thank Kate Hope Day, Random House Publishing and Netgalley for the opportunity to read this book in exchange for a fair and honest review.

  4. 5 out of 5

    Jacqie

    Thanks to Netgalley for providing a copy of this book for review. For some reason, I really loved the cover of this book. You never see pink associated with astronauts! The figure seems to be falling away from the cover and beckoning you in. So I was fine with reading this slightly alternate history. I wasn't sure about when the book was set, but it seemed a bit retro. However, in this book a new pink planet has been found and crewed ships have just begun exploring the solar system. At the beginnin Thanks to Netgalley for providing a copy of this book for review. For some reason, I really loved the cover of this book. You never see pink associated with astronauts! The figure seems to be falling away from the cover and beckoning you in. So I was fine with reading this slightly alternate history. I wasn't sure about when the book was set, but it seemed a bit retro. However, in this book a new pink planet has been found and crewed ships have just begun exploring the solar system. At the beginning of the book, this manned exploration team has fallen out of contact. June, the main character, lives with her uncle. Her uncle is a brilliant scientist who developed the fuel cell that the exploration ship used. This uncle has also been teaching June how to think like an engineer, or an inventor. He encourages her to take things apart to see how they work, to think through alternatives until she hits an obstacle and then either find a way around that obstacle or find an entirely different path. This uncle has recently died and June's aunt and cousin don't seem to be kindred spirits to her the way her uncle was. In short order, June is shipped off to the boarding school at the base for aspiring engineers and astronauts. So far, so good. I don't love reading books that bring you all the way from childhood through the adult main character's life. To me, it seems like a waste of time and a good author could start you where the action is and allow the reader to learn backstory later, as necessary, and more organically to the plot. But I could get through a bit of backstory to get to the good part. But more and more time with June as a child! What did she eat at the cafeteria. How did she learn to scuba dive (which seemed suspicious to me; the kids learned in a pool and then "dropped weight" in order to rise. But scuba divers don't drop weight when they're diving, they increase the amount of air in their BCDs.) Did June make friends. More and more of this. It was all so... mundane. So I skipped ahead. And even in space, time is given to June brushing her teeth (and not in a exciting space way). To what June is eating. To her learning how to deal with people. To June continually focusing on the immediate problem and not understanding the larger situation, in which she might be putting people in danger by dealing only with the immediate problem. It still felt... mundane. None of the wonder of space. Just immature people misunderstanding each other again and again. So, the novel wasn't really about space. It was about a young neuro-atypical woman who leverages her strengths but doesn't understand her weaknesses. And no one tells her how to. This is literary fiction dressed up with a science fiction ribbon. And I've got a short tolerance for books like these because rarely is the science aspect up to par.

  5. 5 out of 5

    Nikki Dolson

    This book! June, lovely June. At twelve she is engaging and smart and passionate. Her love for an uncle, now dead, is palpable. He stoked her dreams and even though he’s gone June carries. I loved following her through the aunt’s house and cringed in so many places. She takes everything apart and it’s wonderful. It hurt my heart when she arrived at Peter Reed. Thrust into an unfamiliar setting in the middle of the school year and too young on top of it all her passion and inventiveness carried m This book! June, lovely June. At twelve she is engaging and smart and passionate. Her love for an uncle, now dead, is palpable. He stoked her dreams and even though he’s gone June carries. I loved following her through the aunt’s house and cringed in so many places. She takes everything apart and it’s wonderful. It hurt my heart when she arrived at Peter Reed. Thrust into an unfamiliar setting in the middle of the school year and too young on top of it all her passion and inventiveness carried me through the beginning. The remaining story and the big thrust of the book is a lost ship, Inquiry. Built to run on her Uncle’s fuel cell design it has been lost and Inquiry’s location and the fuel cell problem become the focus for her and I was riveted. Such a great story. Scratched that itch I’ve had for space and astronauts. Really loved this book.

  6. 4 out of 5

    Karen’s Library

    For me, at first, this book was all about the cover. That gorgeous pink color with an astronaut on it. I was all in as soon as I saw it. As for the inside, it was... different. June is a brilliant, eccentric mechanical genius. For most of her life, since the age of 12, she tries to solve the puzzle of why the fuel cells her uncle invented have failed and stranded a soaceship in deep space and probably killed the crew. The synopsis describes this book as a romance, but I didn’t really see a romance For me, at first, this book was all about the cover. That gorgeous pink color with an astronaut on it. I was all in as soon as I saw it. As for the inside, it was... different. June is a brilliant, eccentric mechanical genius. For most of her life, since the age of 12, she tries to solve the puzzle of why the fuel cells her uncle invented have failed and stranded a soaceship in deep space and probably killed the crew. The synopsis describes this book as a romance, but I didn’t really see a romance as much as a kind of obsession. And the “romance” is not even a part of the story until the last part of the book. The parts of this book that I loved were the ones that take place in space, or on the pink planet (a moon) which did well at describing the realism of being in space or on a harsh world. And there was also some pretty good science. Just give me space and science and I’m a happy camper. I also enjoyed the first part of the story when June is 12 and in school learning how to live and work in space. But... June as a character wasn’t really that likable. She was single minded and it seemed like she kept causing everyone to have serious accidents just to get what she wanted. This book is written without quotation marks so there are times when you’re not sure who’s speaking. It pulled me out of the story several times as I had to reread those parts a few times to figure out who was speaking. It wasn’t a deal breaker for me however as I got used to this style of writing pretty quickly. All in all, I did enjoy the story, mostly due to the space and science, and I seriously couldn’t get enough of that wonderful cover! *Thank you so much to Random House and NetGalley for the advance copy!*

  7. 5 out of 5

    Toya (the reading chemist)

    DNF at 20% One of my biggest issues when it comes to sci-fi is when too many creative liberties are taken since it’s still supposed to be rooted in science. In the Quick definitely falls down that trap immediately. Here we have the 12 year old niece of a renowned aerospace engineer who. After his death, rumors circulate that the fuel cells that her uncle made for the latest shuttle (the Inquiry) were faulty. She refuses to believe this since her uncle’s fuel cells were always perfect. So, the 12 DNF at 20% One of my biggest issues when it comes to sci-fi is when too many creative liberties are taken since it’s still supposed to be rooted in science. In the Quick definitely falls down that trap immediately. Here we have the 12 year old niece of a renowned aerospace engineer who. After his death, rumors circulate that the fuel cells that her uncle made for the latest shuttle (the Inquiry) were faulty. She refuses to believe this since her uncle’s fuel cells were always perfect. So, the 12 year old pulls out all of the complex iterations of the different fuel cells that her uncle constructed with his four lab assistants. She pours over them in order to see where the mistake is. Okay, what 12 year old understands the complexities of aerospace engineering to the point that they could accurately pinpoint the issue of a faulty fuel cell that went missed by a subject matter expert and his four lab assistants?! This girl is a regular 12 year old kid not some prodigy with increased intelligence or anything technology related. Furthermore, there are zero quotations in this book when it comes to dialogue, so trying to figure out what is dialogue versus action is trying to say the least. Also, when multiple people are talking, it’s difficult to figure out who is talking. Yeah, so this whole this is a big NOPE from me. Thank you to Random House Publishing for providing a review copy. This did not influence my review. All opinions are my own.

  8. 4 out of 5

    Karla Urias

    At first a seemingly straight forward science fiction a-la The Martian and Ad Astra with later allusions to Moon (Sam Rockwell) and Gravity (Sandra Bullock) lingering in the Pink silt. June was such a captivating character that her life will pull you in immediately from the very first chapter. This is a story of a young brilliant girl, the niece of a genius scientist astronomer, who becomes captivated at a young age by a tragic manned mission that her uncle had direct responsibility for its failu At first a seemingly straight forward science fiction a-la The Martian and Ad Astra with later allusions to Moon (Sam Rockwell) and Gravity (Sandra Bullock) lingering in the Pink silt. June was such a captivating character that her life will pull you in immediately from the very first chapter. This is a story of a young brilliant girl, the niece of a genius scientist astronomer, who becomes captivated at a young age by a tragic manned mission that her uncle had direct responsibility for its failure. The entirety of the novel, June attempts to solve the issue of the energy cell that failed the Inquiry mission as she discovers at the young age of 12 a missed communication method through the sanitation system that Inquiry has been attempting to use. No one believes her, of course, until she becomes an actual astronaut and the very people that worked on the original mission schematics become her colleagues. One of these colleagues is James. A romance blooms between them as they work together to solve the issue of the cell; but as with most sci-fi stories, we are ultimately left with a sense of melancholy instead as June departs without James on her much awaited rescue mission for the Inquiry. Perhaps the most enthralling aspect of Kate Hope Day’s writing is the hyper-real aspect of June’s world. In other terms, this story is a possible outcome of human error in the foreseeable future. Although we do not often see specific mathematical or scientific outlines of what June is having to learn or create, Hope Day’s words flow lyrically across the page as if It is meant to express how science becomes art. Inclusively, we are given a very hopeful aspect of humanity that if we work together we can save each other. My only regret for this book is that it could not continue – to show us a successful mission – or to continue to live in June and James’ world. Praise for In The Quick!

  9. 5 out of 5

    Kendra

    In a dystopian world where children are trained to become astronauts in their teens, protagonist June is a precocious, self-centered, thoughtless child who grows into a hubristic, self-centered, thoughtless, and reckless adult. Driven to show that she is always, always right and better, June rejects the critical necessity of teamwork in engineering in order to follow her own agenda, leading to the ends of others' careers and health. In addition to having one of the least sympathetic narrators I' In a dystopian world where children are trained to become astronauts in their teens, protagonist June is a precocious, self-centered, thoughtless child who grows into a hubristic, self-centered, thoughtless, and reckless adult. Driven to show that she is always, always right and better, June rejects the critical necessity of teamwork in engineering in order to follow her own agenda, leading to the ends of others' careers and health. In addition to having one of the least sympathetic narrators I've ever read, this book offers a view of engineering and science that is completely antithetical to the way those things should work. Engineers are unethical, withholding vital information; they keep deadly secrets in space; they behave like children. Perhaps this is intended as a cautionary tale about what happens when we let the cult of genius aggrandize itself unchecked, but I think the author genuinely thinks this is all heroic or realistic or something. Want good books about women in space? Go read The Calculating Stars and its sequels instead.

  10. 5 out of 5

    Rachel McKenny

    THE MARTIAN meets JANE EYRE in this rich sophomore novel. I was immediately snagged by Kate Hope Day's prose and totally wrapped up in June's story from page one. Recommend! THE MARTIAN meets JANE EYRE in this rich sophomore novel. I was immediately snagged by Kate Hope Day's prose and totally wrapped up in June's story from page one. Recommend!

  11. 4 out of 5

    Jamie Dacyczyn

    Quit around 20 pages after two things: First: when the 12 year old protagonist figures out the problem in rocket fuel cells just by reading some charts, when her scientist uncle and all of his assistants hadn't noticed the flaw in his invention. AS IF his calculations wouldn't be checked and rechecked by a whole bunch of other NASA scientists before sending a manned spacecraft out past Saturn using those fuel cells. Nah. One guy does some math, it gets checked by his assistants, and that's it. N Quit around 20 pages after two things: First: when the 12 year old protagonist figures out the problem in rocket fuel cells just by reading some charts, when her scientist uncle and all of his assistants hadn't noticed the flaw in his invention. AS IF his calculations wouldn't be checked and rechecked by a whole bunch of other NASA scientists before sending a manned spacecraft out past Saturn using those fuel cells. Nah. One guy does some math, it gets checked by his assistants, and that's it. No one else verifies it. They build the ship, and send it off to fail. Darn, if only they had thought to show it to an untrained middle-schooler first!.............Still, I was ready to suspend my disbelief, but then my second issue arose. After a couple chapters it became clear that the author chose to use one of my biggest pet peeves: a lack of quotation marks. WHY?? Why do they do this??? Punctuation helps you clarify your story, so why would you take it away?? It pulls the reader out of the story when they have to make an effort to discern dialogue from the rest of the narration. STOP DOING THIS. I was going to see if this book was on audio, because when I read audiobooks I don't notice missing quotation marks....so it can be a way for me to still enjoy the book. See: The Handmaid's Tale(which ended up not having quotation marks for an actual reason) or The Pull of the Stars. But then I skimmed some other reviews, and wasn't impressed enough to buy the audiobook. Bummer. This book was touted as being "perfect for fans of The Martian" but that's a pretty big claim to make. The Martian started out with a great hook and a literal bang, and had a level of believability to it. Even if the sciencey stuff went over your head, you could appreciate the snarky narrator and the adventure. This book failed to make a good impression. Onwards to the next book!

  12. 5 out of 5

    Meghan

    “We’re humans, not machines. We have to adapt ourselves to space. Not it to us.” Young June, niece of aerospace engineer is obsessive with her uncle’s knowledge on all things space and mechanics. After he dies, June is shipped off to a school named after her uncle that focuses on preparing students for space. There June utilizes her knowledge and talents to advance quickly. Years later, she is reunited with her uncle’s protégé, James in an attempt to correct a mechanical failure attributed to a co “We’re humans, not machines. We have to adapt ourselves to space. Not it to us.” Young June, niece of aerospace engineer is obsessive with her uncle’s knowledge on all things space and mechanics. After he dies, June is shipped off to a school named after her uncle that focuses on preparing students for space. There June utilizes her knowledge and talents to advance quickly. Years later, she is reunited with her uncle’s protégé, James in an attempt to correct a mechanical failure attributed to a component of the ship her uncle developed that lead to the loss of contact with a ship six years earlier. June thinks the crew are still alive and, with James’ help they work tirelessly to prove it & save them. For about 75% of this book it’s all about June-her growing up, learning to adapt to her new surroundings, becoming an independent & strong woman who focuses on her intellect and drive, but then when James is introduced the focus changes a bit and their slow burn romance begins. After years of isolation, James is no longer stable. His singular focus on correcting the mechanical failure has lead him to some dramatic, obsessive behaviour that endangers June and others. Overall, this was a really enjoyable read. I really liked June’s character and how the story progressed. Though I didn’t like the romantic aspect of this one or James’ character I think they helped humanize the characters and understand the toll this very dangerous work takes on the physical, mental, and emotional well-being of astronauts. Though I’m not a fan of this writing style (the author chose to write dialogue without quotations), I felt it flowed really well and the pace was perfect. I felt compelled to pick it up every chance I got to see how it was going to progress. *please note, this is shelved as queer fiction and it is not. I don’t want anyone to go into this hoping for some queer sci-fi & be disappointed by that misleading tag* Thank you to NetGalley and Random House Publishing for the e-arc.

  13. 5 out of 5

    Anne

    Check out my video review here! https://youtu.be/r-nwtYv6iBU Thank you very much Netgalley for this ARC in exchange for an honest review. Wow, I was blown away by this book. I highly recommend it for any sci-fi fan. Especially if you liked The Martian or the film Interstellar, you would definitely like this book. I am a big sci-fi fan and this book had everything I loved about a good sci-fi: thrilling parts that show how dangerous space really is, the camaraderie built among people working togeth Check out my video review here! https://youtu.be/r-nwtYv6iBU Thank you very much Netgalley for this ARC in exchange for an honest review. Wow, I was blown away by this book. I highly recommend it for any sci-fi fan. Especially if you liked The Martian or the film Interstellar, you would definitely like this book. I am a big sci-fi fan and this book had everything I loved about a good sci-fi: thrilling parts that show how dangerous space really is, the camaraderie built among people working together in space, and creative and vividly described planets. I adored the Pink Planet in this book. We follow an interesting and well-crafted protagonist, June, from her childhood living with her Aunt and Uncle through her life as a student in an academy that trains future astronauts, and when she makes trips into space. I felt she was very realistic and I'm very glad a strong female character was at the forefront of this science fiction novel. The other characters were also realistic in the ways they interacted with June. The twists and turns, along with the problem-solving in this book, were both shocking and realistic in terms of how the harshness of space can turn on an astronaut in an instant. Some readers may be bothered by the fact that there aren't any quotation marks, but I didn't have a problem with it. I felt it added to the feeling that we were in June's head and seeing everything from June's perspective. Also, I want to make it clear that this book does not have any (clear) LGBT+ rep. Not sure why it's shelved that way on goodreads. At first I was disappointed, but IMO, the strength of the story and its characters allowed me to look past my own (misled) expectations for the book. (Although of course I'd love to read a sapphic sci-fi novel like this one day). All in all, I'd LOVE to read more sci-fi novels like this one. It brings you into space and keeps you so engaged that you can't put it down. It's a fast read; I finished this in about a day and a half.

  14. 5 out of 5

    Milton Public Library

    June is an orphan of 12 living with her aunt and uncle. Her uncle happens to be in aeronautics engineering and takes June under his wing. June is brilliant and learns a lot from her uncle until he passes away. Her aunt, who only has so much patience for the curious June, sends her to the aeronautics boarding school named for her uncle. June, and the aeronautics world, have been haunted by the complete communications breakdown by the crew of Inquiry, a mission that had set out to travel deep into June is an orphan of 12 living with her aunt and uncle. Her uncle happens to be in aeronautics engineering and takes June under his wing. June is brilliant and learns a lot from her uncle until he passes away. Her aunt, who only has so much patience for the curious June, sends her to the aeronautics boarding school named for her uncle. June, and the aeronautics world, have been haunted by the complete communications breakdown by the crew of Inquiry, a mission that had set out to travel deep into space. As June grows can she and her fellow crewmates save the crew of the Inquiry when everyone else has lost hope? I love a good space story about exploration and the dangers of space. I expected to like this book no matter what to be honest. I read through it pretty quickly and the second half of the book kept me turning those pages, which I love! June's character was incredibly interesting and the challenges they faced were intriguing and believable. Note that this book is written a little different, with no quotation marks. For some this may be a problem, but you just have to pay attention a little bit more. I didn't have much trouble. I definitely recommend this book! Find it today: https://ent.sharelibraries.info/clien... Ashley C. / Milton Public Library #CheckOutMPL

  15. 5 out of 5

    sel

    This book just wasn’t for me. I was initially drawn to it because it’s sci-fi, and because I thought it was going to be sapphic. Which isn’t a fault of the book, but I’m just annoyed that I got misled by people on Goodreads. It is exactly what the synopsis says it is, but it doesn’t feel like it lives up to it at all. For one thing, it seems like the storyline will follow June six years after her time at Peter Reed, yet almost half the book is about her time up to that point. It says that the sto This book just wasn’t for me. I was initially drawn to it because it’s sci-fi, and because I thought it was going to be sapphic. Which isn’t a fault of the book, but I’m just annoyed that I got misled by people on Goodreads. It is exactly what the synopsis says it is, but it doesn’t feel like it lives up to it at all. For one thing, it seems like the storyline will follow June six years after her time at Peter Reed, yet almost half the book is about her time up to that point. It says that the story focuses on June’s relationship with James, yet in the bigger picture, James seems more like a character that just happens to be there at different stages of June’s life, like many of the side characters who fade into the background. The same goes for the Inquiry, which is the spacecraft whose fuel cells fail, which doesn’t seem like a real focal point in the story, because the real weight of it isn’t properly emphasized. Aside from not being what I expected it would be, this book is ultimately unremarkable in its plot, and struggled to keep my attention. Not only was there no real storyline keeping everything together, but there was nothing interesting about any of the other aspects that could make up for this fact, like the characters or the setting. Also, there were no quotations when characters were speaking, which was irritating. It did nothing to help keep everything from blending together after everything else failed to keep me interested.

  16. 5 out of 5

    Kimberly

    I absolutely fell in love with June. She is endearing, determined and willful. I could not put this book down. I'm usually not a great fan of science fiction because, well, I get confused easily, lol, but this was fantastic! It was just the right amount of science fiction. I am so sad its all over. I read the last page and couldn't believe it was all done. :( If you are interested in starting science fiction, but aren't looking for something too technical, I'd start with this. Thank you Random Hous I absolutely fell in love with June. She is endearing, determined and willful. I could not put this book down. I'm usually not a great fan of science fiction because, well, I get confused easily, lol, but this was fantastic! It was just the right amount of science fiction. I am so sad its all over. I read the last page and couldn't believe it was all done. :( If you are interested in starting science fiction, but aren't looking for something too technical, I'd start with this. Thank you Random House and Netgalley for the ARC in exchange for an honest review. I will be buying this for my dad for Father's day!!

  17. 4 out of 5

    niri

    a lot like if, then in its deliberateness. i really liked it. it's not really what the blurb says it is. a lot like if, then in its deliberateness. i really liked it. it's not really what the blurb says it is.

  18. 4 out of 5

    Samantha Nietzel

    This book was a disappointment for me. And there’s only one thing to blame: the synopsis. I went into this book thinking it would be an adventurous plot with a fiery love story... and warning... none of that happened for me. My biggest issue is that this book focused so much on what felt like mundane bits and bobs of everyday life and breezed right through what could have been high speed and intense plot points. I was bored through a good chunk of this but kept clinging to the promise of an exci This book was a disappointment for me. And there’s only one thing to blame: the synopsis. I went into this book thinking it would be an adventurous plot with a fiery love story... and warning... none of that happened for me. My biggest issue is that this book focused so much on what felt like mundane bits and bobs of everyday life and breezed right through what could have been high speed and intense plot points. I was bored through a good chunk of this but kept clinging to the promise of an exciting romantic relationship and... warning #2: was SORELY DISAPPOINTED. Now for some good bits. I enjoyed the simple approach to the “space theme”. It’s not an in your face WE’RE GOING TO SPACE type of book. It’s much quieter and softer and that was a positive for me. I felt more engaged in the first 50 pages or so when we’re following the main character’s childhood and understanding her mind and love of science, but at the same time, it felt like too much time was spent here versus her adult life where the story really could have taken off (pun intended). Another warning: no quotation marks for dialogue are used. This normally isn’t an issue for me (big Sally Rooney fan over here), but I actually found it hindered the story telling in this case. There were multiples times where I was like “wait who is speaking right now” and was confused where and when the dialogue ended. I wouldn’t call this offensively bad or 100% boring which is the only thing saving this from a 2⭐️ read. Maybe this will work for some of you better than me. If you like quick, subtle and quiet space stories, perhaps this one will be for you. Thanks to NetGalley and Random House for a copy of this ARC in exchange for an honest review.

  19. 4 out of 5

    Geonn Cannon

    This review makes me so sad. I REALLY wanted to love this book. I'm a huge fan of Kate Hope Day's first novel, I was excited when I saw this was available to wish for, and overjoyed when the publisher granted my wish. Unfortunately, all that led to disappointment. I didn't enjoy this book at all, certainly nowhere near as much as IF, THEN. I didn't like the character of June. I felt way too much time was spent on her childhood/teen years and then, when she was finally an adult, she still acted s This review makes me so sad. I REALLY wanted to love this book. I'm a huge fan of Kate Hope Day's first novel, I was excited when I saw this was available to wish for, and overjoyed when the publisher granted my wish. Unfortunately, all that led to disappointment. I didn't enjoy this book at all, certainly nowhere near as much as IF, THEN. I didn't like the character of June. I felt way too much time was spent on her childhood/teen years and then, when she was finally an adult, she still acted selfish and childish. I struggled to finish this book and then sat with it for over a week trying to think of a way to give it some semblance of a good review. In the end, I just couldn't bring myself to do it. I do believe Kate Hope Day is an extremely talented writer, and I'll jump on whatever she writes next, but this one is a definite miss for me. The book also has one of my most-despised affectations: no quotation marks around the dialogue. I've yet to find any plausible defense for why an author would do this or why a publisher would let them do it. Is it supposed to make the book seem more poetic? Profound? "Grown-up"? It's simple punctuation. Imagine this review without any periods or capitalization. Even if I'd adored every other aspect of the book, it would have lost a star for that alone. I was given an advance copy for an honest review, and sadly, that's what I've done.

  20. 4 out of 5

    Hitha

    A brilliant young astronaut (and the niece of a brilliant rocket scientist) makes it her mission to figure out what went wrong on a deep space mission that stranded 4 astronauts, and watching June grow up and grow into her family’s legacy while traveling through space and solving tricky problems was fascinating. This lacks the humor of The Martian and annoyingly does not use quotation marks for dialogue (a stylistic choice that puzzles me, but I digress), but I tore through it in two nights.

  21. 5 out of 5

    Tera Slawson

    I received my copy of In The Quick through NetGalley in exchange for an honest review. Thank you to Kate Hope Day and Penguin Random House for the opportunity to be able to read and review this book If I had to describe this book in one word it would be “Quiet.” That is not usually the word someone would use to describe a Sci-fi book. But this was not your typical science fiction novel. This is the story of June, we start with her being a young girl, she is brilliant in mechanics. But the only per I received my copy of In The Quick through NetGalley in exchange for an honest review. Thank you to Kate Hope Day and Penguin Random House for the opportunity to be able to read and review this book If I had to describe this book in one word it would be “Quiet.” That is not usually the word someone would use to describe a Sci-fi book. But this was not your typical science fiction novel. This is the story of June, we start with her being a young girl, she is brilliant in mechanics. But the only person who understands her, her uncle, has now died. Her abilities turn destructive without her uncle's hands to guide her. After almost burning down their house her aunt admits can no longer handle her. Her aunt then sends her to the astronaut training school started by her uncle. We then follow her to her career in space travel and her obsession with finding the lost crew of another space expedition. One whose mission went wrong due to the fuel cells designed by her uncle. While that description may sound like a bit of drama, this novel didn’t feel like that when reading it. This book has one of my most favorite things, melancholy. She is not depressed or tortured, but it just has this sweet sense of sadness in the writing. We meet Jane after her uncle has passed, and the whole book you feel that sense of loss in her entire story. It’s really beautiful and I shed a few tears. While this is a great science fiction story, it is also just a really lovely written novel. I’m giving it 5 stars.

  22. 4 out of 5

    Kat

    After memorably reading (and being wildly confused by) Kate Hope Day's last book, I was concerned that this space odyssey would be equally as twisty-turny. Instead, I was pleasantly surprised by a realistic saga of one brilliant young girl's journey to deal with loss and grief, while nurturing her clear intelligence and skills. The niece of a well-known aeronautical engineer, June lives with her aunt and uncle after the death of her parents. When her uncle dies on the day a rocket takes off carr After memorably reading (and being wildly confused by) Kate Hope Day's last book, I was concerned that this space odyssey would be equally as twisty-turny. Instead, I was pleasantly surprised by a realistic saga of one brilliant young girl's journey to deal with loss and grief, while nurturing her clear intelligence and skills. The niece of a well-known aeronautical engineer, June lives with her aunt and uncle after the death of her parents. When her uncle dies on the day a rocket takes off carrying the technology he developed, June makes it her life's focus to follow in his footsteps. The rocket, missing in space, becomes her obsession, powering her through grueling astronaut training and eventually as one of the youngest engineers in space. I couldn't put In The Quick down. The scenes were riveting and the characters were well-developed and compelling. I felt for and with June throughout the novel and her passion, perhaps even obsession, for the technology her uncle worked on was realistically portrayed as she often dealt far better with machinery than she did the humans in her life. The scenes in space were gripping and I finished the book wishing I could watch it also play out on the big screen.

  23. 4 out of 5

    Jennifer

    When this novel starts, it's an unspecified time in the future, and 12 year old June is a 12 year old who lives with her aunt and uncle, socially awkward but brilliant at engineering. As June's uncle is dying, a space ship launches nearby with some of the specs designed by June's uncle and his students. Communication is lost with the spaceship and they are presumed dead, but June never stops believing they're still out there, through her time at a special academy for training teenagers for the s When this novel starts, it's an unspecified time in the future, and 12 year old June is a 12 year old who lives with her aunt and uncle, socially awkward but brilliant at engineering. As June's uncle is dying, a space ship launches nearby with some of the specs designed by June's uncle and his students. Communication is lost with the spaceship and they are presumed dead, but June never stops believing they're still out there, through her time at a special academy for training teenagers for the space program to becoming an astronaut herself at a young age. (Ignore the publisher's blurb for this one because I possibly have never seen a more inaccurate description of a book.) I really enjoyed Kate Hope Day's debut novel If Then, so I was excited to get an advanced copy of this one, out 3/2/20. Like that book, this one is a kind of literary science fiction but in a realistic way, quiet but interesting. For the vibe, think a mix of The Light From Other Stars by Erika Swyler, The Martian by Andy Weir, The Wanderers by Meg Howrey, and a dash of the movie Interstellar. Thanks to Netgalley and the publisher for a free copy in exchange for an honest review.

  24. 5 out of 5

    Kayla Garcia

    Quick, N. Informally, as by astronauts: the final minute of life before total oxygen deprivation: in the quick. Radiant, atmospheric and strange. A coming-of-age story about a determined and intellectual character named, June. Spilt within four parts, as the reader, we follow June’s journey of becoming a qualified astronaut and her perseverance in solving the mystery of a lost crew.

  25. 5 out of 5

    Marsha

    The reader is plunged inside the head of June, a brilliant girl whose life goal is to solve a problem that her beloved uncle was on the verge of solving before he died. June is so single minded that she notices practically nothing else. I enjoyed the book but was left with many questions.

  26. 5 out of 5

    Hilary

    a lil bit spooky a lil bit space

  27. 5 out of 5

    Kris Ruggiero

    June is a young, brilliant girl who leaves home to attend an astronaut training program. Her uncle was an engineer who developed fuel cells that powered a groundbreaking space ship named Inquiry. After six years of grueling training, June becomes an astronaut and is assigned to a post as an engineer on a space station. June is obsessed with solving the mystery of what happened to Inquiry and to find out if the fuel cells her uncle invented were to blame for this ship’s disappearance. . I’ve always June is a young, brilliant girl who leaves home to attend an astronaut training program. Her uncle was an engineer who developed fuel cells that powered a groundbreaking space ship named Inquiry. After six years of grueling training, June becomes an astronaut and is assigned to a post as an engineer on a space station. June is obsessed with solving the mystery of what happened to Inquiry and to find out if the fuel cells her uncle invented were to blame for this ship’s disappearance. . I’ve always enjoyed sci-fi, but I haven’t read it as much as I did when I was younger. But I enjoyed this dreamy, atmospheric novel that was both scientific in nature and yet, it was about a young woman who had the courage to brave space travel in order to solve a mystery of a missing space craft and its crew. June is a memorable, courageous character. I found the descriptions of what happens to the human body during space travel fascinating and the descriptions of June on the Pink Planet were riveting. And the cover of this book is beautiful. . In The Quick is an interesting, unique read. It’s a short book that I read in a day and I loved it because it took me back to a genre that I enjoyed so much. I loved it, but I do recognize that this story may only appeal to certain readers. I just saw the movie, The Martian, a few weekends ago and this book did remind me of that movie in parts. If you want a different read out of your comfort zone, this is a great book to read! . Thank you to Random House for an advance copy via NetGalley.

  28. 4 out of 5

    Angelina

    This book took me on a journey. First, I wanted to become an astronaut because the main character June made it sound so appealing. Then I wanted to throw this book away become the take-off scene was so atmospheric that I felt like throwing up. And then the book ended and I'm stuck sitting here wondering wtf I just read and thinking about living on a pink planet with numbing air. Sooo...maybe this is the point in this review where I should tell you that the synopsis is kinda misleading. DON'T go i This book took me on a journey. First, I wanted to become an astronaut because the main character June made it sound so appealing. Then I wanted to throw this book away become the take-off scene was so atmospheric that I felt like throwing up. And then the book ended and I'm stuck sitting here wondering wtf I just read and thinking about living on a pink planet with numbing air. Sooo...maybe this is the point in this review where I should tell you that the synopsis is kinda misleading. DON'T go into this book expecting lots of romance because it doesn't occur until the very end and even then it is very little. DO go into this book expecting to go on a character exploration of June and her life's work of fixing things and becoming an astronaut. I personally really enjoyed getting to follow June as a character and Kate Hope Day did a fantastic job in making this book so atmospheric and making me feel like I was right there the whole time! Also, the cover is absolutely stunning and I wish this book were sitting front and center on my shelves, but alas, I must wait months till I can hold this beautiful book in my hands! *Thank you to NetGalley and the publisher for providing me an eARC in exchange for an honest review!

  29. 5 out of 5

    Brandi

    --- Thank you, NetGalley and Random House Publishing Group for providing me with an eARC in exchange for an honest review. My thoughts and opinions are my own --- [2.5 Stars] Ok, I have a lot of thoughts on this. As one of my more anticipated reads for 2021, I found this to be disappointing. Particularly because I do not feel that the book description was accurate. While yes, the description is true to what does happen in the novel, I didn't find the book's events to be as intense as described. Ce --- Thank you, NetGalley and Random House Publishing Group for providing me with an eARC in exchange for an honest review. My thoughts and opinions are my own --- [2.5 Stars] Ok, I have a lot of thoughts on this. As one of my more anticipated reads for 2021, I found this to be disappointing. Particularly because I do not feel that the book description was accurate. While yes, the description is true to what does happen in the novel, I didn't find the book's events to be as intense as described. Certainly not anywhere near The Martian by Andy Weir, which was the comparison that really drew me in initially. In fact, the book is quite slow-paced and reads with a detached quality that separates the reader from what is going down in the book. I'm never a proponent for rating books based on what I wanted them to be because that's simply not fair. The book is only ever going to be what it is and while I do think that a book could have done more or expanded further on what it is, it will never be something else (I know that sounded convoluted but I hope you get my gist). For this reason, I did try to approach rating this book as objective as possible and really evaluating what it actually was without my prior ideas of what I expected it to be getting in the way. Because while I'm disappointed that it was not as epic as the description sounded, that's not a book fault, it's a marketing fault. Yet even with my objective approach, I still found this book a bit lackluster for these listed reasons: - Inconsistent Pacing: This book had a high tendency to dawdle on daily events and then rush through pivotal plot developments. I feel the book really could have benefited from focusing in on some of these examples and really working through them (or even just explaining them more). Instead, a lot of these events were just introduced and resolved in less than 10 pages which left me reeling and confused. I found myself multiple times going "Hey we should really talk about that!" to the book. I think this lead to my detached feeling from the book's events. This coupled with the fact that we had two major time jumps that left issues unresolved, the book read a little unbalanced. Like it was lurching through the summary of a more fleshed out story. Skipping stuff here or there and consolidating plot points to save pages. Definitely not the vibe I want from a book. - Training Montages: There were at least three, maybe four, training montages that went down. Just paragraphs where her bodily transformation was documented and we heard about how she "saw herself getting slimmer in the mirror". I don't know why but this irked me. The first one, and mayybbeee the second made sense. But all the others after that made no sense and were repetitive. Considering what I said above, how other plot points could have benefited from more page time, every time another training montage came up I just wished we had used that time instead to focus on those more intense moments. Things that actually would have added to the overall story and its intrigue. - "Fiery Love Affair": there was none. June's affliction with James was not cute or logical. Other than the fact that they were both smart and the only two people living on this station, there didn't seem to be much that drove them together. I never once felt that their love "threaten[ed] to destroy everything they've worked so hard to create", nor that there was any "electric attraction". James was honestly a terrible person and his 'relationship' with June was forced and a bit creepy. Something about him having been a grad student who worked with her uncle when she was 12 and how now he was sleeping with her weirded me out even though they are both consenting adults. It would have made a lot more sense to me if he had been a mentor figure vs a 'lover'. - The Ending was Disappointing: After the whole journey we just went on of following June and her efforts to convince others of Inquiry's crew still being alive, I was so frustrated with the ending. And that's where I'm gonna leave that for the sake of spoilers. Overall, I just feel meh about it. I was disappointed in how it wasn't what I expected, and then I was let down by the execution and writing. I didn't care for the detached vibes it had, lack of quotation marks (oh ya, it has those too), the time jumps and pacing problems, or the plot development. I loved June and think that her story and what she experiences was super interesting, but the method in which it was told to me just wasn't it. Ya win some and lose some, I guess.

  30. 4 out of 5

    Ryan Hixson

    In The Quick by Kate Hope Day is about the life of female astronaut from 12 to adulthood. There's a missing crew which seems important and is the driving force until the end when it is about life choice more so. The character work on June is really interesting I actually liked the scenes with her at the astronaut school then her actually being an astronaut in space. The first 50% is all about astronaut school and the other 50% has her in space and going to missions. I loved 75% of this book but In The Quick by Kate Hope Day is about the life of female astronaut from 12 to adulthood. There's a missing crew which seems important and is the driving force until the end when it is about life choice more so. The character work on June is really interesting I actually liked the scenes with her at the astronaut school then her actually being an astronaut in space. The first 50% is all about astronaut school and the other 50% has her in space and going to missions. I loved 75% of this book but man is the last 25% bad. You have a super smart independent female lead, that is ready to throw the mission which has been the reason for her becoming an astronaut, for a borderline abusive relationship. The ending is such a cheat it focuses on the relationship and not on saving people. I was invested in the this mission of saving people, and for it to end before they're saved is horrible. I was liking this book so much, to throw it all away makes me mad. I would like to think Netgalley and Random House for the ARC. In The Quick by Kate Hope Day is published on March 2nd 2021. The Plot: June grows up being raised by her aunt and uncle after her parents death at a young age. June's Uncle is her hero he developed the fuel cells for space shuttles one space shuttle the Inquiry is going on a 6 year manned mission the longest of its kind. half way through the mission the fuel cells have stopped working. June's uncle and team start working on it but her uncle passes unexpectedly. June doesn't want to give up. Her aunt put her in NSP an astronaut school, where June is an outcast with big ideas put no one gives her the time of day. She joins a group developing a metal hand, which know one understands her ideas that are two advance she works on her ideas in secret and changes them on the presentation day. The group is blown away since they could not get it to work, June's ideas are acknowledged, and years later she get a space mission. she has never given up hope that the crew of the Inquiry is still alive, and on the space mission she risk all for a theory. What I Liked: The character of June really smart and thanks outside of the box makes smart and sound choices, and takes risk. The charter let me down at the end but I enjoyed getting to know her. I like the way we got to see Junes mind work with how she developed the superior mechanical hand. I liked her determination and how she didn't give up on the crew still being alive of the Inquiry after 6 years. I really liked the pool training scenes both Junes and the Inquiry crews run. I did think the pick moon was cool. I love the cover art to this book a lot. What I Disliked: The ending, so bad. This book is being compare to the Martian, here's what this book did, say Jessica Chastain's character believes Matt Damon's character is still alive, she spends six years trying to prove this, in the fifth year she meets a guy has an affair. The prove Matt Damon's alive, The people having the affair work on the fuel cell that the guy destroyed in a jealous rage. You finally get the mission to save Matt Damon but all you can thank of is the guy you had the affair with. You're on you way to save Matt Damon and the book is over! What the heck. Recommendations: I want to recommend this book again because of some truly fantastic character work, but I can not. I don't want anybody getting as upset as I did over this book. I got the arc to this early and was super excited but left feeling disappointed. I rated In The Quick by Kate Hope Day 3 out of 5 stars. More 2.5 but I did enjoy the first 50 percent so much.

Add a review

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

Loading...
We use cookies to give you the best online experience. By using our website you agree to our use of cookies in accordance with our cookie policy.