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Shazam and the Seven Magic Lands

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Legendary comics writer Geoff Johns continues his modern reimagining of Shazam following the hit 2019 Warner Bros. movie starring Zachary Levi. In these stories, after a stop at the mysterious subway location of the Rock of Eternity, source of his mighty powers, Shazam and his foster siblings take a trip to a series of magical lands including the Funlands and the Wozenderla Legendary comics writer Geoff Johns continues his modern reimagining of Shazam following the hit 2019 Warner Bros. movie starring Zachary Levi. In these stories, after a stop at the mysterious subway location of the Rock of Eternity, source of his mighty powers, Shazam and his foster siblings take a trip to a series of magical lands including the Funlands and the Wozenderlands. But these dreamlike fantasy worlds hide a nightmarish reality, as the young heroes must face the tyrannical King Kid and try to avoid being fed to hungry tigers. Collects Shazam! #1-12.


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Legendary comics writer Geoff Johns continues his modern reimagining of Shazam following the hit 2019 Warner Bros. movie starring Zachary Levi. In these stories, after a stop at the mysterious subway location of the Rock of Eternity, source of his mighty powers, Shazam and his foster siblings take a trip to a series of magical lands including the Funlands and the Wozenderla Legendary comics writer Geoff Johns continues his modern reimagining of Shazam following the hit 2019 Warner Bros. movie starring Zachary Levi. In these stories, after a stop at the mysterious subway location of the Rock of Eternity, source of his mighty powers, Shazam and his foster siblings take a trip to a series of magical lands including the Funlands and the Wozenderlands. But these dreamlike fantasy worlds hide a nightmarish reality, as the young heroes must face the tyrannical King Kid and try to avoid being fed to hungry tigers. Collects Shazam! #1-12.

30 review for Shazam and the Seven Magic Lands

  1. 5 out of 5

    Chad

    Johns has done a good job of updating the Shazam family's adventures for modern times. It doesn't feel at all hokey like some of the previous Captain Marvel books. This story about the Magic Lands feels somewhat Oz like. It definitely must have been an inspiration. Johns, of course, manages some surprises. I really like the allusion that the exclamation point in Shazam is really an unnamed 7th power source. I can't wait until he finally deals with that. The rotating art is very good, although Sc Johns has done a good job of updating the Shazam family's adventures for modern times. It doesn't feel at all hokey like some of the previous Captain Marvel books. This story about the Magic Lands feels somewhat Oz like. It definitely must have been an inspiration. Johns, of course, manages some surprises. I really like the allusion that the exclamation point in Shazam is really an unnamed 7th power source. I can't wait until he finally deals with that. The rotating art is very good, although Scott Kolins doesn't mesh the best with Dale Eaglesham and Marco Santucci. The numbering listed in the blurb from DC is definitely wrong. The story so far is from issues 1-11, 13-. Issue 12 is a fill in issue from Jeff Loveness and Brandon Peterson.

  2. 5 out of 5

    Robert

    This one wasn't for me, I honestly just skimmed the last 30% or so to take in some of the colourful art. This one wasn't for me, I honestly just skimmed the last 30% or so to take in some of the colourful art.

  3. 5 out of 5

    Ritika

    This was fun! I will look out for more by Geoff Johns on Shazam.

  4. 4 out of 5

    Chris Lemmerman

    Collecting the entirety of Geoff Johns' most recent Shazam! series, Shazam! & The Seven Magic Lands pits Billy and his family against the mystery of the titular Magic Lands, as well as Mister Mind and the Monster Society! Johns knows how to use these characters in a way that will appeal to the old fans and the new. These 12 issues bring a new mystery, old favourites, twists on well established characters, and big superhero battles out the ass. There's a lot packed into this, to the point where it Collecting the entirety of Geoff Johns' most recent Shazam! series, Shazam! & The Seven Magic Lands pits Billy and his family against the mystery of the titular Magic Lands, as well as Mister Mind and the Monster Society! Johns knows how to use these characters in a way that will appeal to the old fans and the new. These 12 issues bring a new mystery, old favourites, twists on well established characters, and big superhero battles out the ass. There's a lot packed into this, to the point where it can be a little crowded at times - the final two issues or so are especially jam packed, even with the additional pages included, but it does feel a little rushed at the end. There's a sense that Johns isn't quite done with these characters just yet, but hey, I'm not complaining if he wants to come back. On art primarily is Dale Eaglesham, whose visuals are always clean and clean - the dude never skimps on details either. Also helping out are Scott Kolins and Marco Santucci - Santucci gels well with Eaglesham's style, but Kolins has a very unique style that really stands out. He draws most of the latter half of the book so once you get into it it's fine, but the initial change is very jarring. Shazam! needs more ongoing series tbh. This series shows what can be achieved in just 12 issues, but I'd love to see more, either from this creative team or another.

  5. 4 out of 5

    Greg

    Goodness gracious... this was phenomenal. The first volume of Shazam by Johns, originally during the New 52, was also incredible. The movie was basically just that graphic novel minus Black Adam. I read the whole thing in one sitting. So when I saw that Johns did a follow-up, I decided to wait it out until the graphic novel came out. And, boy oh boy, I think this was even better than the first run. Geoff Johns is famous for distilling characters down to one word. Superman is hope, Batman is justi Goodness gracious... this was phenomenal. The first volume of Shazam by Johns, originally during the New 52, was also incredible. The movie was basically just that graphic novel minus Black Adam. I read the whole thing in one sitting. So when I saw that Johns did a follow-up, I decided to wait it out until the graphic novel came out. And, boy oh boy, I think this was even better than the first run. Geoff Johns is famous for distilling characters down to one word. Superman is hope, Batman is justice, Wonder Woman is love. Based on what I've read, I assume Shazam is family. And it really pulls at the heartstrings with every page turn. Family is what you make it. Another thing that Geoff Johns is famous for is his world-building. He's the writer that added all of the colored lanterns to the Green Lantern. Similarly, he adds seven magical realms to the world of Shazam in this story. The art seems like the DC house style. Stylistically, it doesn't really stand out. But, make no mistake, the art in this graphic novel is unbelievable. Eaglesham uses a variety of techniques to tell the story. Pages are framed creatively and he uses full page and double page spreads effectively. He had to make A LOT of characters and worlds for this story, and every character is unique and recognizable. One of the worlds is full of animals, and Eagleshem clearly did his research to draw the tigers, lions, elephants, etc. effectively. Not only does each world have new characters, they each also employ a different style. The video game world is sort of art deco, the dark world uses black and white sort of like a Tim Burton movie, etc. This story was a mastercraft. I read dozens of graphic novels every year and this may have been the best one I read in 2020. By the way, there are 13 issues in this graphic novel come up plus a short story about Mary. Not 12 issues like the description says. According to comixology, Johns also did issue 14 before handing it over to a different writer. Time will tell what happens with the story.

  6. 4 out of 5

    Alek Hill

    Not really impressed by this one. I had heard that there had been some scheduling issues with this series and you can kind of tell. Near the middle the art and the pacing take a dip and the plot suffers for it. There is a lot about the plot that goes unexplained, to the audience and the characters, that causes a lot of congestion and confusion. Things that you assume are taking place outside of the heroes awareness, are suddenly common knowledge near the end. I was a little confused by the magic Not really impressed by this one. I had heard that there had been some scheduling issues with this series and you can kind of tell. Near the middle the art and the pacing take a dip and the plot suffers for it. There is a lot about the plot that goes unexplained, to the audience and the characters, that causes a lot of congestion and confusion. Things that you assume are taking place outside of the heroes awareness, are suddenly common knowledge near the end. I was a little confused by the magic lands considering a majority of them were so whimsical and child like what was their origin and purpose? Why was Mr. Tawny a criminal for not wanting to be a tiger that ate people if tigers that did eat people was bad? And why were Black Adam and the Seven Sins stooges that could be bossed around? The big problem though comes from the pacing and portrayal of Billy's reunion with this father and how it impacts the Shazam Family. The dilemma and twist that Johns uses as the climaxes of this story are very flat due to how underdeveloped that reunion is. But this book was not a travesty that people should skip. It is still enjoyable and fun. With a few surprises that I think comic reads will enjoy.

  7. 4 out of 5

    Kevin

    I read this story as the individual issues were published but also wanted to read the story as a whole. It definitely reads better as a whole, having had gaps between issues due to various reasons (including COVID-19/coronavirus). There are two things that, for me, kept the book from earning a 5-star rating. These are: 1. The art didn't have consistency. All of the artists used are fantastic, but it would have been nice if Dale Eaglesham -- who was supposed to be the artist on the series -- had do I read this story as the individual issues were published but also wanted to read the story as a whole. It definitely reads better as a whole, having had gaps between issues due to various reasons (including COVID-19/coronavirus). There are two things that, for me, kept the book from earning a 5-star rating. These are: 1. The art didn't have consistency. All of the artists used are fantastic, but it would have been nice if Dale Eaglesham -- who was supposed to be the artist on the series -- had done all of the art where the focus was on Billy or in Philadelphia, Marco Santucci had done all of the Wildlands, and Scott Kolins had done all of the Black Adam-centric scenes (just an example of how I would have broken it up). 2. The epilogue scenes that wrapped up the story were rushed due to the series being canceled. Writer Geoff Johns had plans for more with Superboy-Prime and for reintroducing the Justice Society of America. Maybe DC will allow Johns the opportunity to tell those stories later. Still, this book is recommended as a highly enjoyable read.

  8. 5 out of 5

    John Hartford

    This collection is a marvel. Geoff Johns returns to the world of Shazam and writes what feels like a event comic. The book has the feel of a 80s blockbuster. Every issue bursting with ideas and character. The whole 'Shazamily' shines throughout. The inconsistent art is the only reason I can't comfortably give this story a 5/5. I feel the story brings a lot to the world of Shazam but the rotating artists keeps it from feeling like a cohesive vision. I am a big fan of both Dale Eaglesham and Scott This collection is a marvel. Geoff Johns returns to the world of Shazam and writes what feels like a event comic. The book has the feel of a 80s blockbuster. Every issue bursting with ideas and character. The whole 'Shazamily' shines throughout. The inconsistent art is the only reason I can't comfortably give this story a 5/5. I feel the story brings a lot to the world of Shazam but the rotating artists keeps it from feeling like a cohesive vision. I am a big fan of both Dale Eaglesham and Scott Kolins but turning the page from one to the other can be somewhat jarring. Both artists have some amazing work here though especially Eaglesham who probably couldn't cram anything else into his splash pages. This will be a collection I will likely reread often. It uses all the aspects I love about Shazam whole adding numerous new ideas to the mythos. Also some great Black Adam content.

  9. 5 out of 5

    Adam Graham

    In the Seven Magic Lands , Billy Batson and his foster siblings return to the Rock of Eternity where their whisked into the seven magic lands and find they've unleashed many dangers on the world that they have to protect the Earth from. Meanwhile, Billy has to deal with teh sudden re-emergence of his father. This book is epic. Essentially, it collects an entire year...all of Geoff Johns run on the 2018 series and it tells one unified story. It includes visits to Magic Lands, introduces Tawny Tige In the Seven Magic Lands , Billy Batson and his foster siblings return to the Rock of Eternity where their whisked into the seven magic lands and find they've unleashed many dangers on the world that they have to protect the Earth from. Meanwhile, Billy has to deal with teh sudden re-emergence of his father. This book is epic. Essentially, it collects an entire year...all of Geoff Johns run on the 2018 series and it tells one unified story. It includes visits to Magic Lands, introduces Tawny Tiger, as well as featuring Shazam's biggest bads, while sprinkling in a lot of family drama. It manages to have fun, provide wacky situations, and have enough action and heart to keep the book engaging. It's rare that I get this entertained by a modern ongoing series, but this oen rings the bell. I heartily reccomend.

  10. 5 out of 5

    Ryan Stewart

    Props to Johns for revitalizing Shazam ever since the beginning of the New 52. But, personally, I’ve learned the character doesn’t really work for me. Not Johns’ fault, and the art remains great, but this would have resonated with me much more as a kid than as a 35-year-old. It’s very silly, but has a heart of gold that still shines through.

  11. 5 out of 5

    Sarah

    *I've read A LOT more than I've reviewed, so... time for some knee-jerk reactions.* I love this take on Billy Batson and the Shazam Family! I enjoyed getting to spend more time with them on this magical adventure that never lost sight of its most important core theme: Family. *I've read A LOT more than I've reviewed, so... time for some knee-jerk reactions.* I love this take on Billy Batson and the Shazam Family! I enjoyed getting to spend more time with them on this magical adventure that never lost sight of its most important core theme: Family.

  12. 4 out of 5

    Averyl Cobb

    Enjoyable story. At times felt a bit muddy and rushed. This is a good mid-grade story and was a nice, easy palate cleanser of a comic book to read.

  13. 5 out of 5

    J.R.

    I guess I just miss the old Billy Batson. The kid who wasn't edgy, who had parents who weren't bums and who was a cub reporter. And the old Freddy Freeman too. I guess I just miss the old Billy Batson. The kid who wasn't edgy, who had parents who weren't bums and who was a cub reporter. And the old Freddy Freeman too.

  14. 5 out of 5

    Deane Hariss

    Maybe it’s just my love for the character, and Geoff Johns but I thought this was a wonderful magic filled crazy ride.

  15. 4 out of 5

    Travis

    Busy but fun. Nice to see Captain Marvel treated as he should be, lighter and mixing big fantasy and smaller personal ideas. The focus on family and big, fun ideas works well and reminds you how great this character is and how Johns can be a solid writer, when he just relaxes and tries to tell one story. The bigger cast is hard to keep track of and a major plot point comes about because the wizard Shazam ( who is now black? When did that happen?) acts like an idiot and never bothers to just talk to Busy but fun. Nice to see Captain Marvel treated as he should be, lighter and mixing big fantasy and smaller personal ideas. The focus on family and big, fun ideas works well and reminds you how great this character is and how Johns can be a solid writer, when he just relaxes and tries to tell one story. The bigger cast is hard to keep track of and a major plot point comes about because the wizard Shazam ( who is now black? When did that happen?) acts like an idiot and never bothers to just talk to Billy Batson. I was willing to forgive that, as a major reveal works really well and I'm a sucker for any version of the Monster Society. Good take on the character.

  16. 5 out of 5

    Elias Rosner

  17. 4 out of 5

    Dusty

  18. 5 out of 5

    Troy-David Phillips

  19. 5 out of 5

    Igor Toscano

  20. 5 out of 5

    Mister

  21. 5 out of 5

    Trey

  22. 5 out of 5

    Glen Farrelly

  23. 5 out of 5

    Jorge Figueroba Sánchez

  24. 5 out of 5

    Mike Collins

  25. 5 out of 5

    Brendan Wright

  26. 5 out of 5

    jennet wheatstonelllsl

  27. 4 out of 5

    JP Nakashima

  28. 5 out of 5

    JT

  29. 4 out of 5

    Matthew

  30. 5 out of 5

    David James

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