web site hit counter Dreams of Savannah - Ebooks PDF Online
Hot Best Seller

Dreams of Savannah

Availability: Ready to download

Cordelia Owens can weave a hopeful dream around anything and is well used to winning the hearts of everyone in Savannah with her whimsy. Even when she receives word that her sweetheart has been lost during a raid on a Yankee vessel, she clings to hope and comes up with many a romantic tale of his eventual homecoming to reassure his mother and sister. But Phineas Dunn finds Cordelia Owens can weave a hopeful dream around anything and is well used to winning the hearts of everyone in Savannah with her whimsy. Even when she receives word that her sweetheart has been lost during a raid on a Yankee vessel, she clings to hope and comes up with many a romantic tale of his eventual homecoming to reassure his mother and sister. But Phineas Dunn finds nothing redemptive in the first horrors of war. Struggling for months to make it home alive, he returns to Savannah injured and cynical, and all too sure that he is not the hero Cordelia seems determined to make him. Matters of black and white don't seem so simple anymore to Phin, and despite her best efforts, Delia's smiles can't erase all the complications in his life. And when Fort Pulaski falls and the future wavers, they both must decide where the dreams of a new America will take them, and if they will go together.


Compare

Cordelia Owens can weave a hopeful dream around anything and is well used to winning the hearts of everyone in Savannah with her whimsy. Even when she receives word that her sweetheart has been lost during a raid on a Yankee vessel, she clings to hope and comes up with many a romantic tale of his eventual homecoming to reassure his mother and sister. But Phineas Dunn finds Cordelia Owens can weave a hopeful dream around anything and is well used to winning the hearts of everyone in Savannah with her whimsy. Even when she receives word that her sweetheart has been lost during a raid on a Yankee vessel, she clings to hope and comes up with many a romantic tale of his eventual homecoming to reassure his mother and sister. But Phineas Dunn finds nothing redemptive in the first horrors of war. Struggling for months to make it home alive, he returns to Savannah injured and cynical, and all too sure that he is not the hero Cordelia seems determined to make him. Matters of black and white don't seem so simple anymore to Phin, and despite her best efforts, Delia's smiles can't erase all the complications in his life. And when Fort Pulaski falls and the future wavers, they both must decide where the dreams of a new America will take them, and if they will go together.

30 review for Dreams of Savannah

  1. 4 out of 5

    Heather Wood

    It's impossible to rate and and review a book in a vacuum, apart from things like previous knowledge of the author and her works, apart from personal experience and other books read. It's impossible not to compare and contrast or to feel culminating weight, and I'm feeling this tension especially strongly with this review. Dreams of Savannah is very honest and well researched, and I liked that it felt less biased, less black and white about what was a very complicated war than some Civil War nov It's impossible to rate and and review a book in a vacuum, apart from things like previous knowledge of the author and her works, apart from personal experience and other books read. It's impossible not to compare and contrast or to feel culminating weight, and I'm feeling this tension especially strongly with this review. Dreams of Savannah is very honest and well researched, and I liked that it felt less biased, less black and white about what was a very complicated war than some Civil War novels are. This book more than most showed subtle nuances in perspectives, and I give it props for that. It had a lot of ingredients that I look for and love in a story: honest history, solid theology, and a happy ending. But this time, for me, the right ingredients did not a loved book make. One of my struggles with this book was a weariness with Civil War novelists in general feeling the need to be gritty, which I believe is a direct reaction against the romanticization of the Old South. But to put it plainly, I'm tired of Civil War books being about rape and attempted rape. So much of this book was about the fear of rape, the evil man with the leering gleam in his eye ever present and the selfish father pushing his daughter into that man's suit, making the reader so tense for so much of the book until the attempted rape did happen, that it made the book a journey that I did not enjoy, a volume that I do not close the cover and think, "Now THAT is a story I must have on my shelves and revisit from time to time." No. Once was too much. Secondly, I can push through painful books when I truly enjoy the characters' company, but I was not hooked at the beginning and came to like the characters far too late in the story for it to redeem the stress of the rape foreshadowing and selfish, controlling parents (I hate books with selfish, controlling parents). Roseanna White has written some of my very favorite fictional characters of all time. Few can compare with the charm and lovability of Brooke, Brice, Rosemary, Lukas, Peter, Barclay, and Philip. Had characters of that level been in Dreams of Savannah, I might have been more willing to plow through the difficult storyline. But since they weren't, I found myself flipping pages to get it over with, not because I couldn't put it down, and that's just not a position that I as a reader want to be put in. I very much regret having to say that by the time the happy ending came, I was skimming and did not care anymore. I wish this wasn't true of such a beloved author. I had a strong sense for most of this book of the fact that it is editorial and the author spent more effort on her message than anything else. It was perhaps too obvious. And I wish I wasn't saying it about a message I agree with. There were some good lines about writing and story that I appreciated. The book was not in any way graphic and actually had low violence, for all its discussion of violent topics. I give the book four stars because I cannot review it in a vacuum and I know how subjective my opinion is. It did have the right ingredients, but unfortunately most of the Dreams of Savannah I am left with from this book are unsavory ones. I received an advance copy from Netgalley and the publisher but I was not compensated for my views and all opinions are my own.

  2. 5 out of 5

    Randi Annie Framnes

    When Cordelia Owens’ sweetheart Phineas enlists to fight against the Yankees, she tries to keep up hope by writing heroic stories. Phineas gets wounded in a raid on his vessel and struggles for months to make it home to Delia. They both have to get real on the issue of keeping slaves as well as deal with the future of their relationship. Dreams of Savannah is the standalone novel written by Roseanna M. White, published by Bethany House Publishers. Setting of the plot is Savannah, Georgia 1861 and When Cordelia Owens’ sweetheart Phineas enlists to fight against the Yankees, she tries to keep up hope by writing heroic stories. Phineas gets wounded in a raid on his vessel and struggles for months to make it home to Delia. They both have to get real on the issue of keeping slaves as well as deal with the future of their relationship. Dreams of Savannah is the standalone novel written by Roseanna M. White, published by Bethany House Publishers. Setting of the plot is Savannah, Georgia 1861 and we get to follow Cordelia Owens as her sweetheart Phineas Dunn has gone off to serve in the Confederate navy. He gets shot, swept aboard and lost, but in spite of bad news, Cordelia writes heroic, hopeful stories and does not accept he is dead. Seriously wounded, Phineas gets washed ashore in Cuba where free black, British Vicar Luther Bromley, agrees to nurse him back to health in return for Phineas’ help finding his illegally sold wife. As war rages ever closer to Savannah, increasing numbers of slaves run away to join the Yankees and be declared free. Cordelia and Phineas have to get real on the issue of keeping slaves as well as deal with the future of their relationship. Main character is Cordelia, Delia, Owens, enjoys a super privileged lifestyle. She has an impressive imagination she uses to raise funds for Confederacy and keep up hope in others. Her character shows a healthy set of values as the plot progresses. British Vicar, Luther Bromley, is my favorite character of this story. He finds himself in a very challenging position as a free black in an area where people like him are slaves. Description of the relationship developing between Phineas and Luther were my favorite part of the plot. As a European, this is a very interesting plot from a new to me author. I loved the amusing and lighthearted writing and dialogue. I particularly found the written Gullah-English of the slaves very entertaining and felt this added uniqueness to the plot. I loved how the Lucas Bromley character taught me more about the difference between a free black and a slave. Delia’s cousin Julius contributed drama to the plot as he was a threat to both Delia and her lady’s maid slave Salina, while trying to present himself as a worthy suitor for Delia. He made my skin crawl every time he was present in the plot. For this, I found his character both excellent and believable if not exactly likable. Anyone who enjoys who enjoys historical romance, specifically set in the Civil War would enjoy this one. Fans of Roseanna M. White would definitely love it, I think. Similar author to explore might be Tamara Alexander. Thank you to #Bethany House Publishers, @roseannamwhite and #NetGalley for this opportunity to share my honest review. All opinions are completely my own. Conclusion: Dreams of Savannah is the captivating novel by Roseanna M. White about Delia and Phin’s privileged life as war breaks out. He enlists, everything changes and she tries to keep up hope by writing heroic stories. They both have to get real on the issue slavery and deal with the future of their relationship.

  3. 5 out of 5

    Deanne Patterson

    White's works are like the finest tapestry's, the words are woven together so seamlessly. It takes a talented author that can write about more than one time period so effortlessly. I will admit I was drawn to the cover of this because yes, I do judge a book by it's cover. The book covers just get better and better all the time. The book has chaos and turmoil ,hope,failures but perseverance. A strong faith message that I did enjoy reading. It was heartwarming to see Phin go from being a man of privi White's works are like the finest tapestry's, the words are woven together so seamlessly. It takes a talented author that can write about more than one time period so effortlessly. I will admit I was drawn to the cover of this because yes, I do judge a book by it's cover. The book covers just get better and better all the time. The book has chaos and turmoil ,hope,failures but perseverance. A strong faith message that I did enjoy reading. It was heartwarming to see Phin go from being a man of privilege who thought he was entitled to being down to earth and humbled after spending time with Luther. The romance was sweet and gentle and OH MY....... I thought all was lost in that romance but at the very end........ Let's just say get your tissues ready you're going to need them. I really appreciate all the research the author put into this it always makes for an entertaining read. Published January 5th 2021 by Bethany House Publishers I was given a complimentary copy of this book. Thank you. All opinions expressed are my own.

  4. 4 out of 5

    Paula Shreckhise

    This story has all the elements of a fairytale set amid the Civil War. Damsels in distress , a dastardly villain and a flawed hero who returns in time to save the day. I liked Cordelia Owens from the start. She is not quite the perfect Southern Belle. She has a vivid imagination and writes stories to help keep folks entertained during a dark time in our history. “We need happy stories in the midst of trials. They keep us going . Remind us of what we are struggling for.” I could say the same for t This story has all the elements of a fairytale set amid the Civil War. Damsels in distress , a dastardly villain and a flawed hero who returns in time to save the day. I liked Cordelia Owens from the start. She is not quite the perfect Southern Belle. She has a vivid imagination and writes stories to help keep folks entertained during a dark time in our history. “We need happy stories in the midst of trials. They keep us going . Remind us of what we are struggling for.” I could say the same for the purpose of Christian Fiction, and this book fits the bill nicely. Delia comes to realize that all people have a story to tell and she seeks to help them tell it. “Stories of heartbreak and injustice, sometimes. Stories of love and family, always. Stories of redemption and sacrifice, more often than not. Stories of humanity. Stories that had changed her as she heard them, as she wrote them.” Phineas Dunn is off to war after Delia promises to wait for him. Crisis comes and he finds himself recovering far from home. Luther Bromley, an English free black preacher in search of his kidnapped wife, Eva, nurses Phin back to health. Phin’s flagging faith is rekindled and he searches his soul on the position of slavery. This is so much more that a great story. It is one to make you ponder a person’s role in this world, and how we can follow God’s purpose for us. * I received a complimentary copy of this book from Bethany House on behalf of the author. I was not required to give a favorable review. All opinions are my own.*

  5. 4 out of 5

    Susan

    Roseanna White's books always find their way to the top of my TBR and this should be no exception. I found this book to be very different from her other books, yet still at the high standard, if not higher, that her readers expect. To me a sign of a great author is that they can shift to different historical settings or genres with ease. This stirring tale is a satisfying blend of a fast-moving plot filled with danger and a developing romance that will satisfy every romantic heart. Under White's Roseanna White's books always find their way to the top of my TBR and this should be no exception. I found this book to be very different from her other books, yet still at the high standard, if not higher, that her readers expect. To me a sign of a great author is that they can shift to different historical settings or genres with ease. This stirring tale is a satisfying blend of a fast-moving plot filled with danger and a developing romance that will satisfy every romantic heart. Under White's skillful pen, it is the individual spiritual journeys that the hero and heroine undertake that is centerstage, as they face moral dilemmas that questions their way of life. As the foundation of their world is crumbling, they each learn to rely on God's will, guiding them to make a difference in the lives of others. I received a complimentary copy of this book from the author/publisher and was not required to write a review. All opinions expressed are my own.

  6. 5 out of 5

    Rebecca

    4.5 stars "Cordelia bolted upright in her bed . . . . What a terrible dream. Hissing flames and acres of water, darkness pressing in on every side. Then - what had it been? More water. A storm. Something bad, something dangerous. Pain, searing and throbbing. Then the gritty taste of sand in her mouth." Troubled by re-occurring dreams after her barely intended young suitor, Phineas Dunn, takes to the seas on behalf of the Confederate Navy, Cordelia Owens is terrified that Phin has experienced life- 4.5 stars "Cordelia bolted upright in her bed . . . . What a terrible dream. Hissing flames and acres of water, darkness pressing in on every side. Then - what had it been? More water. A storm. Something bad, something dangerous. Pain, searing and throbbing. Then the gritty taste of sand in her mouth." Troubled by re-occurring dreams after her barely intended young suitor, Phineas Dunn, takes to the seas on behalf of the Confederate Navy, Cordelia Owens is terrified that Phin has experienced life-threatening circumstances. Living in their Savannah, Georgia home while Yankee troops encroach closer and closer along the coast, Cordelia's family encourages her to pursue a match with a wealthy cousin whose attentions Cordelia continues to spurn. Using her gift of story-telling , Delia chooses to regale Phin's family with her combinations of delightful words, conjuring up grand adventures before his eventual return as a celebrated hero. Thankfully for everyone, Phin does return home, but as an entirely different type of hero than Delia could have ever imagined. "The water enfolded him, warm as a dream, and silenced the thunder of traitors." When a mutiny aboard his ship goes terribly awry, Phineas Dunn finds himself sinking to the bottom of the sea, his last thoughts being those of a beautiful blonde belle promising to wait for him, forever. He can only pray that it won't take that long. Washed up upon an unfamiliar shore, barely clinging to life, Phin is at the mercy of an imposing black British freedman, Luther Bromley, whose search for his beloved wife had stalled on this remote Cuban island. Luther has the means to give Phin aid, but he asks a nearly impossible favor in return. Ushering in a panoramic view of the complexities of the Civil War's impact upon the South, "Dreams of Savannah" debates the moral issues of the day using the thoughts, dreams and actions of its characters as a landscape. And what wonderful characters they turn out to be; each allowing the power of the Holy Spirit to mold their thoughts and intentions, while wielding the sword of courage and carrying the banner of compassion. Phin and Cordelia allow their less than ideal circumstances to change them for the better, so that they too might echo those words hummed that day along the sandy shore, "O God, our help in ages past, Our hope for years to come. Our shelter from the stormy blast, And our eternal home." I received a copy of this book from the author and publisher. The opinions stated above are entirely my own.

  7. 5 out of 5

    Grace Johnson

    *Warnings* #1 This is a long review, so pull up a chair and grab a bowl of popcorn. You'll be here awhile. #2 When I read a review, I want substantial information. So I will not skimp on the details. Which will mean some spoilers, so watch out. #3—additional warning reserved only for this review—I’m trying something different. Again. We’ll just see how this works. Hopefully I can contain the stream of consciousness… First Thoughts I’ve had a lot of experience with Civil War era fiction, and not all *Warnings* #1 This is a long review, so pull up a chair and grab a bowl of popcorn. You'll be here awhile. #2 When I read a review, I want substantial information. So I will not skimp on the details. Which will mean some spoilers, so watch out. #3—additional warning reserved only for this review—I’m trying something different. Again. We’ll just see how this works. Hopefully I can contain the stream of consciousness… First Thoughts I’ve had a lot of experience with Civil War era fiction, and not all of it has been good. As a born and bred Southern girl who comes from a long line of Crackers (aka, poor white trash) who picked cotton and fought for the Confederacy, my opinions on the Civil War are, shall we say, skewed. Because of that, I don’t see the war as everyone else sees—and writes—it. So I’m very picky about my antebellum, Civil War, or Restoration era fiction. I don’t want to read something that stereotypes Southerners as heartless, racist jerks, or something that glosses over slaves (and Crackers) to focus on a bunch of highfalutin Southern belles. I want the grit, the emotion, and the truth behind the war—not propaganda. Therefore, I wasn’t too sure going into Dreams of Savannah. Everyone nowadays is very much a “Yankee,” regardless of where they live, so portraying all Southerners with including clichés is very difficult. I know I enjoyed reading White’s Circle of Spies, but if it’s not Gone with the Wind or Eugenia Price, I’m not interested. Roseanna’s last novel, A Portrait of Loyalty, hadn’t particularly been my favorite and though I really like her last two series (Shadows Over England and The Codebreakers), something in her voice has changed. Her stories haven’t been the same. That being said, I was very wary about DOS. I’ve found that when I’m wary about reading something, the book is pretty much fantastic. This is true for Dreams of Savannah. We open with a ball just before the boys leave for war, and at first the story is light and our main girl, Cordelia, is daydreaming about her soon-to-be beau, Phineas Dunn. This doesn’t seem to leave a lot of room for grit, darkness, and a well-formed argument for the South, if you know know what I mean. Another belle of the ball and her adventurous, rich, pampered boyfriend. But you throw in a traitor or two and an Englishman? You got yo’self a story, dat’s what. The Plot In her earlier works (not including her biblical fiction; they’re on a whole ‘nother level), I could easily describe Roseanna as a “plot-driven” writer. Now, I’m not so sure. I’m beginning to see how she has a vague plot or an inciting incident that she employs on the first page, then a novel that’s carried to The End by the characters. This system has worked pretty well for her in the past—like with On Wings of Devotion, where in the aftermath of Ara’s abduction, not much happens that isn’t, well, drama. However, I’m not sure if that’s the best way to go. For her previous books, we already knew the characters—like Camden, who we met in The Number of Love. The character has already be established and, at least a little bit, fleshed out. We understand from Page 1 why Camden kidnapped Ara, simply because we knew the sort of bloke he was. Right? Not so for Dreams of Savannah. We’ve never met Cordelia or Phin before, so when we immediately dive into him leaving for war and Delia promising to wait for him, we’re not quite certain what kind of characters we’re dealing with. The main event of the plot is carried through ‘til about the halfway point, where we begin to see the characters (both main and secondary, like Delia’s dad, Julius James, etc.) use their drama skills to keep the story going. It’s not a bad idea, but I was left wondering halfway through, who are these guys? That left the rest of the novel kind of flat, I guess. Still, I enjoyed the storyline. Roseanna stuck with a simple method—war + shipwreck + missing person + scoundrel for a cousin = happily ever after. She managed to stay away from politics and bloody fighting without glossing things over. She stayed true to the South, the Cause, and honor without conforming to the image most people today have of Southerners and Confederates (i.e., sexist, racist white jerks)—and that made for a very interesting, enjoyable read. The Characters Remember what I said about not really knowing who Phin and Delia were? Well, that’s what will keep this section pretty short. Phin is describe as adventurous, but he didn’t have much “screen time,” at least as his “old self.” His new self is even harder to pinpoint. I couldn’t get a definite read on his personality. He didn’t seem quiet or reserved, but he wasn’t necessarily talkative and outgoing. He wasn’t rakish, but he was apparently quite the catch. Not really an alpha male but not a beta either. *shrugs* He wasn’t a bad character, but let’s just say he won’t be added to my “Best Hero Ever” shelf. As for Delia, I actually liked her. She’s not my type of heroine, I guess. She had a little more personality than Phin, but I would’ve liked the simple questions answered—not the difficult ones. It was easy to figure out that she liked people, was curious, and loved to dream. She’s optimistic, but also has a lot of deep-seated fears. But what kind of sister is she? Would she rather be gathering inspiration by socializing with her friends or putting it to paper holed up in her room? Why does she get along with everyone but not her mother? On that note, I would’ve liked to have seen more of her family, Phin’s included. Lacy was a great little sister until suddenly...she’s not. Ginny’s never present in the book. Delia’s relationships with her parents are, to say the least, crazy. This is what I was saying. We jumped right into the plot, the story, without first coming to understand the main characters and what makes them tick. Because of this, I really liked Salina and Luther more than Delia and Phin, and I would’ve loved to have seen more of them! Their motives and personalities were pretty clear, and they were so unique (or at least Luther was) and had more interesting storylines of their own. I would’ve liked a lot more romance. Because Phin and Delia were all but engaged by the first chapter, their first kiss wasn’t all sparks and fire. The conflict surrounding them wasn’t as...conflicting as it would’ve been had they just met or fallen in love. As for Salina, her relationship with River just *poof* happened all of a sudden. I would’ve liked to have watched them fall in love, probably more so than Phin and Delia. Luther was fabulous, though. A story about him and Eva when they met and fell in love would be SO AWESOME! He had a lot more personality than Phin did, in my opinion, and so seeing only a few scene here and there of him was kind of disappointing. I was beyond happy when White put in four POVs. Her earlier series usually included four—from the villain to the two love interests to the “other guy,” whether that be the villain’s accomplice or the third point in a love triangle. Even though Phin and Delia weren’t the best characters, Luther and Salina more than made up for it! The Subject Speaking of romance, I’m not entirely certain Roseanna was going for a romance when she wrote Dreams of Savannah. Most romance writers don’t dare go for the story where the characters have already fallen in love and everything seems on the fast track to success. The first kiss and meet cute are almost always nonexistent, and that’s pretty much what makes a romance. Because of the way White wrote this book, I’d probably be more inclined to call it just plain historical fiction than a romance. Without a doubt, it’s more philosophical than anything. And I appreciate that. When one pays too much attention to romance or action, one misses the depth of it all. White’s always been a very thoughtful writer, and even if I may not agree with all of her opinions, I like that she’s not afraid to express them in her writing and carefully craft characters who discover those thoughts and opinions for themselves. It makes the story that much more authentic. I was so terrified that the Civil War was going to be presented as a bunch of heartless white men fighting for slavery and a group of patriots fighting against it. However, White was very mindful of the Confederates’ and the Union’s true agendas, that the war wasn’t just about slavery—that it was a war of honor. She tackled that subject so well and portrayed Phin’s change without a hitch. Instead of embracing racial equality with unrealistically open arms, he struggled with his views and what he’d been taught, without being a jerk. Make sense? I think the transition was really good. It’s difficult to pull off a realistic transition into anything in fiction, so I more than appreciate the care White put into writing that aspect of Phin’s story. The Prose I’ve always loved White’s prose. Her style is unique without being overly so, if you know what I mean. I’d actually say she’s got two separate voices—the one she’s used for her Shadows Over England and Codebreakers series, and the one she’s used for everything else. The latter has visibly grown since A Stray Drop of Blood debuted in 2009, but it has always retained its sense of balance—between emotion, action, dialogue, and narrative. The flow has always been measured and even, not quite melodic but not at all choppy. Perfect, you could say. The first, her “new” voice, is choppy and abrupt, like a clipped London accent. Her one or two word sentences make for a sudden jar—not an unpleasant one. An emotional one. I like both styles. I’ve tried them both in my own writing, and I’ve seen where they fit certain characters and situations better than others. But...I’m really glad she reverted back to her voice. Maybe it’s because she wrote Dreams of Savannah years ago, in 2011, or maybe it’s because she saw that her American accent (not the clipped London one) fit well for her Georgia girls and boys. Speaking of Georgia, can I just say that I LOVE my state? I know nothing’s perfect (and Georgia certainly isn’t), but DOS release day also happens to be the date for the run-off election for senate, so...prophesy, maybe? For those of y’all who enjoyed (or think they will enjoy) Dreams of Savannah, I HIGHLY recommend reading Eugenia Price’s Savannah. You’ll suddenly understand why Delia dreams of Savannah once you read Price’s take on this historic port. Long Story Short… To summarize, Dreams of Savannah wasn’t a perfect book. But it was a perfect reading experience. Not only was I uncertain about White’s novels, I was also uncertain if I could get sucked into anything again. I haven’t been reading like I should (or used to, that is), and I’ve had to force myself to get through some things, so I wasn’t certain if I’d be able to breeze through Dreams of Savannah. (Was it possible that *gasp* I was coming to not love reading as much as before?) But then I got sucked in, page by page, until I was walking around with my face in this book and putting up with the sun through the trees whilst riding in the car just to finish one more chapter. You know how it is. The highlights of DOS are definitely Luther and Salina and the way White wove everything together like a dream. It could have been better, and Delia and Phin could’ve had more personality—or just more. Maybe the book should have been longer to allow their characters more…“fleshiness.” But…(there’s always a but, you know)…it was worth it. I enjoyed it, I really did. And if you were to ask me if I’d read it all over again, I would. Would I recommend it? I would. Would I rate it five stars? Yeah. I would. BookWorm Disclaimer: I received a complementary copy from the publisher in exchange for an honest review. All the opinions expressed above are my own. Obviously. PS: I think I actually managed to contain the stream of consciousness this time! Hooray!

  8. 5 out of 5

    K.E. Stanton

    Everything about this book was so extraordinarily brilliant. The characters, the romances, the arcs, the themes... GAH. Roseanna’s done it again. However, the main thing that stuck out to me was the whimsy. The color. The vibrancy. The magic. Somehow, someway, Roseanna was 100% able to make Savannah both real & whimsical at the same time. I so recommend this book to anyone and everyone who likes history, anti-slavery, whimsy, romance and just a hint of sparkle. ;) Thx to Roseanna & Bethany House f Everything about this book was so extraordinarily brilliant. The characters, the romances, the arcs, the themes... GAH. Roseanna’s done it again. However, the main thing that stuck out to me was the whimsy. The color. The vibrancy. The magic. Somehow, someway, Roseanna was 100% able to make Savannah both real & whimsical at the same time. I so recommend this book to anyone and everyone who likes history, anti-slavery, whimsy, romance and just a hint of sparkle. ;) Thx to Roseanna & Bethany House for the bookie. All thoughts expressed are my own.

  9. 5 out of 5

    Rachael

    Dreams of Savannah had a good message in the book, and I enjoy watching characters grow throughout a book-especially as they come of age. The main characters need to grow in this book so that was nice to see. I also liked the morals portrayed in this book...the fact that we are all people that have a story, all equal in wanting freedom to pursue love and dreams. The leering and untrustworthy men that are in the story...and their stories made for a difficult book to read. It makes it hard to dwell Dreams of Savannah had a good message in the book, and I enjoy watching characters grow throughout a book-especially as they come of age. The main characters need to grow in this book so that was nice to see. I also liked the morals portrayed in this book...the fact that we are all people that have a story, all equal in wanting freedom to pursue love and dreams. The leering and untrustworthy men that are in the story...and their stories made for a difficult book to read. It makes it hard to dwell on the book once it is finished. Will the meaning of the message of the book and what the main characters learned throughout the book outweigh the constant difficult subject of untrustworthy, unfaithful men harassing women? I’m honestly not sure. I do know that occurred, but it felt as if that outweighed the love in the story. I’m hoping as I process this book that the good will outweigh the bad...and that perhaps I can put it on my forever shelves to reread or loan. I did like the way the difficulties were fleshed out as to Confederate verses Union. Not everyone fought for the same purpose. That was a portrait that was well painted in this book. I enjoyed the secondary characters, and I found their stories just as interesting. The plot was well done, and the story very well written and researched. The faith theme is very strong in this book, and it is probably what I liked most about the book-scriptures quoted, scriptures that affected the characters actions and heart, and scripture that had an effectual change. The Civil War is something I’ve always seen both sides. My parents are Yankees, and from a place with very strong Union ties. I grew up in a place that has Southern ties and sympathies. The author handled the difficulties of the Civil War very well...I’m still thinking through somethings in the story. Though the back states it’s a “glowing love story” ...it is really much more than that...and much that has nothing to do with love at all. It gives the reader much to ponder, but a couple subjects are things that are difficult to ponder. It is not at all graphic, but it is definitely a book with adult themes. This author produces thought inspiring books. This one is no different. I received this book from the publisher. All opinions are my own.

  10. 4 out of 5

    Susan Mason

    An amazing story! Delia and Phin's love story runs a long course, fraught with danger amid the civil war in Savannah, Georgia. An amazing story! Delia and Phin's love story runs a long course, fraught with danger amid the civil war in Savannah, Georgia.

  11. 4 out of 5

    Hanne T

    tw // rape and sexual violence This was an interesting book! I have read many of Roseanna's books before (and have even met her in person once!) and loved them, so I was excited to read her new release. It was very different from her previous books, and while this one was also good, it wasn't my favorite. First of all, this book was set in the Civil War era, in the Confederate states. The main characters, Cordelia and Phineas, are members of two families who own slaves/plantations, who have li tw // rape and sexual violence This was an interesting book! I have read many of Roseanna's books before (and have even met her in person once!) and loved them, so I was excited to read her new release. It was very different from her previous books, and while this one was also good, it wasn't my favorite. First of all, this book was set in the Civil War era, in the Confederate states. The main characters, Cordelia and Phineas, are members of two families who own slaves/plantations, who have liked each other since before the book started, and get into an "understanding" fairly early on into the book. Since Phineas, or Phin as he likes to be known, is a Confederate soldier, most of this book details the time that they are apart, and the individual struggles and growth that they go through. With that premise, it makes sense that this book is very white focused: both Cordelia and Phineas have slaves (although they call them servants), and despite being more open to the fact that black people aren't merely animals, they still treat their servants as below them for the vast majority of the book, which is my main concern with this book. Despite the main characters being more sympathetic to the black people working for them, they still treat them in a "less than" fashion. With that, I did like the parts of the book narrated by the black people in the story, as well as their portrayals in general: as the story develops, the humanity of the black people comes to light. Although I understood why this story was told the way it was, I'm kind of wondering what a black reader would feel like reading this book. Moreover, this book felt quite "preachy" for a lot of it. There were a lot of "spontaneous" sermon-conversations, a la characters randomly breaking into song during a musical. There were some really /interesting/ conversations meant as "the message" that was intended to be conveyed, such as one at the beginning where Phineas asked a tall black man, essentially, "if you weren't made to work in the fields, why do you look like that?" Again, as the story progresses, both the main characters (as well as some of the white side characters) begin to learn the value and importance of black people, which somehow wasn't really made clear in the beginning? As someone who is not black, I can't say whether or not that is a fair portrayal, and I understand why the story was told how it was, but at the very least, it bears mentioning. Not only that, there was a LOT of just . . . violence. Nothing actually portrayed, but there was a lot of suggestions towards sexual violence, especially towards slaves. There was one particularly sleazy character, who was very interested in (marrying) Cordelia. While Cordelia understood that he did not have good intentions, she didn't really try to do anything about it, other than pawning her sister off on him (since she already had a love interest)??? SO that was something that bothered me, although it was only mentioned once. Someone important to the story had also taken advantage of a black slave woman, and the resulting child was also not treated well by the man. There was also several scenes where aforementioned sleazy character pulled a girl into a secluded room and attempted to kiss her (and it is suggested that he would go farther than kissing, although it never happened). There was just a LOT of implied sexual violence that was not only unnecessary, but also A Lot to read. As for the characters, I was honestly not a fan of the main (white) characters. The protagonist, Cordelia, was simply unlikeable, not in any particular way, but I never really connected with her. She had a very vivid imagination, and wrote a ton of stories, but that was pretty much her only character trait. Her parents were also selfish and generally terrible people (both to her, as well as to their slaves), and she really did not question it until the very end of the book. Phineas was a slightly more likeable character: his growth development was incredible, and more noticeable starting midway through the book. He did start out the book being very much a "woo confederacy" type, being excited to go into the Confederate army and kill the "Yankees that are ruining everything." His view on slavery was very much 'it's bad but there's nothing I can do about it' and he used the excuse that Georgia didn't allow people to free their slaves as the reason why he kept them so that was . . . Not Great. He was more likable than Cordelia, and I connected more with him in general, but he's nowhere near my favorite fictional male characters.  The black side characters--Selina, Luther, River, and all the servants--really made the story much more enjoyable. Their characters were somehow more fleshed out than Cordelia and Phineas, and their motivations, personalities, and beliefs, were significantly more enumerated, and thus, relatable. I found myself more invested in them than the main characters, and their story was just . . . better (than overcoming racism, which was what Cordelia and Phineas were going through). The spiritual content was very well done: there was a lot of mentions of God, and references to prayer, and just an overall spiritual focus throughout the book. Scripture was quoted several times, and in that regards, I do like it. Overall? This was a very deep and heavy story. It meant to cover both sides of the Civil War, and to tell the story of humanity on both sides. I think it did achieve that purpose, however, I think the way it did so was lacking. There was a lot of violence and unsavory characters and situations, and while it is mostly resolved in the end, it does not mitigate the generations of suffering of black people at the hands of white people, and this portrayal is more harm than good in my opinion. Quite honestly, as I was starting this book, I expected that I would not like it as much as the author's other works (which are among my favorite books), and I was right. My Rating- 3/10 I voluntarily reviewed a complimentary copy of this book which I received from the author. All views expressed are only my honest opinion; I was not required to write a positive review. This review first appeared on: https://losingthebusyness.wordpress.c...

  12. 5 out of 5

    Erin Laramore

    Roseanna M. White is one of my go-to authors for historical fiction. She always writes lovely relatable main characters, dastardly villains, and a beautifully flowing story-line that draws you in and makes you want more. This book was no different. While her most recent novels took place in England during WWI, this one actually takes place in the Southern States during the Civil War. Seeing a Christian novel written from the perspective of slave owners was enlightening. I appreciated that in the Roseanna M. White is one of my go-to authors for historical fiction. She always writes lovely relatable main characters, dastardly villains, and a beautifully flowing story-line that draws you in and makes you want more. This book was no different. While her most recent novels took place in England during WWI, this one actually takes place in the Southern States during the Civil War. Seeing a Christian novel written from the perspective of slave owners was enlightening. I appreciated that in the author's note, she indicated getting critique and perspective from Christian author Toni Shiloh, who has been a strong voice in recent years for POC in Christian fiction. While I felt that the novel depicted history well, it does still speak to the reality of slavery in our nation's history, which felt a little bold. But it's a story that needs to be told. This book follows Coredelia Owens, a member of Savannah's society and story-teller extraordinnaire. I loved seeing an "author" perspective within the book. While in that timeframe, Delia would not likely have ever been able to be published because she was a woman, I loved that she wrote and told stories for the love of the story and not for personal acclaim. I appreciated how she grew personally in her talent and sought to tell stories that were uplifting and honoring and not JUST entertaining (after all, that's one of the big reasons I read Christian fiction!). Our hero was Phineas Dunn, who went to fight in the Confederate navy where an incident had him convalescing south of the border while everyone thought he was missing and/or dead. While there were several plot lines that kept the book moving, this was more of a character driven novel as the main characters learned to see those enslaved in a different light. In addition to strong character development, this book had a solid faith thread. Phin found himself convalescing in the home of a minister and he retained the scriptures that were read over him while he was unconscious. Delia learned to rely more heavily on God as she prayed for Phin's safety and well-being. They both grew spiritually throughout the book as well as personally. I would definitely recommend this one to fans of inspirational historical fiction. Special thanks to the publisher and NetGalley for an advanced e-copy of this book. I was under no obligation to provide a review and the thoughts contained herein are my own.

  13. 4 out of 5

    Joleen

    “There’s only one man’s blood in all of history that can make us better than we are—and you are not Him.” I don’t believe, of all the books I’ve read by Roseanna M. White, that I haven’t enjoyed even one. Somewhat strange way of saying I really like this author. Switching from her novels set in England to Civil War in Savannah, GA, Ms. White hit this one out of the park. History, romance, conflict, and growth in the main characters were central, and sooooo well done. I felt Cordelia (Delia) Owens “There’s only one man’s blood in all of history that can make us better than we are—and you are not Him.” I don’t believe, of all the books I’ve read by Roseanna M. White, that I haven’t enjoyed even one. Somewhat strange way of saying I really like this author. Switching from her novels set in England to Civil War in Savannah, GA, Ms. White hit this one out of the park. History, romance, conflict, and growth in the main characters were central, and sooooo well done. I felt Cordelia (Delia) Owens was quite unique; making up stories to entertain and brighten the lives of all around her, even in the midst of a terrible war and loss. What a fun young lady. And her love for Phineas (Phin) Dunn? Oh my! And his love for her? Yes...oh my! They were separated by war and tragedy, yet even when he came home, family obligations and expectations meant they rarely saw each other, but their love only grew. Delia's parents wanted her to marry well, but the cousin they chose for her? Well, the only "Oh my" involved here would have included head-shaking and cringing. The story was delightful. Luther Bromley, a free-born, well educated, black man from England was my favorite character. What a wonderful addition to this story. Then there’s Salina and River with their separate struggles... also an amazing part of the storyline. Sometimes the faith content was somewhat generic (God instead of Christ), but other times it was so poignant, heartfelt and true to the Word of God that I wanted to just bask in the moments and enjoy their conversations. Good book I did not want to put down.

  14. 4 out of 5

    Rachel

    Dreams of Savannah by Roseanna M. White is an excellent historical fiction novel that has it all: history, action, suspense, romance, obstacles, beautiful landscapes, and faith. I loved the beautiful images and descriptions of the trees, gardens, landscapes, buildings, plantations, and homes that made up the richly historic Savannah, Georgia in 1861. The author was impressive in her ability to place the reader within that time and into that location. I love that Ms. White places us within the li Dreams of Savannah by Roseanna M. White is an excellent historical fiction novel that has it all: history, action, suspense, romance, obstacles, beautiful landscapes, and faith. I loved the beautiful images and descriptions of the trees, gardens, landscapes, buildings, plantations, and homes that made up the richly historic Savannah, Georgia in 1861. The author was impressive in her ability to place the reader within that time and into that location. I love that Ms. White places us within the lives, minds, and thought processes of the people that make up the Confederate. One does not have to agree with the mentality of those one reads about to appreciate experiencing their way of thinking. Many were brought up within this society and through multiple generations, accepted this way of life. In no means am I condoling this acceptance of ideals and customs, and neither is the author, but in placing oneself into the thoughts of another, one can see how it is not black and white for anyone. There were decent, hardworking people caught up within the South that were lumped together with those that were wrong. There were families that were afraid, that had inner battles of their own of what was right and was wrong, that were also caught up in circumstances not of their choosing. While I will be supporter of the Union without a doubt, it was interesting to read about characters from the Confederate and how they felt what they felt to justify and rationalize their beliefs. I really like Cordelia (Delia) and Phineas (Phin). They were wonderfully depicted and complex characters that were flawed, imperfect, and realistic. They were down to earth, like able and had a moral compass that helped guide them toward one another, growth, and towards the right paths as the book progresses. Their passion, love, and faith was evident throughout the story. My personal favorite characters were Salina and River. They were strong, positive people that were able to find one another and help others during this horrific time of oppression and of limited opportunities in the South. They were able to use their education to help others and find happiness for themselves. I would love to read a book that followed them from this book onward. That would be truly enjoyable. 5/5 stars Thank you NetGalley and Bethany House Publishing for this arc and in return I am submitting my unbiased and voluntary review and opinion. I am posting this review to my GR, Instagram, and Bookbub accounts immediately and will post it to my Amazon, Instagram, and B&N accounts upon publication on 1/5/21.

  15. 4 out of 5

    Connie Saunders

    Roseanna White is known for writing excellent historical fiction and Dreams of Savannah is no exception! A Georgia plantation is the setting for this book that covers the early years of the Civil War and I won't soon forget the fascinating characters and their moving story. Cordelia Owens dreams of a life that she and Phineas Dunn can share once he returns from the war. She is both a romantic and optimist and I love that, even though she has always lived with slaves, she truly believes that no o Roseanna White is known for writing excellent historical fiction and Dreams of Savannah is no exception! A Georgia plantation is the setting for this book that covers the early years of the Civil War and I won't soon forget the fascinating characters and their moving story. Cordelia Owens dreams of a life that she and Phineas Dunn can share once he returns from the war. She is both a romantic and optimist and I love that, even though she has always lived with slaves, she truly believes that no one should be judged by their skin color. A startling revelation changes her life, deepens her convictions, and increases her desire to change the world through the stories that she loves to write. I so admire the hope and strength that sustains her as she waits for Phin but his return isn't what she thought it would be. He has changed physically and emotionally, and he questions the cause that he has been fighting for. Has this war forever crushed Delia's dreams? There are many other wonderful characters in this story and White vividly relates the heartaches and struggles of Salina, River, Luther, and Eva. She says that this standalone novel won't turn into a series but I would love to know how their lives change over the years! To say that I loved this book is an understatement! It has sweet romance, an inspiring faith message, and a poignant reminder that the issue of racism that plagued our nation in 1861 is just as relevant today. Oppression still exists and we must continue to fight it in any form! I highly recommend Dreams of Savannah to all who enjoy Christian romance and historical fiction. I received a copy of this book from the publisher. I was under no obligation to write a favorable review and I am voluntarily sharing my own thoughts.

  16. 5 out of 5

    Raechel Lenore

    4.5 stars This novel isn't quite the usual fair of what we've come to expect from author Roseanna M White - instead of set in England, "Dreams of Savannah" is set in the United States, during the tumultuous time that was the Civil War. I was curious to see how this new setting would read, and I was pleasantly drawn right in, just like every other White book I've had the pleasure of reading! The author's writing style really is captivating, and it was easy for me to get lost in the story.The hist 4.5 stars This novel isn't quite the usual fair of what we've come to expect from author Roseanna M White - instead of set in England, "Dreams of Savannah" is set in the United States, during the tumultuous time that was the Civil War. I was curious to see how this new setting would read, and I was pleasantly drawn right in, just like every other White book I've had the pleasure of reading! The author's writing style really is captivating, and it was easy for me to get lost in the story.The historical details were really well done, and I felt that the whole novel, from slavery, to the many other aspects of the war, were written with care and attention. I loved how Cordelia could spin a story from everything, and when she started realizing that every single person had a story of their own, her character shined even more. Phin was a dashing hero, and I loved how their relationship endured.Luther was one of the best characters for certain, and I was touched by how hard he followed after the Lord, and shared His care with others.All of the characters were given such care and details that their stories truly came to life. I thoroughly enjoyed Dreams of Savannah, and will definitely always read whatever this author writes! 

  17. 4 out of 5

    Adrienne

    To preface my review, I'll admit that I was born and raised in New York and have spent less than three weeks of my entire life south of the Mason-Dixon line and in anything related to the Civil War have a strong Northern bias. I've also been making concerted efforts in the past year to become more aware of and involved in issues of social justice, so I'm probably extra sensitive currently to anything race-related. I'm also a character-driven reader, so if you don't give me characters I can love, To preface my review, I'll admit that I was born and raised in New York and have spent less than three weeks of my entire life south of the Mason-Dixon line and in anything related to the Civil War have a strong Northern bias. I've also been making concerted efforts in the past year to become more aware of and involved in issues of social justice, so I'm probably extra sensitive currently to anything race-related. I'm also a character-driven reader, so if you don't give me characters I can love, I'm probably not going to like your book. So, with that background, I might not be the author's ideal audience for a book where the main characters are slave owners during the Civil War, but having quite enjoyed all of Roseanna M. White's previous books, I was eagerly awaiting the chance to read Dreams of Savannah. Unfortunately, I didn't like it at all. Not only did I not love ANY of the characters, but I struggled to even find someone I LIKED. At the outset of the book, when I didn't really like either Cordelia or Phin, I hoped that they'd enough growth throughout the book that I'd come to like them. They DID grow somewhat (not enough, in my opinion), but it also came really slowly (particularly for Cordelia). While the slow growth and awareness of enslaved people actually BEING human beings. with hopes and dreams and talents beyond forced servitude might be realistic, it was torturous to read. There honestly were times that I felt sick to my stomach as Phin expressed thoughts such as slavery nothing being "a situation his family particularly liked but there was nothing they could do about it" or Cordelia's treatment of Salina (whom she's supposed to care for so much--but whose true well-being she doesn't really consider very often) and things such as (even at the end of the book, when she has supposedly had some growth), asking Luther, a black minister, who has just been reunited with his wife, who had been illegally kidnapped and enslaved, to pray for her father--the same father who forced Salina's mother to be his mistress and is adamantly pro-slavery. Cordelia's first thought, even at the end of the book, is always for HERSELF and her family, not for the people who have been enslaved and oppressed. And Phin, even though he has experienced some growth as well, at the end of the book still remains more concerned about his sense of honor and defends his cause by telling Luther not to "make the mistake of thinking the Yankees are any fairer toward your people than Southerners are. They might oppose slavery, but they don't consider you equals." Um, I will readily admit that Northerners had a LONG way to go toward treating blacks equally, but to equate Northern treatment with Southern slavery is wrong, and if your way of life includes enslaving others, you need to change it--and it's really difficult to like characters who can't see that. Secondary characters weren't any better; Cordelia's parents and sister Lacy were awful. Even Salina, who serves as Cordelia's "maid" seems to exist just to support Cordelia--she cares more about Cordelia staying "innocent" and not realizing that they share a father and helping her than about her own well-being. (It was a little easier to read Salina's POV, considering she'd been oppressed her whole life, than Cordelia's ignorance, which came from her being a spoiled little princess, but it was still hard to her sacrificing herself instead of fighting for herself). So, I reiterate that I didn't like this book at all. Maybe the author's intent was to share a message that she wrote in the author's note at the end: "There were heroes--and villains--on both sides of the conflict. Most of all, there were people. People, as Cordelia discovered, with stories to tell." However, given that many of the people involved in the conflict--and even their descendants today--weren't allowed to share their stories, I found it to be insensitive to racial and social issues in our day. A story about a couple of Southern white people who sorta-kinda start to see that slavery might be wrong isn't the sort of book that I think the world needs now or that I can recommend to anyone. I read an ARC provided by the publisher via #NetGalley. All opinions are my own.

  18. 4 out of 5

    Nicole

    Masterfully Written & Exquisite After reading White's Codebreaker Series (and loving it), it was so fun getting to dive into another era on another continent with her. Her rich writing style and thought-provoking themes make her stories all the more enjoyable, and I especially appreciated her take on this tumultuous and divided war. The level of insight and understanding she brings, that looks beneath the surface of both sides, is extremely rare. I absolutely loved Delia, and the way she turns eve Masterfully Written & Exquisite After reading White's Codebreaker Series (and loving it), it was so fun getting to dive into another era on another continent with her. Her rich writing style and thought-provoking themes make her stories all the more enjoyable, and I especially appreciated her take on this tumultuous and divided war. The level of insight and understanding she brings, that looks beneath the surface of both sides, is extremely rare. I absolutely loved Delia, and the way she turns every moment into the next paragraph of a story unfolding around her. Mrs. Dunn said it well when she observed that Delia's wonder was a pastime that kept her from worry. It was so much fun reading a scene and so easily slipping into the descriptions of a hero or villain with her. And speaking of! Her hero had me rooting for him the moment he stepped onto the page in that first chapter. And as for the villain . . . well he just needed a good, strong-armed slap. I enjoyed "putting heads together" with Delia to come up with some good descriptions for him! It always makes a story that much better when you can love hating the villain. Salina was such a wonderful, endearing character; and the special moments she has with her hero are simply adorable! Altogether a delightful read. I continue to enjoy every page that this author delivers, and look forward to more to come (and soon!). [I received a complimentary copy of this book from the publisher. I was not required to write a positive review. All opinions expressed are mine alone.]

  19. 4 out of 5

    Melanie

    Dreams of Savannah was a story that I absolutely loved. I've been a fan of Roseanne M. White's novels ever since the Culper Ring series and it seems like every new story is another favorite...but this one takes the cake. It was just SO amazing! The characters were fantastic. Cordelia was probably my favorite - as her love of stories was endearing and I also loved her strength. Phineas was a wonderful hero and the romance between him and Cordelia was the best. All in all, Dreams of Savannah is goin Dreams of Savannah was a story that I absolutely loved. I've been a fan of Roseanne M. White's novels ever since the Culper Ring series and it seems like every new story is another favorite...but this one takes the cake. It was just SO amazing! The characters were fantastic. Cordelia was probably my favorite - as her love of stories was endearing and I also loved her strength. Phineas was a wonderful hero and the romance between him and Cordelia was the best. All in all, Dreams of Savannah is going on my "favorites" shelf and I highly recommend it. Well worth the read and I can see myself rereading it very soon. :) *Disclosure of Material Connection: I received one or more of the products or services mentioned above for free in the hope that I would mention/review it on my blog. I was not required to give a positive review, only my honest opinion - which I've done. All thoughts and opinions expressed are my own and I only recommend products or services I use personally and believe will be good for my readers. I am disclosing this in accordance with the Federal Trade Commission's 16 CFR, Part 255: "Guides Concerning the Use of Endorsements and Testimonials in Advertising.*

  20. 5 out of 5

    Ashley Johnson

    This was a different sort of novel after coming off of the codebreakers series. I think this story was very authentic to history, even though at times that made it hard to read. The storyline was pretty intense and serious. I think it would be hard to read this book and not be sympathetic for so many of the characters and their difficult situations, which unfortunately are historically accurate. I don’t think I was expecting how heavy this book felt. The different points of view in this book we n This was a different sort of novel after coming off of the codebreakers series. I think this story was very authentic to history, even though at times that made it hard to read. The storyline was pretty intense and serious. I think it would be hard to read this book and not be sympathetic for so many of the characters and their difficult situations, which unfortunately are historically accurate. I don’t think I was expecting how heavy this book felt. The different points of view in this book we not my favorite, but they do allow the reader to experience the thoughts and feelings from several perspectives which offered a lot of depth to this story. I did not like either of the main characters. I wanted to really love one of them and have someone to root for, however they were just too hard to like. Delia was immature and oblivious to the hardships of life and I just could not handle her imaginative daydreams. I wanted Phin to really stand for what was right after his near death experience and I felt that he changed somewhat, but never really fully grasped the gravity of what real change meant. My favorite character was Luther. Luther and Phin’s unlikely friendship was the heart of this story for me. I think readers who like a more serious and emotional story will really be impacted by this novel.

  21. 5 out of 5

    Tara Savanna

    I’ve read books by this author before and enjoyed them, so I knew I would probably like this one, and what a lovely read! Everything is beautifully described and it’s easy to picture what the people and places look like. One of the things I really enjoyed in this book was how Cordelia would start imagining how people might look if they were a fictional character in one of her stories. I found it very amusing how detailed she got sometimes, often losing track of what was going on around her, much I’ve read books by this author before and enjoyed them, so I knew I would probably like this one, and what a lovely read! Everything is beautifully described and it’s easy to picture what the people and places look like. One of the things I really enjoyed in this book was how Cordelia would start imagining how people might look if they were a fictional character in one of her stories. I found it very amusing how detailed she got sometimes, often losing track of what was going on around her, much to the chagrin of her mother! And I also want to throw out how much I appreciated Cordelia honoring her parents as she should. Even when they were wrong, she still obeyed them and honored their authority over her, which I found refreshing as most heroines these days are depicted as rebellious and do whatever they feel is right, especially if others are wrong. This book’s spiritual standpoint is spot on for me. It was filled with scriptures and prayers that melded seamlessly into the storyline, not forced, overly flowery, or unnatural. They didn’t drag on or feel out of place—it was a beautiful addition to this story, especially seeing the spiritual growth of the characters in the process. I think my favorite aspect about this book is how it tells more of the full story of the Civil War, that it wasn’t just about, or even started because of, slavery. This book clearly describes the terribleness of slavery, as it should, but also tells the viewpoint of southerners who were fighting for rights that had nothing to do with slavery. I also learned quite a few things that I did not previously know, something I LOVE in a historical fiction novel! As far as content, I would consider this a clean book (but not squeaky). There is some kissing and some things discussed, but not in detail: Sailors discussing free-time on land and “enjoying and evening” with the local women where they make port, but it’s never known if they mean “intimately” or just being in their company—Phin is shown to be of good, gentlemanly character here and refuses to participate or even discuss it. There is talk of “Masters” having relations with some of their female slaves. (which is a huge part of one of the character’s storylines) and talk of slaves “breeding”. One slave character is almost raped, but is able to get away before anything terrible happens, though she is violently grabbed and pushed around before she gets away. There is no foul language used, but a character does say, “Where the devil” and Cordelia’s mother uses a “choice phrase” about the Yankees (because of the lack of store goods) that we later find out was the d-word (though it is never used fully) Cordelia later says “Blasted Yankees.” in her head, nearly says the d-word version, then goes on to mention that she can’t even think the word. All in all, I really enjoyed this book and had a hard time putting it down! I loved how the author stayed true to the time period while painting a vivid picture, but not too vivid, of the atrocities that occurred. If you love clean reads, Historical Fiction, and this time period in particular, you will enjoy this book! * I received an advanced copy of this book from the publishers, through Netgalley, in return for an honest review. I was not obligated to leave a positive review. Thoughts and opinions expressed are mine alone.

  22. 4 out of 5

    Nicole

    This was a book very rich in historical detail and it is one of those that I felt like I learned from. I really appreciated the way the author explored the motivation and growth of the characters. I will say that the two main characters really never spoke to me. I felt like I came into the story halfway and I would have loved to see how their relationship came to be. They were separated for so much of the book and I craved the interaction and romance I hoped for. However, I adored Luther! Seriousl This was a book very rich in historical detail and it is one of those that I felt like I learned from. I really appreciated the way the author explored the motivation and growth of the characters. I will say that the two main characters really never spoke to me. I felt like I came into the story halfway and I would have loved to see how their relationship came to be. They were separated for so much of the book and I craved the interaction and romance I hoped for. However, I adored Luther! Seriously I would have loved to have a book just about him and his devotion to his love! Likewise with Selina, I found myself more invested in the side characters then the main ones. This book may appeal more to those who want more historical drama than romance. Well written and it did feel like I saw the other in a new light. I recieved a complementary copy of this book from the publisher through Netgally. All opinions and thoughts are my own and completely honest.

  23. 4 out of 5

    Abigail Harris

    Civil War fiction is something that I love but rarely find novels that I agree with and since I don't go into politics (or anything of the like) on my reviews I'm not going further into that... Anyway, I liked this! Except for the fact that once again an author brought in something that I think is way too used and made to be way too light of a subject. So, yes, I like this book but no, I don't really recommend it for younger readers due to the content. 18+ For an interesting story, likable characters Civil War fiction is something that I love but rarely find novels that I agree with and since I don't go into politics (or anything of the like) on my reviews I'm not going further into that... Anyway, I liked this! Except for the fact that once again an author brought in something that I think is way too used and made to be way too light of a subject. So, yes, I like this book but no, I don't really recommend it for younger readers due to the content. 18+ For an interesting story, likable characters, and an incredible cover I give 4 stars, it would have been 5 but I don't agree with how somethings were handled and the abuse that was attempted. I voluntarily received and reviewed a complimentary e/copy of this book which I received from the author/publisher. All views expressed are only my honest opinion.

  24. 5 out of 5

    Sherry Deatrick

    I have absolutely loved every Roseanna White book I've read, and I've read most of them. She has a gift for pulling you into the story, her details of the past are impeccably researched. I have learned so much history by reading her books. And her characters are so well written. I've loved them all. So I wish I could say I loved this book. But for me, it was a book that I could lay down at anytime. I never felt an attachment to the story or the characters.. The story seemed to move slowly and I I have absolutely loved every Roseanna White book I've read, and I've read most of them. She has a gift for pulling you into the story, her details of the past are impeccably researched. I have learned so much history by reading her books. And her characters are so well written. I've loved them all. So I wish I could say I loved this book. But for me, it was a book that I could lay down at anytime. I never felt an attachment to the story or the characters.. The story seemed to move slowly and I just could not get invested in it. I hope it is just me at the place and time I'm in right now. Thank you to NetGalley and the publisher for allowing me to read this book. The opinions are entirely my own.

  25. 5 out of 5

    Hannah

    History, Romance, and Conviction—The Best Kind of Story As a lover of all of Roseanna White’s stories set in England and primarily a reader of British history, I was slightly hesitant to begin a book set in the US during the Civil War, but I trust this author wholeheartedly, so onward I plunged. I am in and from the South, but I have never been one to love to read romanticized or revealing tales of its history, preferring instead to escape to lesser known lands in my literary pursuits; however, History, Romance, and Conviction—The Best Kind of Story As a lover of all of Roseanna White’s stories set in England and primarily a reader of British history, I was slightly hesitant to begin a book set in the US during the Civil War, but I trust this author wholeheartedly, so onward I plunged. I am in and from the South, but I have never been one to love to read romanticized or revealing tales of its history, preferring instead to escape to lesser known lands in my literary pursuits; however, like many white southerners in 2020, I have been challenged to evaluate my role in the fight against racial injustice and reflect on my own privileges and biases, and the issues this novel raises have been on my mind and reading list for months. I read fiction for the sheer joy of reading and the escape stories bring, but in Dreams of Savannah, I found the romance, intrigue, and elements of faith I have loved in all of White’s novels laced with the conviction and sometimes painful honesty that has been a necessary undercurrent to this uncertain year. This is a wonderful, timely novel that is full of well-paced action, witty, soulful dialogue, and delightfully authentic characters. I loved the relationships between Delia and Salina and Phin and Luther, and I appreciated the tension of pre-war ideals held against the new realities the characters faced. If you’re a White fan, this will not disappoint and will be another facet through which we get to to see this author shine; if this is your first experience with her work, I am a little envious but so excited for you as you’re just seeing the tip of the iceberg of the depth of character and conviction she brings to each of her stories. As I close this novel (or exit the Kindle app on my phone, as it were), I am feeling the bittersweet end of a really great book—one that captured my imagination but also my heart—and I can’t wait for the next work from this wonderfully talented author.

  26. 4 out of 5

    Maureen Timerman

    Once you turn the cover you will be quickly drawn in, and warning, this story just keeps getting better and better! The time is the beginnings of the Civil War, and we are in the deep South. We are mainly with the Dunn and Owens families, and their in love offspring, Phin and Cordelia, and life that tries to tear them apart! Warning, you are about to begin a journey that spans Continents, near death, loss and found, and you will be quickly page turning for answers, and hoping for their survival! I Once you turn the cover you will be quickly drawn in, and warning, this story just keeps getting better and better! The time is the beginnings of the Civil War, and we are in the deep South. We are mainly with the Dunn and Owens families, and their in love offspring, Phin and Cordelia, and life that tries to tear them apart! Warning, you are about to begin a journey that spans Continents, near death, loss and found, and you will be quickly page turning for answers, and hoping for their survival! I received this book through Net Galley and the Publisher Bethany House, and was not required to give a positive review.

  27. 4 out of 5

    Kathryn Bochman

    Roseanna White is an author I normally associate with exceptional novels based in England. However, she deviates from her usual activity in her latest, Dreams of Savannah, a story set in the early days of the Civil War. Here, tension mounts as races, ideals, and dreams collide when circumstances challenge deeply held beliefs. I adored the interplay between characters, but it was only deepened by the racial issues White cleverly brought into play. Yes, there was a wonderful element of romance wit Roseanna White is an author I normally associate with exceptional novels based in England. However, she deviates from her usual activity in her latest, Dreams of Savannah, a story set in the early days of the Civil War. Here, tension mounts as races, ideals, and dreams collide when circumstances challenge deeply held beliefs. I adored the interplay between characters, but it was only deepened by the racial issues White cleverly brought into play. Yes, there was a wonderful element of romance within the pages but the story was so much more than that. Rich in history, rich in meaning, and rich in truth, this story will mesmerize any reader. Fans of White will not want to miss this newest release! I received this book from the author. All opinions are my own.

  28. 5 out of 5

    Melissa

    What's better in a book than a character that loves and creates stories? This book is so unique. I've never read a story that used the creation of a story in it's plot in this way...and I really enjoyed it! I really liked the Civil War time period and reading about it from the perspective of people that live in the South was interesting. I also enjoyed that the characters are flawed people, who've made mistakes, but want to do better. Cordelia, the story creating southern belle, has a best frien What's better in a book than a character that loves and creates stories? This book is so unique. I've never read a story that used the creation of a story in it's plot in this way...and I really enjoyed it! I really liked the Civil War time period and reading about it from the perspective of people that live in the South was interesting. I also enjoyed that the characters are flawed people, who've made mistakes, but want to do better. Cordelia, the story creating southern belle, has a best friend who is also her servant. When her eyes are opened and she begins to see that each of these people who take care of her household have a story of their own, she thinks thoughts she never thought she'd think. When Delia's sweetheart, Phin, who is in the Confederate Army, gets injured by a friend gone rogue, she fears the worst, but hopes for the best. Their love story is so incredibly sweet. I loved how they each went on a journey separately, at the same time. Phin's was not only physical, but mental and emotional. Their stories tie together so very well. This book deals with a topic that is incredibly difficult to read and imagine, but Ms. White does a fantastic job of being real and delicate at the same time! I received a complimentary copy of this book through NetGalley. All opinions expressed are my own.

  29. 5 out of 5

    Nancy

    Savannah is a beautiful city. So I was happy to see a story written there by a favorite author. It is a change from her England set novels. Delia and Finn both have much to learn and grow as we begin to learn their story at the beginning of the Civil War. Finn is heading out on a ship for the Confederacy. Delia and he do not have a formal agreement between them, so other suitors are welcomed by her parents. This story is written so well. This time is history is so hard. The way topics were handl Savannah is a beautiful city. So I was happy to see a story written there by a favorite author. It is a change from her England set novels. Delia and Finn both have much to learn and grow as we begin to learn their story at the beginning of the Civil War. Finn is heading out on a ship for the Confederacy. Delia and he do not have a formal agreement between them, so other suitors are welcomed by her parents. This story is written so well. This time is history is so hard. The way topics were handled and presented were in very good taste. The beauty of Savannah shines through. I received a copy of this book from the publisher. All views stated are my own.

  30. 4 out of 5

    Becky

    Roseanna M White includes everything in her books--underdogs, bad guys in sheep's clothing, conflict, the girl who knows her own mind, dreams, fairy tales, historical components, and sometimes the kitchen sink. That is what makes her books so compelling and intriguing. The Underdog--Phineas "Phin" Dunn The Bad Guy--Julius James The Conflict--the War Between the States, or the uncivil Civil War The Girl--Cordelia Owens The Dream--for Phin it's to marry Cordelia, and for Cordelia it's to marry Phin; Roseanna M White includes everything in her books--underdogs, bad guys in sheep's clothing, conflict, the girl who knows her own mind, dreams, fairy tales, historical components, and sometimes the kitchen sink. That is what makes her books so compelling and intriguing. The Underdog--Phineas "Phin" Dunn The Bad Guy--Julius James The Conflict--the War Between the States, or the uncivil Civil War The Girl--Cordelia Owens The Dream--for Phin it's to marry Cordelia, and for Cordelia it's to marry Phin; but there are other dreams involved with other characters: Luther, Eva, Salina, River, and Rock The Fairy Tale--Rescuing the damsel in distress The Historical Components--Savannah during the Civil War is accurately portrayed with research into the times and area being spot on. Cordelia's father wants a match for her who will enrich the family coffers, and Phin is not that man in his eyes. When her mother's cousin, Julius, comes to town, he seems to fit the bill. But, Cordelia sees beyond the smooth exterior to his truly dark nature. She tries her hardest to tell her father what Julius is truly like, but until he sees it for himself, he won't believe anything bad about Julius. Roseanna is such a good writer, I love reading her books. This is a five star book with two thumbs up and your favorite superhero--Underdog! Bethany House Publishing and NetGalley.com provided the copy I read for this review. All opinions expressed are my own.

Add a review

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

Loading...
We use cookies to give you the best online experience. By using our website you agree to our use of cookies in accordance with our cookie policy.