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TSUSHIMA. Japan's long history of isolationism came to an end in 1853 under the threat of naval gunfire. Newly opened to the world, Japan found itself to be weak and subject to the whims of larger nations. What followed was decades of industrialization and modernization as Japan sought to catch up to advanced nations and control its own destiny. In 1905, when Japan's expan TSUSHIMA. Japan's long history of isolationism came to an end in 1853 under the threat of naval gunfire. Newly opened to the world, Japan found itself to be weak and subject to the whims of larger nations. What followed was decades of industrialization and modernization as Japan sought to catch up to advanced nations and control its own destiny. In 1905, when Japan's expansionist policies clashed with the Russian Empire's over Korea, Japan was poised to flex its muscle and stun the world using the same naval supremacy that opened its borders half a century earlier. JUTLAND. May 31, 1916. After waiting more than two years and with several missed opportunities, the British Royal Navy and the German Kaiserliche Marine are preparing to confront one another in the North Sea, off the Danish coast of Jutland. This will be the final great confrontation of World War I by sea and, probably, one of the greatest epic battles in the history of seafaring. Despite their heavy losses, which are greater than the Germans', the English reaffirm their naval supremacy over the seas of the world, and Germany, all too conscious of having escaped disaster, will opt to confine the majority of its ships to its ports. MIDWAY. War has been raging since September 1, 1939. It has spread like the black plague in the Middle Ages, contaminating every person and every land. A wretched epidemic that nothing seems to be able to counter. Even the United States of America is engulfed by the winds of war setting the world afire. Ill-prepared and with undermanned military forces, the world's leading industrial power is on the edge of a precipice when, in June 1942, in the middle of the Pacific, on the minuscule, isolated atoll of Midway, the most extraordinary carrier battle will unfold.


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TSUSHIMA. Japan's long history of isolationism came to an end in 1853 under the threat of naval gunfire. Newly opened to the world, Japan found itself to be weak and subject to the whims of larger nations. What followed was decades of industrialization and modernization as Japan sought to catch up to advanced nations and control its own destiny. In 1905, when Japan's expan TSUSHIMA. Japan's long history of isolationism came to an end in 1853 under the threat of naval gunfire. Newly opened to the world, Japan found itself to be weak and subject to the whims of larger nations. What followed was decades of industrialization and modernization as Japan sought to catch up to advanced nations and control its own destiny. In 1905, when Japan's expansionist policies clashed with the Russian Empire's over Korea, Japan was poised to flex its muscle and stun the world using the same naval supremacy that opened its borders half a century earlier. JUTLAND. May 31, 1916. After waiting more than two years and with several missed opportunities, the British Royal Navy and the German Kaiserliche Marine are preparing to confront one another in the North Sea, off the Danish coast of Jutland. This will be the final great confrontation of World War I by sea and, probably, one of the greatest epic battles in the history of seafaring. Despite their heavy losses, which are greater than the Germans', the English reaffirm their naval supremacy over the seas of the world, and Germany, all too conscious of having escaped disaster, will opt to confine the majority of its ships to its ports. MIDWAY. War has been raging since September 1, 1939. It has spread like the black plague in the Middle Ages, contaminating every person and every land. A wretched epidemic that nothing seems to be able to counter. Even the United States of America is engulfed by the winds of war setting the world afire. Ill-prepared and with undermanned military forces, the world's leading industrial power is on the edge of a precipice when, in June 1942, in the middle of the Pacific, on the minuscule, isolated atoll of Midway, the most extraordinary carrier battle will unfold.

28 review for Great Naval Battles of the Twentieth Century

  1. 5 out of 5

    Geoff

    Interesting look at three 20th century naval battles (from the Tsushima in the Russo-Japanese War, Jutland in WWI, and Midway from WWII). It focused much less on the tactics and strategy and much more on the experience of the naval officers and especially the crew in the long lead up to and during the battles; it captured the uncertainty, contingency, and doubt that escapes the high level historical view when we already know the outcome. Engaging realistic art and while I would have liked to hav Interesting look at three 20th century naval battles (from the Tsushima in the Russo-Japanese War, Jutland in WWI, and Midway from WWII). It focused much less on the tactics and strategy and much more on the experience of the naval officers and especially the crew in the long lead up to and during the battles; it captured the uncertainty, contingency, and doubt that escapes the high level historical view when we already know the outcome. Engaging realistic art and while I would have liked to have seen more discussion of what actually happened in each battle, it was a fun read, if for nothing else the to remind readers that war is fought by real, living, doubting, uncertain, imperfect figures. **Thanks to the artists, author, publisher, and NetGalley for providing a free copy in exchange for on honest review.

  2. 4 out of 5

    Joseph Spuckler

    Great Naval Battles of the Twentieth Century: Tsushima, Jutland, Midway by Jean-Yves Delitte and Giuseppe Baiguera is a graphic novel depicting three naval battles with deeper historical context. Delitte is an official "Painter of the Fleet" and a full member of France's independent Académie des Arts & Sciences de la Mer (Academy of Arts & Sciences of the Sea). He is an architect and designer by training. Baiguera has been teaching at the Scuola Internazionale du Comics (Academy of Visual Arts a Great Naval Battles of the Twentieth Century: Tsushima, Jutland, Midway by Jean-Yves Delitte and Giuseppe Baiguera is a graphic novel depicting three naval battles with deeper historical context. Delitte is an official "Painter of the Fleet" and a full member of France's independent Académie des Arts & Sciences de la Mer (Academy of Arts & Sciences of the Sea). He is an architect and designer by training. Baiguera has been teaching at the Scuola Internazionale du Comics (Academy of Visual Arts and New Media) in Brescia, Italy since 2009. In 2011, he published Ecoguard, a volume distributed in schools to build ecological awareness. When asked to review a book on great naval battles, I was a bit perplexed. As a Marine, maritime history is part of our history, but the mechanics of naval battle strategy is a bit beyond my learning. As someone who studies history, I was intrigued and familiar with the basics of the three battles in varying degrees. Discovering that this book was a graphic novel, I wondered if enough detail could be written and drawn to make it a useful text. What I found was unique. Although the naval battles provide the setting, there is also a deeper historical trend running through each battle story. Each story carries a subtle understory or understories. There is much more to Jutland than the two most powerful navies, at the time, facing off. On the surface, it was similar to two men in white dinner jackets getting into a fight, but neither one wanting to finish the fight because he might dirty his jacket. Unlike Tsushima, both navies returned to port reasonably well intact. What was an indecisive naval battle on the surface carried more profound consequences in the war and history. At least two critical points or ideas are placed in the story that shapes the battle's outcome. All three stories give more than a battle history. They put the battle in a historical context. The world was changing quickly when Russia and Japan fought the Battle of Tsushima. Woven into the story are internal and external political currents that will shape the future of the world. Battles and wars do not happen in a vacuum, and this collection is an excellent demonstration of the complexities outside the physical battle history. The stories have a personal view of the events often seen from the elite or officers' point of view, and the common man in the conscript or volunteer enlisted ranks. Great Naval Battles adds a human as well as a political face to the battles. The graphics in this book add to the writing and complete what the minimal text suggests. For fans of graphic novels, the artwork is very well done and accurate. Overall a very well done history in an easy-to-read and understand format. The complexities are subtle and require the reader's attention to get the most from the experience. Highly recommended.

  3. 5 out of 5

    S.Q. Eries

    In Summary It’s not so much Great Naval Battles as it is Politics and Prelude to Great Naval Battles. This graphic novel does deliver quite a bit of information with beautifully drawn and colored illustrations, but it’s less about tactical maneuvers and salvos and more about providing context for the ultimate outcomes of the clashes. Also despite the fact that Japan contends in two of these engagements, the narrative is very much lacking in terms of an Asian perspective on events. The Review This g In Summary It’s not so much Great Naval Battles as it is Politics and Prelude to Great Naval Battles. This graphic novel does deliver quite a bit of information with beautifully drawn and colored illustrations, but it’s less about tactical maneuvers and salvos and more about providing context for the ultimate outcomes of the clashes. Also despite the fact that Japan contends in two of these engagements, the narrative is very much lacking in terms of an Asian perspective on events. The Review This graphic novel, which was written by Delitte, a member of France’s Academy of Arts and Sciences of the Sea, contains three fictionalized accounts of the Battles of Tsushima, Jutland, and Midway, plus a section of “Battle Histories” at the end to provide context for each of the stories. Unfortunately, the title is misleading. I expected a story like Greyhound, where the majority of the narrative is focused on actual battle/engagement. Instead, “Tsushima” begins six months before the Battle of Tsushima, “Jutland” begins a year before the Battle of Jutland, and “Midway” begins with the immediate aftermath of Pearl Harbor. In terms of page allocation, only five pages of the forty-six page “Tsushima,” seventeen pages of the forty-six page “Jutland,” and ten pages of the fifty-page “Midway” present the battles for which these stories are named. Instead, the focus is the circumstances leading up to the naval battles as well as the lives of rank-and-file sailors and pilots, who, for the most part, have limited knowledge of what’s happening. While this does provide broader scope and gives readers characters to sympathize with, it also means the view of the actual fights are very narrow. While there are stunning illustrations of ships cruising and exchanging fire, there’s almost nothing about the overall flow of these three naval battles. It would be more accurate to title the book: Factors Leading up to the Great Naval Battles of the Twentieth Century. Content aside, this is a wonderfully illustrated book for a military history text, but it is a very slow read for a graphic novel. Delitte relies almost exclusively on character dialogue to relay information about what’s happening politically and strategically, so conversations end up dense and info dumpy. And even though the narrative constantly refers to different geographical locations, no maps are included, and incorporating maps into the illustrations definitely would’ve helped from a storytelling and educational perspective. Finally, this might be because the writer is French, but the book definitely has a Eurocentric bent to it, “Tsushima” especially. “Jutland” and “Midway” have primary characters representing both opposing nations, but in “Tsushima,” the main characters are the sailors on a Russian ship and military observers from Britain and France; there’s no Japanese perspective at all. Moreover, the entire lead up to the Battle of Tsushima seems like a bunch of excuses for why the Russians lost to the Japanese. Also, while the English and Germans toss a few slurs against each other in “Jutland,” an avalanche of Asian/Japanese slurs are used by Russians and Americans in “Tsushima” and “Midway,” but the Japanese don’t use any equivalent Western slurs against them. Not that I’m a fan of slurs, but if a writer is going to use insults for flavor or accuracy, those of both sides should be presented. For more manga and book reviews, drop by my blog Keeping It In Canon!

  4. 4 out of 5

    Sara

    ​This graphic novel presents three the major naval battles: the Battle of Tsushima, the Battle of Jutland, and the Battle of Midway. In the Battle of Tsushima, the Russian Baltic Fleet is ordered to reinforce the fleet at Port Arthur, but their way is blocked by the English control of the Suez Canal. By the time they make it around Africa, the Japanese have decimated the forces at Port Arthur. The Japanese navy deals another blow at the Straight of Tsushima as the Russian fleet tries to sneak th ​This graphic novel presents three the major naval battles: the Battle of Tsushima, the Battle of Jutland, and the Battle of Midway. In the Battle of Tsushima, the Russian Baltic Fleet is ordered to reinforce the fleet at Port Arthur, but their way is blocked by the English control of the Suez Canal. By the time they make it around Africa, the Japanese have decimated the forces at Port Arthur. The Japanese navy deals another blow at the Straight of Tsushima as the Russian fleet tries to sneak through on their way to Vladivostok. The Battle of Jutland was a showdown between the British Royal Navy and the German Kaiserliche Marine. This was one of the final battles of World War I, and helped the British reaffirm their supremacy over the seas, despite the heavy losses dealt to them here by the Germans. The Battle of Midway is one of the most famous battles in World War II. In this chapter, four pilots, friends since childhood, are separated from their post at Pearl Harbor and reassigned to different areas. One ends up at Midway, flying ancient planes in a vain attempt to stop the Japanese fleet. At a critical moment, the Americans break the Japanese code and find out that they plan to attack the base at Midway. The American forces lay a trap for the Japanese fleet, and turn the tide of the War in the Pacific. I really appreciated the addition of fictional characters that Delittle added to each of the chapters because it meant that there was someone in each chapter that I could care about. Having a very bad history education, I didn't know that certain characters were on doomed ships. Had I had more information, I probably would have understood that some of them were going to die based on the ship to which they were stationed. The strongest of all the chapters was the Battle of Midway. The story of the four friends was heart-wrenching and made the tragedies more impactful. The chapters on Tsushima and Jutland were not as interesting. There is a lot of build up to the battle, then a very quick depiction of the battle, and then a really short or nonexistence resolution post-battle. A narrative voice is inserted within the second story and isn’t present throughout - it is only used when convenient, rather than consistently lending information that could be critical to the reader. Some of the characters were presented with great bias. The Japanese were presented as unintelligent, and Eric/k, the boy from French Moselle who wants to be German, is treated rather unfairly throughout. Character use slurs for the Japanese in two of the chapters, which is probably for historical accuracy. There is some adult language and some sexual suggestiveness in all three chapters as well. The ships are drawn with great detail, but characters all look very similar and indistinguishable at times. The coloring is beautiful and vibrant. Sara's Rating: 6/10 Suitability level: Grades 10-12 This review was made possible with an advanced reader copy from the publisher through Edelweiss. This graphic novel will be on sale October 21, 2020.

  5. 5 out of 5

    Sarah Evans

    Although the details of the battles and the participating ships are interesting, this book fails as a graphic novel. The authors make an effort to tell the story of each battle from different perspectives. We follow lower level recruits and military leadership, though almost exclusively from one nation each time. Most of the panels are spent on these characters giving exposition, resulting in many wasted opportunities where images could have told parts of the story. Even the battle scenes are li Although the details of the battles and the participating ships are interesting, this book fails as a graphic novel. The authors make an effort to tell the story of each battle from different perspectives. We follow lower level recruits and military leadership, though almost exclusively from one nation each time. Most of the panels are spent on these characters giving exposition, resulting in many wasted opportunities where images could have told parts of the story. Even the battle scenes are limited and do not make full use of the medium. The art style in reminiscent of Prince Valiant and Flash Gordon, but falls flat with the lack of coherent storyline. Text pages at the end explain the battles’ historical context and impact, though a bias against the Japanese role in 2 of the battles is evident. In the graphic novel itself, this bias is even more obvious in the characters’ conversations about the opposition. While this could be viewed as an effort to be correct to period, the one-sided element of it, plus the added crudeness of the “everyday” characters, makes it unjustified.

  6. 4 out of 5

    Nicholas

    This book features the artwork and words of Jean-Yves Delitte and Giuseppe Baiguera, who have separately and together created a number of graphic historical novels featuring a number of famous naval battles. In this volume, they join forces to tell stories about three of the biggest and most noteworthy naval battles of the twentieth century: Battle of Tsushima in the Russo-Japanese War; Battle of Jutland in WWI and the Battle of Midway in WWII. Using the style of popular graphic novels, the artis This book features the artwork and words of Jean-Yves Delitte and Giuseppe Baiguera, who have separately and together created a number of graphic historical novels featuring a number of famous naval battles. In this volume, they join forces to tell stories about three of the biggest and most noteworthy naval battles of the twentieth century: Battle of Tsushima in the Russo-Japanese War; Battle of Jutland in WWI and the Battle of Midway in WWII. Using the style of popular graphic novels, the artists/authors bring the details of these pivotal naval battles by focusing on both the normal seaman as well as the commanders of the vessels involved. They also include enought background and historical details to help younger students to make use of this work for educational purposes. But this book is far from a dry overview of history. The drawing is bright and accurate, and the action moves pretty quickly. Recommended for ages 12 to adult.

  7. 4 out of 5

    Ron

    Three naval battles in one volume! Jen-Yves Delitte and Giuseppe Baiguera provides a nicely illustrated graphic novel that provides a look at the Battle of Tsushima where Japan defeated the Russian fleet, the Battle of Jutland where the Germans and British clashed in the biggest naval battle of World War I, and finally the Battle of Midway where the United States managed to defeat Japan. Each battle is told through the eyes of fictional participants. And each battle has a series of short article Three naval battles in one volume! Jen-Yves Delitte and Giuseppe Baiguera provides a nicely illustrated graphic novel that provides a look at the Battle of Tsushima where Japan defeated the Russian fleet, the Battle of Jutland where the Germans and British clashed in the biggest naval battle of World War I, and finally the Battle of Midway where the United States managed to defeat Japan. Each battle is told through the eyes of fictional participants. And each battle has a series of short articles setting the battles in context, explaining weapons used, and providing short entries on various leaders involved in the individual battles. If you are a fan of naval battles, this is a title to pick up and enjoy! Thanks Netgalley for the opportunity to read this volume!

  8. 5 out of 5

    Cynthia

    I actually learned some history about these 3 naval battles profiled, but I did have to read a couple of the segments a couple of times to get the players/characters straight/in proper perspective & I struggled with some of the artwork....it just seemed kind of 'jagged'? I appreciated the further explanations & additional information about the battles, accompanied by photos, at the end of the book. I wouldn't consider this an easy read, as I did have to kind of work at .....actually, quite a bit I actually learned some history about these 3 naval battles profiled, but I did have to read a couple of the segments a couple of times to get the players/characters straight/in proper perspective & I struggled with some of the artwork....it just seemed kind of 'jagged'? I appreciated the further explanations & additional information about the battles, accompanied by photos, at the end of the book. I wouldn't consider this an easy read, as I did have to kind of work at .....actually, quite a bit of it! This book would probably appeal mostly to naval history buffs.... I received an e-ARC of this book from publisher Dead Reckoning via NetGalley, in return for reading it & posting my own fair/honest review.

  9. 4 out of 5

    Reverenddave

    Not really sure why this book exists. There is no real through line connecting the three battles and trying to depict these different engagements prevents the authors from being able to properly explore any of them in sufficient depth. In some cases its difficult to understand what is happening in the battle or its significance without having preexisting knowledge of them. Similarly, the brevity makes it impossible to get invested in the characters in each tale.

  10. 5 out of 5

    Craig Pearson

    Thank you to Netgalley for the opportunity to read and review this graphic book. As a retired naval officer and historian this book did not offer me anything new or interseting about the subject. It would, however, give the casual historian hobbyist or young reader an introduction into further research. the graphics are nicely done and the conversations are appropriate for the time period.

  11. 4 out of 5

    Lourdes

    Thank you to NetGalley for the ARC in exchange for my honest review. This graphic novel presents three the major naval battles: the Battle of Tsushima, the Battle of Jutland, and the Battle of Midway. As I love history, knowing a bit of history by the artworks, fascinating. I would recommend this book. Thank you again NetGalley.

  12. 4 out of 5

    J.D. DeHart

    This book is an exemplary use of the graphic novel as nonfiction source. The images are detailed and informative and undergird the text. Another damn fine product from Dead Reckoning.

  13. 4 out of 5

    Andréa

    Note: I accessed a digital review copy of this book through Edelweiss.

  14. 5 out of 5

    Jim

    Good artwork, great stories. I would buy a hardcopy of this graphic novel. My favorite was Midway.

  15. 5 out of 5

    K Saju

    Thank you to NetGalley for the ARC in exchange for my honest review. From childhood I have been fascinated with war campaigns and their associated stories and war graphic novels has been where all my pocket money used to go. Great Naval Battles of the 20th Century started with a good one ,the Battle of Tsushima which marked the emergence of Japan as a super power but the next Jutland battle could have been better done. Midway battle was better but again the naval drama was lacking. Overall 4 stars Thank you to NetGalley for the ARC in exchange for my honest review. From childhood I have been fascinated with war campaigns and their associated stories and war graphic novels has been where all my pocket money used to go. Great Naval Battles of the 20th Century started with a good one ,the Battle of Tsushima which marked the emergence of Japan as a super power but the next Jutland battle could have been better done. Midway battle was better but again the naval drama was lacking. Overall 4 stars for the graphics, 3.5 stars for the stories .

  16. 4 out of 5

    Chill donut

  17. 4 out of 5

    Shivam

  18. 4 out of 5

    Ty Keith

  19. 4 out of 5

    Sarah Smith

  20. 4 out of 5

    Danielle

  21. 5 out of 5

    Fatima

  22. 5 out of 5

    Laura Zorrilla

  23. 4 out of 5

    Anton Heinlein

  24. 5 out of 5

    Voodooenglishman

  25. 5 out of 5

    Amarboyesally

  26. 5 out of 5

    Veeral

  27. 4 out of 5

    Olivia Plasencia

  28. 4 out of 5

    David Skulstad

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