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Original Cover Edition for ISBN 0310245656 In 1987, an IRA bomb buried Gordon Wilson and his twenty-year-old daughter beneath five feet of rubble. Gordon alone survived. And forgave. He said of the bombers, ' I have lost my daughter, but I bear no grudge . . . I shall pray, tonight and every night, that God will forgive them.' His words caught the media's ears — and out of Original Cover Edition for ISBN 0310245656 In 1987, an IRA bomb buried Gordon Wilson and his twenty-year-old daughter beneath five feet of rubble. Gordon alone survived. And forgave. He said of the bombers, ' I have lost my daughter, but I bear no grudge . . . I shall pray, tonight and every night, that God will forgive them.' His words caught the media's ears — and out of one man's grief, the world got a glimpse of grace. Grace is the church's great distinctive. It's the one thing the world cannot duplicate, and the one thing it craves above all else — for only grace can bring hope and transformation to a jaded world. In What's So Amazing About Grace? award-winning author Philip Yancey explores grace at street level. If grace is God's love for the undeserving, he asks, then what does it look like in action? And if Christians are its sole dispensers, then how are we doing at lavishing grace on a world that knows far more of cruelty and unforgiveness than it does of mercy? Yancey sets grace in the midst of life's stark images, tests its mettle against horrific 'ungrace.' Can grace survive in the midst of such atrocities as the Nazi holocaust? Can it triumph over the brutality of the Ku Klux Klan? Should any grace at all be shown to the likes of Jeffrey Dahmer, who killed and cannibalized seventeen young men? Grace does not excuse sin, says Yancey, but it treasures the sinner. True grace is shocking, scandalous. It shakes our conventions with its insistence on getting close to sinners and touching them with mercy and hope. It forgives the unfaithful spouse, the racist, the child abuser. It loves today's AIDS-ridden addict as much as the tax collector of Jesus' day. In his most personal and provocative book ever, Yancey offers compelling, true portraits of grace's life-changing power. He searches for its presence in his own life and in the church. He asks, How can Christians contend graciously with moral issues that threaten all they hold dear? And he challenges us to become living answers to a world that desperately wants to know, What's So Amazing About Grace?


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Original Cover Edition for ISBN 0310245656 In 1987, an IRA bomb buried Gordon Wilson and his twenty-year-old daughter beneath five feet of rubble. Gordon alone survived. And forgave. He said of the bombers, ' I have lost my daughter, but I bear no grudge . . . I shall pray, tonight and every night, that God will forgive them.' His words caught the media's ears — and out of Original Cover Edition for ISBN 0310245656 In 1987, an IRA bomb buried Gordon Wilson and his twenty-year-old daughter beneath five feet of rubble. Gordon alone survived. And forgave. He said of the bombers, ' I have lost my daughter, but I bear no grudge . . . I shall pray, tonight and every night, that God will forgive them.' His words caught the media's ears — and out of one man's grief, the world got a glimpse of grace. Grace is the church's great distinctive. It's the one thing the world cannot duplicate, and the one thing it craves above all else — for only grace can bring hope and transformation to a jaded world. In What's So Amazing About Grace? award-winning author Philip Yancey explores grace at street level. If grace is God's love for the undeserving, he asks, then what does it look like in action? And if Christians are its sole dispensers, then how are we doing at lavishing grace on a world that knows far more of cruelty and unforgiveness than it does of mercy? Yancey sets grace in the midst of life's stark images, tests its mettle against horrific 'ungrace.' Can grace survive in the midst of such atrocities as the Nazi holocaust? Can it triumph over the brutality of the Ku Klux Klan? Should any grace at all be shown to the likes of Jeffrey Dahmer, who killed and cannibalized seventeen young men? Grace does not excuse sin, says Yancey, but it treasures the sinner. True grace is shocking, scandalous. It shakes our conventions with its insistence on getting close to sinners and touching them with mercy and hope. It forgives the unfaithful spouse, the racist, the child abuser. It loves today's AIDS-ridden addict as much as the tax collector of Jesus' day. In his most personal and provocative book ever, Yancey offers compelling, true portraits of grace's life-changing power. He searches for its presence in his own life and in the church. He asks, How can Christians contend graciously with moral issues that threaten all they hold dear? And he challenges us to become living answers to a world that desperately wants to know, What's So Amazing About Grace?

30 review for What's So Amazing About Grace?

  1. 5 out of 5

    Fergus

    CONVERSION FOR ME WAS NOT A DAMASCUS ROAD EXPERIENCE. I SLOWLY MOVED TO AN INTELLECTUAL ACCEPTANCE OF WHAT MY INTUITION HAD ALWAYS KNOWN. - Madeleine l’Engle What’s so amazing about grace - really? Well, for starters, it can pull you out of a desperately Heartless Void into a life of inner abundance and living love. It can plant a seed that will grow enormously, give you rest and shelter, and nourish your parched soul FOR THE REST OF YOUR LIFE. And that’s saying a lot. The world is ugly. Grace is n CONVERSION FOR ME WAS NOT A DAMASCUS ROAD EXPERIENCE. I SLOWLY MOVED TO AN INTELLECTUAL ACCEPTANCE OF WHAT MY INTUITION HAD ALWAYS KNOWN. - Madeleine l’Engle What’s so amazing about grace - really? Well, for starters, it can pull you out of a desperately Heartless Void into a life of inner abundance and living love. It can plant a seed that will grow enormously, give you rest and shelter, and nourish your parched soul FOR THE REST OF YOUR LIFE. And that’s saying a lot. The world is ugly. Grace is not. The world’ll try to finagle your last penny out of you. Grace gives you inner riches. The world will insinuate, prevaricate and back you into an impossible corner. But Grace will always free you from each and every trap. Remember how ancient Hercules raised an army in ancient times? He sowed Dragon’s Teeth in the ground (the Greeks, like us, had a vivid imagination)! So, what he did, of course, was Plant these teeth in a fertile field - like a crop of potatoes - and by the end of that faraway mythical summer, a group of fully-armed and steely-plated warriors started to sprout. So Hercules, capable and wily hero that he was, used them to get his revenge against the bad guys that were pestering him. Now, how that relates to us is : if we play fast and loose in our social lives, our nemesis may carefully cultivate a battalion of armed warriors, by sowing the seeds of ill rumour, so we could reap the whirlwind. Virtue is the best road. If we’re not always on our street-smart toes, as the semi-divine Hercules was, the fates have a way of rising up in a massed battalion against our own personal but picayune dreams and values. And that’s why there are so many broken, lonely people in our world... Whereas, a life lived straight, no chaser - as Thelonius Monk played it and tried to live it - yields an abundant harvest of good things in a twisted world. 1977 was a threshold year for me... It was very good... and very ugly, the way the world is ugly. But first the good stuff: I met my soon-to-be wife that year. And, the ugly stuff is that I was promoted into a disheartened and greasy backwater of my employer’s department. I was to look after property records. That part was simple. But the environment I worked in was a rest haven for cynical, infighting Lotus Eaters - indolent and issuelessly amoral souls whose daily accomplishments primarily amounted to spreading the acrid taste of malicious stories. Dragon’s teeth. It was suffocating. Its greasy tendrils threatened to choke me, as the snakes choked old Laocoon and his boys. And it was every bit as dangerous to my positive outlook as one of those Greek Boas. But I endured it, for three long years. Till, thank Heaven, I was promoted again. The new office upstairs was a regular beehive of activity. It seemed like I was going from the frying pan to the fire - but in reality I rather liked the pervading work ethic. It was normal for a change. And then, I met Robert. Robert was a country boy, who couldn’t stand working in a tight space in the midst of urban chaos - and he soon quit his job, before three months were out. But almost as soon as we met, he told me what pure, unvarnished Christianity meant to him - in his heart. He told me Grace is a free gift, and it would get me where I wanted to go. God loves us. It was Sheer Serendipity. I have never so much needed such a heartening message at any other time in my life. I was just escaping from a shark-infested swimming pool and I was mighty glad to be free. And NOW there was peace in my life as well. Because he told me the gospel taught love, in total freedom from the rigidity of the law. And THAT was how a serendipitous stranger sowed a seed that has never since stopped giving me Life. Yancey, of course, will tell you a little bit about the stuff Robert talked about back in those glorious Fall Days of 1980. But he’s addressing a different audience. Yancey, you see, is addressing the Disenchanted, Disenfranchised, DE-CHURCHED majority who live in the cities, towns, countryside and villages of our grubby little planet. He tells them how a simple message of just a few words that can pull them FREE of the gloomy and perilous pit into which they’ve fallen and can LIBERATE them forever from the slimy tentacles of the Dark Souls who thrive there upon hapless, fearful minds. He tells them of ordinary people like them - and me - who accomplished the Miraculous in unnoticed, though life-affirming little ways - even without a mainstream religion. For they’ve escaped from the Jaws of Despair. They can LIVE again. What’s so amazing about Grace? Just that. For Yancey, it doesn’t necessarily happen within the Stone Walls of a church. It happens right out in the Open Air of ordinary happenstance... when we MOST need it, and LEAST expect it - the day someone ALTERS YOUR LIFE. The same fateful way it happened to me when I met Robert, so many years ago.

  2. 5 out of 5

    Edward Waters

    STILL one of the best books I've ever read, of ANY genre -- also one of the few I've read as many as FIVE times (so far), most recently aloud with my wife, who has long struggled with clinical depression and was deeply encouraged by this work. I've been a Christian for some forty years and have found much 'religious' writing unbearable, particularly that written over the past century (with certain notable exceptions). In an age glutted with so-called 'Christian' politics, posturing, and propagand STILL one of the best books I've ever read, of ANY genre -- also one of the few I've read as many as FIVE times (so far), most recently aloud with my wife, who has long struggled with clinical depression and was deeply encouraged by this work. I've been a Christian for some forty years and have found much 'religious' writing unbearable, particularly that written over the past century (with certain notable exceptions). In an age glutted with so-called 'Christian' politics, posturing, and propaganda, Yancey looks around with compassionate eyes and quietly, gently, just tells stories -- one after another after another. He draws on his life and travels, on his reading, on his not-always-kind reader responses, on his many conversations with both the famous and the decidedly not, and on history recent or remote. What we SEE through his eyes is the healing grace through which God takes the world into His arms -- not the self-righteous and arrogant, but those weighed down with pain and struggle, shame and regret, weariness and disappointment -- a world of deep longing and near despair. This is not a book of 'doctrine' in the way that word is so often used, but one of hope and consolation. There can be very few, whatever their experience or persuasion, who read these pages and are not in some measure moved, comforted, and inspired. Grace indeed emerges as what Yancey calls 'the last best word' for us all.

  3. 5 out of 5

    Jonathan

    Few books reveal the core of what the grace of the gospel of Jesus Christ is in its frightening, glorious, unparalled nature. Yancey comes very close to doing so in using an array of diverse, complex, beautiful, and amazing stories to illustrate the true grace of the gospel. These stories aren't cheesy, long-winded, and annoying--as many Christian books succumb to when authors seek to illustrate spiritual/Christian concepts through stories--but are transparent, beautiful, sometimes shocking, and Few books reveal the core of what the grace of the gospel of Jesus Christ is in its frightening, glorious, unparalled nature. Yancey comes very close to doing so in using an array of diverse, complex, beautiful, and amazing stories to illustrate the true grace of the gospel. These stories aren't cheesy, long-winded, and annoying--as many Christian books succumb to when authors seek to illustrate spiritual/Christian concepts through stories--but are transparent, beautiful, sometimes shocking, and unbelievable stories of grace. The stories, also, don't all possess one recurring theme concerning grace, but show a great diversity in illustating the multi-faceted, complex nature of all that the grace of God in Jesus Christ is. Read Yancey and this book: he really understands grace and is one of the few clever, creative, gifted Christian authors today.

  4. 5 out of 5

    Glen

    As I remember, he never fully resolves the issue/reason for writing the book.

  5. 5 out of 5

    Marie

    Yancey is thorough in his examples of grace. He uses his own life experiences, everything from being part of a racist church as a child to interviewing President Clinton to dissect grace. Yancey is clear, grace is the true message of Jesus and today's Christians as a whole are not doing a great job of relaying this message. Grace is the idea that God loves us--all of us--no matter what; no one has to earn God's love. Yancey presents many ways in which the world needs grace. His argument is power Yancey is thorough in his examples of grace. He uses his own life experiences, everything from being part of a racist church as a child to interviewing President Clinton to dissect grace. Yancey is clear, grace is the true message of Jesus and today's Christians as a whole are not doing a great job of relaying this message. Grace is the idea that God loves us--all of us--no matter what; no one has to earn God's love. Yancey presents many ways in which the world needs grace. His argument is powerful and thought-provoking.

  6. 5 out of 5

    Chris McGrath

    This book contains a good exploration of the concept of grace, not from a heavy theological perspective but a simpler, practical one, by presenting many modern examples of grace in action along side Biblical references. Some of these were very compelling to me and some fell kind of flat for me, just based on the kinds of stories that interest me. But overall I enjoyed the book and was inspired by it. I would not say it contains anything groundbreaking for someone not new to Christianity, but jus This book contains a good exploration of the concept of grace, not from a heavy theological perspective but a simpler, practical one, by presenting many modern examples of grace in action along side Biblical references. Some of these were very compelling to me and some fell kind of flat for me, just based on the kinds of stories that interest me. But overall I enjoyed the book and was inspired by it. I would not say it contains anything groundbreaking for someone not new to Christianity, but just plenty of good reminders of how grace and love for God and our fellow man should look, and what they mean for us and for those we share these things with. I was probably most struck by his description at the very end of the book of what AA meetings are like, compared to the average church gathering; at church we often put on a good face and keep our dark side to ourselves, whereas you only walk into AA because you admit your life is a mess and you need help. This strikes me as how the church is meant to be, nobody faking it, and everybody receiving grace because we are all sympathetic to each other's struggles.

  7. 5 out of 5

    Tom Brennan

    A review of this book from my blog series on grace... In my discussion earlier in this series of Paul's seminal statement, Ye are not under the law, but under grace I mentioned Philip Yancey's influential book, "What's So Amazing About Grace?" I alluded to the fact that it, along with a few other original works and a whole bunch of copycats, have twisted much of American Christianity's concept of grace into something wholly unrecognizable to our forefathers. In so saying, I am not overstating its A review of this book from my blog series on grace... In my discussion earlier in this series of Paul's seminal statement, Ye are not under the law, but under grace I mentioned Philip Yancey's influential book, "What's So Amazing About Grace?" I alluded to the fact that it, along with a few other original works and a whole bunch of copycats, have twisted much of American Christianity's concept of grace into something wholly unrecognizable to our forefathers. In so saying, I am not overstating its influence. For example, it is praised by religious leaders as diverse as Larry Crabb, Brennan Manning (no surprise there), J. I. Packer, Jill Briscoe, Jim Wallis, Gordon MacDonald, Charles Colson, and the Irish rocker Bono. Tony Campolo said, "There are huge amounts of sermon material here." (No surprise there either.) Robert Seiple said, "This is beyond a doubt the very best book I have read from a Christian author in my life." Robert Jeffress said that it "did a valuable service by rescuing the doctrine of grace from the legalists." It was awarded Book of the Year by the Evangelical Christian Publishers Association in 1998, and in 2006 was named as the seventeenth most influential book on Christianity Today's list of works that have shaped evangelicalism the most. Never mind the dizzying array of contradictory theological positions held by those listed in this paragraph, and how ashamed I would be if all of them praised any work of mine, let us simply agree that selling more than 15 million copies of any religious book in ten years, as this book did, qualifies as influential. If it is so praised why do I assert that it is awful? Let us start with the fact that for a book that purports to bring us back to a scriptural view of grace there is an appalling paucity of Scripture in it. Yancey unabashedly emphasizes this in his own introduction. "I have just read a thirteen-page treatise on grace in the New Catholic Encyclopedia, which has cured me of any desire to dissect grace and display its innards. I do not want the thing to die. For this reason, I will rely more on stories than syllogisms. In sum, I would far rather display grace than explain it." In choosing this course Yancey does two things. First, he makes his book much more readable and thus popular. Second, and far more importantly, he writes a book almost entirely untethered from the Word of God. Yancey does an emotionally entertaining job of telling us what he wants grace to be, and a spiritually wretched job of telling us what God said grace actually is and does. It takes him forty-two pages to quote the first Bible verse. In the entirety of the book he never takes a verse, let alone a passage, and systematically explores its words, context, and flow of thought to tell us what God says about grace. Needless to say, he does not examine contrasting thoughts either. He examines nothing and reveals less of God's Word on the subject. Curiously enough, while studiously avoiding the Scriptures, he manages to favorably quote any number of theologically sketchy characters. Roman Catholic theologians such as Romano Guardini and Brennan Manning? Check. Mystics such as John of the Cross and Bernard? Check. Intellectuals such as Mark Twain and Anthony Hecht? Check. Neo-orthodox Europeans such as Karl Barth and Dietrich Bonhoeffer? Check. To add insult to injury, he purposely chooses to use both Pope John Paul II and Mother Teresa as wonderful examples of grace. The previous paragraph does not mark Yancey as wicked. It does, however, mark him as severely lacking in discernment and seriously doctrinally deficient. Why conservative Christians let alone independent Baptists would look to such a man to explain and expound the Word of God is a mystery to me. If his book does not come from Scripture where does it come from? I believe it was birthed out of a reaction to his own conservative/fundamentalist Southern upbringing. He mentions it often in the book and makes no bones that he found his home church experience wretched. In some sense Yancey is right to be appalled. The deacons of his home church patrolled the entrances to ensure no African-Americans made their way in. But in reacting against error Yancey makes the same mistake I have seen numerous acquaintances of mine make – he throws the baby out with the bathwater. At a dead run, he heads from the ditch of a harsh, racist religious upbringing to the ditch of license on the other side of the road. In the process he is highly critical of rules of any kind, and especially those of his youth forbidding rock music, alcohol, short skirts, and long hair. Those are, in his words, "pettiness", signs of a religion with no grace. Do you begin to see his influence? The problem with Yancey, however, is much worse than that, much worse. It is not just about where Yancey was when he wrote the book, and how your friends use its arguments to overthrow their own long-held beliefs, it is even more about where Yancey's concept of grace leads, about what it produces years down the road. For example, the church here in Chicago where he served as an assistant so long believes nothing, is against nothing but taking a stand. But even more egregiously, Yancey's embrace of "grace" toward homosexuality is revelatory indeed. In the book, now twenty years old, he unabashedly promotes the homosexual Mel White as a wonderful example of Christian grace and love vs the evil, intolerant Christians who insist on shouting about doctrine. An emphasis on doctrine is "hatred" while Mel, on the other hand, evidences "a graceful spirit." Yancey likens preaching against homosexuality to the preaching against social drinking he heard in his youth, preaching that he clearly views as petty, legalistic, and beneath the spirit of Christ. Remember, though, it is not just about where Yancey is when he writes this book, though that is bad enough. It is about where his concept of grace is going, and where it is going to take you. On his own website today on a page discussing his views of homosexuality he gives us these little gems. "In my relationship with Mel White, I have to remind myself that it’s not my job to present the absolutely proper, balanced viewpoint of the church." Somehow, after reading his book, I do not think Yancey even balances his checkbook. But I digress. Or there is this: "I intentionally don't take sides on this issue." And this: "I feel no need to represent a balanced viewpoint myself. So I don't take an official position. I simply try to love the gay individuals I know and bring a little grace and mercy to a church that puts this particular sin – if indeed it is that – in a special category." And this: "When it gets to particular matters of policy, like ordaining gay and lesbian minsters, I'm confused, like a lot of people." I could go on in the same vein but I risk you thinking this blog post is about homosexuality. It is not. It is about where the wrong view of grace leads. It leads to repentance eliminated in favor of tolerance and forgiveness cheapened into permission. In a word, it leads to grace no longer being grace but rather being acceptance. Yancey can deny it all he wants, and your now-contemporary-used-to-be-fundamentalist friends can do the same. Their denials fade to the echoes of a whisper when confronted with their actions. What you believe changes how you live, and what you read changes what you believe. You might want to think long and hard about that before ingesting what passes for classic discussions of grace in our day. No matter how many copies the guy has sold or how many famous religious leaders recommend it.

  8. 5 out of 5

    Dani

    This book has honestly changed my perspective on Christianity, religion, politics and my own relationship with Jesus. All too often Christians are viewed as being critical, judgmental, unforgiving, harsh, condemning and downright mean. Yet everything in Jesus' life showcased grace. If I am supposed to be living as an example of Christ to the rest of the world, why do I so often miss the boat when it comes to grace? There were very few instances in the Bible that Jesus responded to situations the This book has honestly changed my perspective on Christianity, religion, politics and my own relationship with Jesus. All too often Christians are viewed as being critical, judgmental, unforgiving, harsh, condemning and downright mean. Yet everything in Jesus' life showcased grace. If I am supposed to be living as an example of Christ to the rest of the world, why do I so often miss the boat when it comes to grace? There were very few instances in the Bible that Jesus responded to situations the way we would, or think he should have. He lived with, ate with, communicated with, loved, healed, forgave those people that no one else wanted to be around. In Mark 2:17 Jesus said "It is not the healthy who need a doctor, but the sick. I have not come to call the righteous, but sinners." More often than not, as Christians, we get so wrapped up in legalism, the “rules” of Christianity, that we miss the point that Phillip Yancey so wonderful, and beautifully brought to light. There is nothing we can do to make God love us less, and there is nothing we can do to make God love us more! Now as Christians we have to start showing the rest of the world that fact! If you get nothing else out of this book I hope you get that God loves you more than you can even imagine! No matter what you have done in the past, no matter what you are doing now and no matter what you will do in the future, God still loves you. He is waiting for you to come to him and ask him to forgive you. It's as simple as that! The “rules” that we “have to follow” don’t seem so daunting when you’re following them because you love, trust and respect the person who is asking you to do, or not do, something. Christianity is a relationship, not a dictatorship.

  9. 4 out of 5

    Dominic

    THE GOOD: Not much. THE BAD: Does not clearly define grace and it just seemed to me like he was constantly walking around the subject the whole time. Was not very interesting, although occasionally inspirational. Would not particularly recommend. THE UGLY: Almost did not finish reading this book. Don't waste your time. THE GOOD: Not much. THE BAD: Does not clearly define grace and it just seemed to me like he was constantly walking around the subject the whole time. Was not very interesting, although occasionally inspirational. Would not particularly recommend. THE UGLY: Almost did not finish reading this book. Don't waste your time.

  10. 4 out of 5

    Lynai

    Amazing. Grace is amazing. More thoughts soon. ***UPDATE*** Also posted in It's A Wonderful Bookworld. Except for work-related readings, I rarely read non-fiction books, and if I indeed find myself reading one, it would always be Christian literature. The first time I encountered Philip Yancey was through his book, Disappointment with God, and it was during one of the tumultuous moments of my life. That book did not answer the questions I had that time, but it made me feel that I was not alone in m Amazing. Grace is amazing. More thoughts soon. ***UPDATE*** Also posted in It's A Wonderful Bookworld. Except for work-related readings, I rarely read non-fiction books, and if I indeed find myself reading one, it would always be Christian literature. The first time I encountered Philip Yancey was through his book, Disappointment with God, and it was during one of the tumultuous moments of my life. That book did not answer the questions I had that time, but it made me feel that I was not alone in my struggles. And that was what I actually needed that time. Fast forward to this year, the year that I declared to be a year of grace. And what book to better start this grace journey than another Philip Yancey? What’s So Amazing About Grace? was a truly satisfying read. I was in awe – amazed – with every chapter that I got to finish. I relished each page, each paragraph, and I always found myself if not nodding with agreement, then staring blankly for a few moments, trying to digest the truths that I was presented with. Indeed, grace is a word most often used but most often misunderstood. I truly learned a lot and I was confronted by my own self-righteousness and hypocrisy. The good thing about this book, about grace, in fact, was that it talked about forgiveness – one thing that I badly needed. What made reading this book easy were the references to the parables in the Bible and the real life experiences of the author. Most of all, I enjoyed reading about the references to other books. Babette's Feast by Isak Dinesen, for instance, was used to illustrate a point, and although I had been somewhat spoiled about the story, I still added it to my to-be-read stack. Philip Yancey is a reader and isn’t that awesome? :) This book is truly a gem. I had the most wonderful reading experience with What’s So Amazing About Grace? It gave me a new perspective — grace-filled eyes, I’d like to think — and gave me an opportunity to intimately know my Creator and His character. The “scandalous mathematics of grace” both scandalized and challenged me, and motivated me to love more, give more, care more, understand more, and forgive more, because God has loved me more, given me more, cared for me more, understood me more, forgiven me more. I highly recommend this book to all. Because whether we want it or not, whether we’re aware of it or not, we all need grace. The world needs grace.

  11. 4 out of 5

    Josh Crews

    I got the "visual" edition of this book from Stephie right after I became a Christian in South Africa. (Later I read the full edition) So I got to dwell by myself in Africa with a Bible, this book, and an RC Sproul book. The visual pages of What's So Amazing About Grace unfolded as amazing news! Is this really true? God has pardoned dirty criminals through the death of his Son? It's free? No pre-requisites? It's just... by grace? My death sentence for hating God has been paid for by another... whi I got the "visual" edition of this book from Stephie right after I became a Christian in South Africa. (Later I read the full edition) So I got to dwell by myself in Africa with a Bible, this book, and an RC Sproul book. The visual pages of What's So Amazing About Grace unfolded as amazing news! Is this really true? God has pardoned dirty criminals through the death of his Son? It's free? No pre-requisites? It's just... by grace? My death sentence for hating God has been paid for by another... while I was still hating him? What the book does well is captures the aroma of Grace through stories of grace mixed in with bible teaching. While Philip Yancey isn't a Calvinist, this book strongly affected my theology towards Calvinism on the issue of undeserved grace*. *undeserved grace is redundant, all grace is by definition undeserved

  12. 4 out of 5

    Perri

    An easy to read book about one of my favorite words in the English language. It only took so long to read because I hid my Kindle from the GKid then forgot where. But it's the kind of book you can pick up anytime and jump back in. Yancey is a natural story teller and I felt encouraged and enlightened by his examples of grace. Four and a half stars An easy to read book about one of my favorite words in the English language. It only took so long to read because I hid my Kindle from the GKid then forgot where. But it's the kind of book you can pick up anytime and jump back in. Yancey is a natural story teller and I felt encouraged and enlightened by his examples of grace. Four and a half stars

  13. 4 out of 5

    Jim B

    As Yancy usually does, he tackles the hard issues, especially "ungrace" among Christians. He quotes a prostitute about church, "Church! Why would I ever go there? I was already feeling terrible about myself. They'd just make me feel worse." The first section is a beautiful exposition of grace. Yancy uses "Babette's Feast" as a model of grace. C.S. Lewis overheard a debate about Christianity's unique contribution to the world and he responded, "That's easy: Grace." This book establishes the uniqu As Yancy usually does, he tackles the hard issues, especially "ungrace" among Christians. He quotes a prostitute about church, "Church! Why would I ever go there? I was already feeling terrible about myself. They'd just make me feel worse." The first section is a beautiful exposition of grace. Yancy uses "Babette's Feast" as a model of grace. C.S. Lewis overheard a debate about Christianity's unique contribution to the world and he responded, "That's easy: Grace." This book establishes the uniqueness of the Christian teaching of grace and the need of the world for this message. Philip Yancy has had the experience of being the target of hate mail from Christians. He makes the point that grace should be the strongest witness of our behavior -- he urges us to imagine feminists who, while disagreeing with the Scriptural teaching of the roles of men and women, would have to grudgingly admit that Christian men love their wives like no one else, or gays who reject Christian teaching regarding homosexuality would concede that the best AIDS-HIV care was lovingly provided by Christians. This book also contains an on-target assessment of why law can never do what the gospel can -- the law can close stores, but not make you worship; it can make divorce difficult but cannot make a husband love his wife, etc. I also enjoyed the analogy in Chapter 19, "Patches of Green," where after a forest fire, the first patches of new growth were seen where an elk / moose died. Where Christians once thrived there will be elements of grace that show themselves. Another interesting observation was on Matthew 7 where Jesus says, "I never knew you," on the Last Day, we would expect Him to tell unbelievers, "You never knew Me." But their hearts were closed to Him -- they never admitted their evil thoughts and sins. Yancy uses Romans 6-7 to deal with the objection "Why be good, if you get forgiven?" (pages 183-191) A good book to reread regularly, so we grow in grace!

  14. 4 out of 5

    Wendy Hall

    I believe this is my third time reading this book. I read it when it first came out in 1997. At that time, it totally rocked me. Caused me to look at my faith and grace in a much different way. Soon thereafter, I read it again, desiring to internalize these truths. This must be the first time I have read it in over a decade and I am glad to say, all it did now was confirm and solidify my beliefs and understanding of Christ. So, so much I could say about how this book, written from a very intelle I believe this is my third time reading this book. I read it when it first came out in 1997. At that time, it totally rocked me. Caused me to look at my faith and grace in a much different way. Soon thereafter, I read it again, desiring to internalize these truths. This must be the first time I have read it in over a decade and I am glad to say, all it did now was confirm and solidify my beliefs and understanding of Christ. So, so much I could say about how this book, written from a very intellectual perspective, challenges us to see ourselves and others the way Jesus sees us. And it call us to love and embrace those that society and the church often shun. It is both a challenging and encouraging book. Highly recommend it and hope to read it again myself someday, to be sure I keep on track loving rather than judging others. Fourth time reading it, beginning of 2017. Only echo what is above. I didn't realize that 2020 was my fifth time reading this book. I am not a re-reader (can only think of a few books I have read more than once but none more than twice), but apparently, this keeps pulling me back. And every time, I mine more and learn more and hopefully apply more. This time, however, was my first time reading it with a group and processing two chapters a week. Therefore, I learned more, had a wider perspective, and gleaned so much from the others in this group. Highly, highly recommend this book.

  15. 5 out of 5

    Ali M

    Grace is something that is incredibly simple in theory, deeply personal and very difficult to implement in our everyday lives. Grace is the defining element of Christianity and it is beautiful. Yet, the idea that we are loved and there is nothing that we can do that will change that love is met with skepticism at best and usually suspicion. Yancey makes it clear how very beautiful and simple Grace is. But he also covers "Grace Abuse" and forgiveness. All of this was thought provoking and inspire Grace is something that is incredibly simple in theory, deeply personal and very difficult to implement in our everyday lives. Grace is the defining element of Christianity and it is beautiful. Yet, the idea that we are loved and there is nothing that we can do that will change that love is met with skepticism at best and usually suspicion. Yancey makes it clear how very beautiful and simple Grace is. But he also covers "Grace Abuse" and forgiveness. All of this was thought provoking and inspired many conversations in our house. Throughout the book Yancey makes clear how very powerful Grace can be... it's just not easy. In a world marred by ungrace I was drawn to this book to see where we had gone wrong in Western society. Yancey's book really helps with working through that thought process. Yancey discusses "legalism" as an enemy of grace and he focuses particularly on the involvement of the church in politics. In the end I came away with the message that it is up to each of us as individuals to live a life of grace and carry that message out into the world. If the world you see reflected back is not one with grace, it is up to us to act differently to change that. I could write more about the intertwining of grace and politics but in the end such discussions seem pointless when grace is just absent. Perhaps we should all just start with the end in mind, and that may be as simple as a recognition of the fact that Grace can change the world.

  16. 4 out of 5

    Petrea

    The author is, I gather, popular in evangelical Christian circles. He has some really profound things to say. He starts out by discussing the grace of God and he selects certain parables and examples to make his point that God's grace is boundless, and his forgiveness beyond anything we can imagine. Then he devotes the rest of the book to talking about how much grace--or lack of grace--Christians actually exemplify in their doctrines and lives. He grew up in the southern part of the United State The author is, I gather, popular in evangelical Christian circles. He has some really profound things to say. He starts out by discussing the grace of God and he selects certain parables and examples to make his point that God's grace is boundless, and his forgiveness beyond anything we can imagine. Then he devotes the rest of the book to talking about how much grace--or lack of grace--Christians actually exemplify in their doctrines and lives. He grew up in the southern part of the United States--very racist, as he was taught at home and in church. Only as an adult did he realize the hypocrisy of this position. He also discusses the intolerance of Christians toward homosexuals and many other people and points out that while we are freely given the grace of God we are pretty selfish about being "grace-full" ourselves, and that makes us less than Christian His book begins and ends with a story about a woman who was living a very sinful life, and when she was asked if she had gone to the church for help she responded, "Why would I ever go there? I was already feeling terrible about myself. They'd just make me feel worse." And he asks if it is possible for us as Christians to extend the same love and forgiveness to our fellow beings that we receive so freely from God? Excellent Book!!

  17. 5 out of 5

    Ebookwormy1

    I read this book for a book club and strongly disliked it. To me, it was a testimony as to why a journalist should not write theology. I found his thinking to be sloppy, uninformed, and lacking Biblical basis. All of this said, I cannot deny that it fostered a great deal of conversation, and that some of his thoughts were challenging. Just make sure you read a good dose of your Bible before you read Yancy's anecdotes. Oftentimes, when I write a review like this, the post modern challenge is: "Do I read this book for a book club and strongly disliked it. To me, it was a testimony as to why a journalist should not write theology. I found his thinking to be sloppy, uninformed, and lacking Biblical basis. All of this said, I cannot deny that it fostered a great deal of conversation, and that some of his thoughts were challenging. Just make sure you read a good dose of your Bible before you read Yancy's anecdotes. Oftentimes, when I write a review like this, the post modern challenge is: "Do you have a lock on what the Bible says?" or "How do you know you are right and the author is wrong?" To give some answers to these recurring questions, I am posting additional resources below for those who would like to explore the Biblical teachings embraced by Christians for, literally, hundreds of years. For those who want to hear, there are plenty of strong, researched voices to whom you can listen. Tim Challies http://www.challies.com/general-news/... Greg Gilbert https://9marks.org/review/whats-so-am...

  18. 5 out of 5

    Mel

    This is one of the books that I both like and hate. I agree to how Philip Yancey portrays the "Christians" he has encountered. Many of those who call themselves Christians seem to have an attitude of hate rather than love; who are bent on making rules and making sure everybody follows it, an "modern day pharisee". Then again I disagree with the general definition of grace in the book. Instead of the true essence of grace, it was defined as license, a point exemplified with the story of when the This is one of the books that I both like and hate. I agree to how Philip Yancey portrays the "Christians" he has encountered. Many of those who call themselves Christians seem to have an attitude of hate rather than love; who are bent on making rules and making sure everybody follows it, an "modern day pharisee". Then again I disagree with the general definition of grace in the book. Instead of the true essence of grace, it was defined as license, a point exemplified with the story of when the author was asked by a friend if God would forgive him if he left his wife for a younger woman. We already live in a world "baptized by grace". A world who uses the grace of God for the occasion of the flesh, a world who prefers to trample the blood of Christ underfoot, does not need a book that might further encourage such attitude. This was an interesting read but a book I would not recommend to anybody.

  19. 4 out of 5

    Daughters Of Abraham

    Arlington Group: Many members selected this book as the best of the year. Members from all three faith traditions felt strongly that it brought a lot to our understanding and stimulated an excellent discussion. It helped provide a springboard to explore concepts related to forgiveness, universal love, ultimate judgment and sin. One measure of a good DoA book might be the frequency with which it comes up in future discussions and by that measure, this book is a success. Yancey uses many personal Arlington Group: Many members selected this book as the best of the year. Members from all three faith traditions felt strongly that it brought a lot to our understanding and stimulated an excellent discussion. It helped provide a springboard to explore concepts related to forgiveness, universal love, ultimate judgment and sin. One measure of a good DoA book might be the frequency with which it comes up in future discussions and by that measure, this book is a success. Yancey uses many personal stories to exemplify both the meaning of grace and its absence from some Christian practice and preaching today. While the book covers a heady topic that could be seen as dry or academic, Yancey really puts it firmly on the ground in our lives and the lives of people who might be feeling guilt, shame or a failure to live up to perceived standards of the divine eternal. Yancey really does help to answer the question posed in the title and it has enriched our group.

  20. 4 out of 5

    Lisa

    Philip Yancey is one of my very favorite Christian authors. I loved his book "Prayer" and now this one. I can't wait to read the rest. This book has so many great things to say - such as: God dispenses gifts, not wages. In the realm of grace, the word DESERVE does no even apply. The only thing harder than forgiveness is the alternative. Believers who are most desperate about themselves are the ones who express most forcefully their confidence in grace. And so on. Oh, read it. It's just wonderful! Philip Yancey is one of my very favorite Christian authors. I loved his book "Prayer" and now this one. I can't wait to read the rest. This book has so many great things to say - such as: God dispenses gifts, not wages. In the realm of grace, the word DESERVE does no even apply. The only thing harder than forgiveness is the alternative. Believers who are most desperate about themselves are the ones who express most forcefully their confidence in grace. And so on. Oh, read it. It's just wonderful!

  21. 4 out of 5

    Oliviana Tugui

    I enjoyed his exposition of grace as much as the many examples. Particularly, the example when Mother Theresa was present at the Prayer Breakfast with President Clinton and shamed everyone about the abortion in the US, saying that she would take all those babies, and no one dared to question her. The true story about the repugnant serial killer was definite one I had to think about. Would I be able to accept the repentance of such a man and offer grace? Not many can, to this day.

  22. 4 out of 5

    Danny

    I enjoyed this fresh look at grace. Some of my favorite quotes include: In my experience, rejoicing and gladness are not the first images that come to mind when people think of the church. They think of holier-than-thous. They think of church as a place to go after you have cleaned up your act, not before. They think of morality, not grace. "Church!" said the prostitute, "Why would I ever go there? I was already feeling terrible about myself. They'd just make me feel worse." I rejected the church I enjoyed this fresh look at grace. Some of my favorite quotes include: In my experience, rejoicing and gladness are not the first images that come to mind when people think of the church. They think of holier-than-thous. They think of church as a place to go after you have cleaned up your act, not before. They think of morality, not grace. "Church!" said the prostitute, "Why would I ever go there? I was already feeling terrible about myself. They'd just make me feel worse." I rejected the church for a time because I found so little grace there. I returned because I found grace nowhere else. Now I am trying in my own small way to pipe the tune of grace. I do so because I know, more surely than I know anything, that any pang of healing or forgiveness or goodness I have ever felt comes solely from the grace of God. I yearn for the church to become a nourishing culture of that grace. I believe Jesus gave us these stories to call us to step completely outside our tit-for-tat world of ungrace and enter into God’s realm of infinite grace. "If John were to be asked, 'What is your primary identity in life?' he would not reply, 'I am a disciple, an apostle, an evangelist, an author of one of the four Gospels,' but rather, 'I am the one Jesus loves.'" Brennan Manning At last I understood: in the final analysis, forgiveness is an act of faith. By forgiving another, I am trusting that God is a better justice-maker than I am. By forgiving, I release my own right to get even and leave all issues of fairness for God to work out. I leave in God’s hands the scales that must balance justice and mercy. I share a deep concern for our society. I am struck, though, by the alternative power of mercy as demonstrated by Jesus, who came for the sick and not the well, for the sinners and not the righteous. Jesus never countenanced evil, but he did stand ready to forgive it. Somehow, he gained the reputation as a lover of sinners, a reputation that his followers are in danger of losing today. As Dorothy Day put it, "I really only love God as much as I love the person I love the least." “Don't the Bible say we must love everybody?" "O, the Bible! To be sure, it says a great many things; but, then, nobody ever thinks of doing them." Harriet Beecher Stowe, Uncle Tom’s Cabin We may be abominations, but we are still God’s pride and joy. All of us in church need “grace-healed eyes” to see the potential in others for the same grace that God has lavishly bestowed on us. The scene from John 8 rattles me because by nature I identify more with the accusers than the accused. I deny far more than I confess. Cloaking my sin under a robe of respectability, I seldom if ever let myself get caught in a blatant, public indiscretion. Yet if I understand this story correctly, the sinful woman is the nearest the kingdom of God. Indeed, I can only advance in the kingdom if I become like that woman: trembling, humbled, without excuse, my palms open to receive God's grace. If we truly grasped the wonder of God’s love for us, the devious question that prompted Romans 6 and 7 — What can I get away with? — would never even occur to us. We would spend our days trying to fathom, not exploit, God’s grace. Legalism may "work" in an institution such as a Bible college or the Marine Corps. In a world of ungrace, structured shame has considerable power. But there is a cost, an incalculable cost: ungrace does not work in a relationship with God. I have come to see legalism in its pursuit of false purity as an elaborate scheme of grace avoidance. You can know the law by heart without knowing the heart of it. Jesus' fierce denunciations of the Pharisees show how seriously He viewed the toxic threat of legalism. Its dangers are elusive the proof of spiritual maturity is not how 'pure' you are but awareness of your impurity. That very awareness opens the door to grace. The spiritual games we play, many of which begin with the best of motives, can perversely lead us away from God, because they lead us away from grace. Repentance, not proper behavior or even holiness, is the doorway to grace. And the opposite of sin is grace, not virtue. In short, the President had not experienced much grace from Christians. “I've been in politics long enough to expect criticism and hostility. But I was unprepared for the hatred I get from Christians. Why do Christians hate so much?” Bill Clinton as I read through stacks of vituperative letters I got a strong sense for why the world at large does not automatically associate the word ‘grace’ with evangelical Christians. For this reason, I wonder about the enormous energy being devoted these days to restoring morality to the United States. Are we concentrating more on the kingdom of this world than on the kingdom that is not of this world? The public image of the evangelical church today is practically defined by an emphasis on two issues that Jesus did not even mention. How will we feel if historians of the future look back on the evangelical Church of the 1990's and declare, ‘They fought bravely on the moral fronts of abortion and homosexuality rights,' while at the same time reporting that we did little to fulfill the great commission, and we did little to spread the aroma of grace in the world? “the church must be reminded that it is not the master or servant of the state, but rather the conscience of the state. It must be the guide and the critic of the state, and never its tool.” Rev. Dr. Martin King, Jr. “Our Constitution was made only for a moral and religious people. It is wholly inadequate to the government of any other.” John Quincy Adams One China expert estimates that the revival in China represents the greatest numerical increase in the history of the Church. In an odd way the government hostility ultimately worked to the church’s advantage. Chinese Christians devoted themselves to worship and evangelism - the original mission of the Church - and did not much concern themselves with politics. They concentrated on changing lives not changing laws. How does a grace-full Christian look? The Christian life, I believe, does not primarily center on ethics or rules but rather involves a new way of seeing. I escape the force of spiritual “gravity” when I begin to see myself as a sinner who cannot please God by any method of self-improvement or self-enlargement. Only then can I turn to God for outside help – for grace – and to my amazement I learn that a holy God already loves me despite my defects. I escape the force of gravity again when I recognize my neighbors also as sinners, loved by God. A grace- full Christian is one who looks at the world through “grace-tinted lenses.”

  23. 4 out of 5

    Jessica Alexander

    I love the parallel he draws near the end of the book between small groups and AA meetings. Someone I'm close to once criticized small groups knowing I lead one because they seemed inauthentic to her. She thought it seemed formulaic that those groups demand honesty (I think she phrased it more like "they want to know your shame and darkest secrets") so that you cry and hug things out and grow friendships and bonds together. I was kind of baffled at how to respond. But it isn't just Christian gro I love the parallel he draws near the end of the book between small groups and AA meetings. Someone I'm close to once criticized small groups knowing I lead one because they seemed inauthentic to her. She thought it seemed formulaic that those groups demand honesty (I think she phrased it more like "they want to know your shame and darkest secrets") so that you cry and hug things out and grow friendships and bonds together. I was kind of baffled at how to respond. But it isn't just Christian groups that do that and AA is such a great example. We are all addicts to sin, we are all on the same leveled plane of unrighteousness, we all need confession and brother/sisterhood to stay on the godly path. The two go hand in hand, so it makes sense, but a lot of the chapters have more to do with forgiveness than grace specifically. This is a great read for anyone struggling to forgive someone. Like a good worship song, this book doesn't really teach me anything new, but helps me articulate things I know and need reminders of. Love this quote: "If we truly grasped the wonder of God's love for us...we would spend our days trying to fathom, not exploit, God's grace." Thoroughly did not love Yancey's little anecdotes between chapters. They were so cheesy and felt contrived. The book is filled with historical context which helped me zoom out a little bit and see more of a bigger picture of how God moves globally. Also he drops a bazillion references to other Christian authors and theologians throughout the centuries (Bonhoeffer, Martin Luther, Billy Graham and Kierkegaard seem to be his favorites) and I really liked getting the reader's digest version of some of their thoughts. For example I absolutely love this quote from Ron Sider (never heard of him): "A little consistent wholesome modeling and costly servanthood are worth millions of true words harshly spoken." I'd love to sit down for coffee with this guy, the amount of knowledge and experience he has is kind of overwhelming.

  24. 5 out of 5

    Gemima

    Very insightful book that required many self-reflection during the readings. This book thoroughly explains what the word grace is how important it is to Jesus' message. Once we understand the gravity and importance of grace, we can true live the way Christ wanted us to and see the world through a different lens. Even though this book was written in the late 90s, the message and stories are ever so relevant. I will definitely be reading this book again! Very insightful book that required many self-reflection during the readings. This book thoroughly explains what the word grace is how important it is to Jesus' message. Once we understand the gravity and importance of grace, we can true live the way Christ wanted us to and see the world through a different lens. Even though this book was written in the late 90s, the message and stories are ever so relevant. I will definitely be reading this book again!

  25. 4 out of 5

    Ian Smith

    Timeless in message, and ought to be dated in anecdotes, but surprisingly remains extraordinarily contemporary in his overview of the gracelessness of the evangelical right. Yet the real value of this powerful book remains in his examples of those who practice graceful living rather than those who sadly choose a graceless life.

  26. 4 out of 5

    Brittany

    This is one of the most important books I have read about Christian spirituality. Yancey digs back to the heart of the Christian gospel: that grace is a gift freely given by God and needed by all of us. While reading this book I cried from sorrow about my own depravity and from joy because my life can be made new. As a Christian, my purpose is not to judge or damn the world, but view it through "grace tinted lenses". Very good book. Very life-changing. This is one of the most important books I have read about Christian spirituality. Yancey digs back to the heart of the Christian gospel: that grace is a gift freely given by God and needed by all of us. While reading this book I cried from sorrow about my own depravity and from joy because my life can be made new. As a Christian, my purpose is not to judge or damn the world, but view it through "grace tinted lenses". Very good book. Very life-changing.

  27. 5 out of 5

    Jeff Stevens

    Yancey's just slightly ahead of his time. In 1997 he realizes there's a sickness at the heart of American Fundamentalism's soul, even if he misdiagnoses a vicious pneumonia as a cold. Unlike Gabe Lyons (unChristian) writing several years later, Yancey's honest enough to know that what the cult needs is more than a better PR job. He is even honest enough to allow that Fundamentalism's approach to belief may not be perfect, a difficult assertion for a member of a movement that values obedience to Yancey's just slightly ahead of his time. In 1997 he realizes there's a sickness at the heart of American Fundamentalism's soul, even if he misdiagnoses a vicious pneumonia as a cold. Unlike Gabe Lyons (unChristian) writing several years later, Yancey's honest enough to know that what the cult needs is more than a better PR job. He is even honest enough to allow that Fundamentalism's approach to belief may not be perfect, a difficult assertion for a member of a movement that values obedience to authority above all else to make. He sees so clearly... up to a point, and then, Yancey goes completely blind again. He's happy to question how religious leaders have used and abused God language, happy to note some of the missteps of Fundamentalism, but utterly unable to even begin to question the rotted core of Fundamentalist belief. Yancey, for example, can understand that a gay friend is hurt by self righteous Fundamentalists telling him he's going to hell and his sins are unforgivable. Still Yancey will not even for a nanosecond allow himself to wonder if maybe Fundamentalism is known by its fruits, and if its fruits are hatred and bigotry it might be time to pause and reflect. Yancey is quick to tell us that ultimately, he too, has to consign his friend to hell. Realizing that the word "love" has become diminished and exhausted through misuse and overuse, Yancey cleverly suggests that faith be reviewed using the relatively unadulterated word "grace." If only he, or some other Fundamentalist, would go one step further and examine their own beliefs in a new light instead of simply crafting a convenient, non-threatening, definition of grace that reinforces a misguided and unhaopoy set of religious ideas.

  28. 4 out of 5

    Kimberly

    I read this for the in-person book club I'm in. I really liked Yancey's message throughout the book, namely that the unique characteristic of Christianity is the offering of grace and that Christians need to practice forgiveness the way they did back in Jesus's time. I completely agree with Yancy that society's prevailing impression of Christians is that they're a bunch of judgmental exclusionists rather than grace-filled, generous people. I'm a Christian, but I sometimes inwardly cringe when I I read this for the in-person book club I'm in. I really liked Yancey's message throughout the book, namely that the unique characteristic of Christianity is the offering of grace and that Christians need to practice forgiveness the way they did back in Jesus's time. I completely agree with Yancy that society's prevailing impression of Christians is that they're a bunch of judgmental exclusionists rather than grace-filled, generous people. I'm a Christian, but I sometimes inwardly cringe when I proclaim it due to the negative thoughts the word evokes. It's sad and frustrating to me that so many Christians are so eager to pass judgement and be unforgiving when that was exactly the opposite of what Jesus stood for. Although I really liked Yancy's message, I had a tough time not getting bored with the book, mainly because it's non-fiction and I generally don't enjoy non-fiction as much. 2.5 stars, rounded to 3

  29. 4 out of 5

    James Wilson

    WOW, whether you are a Christian or not this book is an amazing, thought provoking and challenging read. What can Christianity bring to the world which is unique? Grace, the unfair, undeserved, totally illogical gift, that we are so bad at sharing. This is not a deep academic about all the aspects of Grace, its an exploration of what grace is, why we need it, and why its hard to accept and to show. Shown through real life stories, and quotes. This book challenged me to the core of my beliefs, abou WOW, whether you are a Christian or not this book is an amazing, thought provoking and challenging read. What can Christianity bring to the world which is unique? Grace, the unfair, undeserved, totally illogical gift, that we are so bad at sharing. This is not a deep academic about all the aspects of Grace, its an exploration of what grace is, why we need it, and why its hard to accept and to show. Shown through real life stories, and quotes. This book challenged me to the core of my beliefs, about my faith and about who I am as a person. everyone should read this at least once in their life, its an easy read not full of religious doctrine but full of stories and thoughts about how Grace affects our lives and why it is so needed within the world. In summary READ IT it may just change your life

  30. 5 out of 5

    Michael Decamp

    This is now my second full reading of this fantastic book! If you come from a Christian faith background, you need to read this book! If you come from a church background that was performance-oriented, you really need to read this book! I can speak from experience. Being someone who has made the journey of passing through the treacherous roads of legalistic, performance-based church organizations, an accurate and growing understanding of the grace of God is critical to the health and wellbeing o This is now my second full reading of this fantastic book! If you come from a Christian faith background, you need to read this book! If you come from a church background that was performance-oriented, you really need to read this book! I can speak from experience. Being someone who has made the journey of passing through the treacherous roads of legalistic, performance-based church organizations, an accurate and growing understanding of the grace of God is critical to the health and wellbeing of a person's spiritual life. There is a fear out there that if churches focus too much on grace then people will stop doing the works of the church. That cannot be further from the truth. Only a deep understanding of the gift of grace can actually sustain the life's work of the Christian. It is the only true motivation that really works. Again, I highly recommend this book.

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