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America in 1982: Japanese car companies are on the rise and believed to be putting U.S. autoworkers out of their jobs. Anti–Asian American sentiment simmers, especially in Detroit. A bar fight turns fatal, leaving a Chinese American man, Vincent Chin, beaten to death at the hands of two white men, autoworker Ronald Ebens and his stepson, Michael Nitz. Paula Yoo has crafted America in 1982: Japanese car companies are on the rise and believed to be putting U.S. autoworkers out of their jobs. Anti–Asian American sentiment simmers, especially in Detroit. A bar fight turns fatal, leaving a Chinese American man, Vincent Chin, beaten to death at the hands of two white men, autoworker Ronald Ebens and his stepson, Michael Nitz. Paula Yoo has crafted a searing examination of the killing and the trial and verdicts that followed. When Ebens and Nitz pled guilty to manslaughter and received only a $3,000 fine and three years’ probation, the lenient sentence sparked outrage. The protests that followed led to a federal civil rights trial—the first involving a crime against an Asian American—and galvanized what came to be known as the Asian American movement. Extensively researched from court transcripts, contemporary news accounts, and in-person interviews with key participants, From a Whisper to a Rallying Cry is a suspenseful, nuanced, and authoritative portrait of a pivotal moment in civil rights history, and a man who became a symbol against hatred and racism.


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America in 1982: Japanese car companies are on the rise and believed to be putting U.S. autoworkers out of their jobs. Anti–Asian American sentiment simmers, especially in Detroit. A bar fight turns fatal, leaving a Chinese American man, Vincent Chin, beaten to death at the hands of two white men, autoworker Ronald Ebens and his stepson, Michael Nitz. Paula Yoo has crafted America in 1982: Japanese car companies are on the rise and believed to be putting U.S. autoworkers out of their jobs. Anti–Asian American sentiment simmers, especially in Detroit. A bar fight turns fatal, leaving a Chinese American man, Vincent Chin, beaten to death at the hands of two white men, autoworker Ronald Ebens and his stepson, Michael Nitz. Paula Yoo has crafted a searing examination of the killing and the trial and verdicts that followed. When Ebens and Nitz pled guilty to manslaughter and received only a $3,000 fine and three years’ probation, the lenient sentence sparked outrage. The protests that followed led to a federal civil rights trial—the first involving a crime against an Asian American—and galvanized what came to be known as the Asian American movement. Extensively researched from court transcripts, contemporary news accounts, and in-person interviews with key participants, From a Whisper to a Rallying Cry is a suspenseful, nuanced, and authoritative portrait of a pivotal moment in civil rights history, and a man who became a symbol against hatred and racism.

30 review for From a Whisper to a Rallying Cry: The Killing of Vincent Chin and the Trial that Galvanized the Asian American Movement

  1. 4 out of 5

    Emi Bevacqua

    When Vincent Chin was brutally murdered in Detroit by an auto worker and his laid off step-son in June of 1982, I had just finished my sophomore year of high school in the suburbs, where I was the only Japanese-American student and everybody seemed to assume that me and Kim the only Korean-American and Plato the only Chinese-American were all either related or interchangeable. My Japanese father, who was working in the auto industry at the time, died last year, and this is yet another thing I wi When Vincent Chin was brutally murdered in Detroit by an auto worker and his laid off step-son in June of 1982, I had just finished my sophomore year of high school in the suburbs, where I was the only Japanese-American student and everybody seemed to assume that me and Kim the only Korean-American and Plato the only Chinese-American were all either related or interchangeable. My Japanese father, who was working in the auto industry at the time, died last year, and this is yet another thing I wish I'd had the opportunity to discuss with him. Especially now, in light of all the anti-Asian violence Trump instigated with his China Flu baiting. Paula Yoo's timing for this book release is impeccable. I like how she describes the local and national history leading up to the fateful event, which became the country's first federal civil rights trial in connection with an Asian American citizen, in addition to faithfully researching its personal, legal and political aftermath. I was so sickened by Ron Ebens being sentenced to probation and a $3,000 fine for bashing in a young man's head over and over and over again with a baseball bat. And then all the more with the realization of what he meant when he told police officers on the scene "he shouldn't have done it". That Vincent Chin shouldn't have reacted to insults being hurled at him, that he should have sucked it up like he's supposed to. To quote Helen Zia, "it just goes to show just how ignorant white America is."

  2. 5 out of 5

    Siofra

    My deepest thanks to Netgalley & publishers for giving me an arc of this book! After reading 'from a whisper to a rallying cry', one thing stands out to me: Even after 40 years, Vincent Chin's case is still very much present in the world, the hate is still here and unforgivably living. This book gave me a part of American/world history I didn't know. And showed me that I need to look harder at the world and history & today. This book was a perfectly unbiased read; it made sure you felt the heartbr My deepest thanks to Netgalley & publishers for giving me an arc of this book! After reading 'from a whisper to a rallying cry', one thing stands out to me: Even after 40 years, Vincent Chin's case is still very much present in the world, the hate is still here and unforgivably living. This book gave me a part of American/world history I didn't know. And showed me that I need to look harder at the world and history & today. This book was a perfectly unbiased read; it made sure you felt the heartbreak of the case and that you knew everyone from Lily Chin to Eben were human, and it gave their sides and the facts. No one can claim it was biased or that it affected their opinion in this case. It, in the end, left me heartbroken. Little note: I will be requesting my store and stores surrounding me to get this book. The hate and harassment that Asians in the world had to experience during the pandemic were awful, and I hope that many can read this and realize we must always fight for each other. We have to fight for the BLM, Chinese Muslims, and more.

  3. 5 out of 5

    Kelly

    For readers who want a book at the intersection of true crime and social justice, Yoon's YA nonfiction is a winner. The book follows the murder of young Chinese American Vincent Chin in Detroit in 19082 by two white men, Ronald Ebens and Michael Nitz. What began as a fight at a dance club sparked a series of trials where racism lie at the heart of the murder -- at a time when anti-Asian sentiment in Detroit was high, especially among those in and near the auto industry, many believed this crime For readers who want a book at the intersection of true crime and social justice, Yoon's YA nonfiction is a winner. The book follows the murder of young Chinese American Vincent Chin in Detroit in 19082 by two white men, Ronald Ebens and Michael Nitz. What began as a fight at a dance club sparked a series of trials where racism lie at the heart of the murder -- at a time when anti-Asian sentiment in Detroit was high, especially among those in and near the auto industry, many believed this crime happened as a result. The series of trials were able to happen due to Vincent's mother Lily advocating for her son and helping spearhead social justice movements among and for Asian Americans. The book, which initially doesn't seem like YA, is a read so many teens will love because of how it ties together crime and social justice. But it also is a story of family secrets: the framing of the book is around Vincent's fiancee's son, who never knew his mother lost her first love to violence. When he discovers this, he unravels a whole history of his mom, his family, and Asian American activism he never knew before. Yoo's research is excellent and the narrative engaging. It's not an easy read, and it's a reminder that 1982 wasn't that long ago. The end of the book ties the events in the early 80s to today's anti-Asian sentiments.

  4. 4 out of 5

    Alex

    Thanks to the publisher for providing an eARC of From a Whisper to a Rallying Cry in exchange for an honest review. It's difficult with books like these to separate content and intent from impact because ultimately while I think Vincent Chin's story and the implications of it on a global scale are important things to examine, I don't think Yoo did a good job of it here. From a Whisper to a Rallying Cry turns the story of Vincent Chin and the impact of his murder into a YA piece and while I appreci Thanks to the publisher for providing an eARC of From a Whisper to a Rallying Cry in exchange for an honest review. It's difficult with books like these to separate content and intent from impact because ultimately while I think Vincent Chin's story and the implications of it on a global scale are important things to examine, I don't think Yoo did a good job of it here. From a Whisper to a Rallying Cry turns the story of Vincent Chin and the impact of his murder into a YA piece and while I appreciate Yoo's intent, it wasn't well done. This is mostly just shelved as YA because we occasionally peak in on the son of Chin's fiancée, but I wouldn't even call it a framing device. It's more like an occasional after thought to justify this being YA. The story is also way longer and slower than it should have been to novelize everything and the narration is blunt and clinical and honestly, the whole time I was reading it, I was just wishing I'd researched Vincent Chin on my own instead. Everything good about this comes from facts and quotes surrounding the case and instead of making that more lyrical or more compelling to appeal to a new audience, this book bogs it down to try and turn it into a novel and it didn't work for me.

  5. 5 out of 5

    Danielle Wood

    I received an ARC of this book from NetGalley in exchange for an honest review. I was born in the late 80s so just slightly past when the last bit of these court proceedings passed. I still never heard anything about this story though. This book really touched my heart, especially in light of recent hate crimes against the AAPI population. This is an important book to read.

  6. 5 out of 5

    Amanda

    Overall, this book did a good job of relaying the complexity of the Vincent Chin case from the cultural context, the act itself, the trials, and its legacy, up to and including the racism surrounding the Coronavirus. That said, this retelling was a slog. If part of the intent was to sympathize with the dragging of the justice system that ultimately failed by being slowly dragged through the process, then it succeeds. I don't see a YA audience going for this. I dont see other 40 somethings like m Overall, this book did a good job of relaying the complexity of the Vincent Chin case from the cultural context, the act itself, the trials, and its legacy, up to and including the racism surrounding the Coronavirus. That said, this retelling was a slog. If part of the intent was to sympathize with the dragging of the justice system that ultimately failed by being slowly dragged through the process, then it succeeds. I don't see a YA audience going for this. I dont see other 40 somethings like myself going for this. I am also not sure how this is YA. There is an occasional parallel story drawn about the son of Vincent's former fiancee. It was distracting more than enlightening and the story arc never was completed. My take away is to seek out the documentaries mentioned and / or shorter video clips to incorporate into lessons on the economic changes in cities like Detroit in the 70s and 80s. If anyone has opinions or sources on those, let me know!! Thank you to Paula Yoo, WW Norton and Co, and Netgalley for a free ecopy in exchange for an honest review

  7. 5 out of 5

    Ben Truong

    From a Whisper to a Rallying Cry: The Killing of Vincent Chin and the Trial that Galvanized the Asian American Movement is an account of the 1982 killing of Vincent Chin and its subsequent impact on Asian Americans' civil rights struggles. Paula Yoo, an author, screenwriter, and musician wrote this biography. Vincent Jen Chin was a Chinese American draftsman who was beaten to death by two white men, Chrysler plant supervisor Ronald Ebens and his stepson, laid-off autoworker Michael Nitz. Ebens an From a Whisper to a Rallying Cry: The Killing of Vincent Chin and the Trial that Galvanized the Asian American Movement is an account of the 1982 killing of Vincent Chin and its subsequent impact on Asian Americans' civil rights struggles. Paula Yoo, an author, screenwriter, and musician wrote this biography. Vincent Jen Chin was a Chinese American draftsman who was beaten to death by two white men, Chrysler plant supervisor Ronald Ebens and his stepson, laid-off autoworker Michael Nitz. Ebens and Nitz assailed Chin following a brawl that took place at a strip club in Highland Park, Michigan, where Chin had been celebrating his bachelor party with friends in advance of his upcoming wedding. They apparently assumed Chin was of Japanese descent and are alleged to have used racial slurs as they attacked him. In 1982 Detroit, anti–Asian American sentiment is on the rise as Japanese car companies are purported to threaten the livelihoods of American autoworkers. After autoworker Ronald Ebens and his stepson Michael Nitz, both white, kill Chinese American Vincent Chin, they plead guilty to his manslaughter, but are let off with a lenient sentence. This served as a wake-up call for Asian America, as this incident spurs outrage and action in the Asian American community. From a Whisper to a Rallying Cry: The Killing of Vincent Chin and the Trial that Galvanized the Asian American Movement is written and researched extremely well – it is far from perfect, but it comes rather close. Through in-person interviews, court transcripts, and present-day accounts, Yoo's exhaustively details Chin’s murder and carefully considers its resulting impact. Eyewitness accounts provide clarity, and detailed chronicling of the trials elicits justified frustration on the final verdict. In six well-structured parts, suspenseful narration illuminates Chin's personal life, his gruesome death, the trials’ obstacles, and Chin’s legacy with well-integrated news clippings and emotive photographs imbue events with a hard-hitting real-time feel. Furthermore, this resonant, painstakingly recreated historical account features a timely afterword spotlighting the rise in anti-AAPI violence amid the Covid-19 pandemic, drawing parallels between this haunting account of a 40-year-old crime to present-day atrocities. Back matter includes a timeline, notes, list of sources, and suggestions for further reading. All in all, From a Whisper to a Rallying Cry: The Killing of Vincent Chin and the Trial that Galvanized the Asian American Movement is an accessible and compelling account of a tragedy that resonates through the decades.

  8. 5 out of 5

    Dow

    Such an important book. It was at times heart wrenching to read, but I believe all Americans should know of this story: this murder that brought Asian Americans together to fight against anti-Asian racism for the first time in history. To think that this occurred in our lifetime, this terrible injustice, leaves me shaking my head: a murderer, with obvious intent, who never served a single day of jail time because of privilege. We cannot forget Vincent Chin, especially today, when we are facing s Such an important book. It was at times heart wrenching to read, but I believe all Americans should know of this story: this murder that brought Asian Americans together to fight against anti-Asian racism for the first time in history. To think that this occurred in our lifetime, this terrible injustice, leaves me shaking my head: a murderer, with obvious intent, who never served a single day of jail time because of privilege. We cannot forget Vincent Chin, especially today, when we are facing similar anti-Asian hatred anew. Back then it was the automobile industry and Japanese imports. Now, some Americans are looking for scapegoats in the time of the pandemic, with fuel from the racist former president. It is a strong reminder that our work towards equality for all Americans is far from done.

  9. 5 out of 5

    Audrey

    Vincent Chin isn't the first Asian American to be murdered out of hate and he won't be the last. But, his violent death brought together the AAPI diaspora and started a movement. Here, the AAPI community, first in Detroit and then around the country, rallied with allies to help bring his case forward and reevaluated. We are the cusp of the 40th anniversary and it's unfortunate how little things have changed. Vincent Chin's death was tragic and criminal but not in vain. ETA: May 2021 staff pick Vincent Chin isn't the first Asian American to be murdered out of hate and he won't be the last. But, his violent death brought together the AAPI diaspora and started a movement. Here, the AAPI community, first in Detroit and then around the country, rallied with allies to help bring his case forward and reevaluated. We are the cusp of the 40th anniversary and it's unfortunate how little things have changed. Vincent Chin's death was tragic and criminal but not in vain. ETA: May 2021 staff pick

  10. 4 out of 5

    K

    "From a Whisper to a Rallying Cry" is pretty heavy for a Children's Nonfiction book, but appropriately so. Building on "Every truth has two sides; it is as well to look at both, before we commit ourselves to either," Yoo compiled a narrative of VIncent Chin's story (and beyond) from numerous vantage points, including those of the men who pled guilty to his death. The end product is a book as heartbreaking as it is detailed. The story follows Chin's story from his childhood, the local court, the "From a Whisper to a Rallying Cry" is pretty heavy for a Children's Nonfiction book, but appropriately so. Building on "Every truth has two sides; it is as well to look at both, before we commit ourselves to either," Yoo compiled a narrative of VIncent Chin's story (and beyond) from numerous vantage points, including those of the men who pled guilty to his death. The end product is a book as heartbreaking as it is detailed. The story follows Chin's story from his childhood, the local court, the local federal court, and its legal end in appeals court. Additional context is provided for how Lily Chin lived the rest of her life on earth, an update on the guilty party, and how Vincent's story led to changes in the legal system. The courtroom drama portion of the book may turn off younger readers, but the narrative spared from inline footnotes made it more compelling to me. (I received a free electronic copy of this book in exchange for my honest opinion.)

  11. 5 out of 5

    Amethyst

    Do you know the story of Vincent Chin, the 27-year-old bookish and outgoing Chinese American man who was beaten to death by a baseball bat days on the evening of his bachelor party by two White men? If so, you may remember that the men who murdered him were sentenced to $3,000 each plus probation for their premeditated murder. And if so, then you may also remember how the judge’s ruling galvanized the multicultural “Asian American movement” in the ‘80s. Black, Latinx, and Jewish groups joined to Do you know the story of Vincent Chin, the 27-year-old bookish and outgoing Chinese American man who was beaten to death by a baseball bat days on the evening of his bachelor party by two White men? If so, you may remember that the men who murdered him were sentenced to $3,000 each plus probation for their premeditated murder. And if so, then you may also remember how the judge’s ruling galvanized the multicultural “Asian American movement” in the ‘80s. Black, Latinx, and Jewish groups joined together with Asian groups to demand justice for Vincent Chin through a civil rights trial. And then a second. This book speaks to Vincent Chin’s humanity; how his life and death impacted his fiancée, friends, mother, coworkers, and future activists. It also explores centuries-old xenophobia and anti-Asian discrimination and violence; how Asian Americans have been scapegoated for the decline of the auto industry then and for the COVID-19 pandemic now. Paula Yoo analyses court transcripts, news accounts, and interviews; this book is as well-researched as it is heartbreaking. Vincent Chin’s life mattered. I cannot help but also think of the victims of the domestic terrorist attack at the Atlanta spa: Soon Chung Park, age 74; Hyun Jung Grant, age 51; Suncha Kim, age 69; Yong Yue, age 63; Delaina Ashley Yaun, age 33; Paul Andre Michels, age 54; Xiaojie Tan, age 49; Daoyou Feng, age 44. Their lives and the countless other victims of racialized violence and hate crimes matter. May their lives be remembered in the continued fight against White supremacy and injustice. May the family and friends who survived their deaths find peace and healing. Thank you to RB Media Recorded Books, Paula Yoo, and NetGalley for a copy of this audiobook in exchange for an honest review.

  12. 4 out of 5

    Erricka Hager

    I struggle with the rating for this book because while I really enjoyed learning about Vincent Chin, the book really dragged with reviewing the case. I'm sure the dragging was synonymous with the criminal justice system in the United States but still, there were parts in this book that I could've done without. This true crime examination of the wrongful murder of Vincent Chin, a young Asian American attempting to live the American dream in Detroit. We follow the events that led up to Vincent Chin I struggle with the rating for this book because while I really enjoyed learning about Vincent Chin, the book really dragged with reviewing the case. I'm sure the dragging was synonymous with the criminal justice system in the United States but still, there were parts in this book that I could've done without. This true crime examination of the wrongful murder of Vincent Chin, a young Asian American attempting to live the American dream in Detroit. We follow the events that led up to Vincent Chin's murder to the LONG trajectory his case went through for his family to receive some justice. We follow the case as it moves through multiple barriers - gaining traction in the AAPI community, gaining allies, navigating the criminal justice system, etc - and how Chin's case sparked a social justice movement. I think this book is very important and a timely read for the current hate crimes that the AAPI community is experiencing. But, I'm not sure if this book is for the YA genre. I think there were maybe two sections in the book where the author attempted to connect present-day family members to Vincent Chin's but I seriously could've done without that; it just felt like an afterthought. Overall this was a quick and easy (at times) read but I'm still torn on who this book is for. Thank you to Paula Yoo, WW Norton and Co, and Netgalley for gifting me with this advanced reader's copy in exchange for my honest review.

  13. 5 out of 5

    Stacy

    From a Whisper to a Rallying Cry tells the story of Vincent Chin's murder in 1982 Detroit and the outrage that followed it. Paula Yoo did an excellent job researching the story and presenting all sides. It is fascinating to me how one man's murder brought together Asian Americans of all ethnicities into one cohesive group to look for justice. The book's timing is impeccable to bring Chin's story to a new generation, especially with all the anti-Asian hatred that has been going on due to the pand From a Whisper to a Rallying Cry tells the story of Vincent Chin's murder in 1982 Detroit and the outrage that followed it. Paula Yoo did an excellent job researching the story and presenting all sides. It is fascinating to me how one man's murder brought together Asian Americans of all ethnicities into one cohesive group to look for justice. The book's timing is impeccable to bring Chin's story to a new generation, especially with all the anti-Asian hatred that has been going on due to the pandemic. I did not realize until after I listened to the book that it has been classified as YA, and I am not entirely sure why it has been. Catherine Ho did a fantastic job with the narration. There were times when the story seemed to drag a bit, but overall, this was an heartbreaking and informative book. Many thanks to NetGalley for providing me an audio ARC of this book.

  14. 4 out of 5

    Toni

    Wow. I am not a native of Michigan but as a current resident I am always intrigued by books that contain historical elements from this area, particularly the metro Detroit area. I had not heard of Vincent Chin before reading this book and was fascinated by the details of this story (albeit the description of the murder was a bit gruesome). Not only were the facts of the case laid out in an easy to follow and understand manner, the consequences and changes in current policy were also explored. Fa Wow. I am not a native of Michigan but as a current resident I am always intrigued by books that contain historical elements from this area, particularly the metro Detroit area. I had not heard of Vincent Chin before reading this book and was fascinated by the details of this story (albeit the description of the murder was a bit gruesome). Not only were the facts of the case laid out in an easy to follow and understand manner, the consequences and changes in current policy were also explored. Fascinating read.

  15. 4 out of 5

    Natasha C

    This is a really interesting read for young adults as a lens into the criminal justice system and how Asian Americans came together as a group, even bringing the term "Asian American" really into existence the way we think of it today. The last chapter draws direct parallels to racism Asian Americans face today and explains how while many have forgotten the name Vincent Chin, the movement's effects still touch us. It is an important argument for why we should pass on this book and its history to This is a really interesting read for young adults as a lens into the criminal justice system and how Asian Americans came together as a group, even bringing the term "Asian American" really into existence the way we think of it today. The last chapter draws direct parallels to racism Asian Americans face today and explains how while many have forgotten the name Vincent Chin, the movement's effects still touch us. It is an important argument for why we should pass on this book and its history to the next generation.

  16. 4 out of 5

    Tlc

    I was given an ARC for free and found myself unable to put the book down. Written in story form, the author unfolds the true events leading up to as well as after the murder of Vincent Chin in the 1970s. Both sides of the trials are sketched well which leaves the reader wondering how two different juries could come up with such different verdicts. This book changed my perspective in so many ways.

  17. 4 out of 5

    Bernie

    Audiobook. I’ve been seeing a lot about this book recently as people highlight works by AAPI authors on social media to counteract anti-Asian violence. It was only published in the last couple weeks so I was happy to find it available. It was well told and well researched and gave me insight into yet another event in history that I did not know about.

  18. 5 out of 5

    Amy

    The unnecessary death of 27 year-old Vincent Chin, the night before his wedding, by the hands of Asian-American haters, shocked the country, who demanded justice after the attackers were set free. This book shows how people rallied for rights to be protected, took us into the lives of his family, and we learned about the American culture at this time.

  19. 5 out of 5

    Glenda Nelms

    Heartbreaking and heart `wrenching for Vincent Chin's family, friends and his community. This book reminds readers that the fight to end Anti-Asian hate and racial injustice in this world still continues. Heartbreaking and heart `wrenching for Vincent Chin's family, friends and his community. This book reminds readers that the fight to end Anti-Asian hate and racial injustice in this world still continues.

  20. 5 out of 5

    Missie Jacobson

    I think in was to young to know about what happened with Vincent Chin (I was born in 1982) so I didn't know this case. What happened here is utterly horrible! I had no idea judges could accept plea bargains like this. With everything that has happened in 2020 this story broke my heart. And is so relevant to today. Anyone who wants to work on becoming an ally should read this. I think in was to young to know about what happened with Vincent Chin (I was born in 1982) so I didn't know this case. What happened here is utterly horrible! I had no idea judges could accept plea bargains like this. With everything that has happened in 2020 this story broke my heart. And is so relevant to today. Anyone who wants to work on becoming an ally should read this.

  21. 5 out of 5

    Libriar

    An important book being published at exactly the moment it is needed most. I knew nothing about the murder of Vincent Chin and I learned a lot from this book. However, the style in which the story was told was not very engaging. It is going to be hard to get teens to read or listen to this.

  22. 5 out of 5

    OjoAusana

    *received for free from netgalley for honest review* Wow im shocked i've never heard of this case before, what a sad one too. Plan on buying this book for my dad too. *received for free from netgalley for honest review* Wow im shocked i've never heard of this case before, what a sad one too. Plan on buying this book for my dad too.

  23. 4 out of 5

    Kim

    This meticulously researched book shines a light on a little-known killing in the early 1980s in a Detroit suburb, and the impact that the case had on civil rights for Asian-Americans. Yoo’s delivery is matter-of-fact, keeping readers at arm’s length. The density of the recounting may deter some teens, but those who persevere will appreciate how their views of this country’s history with race relations are broadened. 3.5 stars rounded up to 4. Thanks to Norton Young Readers and Edelweiss for the d This meticulously researched book shines a light on a little-known killing in the early 1980s in a Detroit suburb, and the impact that the case had on civil rights for Asian-Americans. Yoo’s delivery is matter-of-fact, keeping readers at arm’s length. The density of the recounting may deter some teens, but those who persevere will appreciate how their views of this country’s history with race relations are broadened. 3.5 stars rounded up to 4. Thanks to Norton Young Readers and Edelweiss for the digital ARC.

  24. 5 out of 5

    Rebecca Russell

  25. 4 out of 5

    Erica Martin

  26. 4 out of 5

    Elizabeth Keener

  27. 5 out of 5

    Cami Andersen

  28. 4 out of 5

    Liz

  29. 4 out of 5

    Marge Shaffer

  30. 4 out of 5

    John

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