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After the Rain

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During a furious storm a young woman’s destiny is revealed . . . and her life is changed forever   After the Rain is a graphic novel adaptation of Nnedi Okorafor’s short story “On the Road.” The drama takes place in a small Nigerian town during a violent and unexpected storm. A Nigerian-American woman named Chioma answers a knock at her door and is horrified to see a boy wi During a furious storm a young woman’s destiny is revealed . . . and her life is changed forever   After the Rain is a graphic novel adaptation of Nnedi Okorafor’s short story “On the Road.” The drama takes place in a small Nigerian town during a violent and unexpected storm. A Nigerian-American woman named Chioma answers a knock at her door and is horrified to see a boy with a severe head wound standing at her doorstep. He reaches for her, and his touch burns like fire. Something is very wrong. Haunted and hunted, Chioma must embrace her heritage in order to survive. John Jennings and David Brame’s graphic novel collaboration uses bold art and colors to powerfully tell this tale of identity and destiny.  


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During a furious storm a young woman’s destiny is revealed . . . and her life is changed forever   After the Rain is a graphic novel adaptation of Nnedi Okorafor’s short story “On the Road.” The drama takes place in a small Nigerian town during a violent and unexpected storm. A Nigerian-American woman named Chioma answers a knock at her door and is horrified to see a boy wi During a furious storm a young woman’s destiny is revealed . . . and her life is changed forever   After the Rain is a graphic novel adaptation of Nnedi Okorafor’s short story “On the Road.” The drama takes place in a small Nigerian town during a violent and unexpected storm. A Nigerian-American woman named Chioma answers a knock at her door and is horrified to see a boy with a severe head wound standing at her doorstep. He reaches for her, and his touch burns like fire. Something is very wrong. Haunted and hunted, Chioma must embrace her heritage in order to survive. John Jennings and David Brame’s graphic novel collaboration uses bold art and colors to powerfully tell this tale of identity and destiny.  

30 review for After the Rain

  1. 5 out of 5

    Starlah

    In this graphic novel adaptation of Nnedi Okorafor's short story "On the Road", we are following Chioma, who is visiting her family in Nigeria. Shortly after she arrives, the rural town is hit with a harsh storm. And as soon as the rain stops, a young man comes to the door. When Chioma answers, she sees that his head is bashed in, there is blood everywhere, and with all her knowledge and common sense, this boy should be dead. Her instinct, as a police officer, is to help him. So she let's, not o In this graphic novel adaptation of Nnedi Okorafor's short story "On the Road", we are following Chioma, who is visiting her family in Nigeria. Shortly after she arrives, the rural town is hit with a harsh storm. And as soon as the rain stops, a young man comes to the door. When Chioma answers, she sees that his head is bashed in, there is blood everywhere, and with all her knowledge and common sense, this boy should be dead. Her instinct, as a police officer, is to help him. So she let's, not only this boy but the curse that follows him, into her life. Over the next few days, Chioma feels like she is being followed. There is a nasty odor she can't seem to determine it's origin. And the town's lizards flock to her in scary numbers. She has no idea what she has awoken, but her grandmother, great aunt, and the other town elders seem to be preparing for what's to come. As always, Okorafor does such an amazing job conveying so much in so few words. The way she built up the tension in this story had me actually anxious. And the build-up to the big reveal truly paid off. As with the majority of Okorafor's writings, this story centers on African mythology and it is absolutely beautiful. Also, I was obsessed with David Brame's illustrations throughout this. They truly took this story to the next level. There is artwork in this that I want to print and hang on my walls. The ending to this was really cool and I'm truly hoping and crossing my fingers that there will be more in this world. The only issue I had with this, was that there were a couple of instances where the story didn't line up with what was happening in the illustrations and that kind of threw me off for a moment. But it's a very small complaint Overall, this was haunting, thrilling, beautiful, and a great read!

  2. 4 out of 5

    Sheena

    The quality of the digital arc was terrible, I had to squint and zoom in just to read some of the pages. Even then it was almost impossible to read and it was a little frustrating. This definitely took away from the experience so I hope whatever happened will be fixed upon publication. As for the positives, I loved the artwork and wish it was in color! The cover makes sense now but I do feel like it was rushed and wish there were more answers. I was a little confused at the end too. I’d like to The quality of the digital arc was terrible, I had to squint and zoom in just to read some of the pages. Even then it was almost impossible to read and it was a little frustrating. This definitely took away from the experience so I hope whatever happened will be fixed upon publication. As for the positives, I loved the artwork and wish it was in color! The cover makes sense now but I do feel like it was rushed and wish there were more answers. I was a little confused at the end too. I’d like to see more from Nnedi Okorafor in the future. Thank you for the advanced copy to Netgalley and the publisher!

  3. 5 out of 5

    Michelle

    "On the Road" is a short story from Nnedi Okorafor's Kabu Kabu collection. Chioma is a visiting her family in Nigeria. Shortly after arriving the town is hit with torrential rains in which should have been their dry season. As soon as the rain stops you have this young man come to her door. His head is bashed in. Chioma can see the blood matter. For all intents and purposes this young man should not be alive. He should not be able to walk or talk. But there he is, the monster at her door. And sh "On the Road" is a short story from Nnedi Okorafor's Kabu Kabu collection. Chioma is a visiting her family in Nigeria. Shortly after arriving the town is hit with torrential rains in which should have been their dry season. As soon as the rain stops you have this young man come to her door. His head is bashed in. Chioma can see the blood matter. For all intents and purposes this young man should not be alive. He should not be able to walk or talk. But there he is, the monster at her door. And she lets him in. Over the next few days Chioma senses she is being followed. There is a strange odor wafting through her house and she seems to possess a strange magnetism for the town's lizards. She has no idea what she has awoken or what fate awaits her. But the elders of the town seem to know something. As Chioma gets thinner and weaker the women of the village prepare for what's to come. Okorafor does a great job with the build up. She certainly had me anxious and it definitely did not help that I was reading this story at 3 am on a rainy day when the house and neighborhood were fast asleep. Like Binti, I found that I fell right into the story and the pages of this fantasy came to life. As with the majority of Okorafor's work After the Rain is centered on African mythology. For the most part the graphic novel is true to "On the Road" with a few departures for clarity's sake. I loved the artwork by David Brame and found that his illustrations really do make the story leap off the page. I am hoping that this is a superhero origin story and that there will be a spin off or sequel to After the Rain.

  4. 4 out of 5

    Knightshereads

    3.5 stars maybe? I really loved the atmosphere of this book and the art style really topped it off, though it was really hard to read sometimes (the words were blurry on my device) The fact that there wasn't any explanation near the end kinda rubbed me the wrong way, but then I thought, it leaves a long impression and has you forever guessing like the characters in there. Love the mention of food, the culture shown, and just the vibes. But the execution felt a bit flat in a sense to me esp the endi 3.5 stars maybe? I really loved the atmosphere of this book and the art style really topped it off, though it was really hard to read sometimes (the words were blurry on my device) The fact that there wasn't any explanation near the end kinda rubbed me the wrong way, but then I thought, it leaves a long impression and has you forever guessing like the characters in there. Love the mention of food, the culture shown, and just the vibes. But the execution felt a bit flat in a sense to me esp the ending felt quite rushed ?

  5. 4 out of 5

    Geoff

    After the Rain is a very interesting graphic novel about cultural identity, guilt, redemption, tradition, and above all, Nigerian traditional beliefs. It is a bit confusing at times, since the protagonist is a Nigerian American (or "Nigamerican " in Okorafor's coinage) who has little understanding of what is happening to her, and the author doesn't spoon-feed anything to us. It's really interesting that this graphic novel was based on a short story, since the art (althoguh rough) is at its best After the Rain is a very interesting graphic novel about cultural identity, guilt, redemption, tradition, and above all, Nigerian traditional beliefs. It is a bit confusing at times, since the protagonist is a Nigerian American (or "Nigamerican " in Okorafor's coinage) who has little understanding of what is happening to her, and the author doesn't spoon-feed anything to us. It's really interesting that this graphic novel was based on a short story, since the art (althoguh rough) is at its best with depictions of the Nigerian mythical entities and spirits actually does help give some context and understanding as to what is going on. And the goings on are creepy, unsettling, and ultimately empowering. An engaging read.

  6. 4 out of 5

    Roxie |The Book Slayer| Voorhees

    Thank you NetGalley for a gifted eARC of this title in exchange for an honest review. It is really unfortunate that I must review the copy I was given. This review is based solely on that file and I will likely seek out a finished print copy to fully appreciate this story. My first heartache occured after downloading the kindle file to find out that it is in black and white. (The finished copy will be full color) I have a strong distaste for graphic novels not in color. The purpose one reads a gr Thank you NetGalley for a gifted eARC of this title in exchange for an honest review. It is really unfortunate that I must review the copy I was given. This review is based solely on that file and I will likely seek out a finished print copy to fully appreciate this story. My first heartache occured after downloading the kindle file to find out that it is in black and white. (The finished copy will be full color) I have a strong distaste for graphic novels not in color. The purpose one reads a graphic novel (instead of or in conjuction with the original format) IS the art! From what I could tell, the art is decent, but the grayscale really does it no favors. Then whomever inked this perticular file, used a defective font. Just throw that salt in the wound why don't you! I could only read about every third word and had to guess the context. It was a very unhappy experience. SO I can't fully rate the art or the story of this GN accurately. I give THIS file this rating and really hope they redeem themselves in January.

  7. 5 out of 5

    Rod Brown

    A thirtysomething Nigerian American police officer from Chicago falls into some supernatural something or other with visions and body horror during a visit to her grandmother in Nigeria. I haven't read the original story, but this adaptation left me a bit confused and mostly indifferent, especially since it does not seem well-done, with words and images sometimes out of sync or outright contradicting each other: a pink lizard is blue, the stone face of a monster suddenly transforms into the wood A thirtysomething Nigerian American police officer from Chicago falls into some supernatural something or other with visions and body horror during a visit to her grandmother in Nigeria. I haven't read the original story, but this adaptation left me a bit confused and mostly indifferent, especially since it does not seem well-done, with words and images sometimes out of sync or outright contradicting each other: a pink lizard is blue, the stone face of a monster suddenly transforms into the wood mask with which (uh-oh) it has been depicted for the last eight pages. The art is a bit too cartoony to ever seem scary or ominous. By the end it seems like the set-up for a sequel that might be more interesting.

  8. 4 out of 5

    Peacegal

    This is a unique graphic novel that blends elements of traditional Nigerian folklore with modern horror and supernatural imagery. At times I had difficulty following the storyline, but the illustrations crackled with life and energy, and there were some truly creepy monster/horror moments.

  9. 4 out of 5

    Tate

    TWs: extensive body horror; death/murder; blood/gore Rep: Nigerian-American MC; Nigerian cast -- Honestly, I'm...not sure what to say about this book? I just felt unattached to it. I didn't feel like I knew the main character or had a reason to care for her, which isn't necessarily the point in every horror short story, but it felt like the story wanted me to care and I didn't. I also had a sense that I was missing something or not grasping what they wanted me to throughout--maybe that's user error TWs: extensive body horror; death/murder; blood/gore Rep: Nigerian-American MC; Nigerian cast -- Honestly, I'm...not sure what to say about this book? I just felt unattached to it. I didn't feel like I knew the main character or had a reason to care for her, which isn't necessarily the point in every horror short story, but it felt like the story wanted me to care and I didn't. I also had a sense that I was missing something or not grasping what they wanted me to throughout--maybe that's user error, maybe that's an issue of fleshing out the story, maybe that's not translating it properly into graphic novel form, I'm not sure. (Speaking of graphic novel form, I want to note I haven't read the short story this is adapted from, so I can't comment on how it went from there to here.) The ARC quality was also not great (all b/w and grainy), which might've affected the experience. I will say I liked the unsettling art style and the concept--just wish I'd felt like I got more out of it by the end.

  10. 5 out of 5

    Brandie Shanae Bridges

    The book was very interesting, but when you get closer to the end of the book there was more chatter of what is happening and what the main character was describing what she was going through. Now since this is a graphic novel I felt like the panels would have done well of describing what we were seeing than having the little bubbles of the narrator and the main character constantly describing over and over again what was happening. But this book is following a Nigerian American woman named Chio The book was very interesting, but when you get closer to the end of the book there was more chatter of what is happening and what the main character was describing what she was going through. Now since this is a graphic novel I felt like the panels would have done well of describing what we were seeing than having the little bubbles of the narrator and the main character constantly describing over and over again what was happening. But this book is following a Nigerian American woman named Chioma who is a cop from Chicago who goes to Nigeria and visits her Aunt and Grandmother. One night it was raining a boy came knocking their door and Chioma answers it and realized this boys brain was showing and that he should be dead and so the boy touches her hand as she tries to help him but then as she is helping him he disappears. Now throughout the book and after her encounter with the boy she’s starts to feel like something is haunting her and she is mentality but stable at this point. As we move further in the book we still do not know what he haunting her and the people including her own family does not tell her anything. So eventually we do get more information and what is occurring is something only people in Nigeria and the people in the village know about except her because she primarily loved her life in America. Now this book has great meaning, but I definitely feel like there could have been a little bit more to it at times.

  11. 4 out of 5

    Erin || erins_library

    (Gifted from Abrams via Netgalley) This is a graphic novel adaptation of the story “On the Road” by Nnedi Okorafor. I haven’t read the original story, but this adaptation has made me interested in reading it and more of Okorafor’s short stories! It’s a really compelling, fast paced story that had me thinking about healing, violence, trauma, identity.... the way we carry things. The illustrations themselves were also very beautiful! I loved all the detail and care that was put into it and I hope t (Gifted from Abrams via Netgalley) This is a graphic novel adaptation of the story “On the Road” by Nnedi Okorafor. I haven’t read the original story, but this adaptation has made me interested in reading it and more of Okorafor’s short stories! It’s a really compelling, fast paced story that had me thinking about healing, violence, trauma, identity.... the way we carry things. The illustrations themselves were also very beautiful! I loved all the detail and care that was put into it and I hope to read this again just so I can see the physical copy with color illustrations. I would highly recommend for Okorafor fans for sure!

  12. 4 out of 5

    Tate

    TWs: extensive body horror; death/murder; blood/gore Rep: Nigerian-American MC; Nigerian cast -- Honestly, I'm...not sure what to say about this book? I just felt unattached to it. I didn't feel like I knew the main character or had a reason to care for her, which isn't necessarily the point in every horror short story, but it felt like the story wanted me to care and I didn't. I also had a sense that I was missing something or not grasping what they wanted me to throughout--maybe that's user error TWs: extensive body horror; death/murder; blood/gore Rep: Nigerian-American MC; Nigerian cast -- Honestly, I'm...not sure what to say about this book? I just felt unattached to it. I didn't feel like I knew the main character or had a reason to care for her, which isn't necessarily the point in every horror short story, but it felt like the story wanted me to care and I didn't. I also had a sense that I was missing something or not grasping what they wanted me to throughout--maybe that's user error, maybe that's an issue of fleshing out the story or translating it properly into graphic novel form, I'm not sure. (Speaking of graphic novel form, I want to note I haven't read the short story this is adapted from, so I can't comment on how it went from there to here.) The ARC quality was also not great (all b/w and grainy), which might've affected the experience. I will say I liked the unsettling art style and the concept--just wish I'd felt like I got more out of it by the end.

  13. 4 out of 5

    Kirby

    Okorafor always writes something unique and a little strange which I just adore. The graphic novel form really lends itself to the excitement of her story and the artistry was stunning. The pairing is wonderful and I love this setup for a superhero cop with an ancestral purpose. It's poised for a long and successful series - namely because I'll be first in line for every addition. Okorafor always writes something unique and a little strange which I just adore. The graphic novel form really lends itself to the excitement of her story and the artistry was stunning. The pairing is wonderful and I love this setup for a superhero cop with an ancestral purpose. It's poised for a long and successful series - namely because I'll be first in line for every addition.

  14. 5 out of 5

    Brandi (Brandi Janee's Bookshelf)

    I felt like there was so much I was missing out on while reading this because I was confused a lot of the time. I found out this was a graphic adaptation of a short story and I just felt like there was a lot more context in the short story that wasn't included in this version. However, I loved the artwork! I felt like there was so much I was missing out on while reading this because I was confused a lot of the time. I found out this was a graphic adaptation of a short story and I just felt like there was a lot more context in the short story that wasn't included in this version. However, I loved the artwork!

  15. 4 out of 5

    Caitlin

    First, this made me realize how much I need to read more graphic novels. Second, it made me realize that I most especially need to read more Nnedi Okorafor. I feel this was just a glimpse into a fierce and fascinating imagination and I absolutely need to get my hands on more of her books. Also, the artwork in here is stunning!

  16. 4 out of 5

    Rachel

    *I received an eARC of this book in exchange for an honest review.* I honestly don't really know how to feel about this book! The concept is definitely interesting and I love the setting and atmosphere of the story. I think most of my issues have to do with the specific file downloaded rather than the book itself. I really would have loved for this to be in color and the majority of the words were blurry and not completely penciled in, so it was hard to follow some panels. The story felt a bit ru *I received an eARC of this book in exchange for an honest review.* I honestly don't really know how to feel about this book! The concept is definitely interesting and I love the setting and atmosphere of the story. I think most of my issues have to do with the specific file downloaded rather than the book itself. I really would have loved for this to be in color and the majority of the words were blurry and not completely penciled in, so it was hard to follow some panels. The story felt a bit rushed and I'm left with many questions, but I think that part of that was intended. Overall, it was good but nothing I'd rush to read once published. Full review: https://picturethisliteraturecom.word...

  17. 5 out of 5

    Kyle Dinges

    After the Rain is the graphic novel adaptation of Nnedi Okorafor’s story “On the Road”. The story is adapted by John Jennings and illustrated by David Brame. After the Rain is slated to come out in January of 2021. I received an advanced copy through NetGalley. The story follows Chioma, a Nigerian-American detective from Chicago, who is on a trip to a Nigerian village to visit some of her relatives. After the beginning of her visit is plagued by a fierce rainstorm lasting days on end, Chioma fin After the Rain is the graphic novel adaptation of Nnedi Okorafor’s story “On the Road”. The story is adapted by John Jennings and illustrated by David Brame. After the Rain is slated to come out in January of 2021. I received an advanced copy through NetGalley. The story follows Chioma, a Nigerian-American detective from Chicago, who is on a trip to a Nigerian village to visit some of her relatives. After the beginning of her visit is plagued by a fierce rainstorm lasting days on end, Chioma finds herself in trouble when she answers the door to a boy with a serious head injury. His touch burns Chioma and things begin to spiral out of control. Chioma’s Grandmother and Grand-aunt are less than thrilled at Chioma’s choice to open the door for the wounded boy. There are strange forces at work in the village and now Chioma has invited them in. Okorafor and Jennings do a good job of gradually building horror. The book hits the ground running, but after the initial jolt, the pace slows and there’s a more gradual descent that starts and stops. One moment, things may appear to be close to normal and then Chioma comes face-to-face with another creepy experience. It leaves Chioma questioning her sanity and it helps build the reader’s anticipation as to what Chioma is going to face next. I found the scripting by Jennings to be an interesting balance or modern comics story-telling and traditional prose. Knowing that this graphic novel was adapted from a short story helped illuminate some of the story telling choices. A lot of the narrative is driven forward by Chioma’s running internal monologue that is very reminiscent of a prose-style narrator. Comics in general have moved away from that style over the past few decades, but I thought Jennings did a pretty good job balancing the monologue’s presence without over-filling the page. The narration wasn’t duplicating what was shown on the page, but describing Chioma’s reaction and interpretation of the events. It did get a bit wordy in the third act. There were a few pages that were pretty stuffed with blocks of text at the climax of the story. The pace was still pretty quick, and there are quite a few pages here that rely solely on Brame’s illustration to move the story. I find the use of inner-monologue to be a difficult balancing act, but Jennings did an adequate job in After the Rain. Brame’s use of the page is visually striking. There are generally only 5 or 6 panels on each page. Much of the rest of the space is filled with arresting background details. Menacing vines and flowers weave between the panels and add to the encroaching sense of horror. Even in seemingly innocent trips to the market, Brame’s page design permeates the foreboding and maintains the tension. I found the technique to be a welcome departure from a straightaway grid structure and it did feel like it helped make the book more visually distinct. Brame’s rendering of the climax of the story was certainly the best looking part of the book. After the Rain is a story about horror, ancestry, and healing. Okorafor wrote a compelling story and it was adapted admirably by Jennings and Brame. The graphic novel gets a bit verbose in the third act, but otherwise I found it to be enjoyable. You should give it a read when it hits shelves in January 2021 and maybe give the source material from Nnedi Okorafor a read between now and then.

  18. 4 out of 5

    Sara

    Read more graphic novel reviews at www.graphiclibrary.org. Adapted and colored by John Ira Jennings, illustrated by David Brame, lettered by Damian Duffy ​ Chioma is a Chicago cop visiting her grandmother and grand aunt in Nigeria. It rains for three days, and a little boy with his scull bashed in stands on the doorstep. Chioma opens the door, and the little boy touches her hand, sizzling her flesh, and declares, “tag, you’re it!” She is it, indeed. The elders all become fearful for Chioma; lizards Read more graphic novel reviews at www.graphiclibrary.org. Adapted and colored by John Ira Jennings, illustrated by David Brame, lettered by Damian Duffy ​ Chioma is a Chicago cop visiting her grandmother and grand aunt in Nigeria. It rains for three days, and a little boy with his scull bashed in stands on the doorstep. Chioma opens the door, and the little boy touches her hand, sizzling her flesh, and declares, “tag, you’re it!” She is it, indeed. The elders all become fearful for Chioma; lizards start stalking her everywhere she goes; shadows eerily creep behind her, just out of sight. Then, one night, Chioma is attacked by supernatural forces and undergoes a transformation unlike anything she could have imagined. This story definitely has the creepy factor and should not be read if you’re alone, at night, and especially not if it’s raining. While the lack of full explanation at the end will probably dissatisfy readers, the ending forces you to wonder and ponder for days to come. This is based on the short story “On the Road” by Okorafor, and there is no sequel, but perhaps there could be and we can see what happens to Chioma back in Chicago, back in her life as a cop, with what happened to her. Chioma has some real depth to her character that we don’t get until almost the very end, but it’s revelation begs for a reread with that information in mind. Brame’s illustrations utilize heavy lines and draw extensively on traditional African artistic themes. The digital copy I obtained was in black and white, so I will have to buy the book to appreciate Jennings’ coloring, which will probably be vibrant like his other books are. There are a few f-bombs and some other cussing, as well as some gore. This title is better suited for older teens. Sara's Rating: 8/10 Suitability Level: Grades 10-12 This review was made possible with an advanced reader copy from the publisher through Net Galley. This graphic novel will be on sale January 5, 2021.

  19. 5 out of 5

    Kingtchalla83

    Medium: Graphic Novel – based on the short story “On the Road” by Nnedi Okorafor Length: 128 pages Writer: John Jennings Illustrator: David Brame Genre: Surreal Horror and African Mythology.  Song: Somebody’s Watching Me by Rockwell Mood: Creeped out and slightly confused 🖐🏿 Book Summary: Chioma is a Nigerian American woman visiting her grandmother and auntie in Nigeria. She’s taking a much-needed break from police work in Chicago. Strangely it’s been raining for three days in her grandmother’s village Medium: Graphic Novel – based on the short story “On the Road” by Nnedi Okorafor Length: 128 pages Writer: John Jennings Illustrator: David Brame Genre: Surreal Horror and African Mythology.  Song: Somebody’s Watching Me by Rockwell Mood: Creeped out and slightly confused 🖐🏿 Book Summary: Chioma is a Nigerian American woman visiting her grandmother and auntie in Nigeria. She’s taking a much-needed break from police work in Chicago. Strangely it’s been raining for three days in her grandmother’s village during a usual time of the year. Foolishly, Chioma opens the door to a young boy with his head split open and invites the spirit world! 🖐🏿 Thoughts: Okorafor’s writing is a thing of wonder. She always advances Africaness, mostly Nigerian lore, within her stories, be it fantasy or science fiction, adding much-needed diversity to the genre. 🖐🏿 After the Rain is a complicated graphic novel with visuals and descriptions that feel like a fever dream. Chioma experiences body horror and mental distress after her encounter with the undead boy. Smells and unease plague her as trauma resurfaces from the past - underscoring a splintered identity. Okorafor’s focuses on the hands as a source of conflict, disconnect, and identity. Chioma is a changed woman by the end, but I need a follow-up! 🖐🏿 Now this graphic novel had to sit with me for a few days, and I reread it to ingest the narrative as a whole. The lushness of the writing and illustrations requires careful consideration. All-in-all I enjoyed it.

  20. 4 out of 5

    Kristina

    Chioma is a police officer from Chicago visiting her grandmother and great aunt in Nigeria. She quickly encounters the Nigerian ancestors, mythological beings in the folklore of this country. The story is full of horror, but ultimately centers around Chioma finding her identity and coming to terms with her past. As usual, Okorafor is a master at blending themes of belonging into science fiction/fantasy/horror. Trigger warnings for this title for assault, rape and body horror images. This story w Chioma is a police officer from Chicago visiting her grandmother and great aunt in Nigeria. She quickly encounters the Nigerian ancestors, mythological beings in the folklore of this country. The story is full of horror, but ultimately centers around Chioma finding her identity and coming to terms with her past. As usual, Okorafor is a master at blending themes of belonging into science fiction/fantasy/horror. Trigger warnings for this title for assault, rape and body horror images. This story was originally featured as On The Road in Okorafor’s short story collection, Kabu Kabu, but is reimagined in graphic format. I enjoyed the graphic novel, but think I would enjoy the original story more as I’m assuming it would be more detailed. The art style was unique and incredibly well done. The arc copy provided was in black in white, with a note that the final publication will be colorized. I’m sure that will be gorgeous! I received an ebook of this title from the publisher via Netgalley; all opinions are my own.

  21. 5 out of 5

    Jessica Haider

    I love Nnedi Okorafor so I was excited when I saw a graphic novel adaptation was being made out of one of her short stories. After the Rain is based on her short story "On the Road". The story is set in a small town in Nigeria. Chioma answers a knock at the door to find a boy with a horrible head wound standing outside. From there she becomes haunted be something that she is not quite sure of. Her grandmother and aunt attempt to help her using their customs and knowledge from their heritage. I h I love Nnedi Okorafor so I was excited when I saw a graphic novel adaptation was being made out of one of her short stories. After the Rain is based on her short story "On the Road". The story is set in a small town in Nigeria. Chioma answers a knock at the door to find a boy with a horrible head wound standing outside. From there she becomes haunted be something that she is not quite sure of. Her grandmother and aunt attempt to help her using their customs and knowledge from their heritage. I had not previously read the short story On the Road so I wasn't sure of the plot line going in. But, I have read a number of other books by Okorafor so know to expect an element of fantasy. Overall, I enjoyed the story and the involvement of Nigerian folklore and superstitions. There were a few issues with the eBook file I was sent that made some parts of the text difficult to read, but overall I was able to follow the story despite not being able to read all of the words. Thank you to the publisher for the advanced review copy!

  22. 5 out of 5

    Cindy

    "If you see a monster at your doorstep, the wise thing to do is shut the door." Solid (if ignored) advice from this gorgeous adaptation of Nnedi Okorafor's short story "On the Road." Chioma, a Nigerian-American police officer is visiting her grandmother in her Nigerian village when - after a wild rainstorm - a severely injured boy appears at her door. He touches her, and Chioma begins smelling weird smells, hearing whispers, feels invisible presences, and is being stalked by a herd of lizards. Ev "If you see a monster at your doorstep, the wise thing to do is shut the door." Solid (if ignored) advice from this gorgeous adaptation of Nnedi Okorafor's short story "On the Road." Chioma, a Nigerian-American police officer is visiting her grandmother in her Nigerian village when - after a wild rainstorm - a severely injured boy appears at her door. He touches her, and Chioma begins smelling weird smells, hearing whispers, feels invisible presences, and is being stalked by a herd of lizards. Eventually there is an Evil Dead-style hand situation and an encounter with a "dragon monster Nigerian ancestor made of rolling hot gravel and vines and wood." This story is scary and weird and the illustration style captures the chaos and confusion perfectly, with complicated multi-panels surrounded by brambles and vines and eyes and skulls. My version was a janky, blurry, black & white PDF, and I'm very much looking forward to reading this again in color, with less squinting. Age range: high school + mainly for language and the scary factor (though I'll absolutely encourage my 6th grade graphic novel fiend daughter to read it) Review based on an ARC kindly provided by Abrams ComicArts/Megascope via NetGalley.

  23. 5 out of 5

    Shawna (SugoiShawn/SugoiReads)

    Thank you to NetGalley and the publisher for giving me a chance to review this book. I almost DNFed this book. The font and the text was weird, which made it almost impossible for me to make out what the words were saying. Hopefully the final text of this book will be easier to read. My favorite part of this book was the illustrations. They were beautiful and they’re the sole reason why I am giving this book more than one star. I haven’t read “On the Road” yet, so I can’t compare this graphic nove Thank you to NetGalley and the publisher for giving me a chance to review this book. I almost DNFed this book. The font and the text was weird, which made it almost impossible for me to make out what the words were saying. Hopefully the final text of this book will be easier to read. My favorite part of this book was the illustrations. They were beautiful and they’re the sole reason why I am giving this book more than one star. I haven’t read “On the Road” yet, so I can’t compare this graphic novel to the short story that it was based off of, but what I can say is that it didn’t feel like this story translated well to a graphic novel. The story was heavy on thoughts and descriptions. When I read graphic novels, lots of dialogue and only a little bit of inner thought flows smoother. The lack of dialogue to some extent prevented me from getting invested in the story. This story is probably good as a short story, but this graphic novel adaptation just did not work well for me.

  24. 5 out of 5

    Tara

    Trigger warnings: (view spoiler)[attempted sexual assault, body horror (hide spoiler)] After the Rain is a creepy and surreal Graphic Novel. It's a dreamlike rendition of a folk-tale short story that connects Nigerian and Nigerian-American identities. The art is beautiful and the whole page is used to tell the story. No part of the background or the space between the panels is taken for granted. After I finished, I had to go back through to look at the art more closely. My only criticism is that Trigger warnings: (view spoiler)[attempted sexual assault, body horror (hide spoiler)] After the Rain is a creepy and surreal Graphic Novel. It's a dreamlike rendition of a folk-tale short story that connects Nigerian and Nigerian-American identities. The art is beautiful and the whole page is used to tell the story. No part of the background or the space between the panels is taken for granted. After I finished, I had to go back through to look at the art more closely. My only criticism is that when I finished, I desperately wanted more of the story. I couldn't believe I'd hit the last page already. I'll definitely have to read some of the author's other work. I received this DRC from Edelweiss+ in exchange for an honest review.

  25. 4 out of 5

    Vaish -bookishbelle1008

    I want to thank Edelweiss for providing me an ARC of this book. I enjoyed reading this graphic novel and found the art to be detailed. The setting of the story in a small town in Nigeria in the middle of an intense storm sets a haunting tone. As we progress through the story, it seems like a dream that is playing out for the reader. The main female protagonist undergoes a life changing experience through her encounters and I wished there was more layers to her character. There are moments when sh I want to thank Edelweiss for providing me an ARC of this book. I enjoyed reading this graphic novel and found the art to be detailed. The setting of the story in a small town in Nigeria in the middle of an intense storm sets a haunting tone. As we progress through the story, it seems like a dream that is playing out for the reader. The main female protagonist undergoes a life changing experience through her encounters and I wished there was more layers to her character. There are moments when she undergoes impulsive emotional changes and this leaves us confused as to what she is truly feeling. I wish the file was in colour as I believe the artworks are done so beautifully that they deserve to be witnessed in vibrancy.

  26. 5 out of 5

    Susan

    Thank you for this free copy. This graphic adaptation of Nnedi Okorafor"s short story On the Road was well done. A quick read. If you enjoy her work, you will enjoy this book as well. The graphics are a very good representation/interpretation of her writing ~ well done. Take time to look at the details of the art work, as they add depth to the story. This story also shows the richness of a particular culture, especially at the crossroads/blending of another culture. The story itself tells of person Thank you for this free copy. This graphic adaptation of Nnedi Okorafor"s short story On the Road was well done. A quick read. If you enjoy her work, you will enjoy this book as well. The graphics are a very good representation/interpretation of her writing ~ well done. Take time to look at the details of the art work, as they add depth to the story. This story also shows the richness of a particular culture, especially at the crossroads/blending of another culture. The story itself tells of personal growth, reflecting on past events while looking to the future. I enjoy Nnedi Okorafor's writing ~ and this did not disappoint.

  27. 4 out of 5

    Kim

    I am a fan of #NnediOkorafor's work, and #AfterTheRain is no exception. I had not yet read this short story, so the graphic novel version was completely new to me. The story itself is engaging, crossing genres. Without spoilers: a woman who is a police officer in the United States returns to her grandmother's home in Nigeria and experiences an event that changes her. The artwork was a compelling accompaniment to each aspect of the story. I especially liked the external frames and how they affect I am a fan of #NnediOkorafor's work, and #AfterTheRain is no exception. I had not yet read this short story, so the graphic novel version was completely new to me. The story itself is engaging, crossing genres. Without spoilers: a woman who is a police officer in the United States returns to her grandmother's home in Nigeria and experiences an event that changes her. The artwork was a compelling accompaniment to each aspect of the story. I especially liked the external frames and how they affected inside the panels. This would be a good addition to an older school library collection. Thank you to #NetGalley and the publisher for this advanced copy.

  28. 5 out of 5

    (a)lyss(a)

    I received a copy of this book through NetGalley in exchange for an honest review. This is a great story! We follow Chioma as she's returned to her hometown in Nigeria and she encounters a strange boy. After their meeting something seems to be hunting her. This is a fast paced and compelling read! Like Okorafor's other books it's hard to put down and keeps you guessing. It's beautifully illustrated and written in a way that's hard to put down. A great read from start to finish! I received a copy of this book through NetGalley in exchange for an honest review. This is a great story! We follow Chioma as she's returned to her hometown in Nigeria and she encounters a strange boy. After their meeting something seems to be hunting her. This is a fast paced and compelling read! Like Okorafor's other books it's hard to put down and keeps you guessing. It's beautifully illustrated and written in a way that's hard to put down. A great read from start to finish!

  29. 5 out of 5

    Lauren

    I was so excited for this one and loved it. The art is absolute madness in the best way possible and it tells this story so well. I love that the art goes into the margins on almost every page. It really adds to the invasive feel.

  30. 5 out of 5

    Ariel

    Thank you NetGalley for the ARC!

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