web site hit counter Unspoken: Bathsheba - Ebooks PDF Online
Hot Best Seller

Unspoken: Bathsheba

Availability: Ready to download

The compelling story of Bathsheba and David as told by award-winning author Francine Rivers. Readers will see the familiar biblical account unfold in a whole new light through the eyes of Bathsheba. This timeless story has contemporary meaning for today's readers. A study on the biblical text is included for personal or group study. The compelling story of Bathsheba and David as told by award-winning author Francine Rivers. Readers will see the familiar biblical account unfold in a whole new light through the eyes of Bathsheba. This timeless story has contemporary meaning for today's readers. A study on the biblical text is included for personal or group study.


Compare

The compelling story of Bathsheba and David as told by award-winning author Francine Rivers. Readers will see the familiar biblical account unfold in a whole new light through the eyes of Bathsheba. This timeless story has contemporary meaning for today's readers. A study on the biblical text is included for personal or group study. The compelling story of Bathsheba and David as told by award-winning author Francine Rivers. Readers will see the familiar biblical account unfold in a whole new light through the eyes of Bathsheba. This timeless story has contemporary meaning for today's readers. A study on the biblical text is included for personal or group study.

30 review for Unspoken: Bathsheba

  1. 5 out of 5

    K.M. Montemayor

    I've read the biblical account of David and Bathsheba many times. As most of their story is told through the eyes of David, I always wondered what was going through Bathsheba's mind as the sordid story played out. Of course, we can't ask her. But I do like Francine River's take on it. With the exception of Bathsheba pining for David when she was eight years old, I found it believable. What I loved: Ms. Rivers breaks down the events bit by bit. We see how the thoughts of David and Bathsheba turn t I've read the biblical account of David and Bathsheba many times. As most of their story is told through the eyes of David, I always wondered what was going through Bathsheba's mind as the sordid story played out. Of course, we can't ask her. But I do like Francine River's take on it. With the exception of Bathsheba pining for David when she was eight years old, I found it believable. What I loved: Ms. Rivers breaks down the events bit by bit. We see how the thoughts of David and Bathsheba turn to lust. They act on it, then compound it. I couldn't believe how much this book affected me. When Bathsheba went to the gate to try to bring Uriah home, and he knew what she did, it was heartbreaking to read. It was even worse when David brought Bathsheba into the palace as his wife. Everyone hated her. It was then that Bathsheba finally realized it is much better to be the adored wife of one man, than one of many in the king's harem. David, too, was despised by his men for what he did. If Bathsheba had not been the wife of the king, she would have been stoned. But though they could not go against David, the people did turn from him and it weakened his reign. Both David and Bathsheba suffer through grief, pain, and regret, bringing them to a place of repentance. Bringing both of them back to God. With all the turmoil surrounding David's reign in his latter years, I can certainly see why Ms. Rivers included a fair amount of gossip and why so many tried to take David's throne from him. One thing this book made clear is that actions have consequences. After the death of her firstborn, Bathsheba turned her life around. She sought God's favor and brought her four sons up to love and trust in God. Bathsheba's mother was both wise and cruel. Wise to counsel her daughter to be happy being the only wife of Uriah. Cruel after she found out about her sin. She predicted the name Bathsheba would become a byword for adultery, and she was right. Bathsheba lived under the shadow of that sin her entire life. I do believe she found forgiveness in the Lord, and that gave her the strength to deal with all those who never would forgive her, including her mother.

  2. 4 out of 5

    Tatuu

    She committed adultery...she repented and was forgiven. Who would have thought that the son of an adulteress would be King? The story of Bathsheba is one of hope to us all who have sinned and fallen short of Gods glory. God forgives and He restores. "Considering how greatly God had blessed her despite her grievous sin, she couldn't imagine what His plan might have been had she been faithful and obedient. What if David had never seen her bathing? What if he’d never called for her and she’d remaine She committed adultery...she repented and was forgiven. Who would have thought that the son of an adulteress would be King? The story of Bathsheba is one of hope to us all who have sinned and fallen short of Gods glory. God forgives and He restores. "Considering how greatly God had blessed her despite her grievous sin, she couldn't imagine what His plan might have been had she been faithful and obedient. What if David had never seen her bathing? What if he’d never called for her and she’d remained faithful to Uriah? Yet having experienced God’s discipline, she knew she had gained a life-changing understanding of redemption and restoration. She now knew beyond a shadow of a doubt how great were God’s mercy and loving-kindness, and for that she was oh so thankful. The sweet incense of faith was released when her life and will were crushed".

  3. 4 out of 5

    Ashley

    I really liked this one. Rivers does an inspiring job of humanizing a woman who is so often villanized, or at least discounted. Such a good reminder that despite her past mistakes, it is godly mother Bathsheba who raised the one son of David who would become the wisest man of the Bible. I liked too the characterization of David as so very, very human. I think sometimes as we remember his triumphs, we forget how very, very low his darkest moments were. A beautiful picture of how God uses broken, I really liked this one. Rivers does an inspiring job of humanizing a woman who is so often villanized, or at least discounted. Such a good reminder that despite her past mistakes, it is godly mother Bathsheba who raised the one son of David who would become the wisest man of the Bible. I liked too the characterization of David as so very, very human. I think sometimes as we remember his triumphs, we forget how very, very low his darkest moments were. A beautiful picture of how God uses broken, sinful people for their blessing and His glory.

  4. 4 out of 5

    Vivian

    This whole series is amazing!!! God used these women regardless of what others thought of them. He saw through to the heart of each of them (right past their sins & faults), and used the gifts and talents that He gave them to bring us a Savior that we despearately need/needed. It speaks to God's capacity to love and forgive us! It shows the humble beginings from which Christ was born. This whole series is amazing!!! God used these women regardless of what others thought of them. He saw through to the heart of each of them (right past their sins & faults), and used the gifts and talents that He gave them to bring us a Savior that we despearately need/needed. It speaks to God's capacity to love and forgive us! It shows the humble beginings from which Christ was born.

  5. 4 out of 5

    Sarah Marie

    5 stars. This story spanning over many decades paints a beautiful picture of redemption. Review to come.

  6. 5 out of 5

    Joann Wright

    Last Lines from "Unspoken" "I know they will remember my sins, Lord, but when they look upon my life, let them see what You did for an unworthy woman. let them see the hope born from despair. If they must recount my sins, let them count Your blessings more so. You protected me. You raised me up. You gave me sons. Let my name be unspoken, Lord, for what am I that anyone should remember me? But, oh, Lord God of Israel if they do remember me, let them open their mouths and sing praises for your grea Last Lines from "Unspoken" "I know they will remember my sins, Lord, but when they look upon my life, let them see what You did for an unworthy woman. let them see the hope born from despair. If they must recount my sins, let them count Your blessings more so. You protected me. You raised me up. You gave me sons. Let my name be unspoken, Lord, for what am I that anyone should remember me? But, oh, Lord God of Israel if they do remember me, let them open their mouths and sing praises for your great mercy toward me. let them see Your infinite grace and your boundless love and let them be encouraged"

  7. 5 out of 5

    Amy

    This is my favorite book out of the Lineage of Grace series (much to my surprise). This book spoke to me in many ways. I seriously thought I would not like this one at all because of what I've read and known of Bathsheba- BUT I was proven wrong- she is definitely one of my favorite Bible stories now. I love how Rivers put this in a different light and has made it accessible to many people, bringing others to or closer to God. This is my favorite book out of the Lineage of Grace series (much to my surprise). This book spoke to me in many ways. I seriously thought I would not like this one at all because of what I've read and known of Bathsheba- BUT I was proven wrong- she is definitely one of my favorite Bible stories now. I love how Rivers put this in a different light and has made it accessible to many people, bringing others to or closer to God.

  8. 5 out of 5

    Carrie Daws

    Whenever I've considered the story of David and Bathsheba, I've never really thought much about what Bathsheba endured once she entered the palace. This book is as good as the others, creating one possible scenario from what we know from Scripture, but it opens my thoughts to other possibilities -- and deeper Scriptural truths. Whenever I've considered the story of David and Bathsheba, I've never really thought much about what Bathsheba endured once she entered the palace. This book is as good as the others, creating one possible scenario from what we know from Scripture, but it opens my thoughts to other possibilities -- and deeper Scriptural truths.

  9. 5 out of 5

    Leah

    Unspoken completely changed my way of thinking about Bathsheba...and David. Thank you, Mrs. Rivers! Here's my favorite quote: "Maybe it's only those who've made such chaos of their lives who can understand the heights and depths of God's mercy" (147). Unspoken completely changed my way of thinking about Bathsheba...and David. Thank you, Mrs. Rivers! Here's my favorite quote: "Maybe it's only those who've made such chaos of their lives who can understand the heights and depths of God's mercy" (147).

  10. 4 out of 5

    rjp316

    I was surprised that Rivers included Bathsheba in her lineage of grace series. After all who was Bathsheba but the women who led David into adultery. However I learned so much more about her from this book and also so much more about God’s grace and mercy. That no matter what are sin God can still use you. After all everyone sins and there will be consequences for your sins (Bathsheba and David’s sins led to repercussions for 1,000 of people) but despite all that God blessed her because of her w I was surprised that Rivers included Bathsheba in her lineage of grace series. After all who was Bathsheba but the women who led David into adultery. However I learned so much more about her from this book and also so much more about God’s grace and mercy. That no matter what are sin God can still use you. After all everyone sins and there will be consequences for your sins (Bathsheba and David’s sins led to repercussions for 1,000 of people) but despite all that God blessed her because of her willingness to confess, ask forgiveness and continue to lead a life for God. Another great book in the series. One note about the whole series: I would recommend reading a little of the book and then stopping to reflect and complete one section of the “seek and find” chapters rather than doing them all once you have read the entire book. You will get more out of the reading that way.

  11. 5 out of 5

    Jerry

    A step up from the previous volumes in the series.

  12. 4 out of 5

    Karen Boraski

    The reason I loved the first 3 books in this series is because the stories rang true to the Biblical account and the additional fiction made the characters more understandable. This one seems way off to me. I don't see any evidence of Bathsheba wanting David or having a choice in the matter. She was having a ritual bath required by law and was taken to the palace. As a woman of that time I really don't think it's realistic for her to refuse the King. The reason I loved the first 3 books in this series is because the stories rang true to the Biblical account and the additional fiction made the characters more understandable. This one seems way off to me. I don't see any evidence of Bathsheba wanting David or having a choice in the matter. She was having a ritual bath required by law and was taken to the palace. As a woman of that time I really don't think it's realistic for her to refuse the King.

  13. 4 out of 5

    Lindsey Robison

    Alright, so I read this and I have to say it was some what insightful, but overall, I didn’t enjoy it all that much. The story was good, flawed, but good. I liked seeing it from Bathsheba’s point of view more than David’s, obviously haha! Francine would have had to do a lot of research for this, and the Biblical history is great! The characters? Eh, not so much.

  14. 5 out of 5

    Niya Davis

    4.75/5 If you are looking for a book on redemption... then this is the book for you! The author allows you to have a visual representation that enhances your understanding of the story. Watching the story unfold does in fact spark emotions. Beautiful story. Beautiful character development. You can clearly see how different they were at the beginning of the story to the end due to the story expanding over decades. You can see their faith change and you can see restoration/ reconciliation take plac 4.75/5 If you are looking for a book on redemption... then this is the book for you! The author allows you to have a visual representation that enhances your understanding of the story. Watching the story unfold does in fact spark emotions. Beautiful story. Beautiful character development. You can clearly see how different they were at the beginning of the story to the end due to the story expanding over decades. You can see their faith change and you can see restoration/ reconciliation take place. You even see God’s promises take place and David’s heart change as well as Bathsheba’s. I don’t want to say too much! But all in all great book! I would re-read it.

  15. 4 out of 5

    Hiraeth

    The previous stories about Ruth and Rahab were stories of yearning to belong/be grafted into God's family. I love Ruth and Rahab and I love the way Francince Rivers handled the entire story, making the characters come alive right before my very eyes. The books gave me an appreciation of the Bible I never quite grasped before. These were people who actually lived... not just mere characters! And the story of Bathsheba is quite confounding... and entirely human. I recall her as the woman who was Ur The previous stories about Ruth and Rahab were stories of yearning to belong/be grafted into God's family. I love Ruth and Rahab and I love the way Francince Rivers handled the entire story, making the characters come alive right before my very eyes. The books gave me an appreciation of the Bible I never quite grasped before. These were people who actually lived... not just mere characters! And the story of Bathsheba is quite confounding... and entirely human. I recall her as the woman who was Uriah's wife... in this story, Bathsheba came alive as Bathsheba, the adulteress, and the woman who was mother to Solomon... It talks about grace and how we, mere mortals, still could not forgive what God has forgiven. The last part was especially poignant when, upon her deaht, Bathsheba yearned to be seen not just as the "wife of Uriah"... but it was comfort enough for her to know that the Lord knows she was more than that...

  16. 4 out of 5

    Deba

    Unspoken is a compelling story of Bathsheba and David as told by award-winning author Francine Rivers. Bathsheba, a name that to many, means seduction and sin, a name to remain unspoken! But, God called Bathsheba his own, worthy of legacy of his Son. A woman so entranced King David that he sinned greatly for her. Who was this woman who gave birth to Solomon, wise king of Israel? Bathsheba is brought to life, to speak to us in new and life-changing ways. This is her story, a journey from innocenc Unspoken is a compelling story of Bathsheba and David as told by award-winning author Francine Rivers. Bathsheba, a name that to many, means seduction and sin, a name to remain unspoken! But, God called Bathsheba his own, worthy of legacy of his Son. A woman so entranced King David that he sinned greatly for her. Who was this woman who gave birth to Solomon, wise king of Israel? Bathsheba is brought to life, to speak to us in new and life-changing ways. This is her story, a journey from innocence to despair, and on to hope in the God who restored her. Readers will see the familiar biblical account unfold in a whole new light through the eyes of Bathsheba. This timeless story has contemporary meaning for today’s readers. A study on the biblical text is included for personal or group study. Unspoken is the fourth book in the Lineage of Grace series.

  17. 5 out of 5

    Paige Cuthbertson| Turning_Every_Paige

    It took me a while to get into this book. Reading of an eight year old's "love" for a grown man is mildly disturbing and unpalatable; and it didn't really get better as Bathsheba grew a bit older. I struggled to sympathize with her until after she and David had married. After that, I really grew to love and appreciate the way Rivers portrayed her. I thought David's characterization was very accurate. My favorite character would have to Uriah. He was so dear and loyal and forgiving, it really bro It took me a while to get into this book. Reading of an eight year old's "love" for a grown man is mildly disturbing and unpalatable; and it didn't really get better as Bathsheba grew a bit older. I struggled to sympathize with her until after she and David had married. After that, I really grew to love and appreciate the way Rivers portrayed her. I thought David's characterization was very accurate. My favorite character would have to Uriah. He was so dear and loyal and forgiving, it really broke my heart! I also enjoyed reading about young Solomon. Good book! It just took a while to really grasp the story.

  18. 4 out of 5

    The Badger

    Mysogenistic hypocritical crap. I bought this book by accident, but read it anyway. God apparently talks to these people relentlessly--but only to the men. Bathsheba's married, but David is all, "God said you should have sex with me." Then he kills her husband. Later one of his sons by his harem of wives raped his daughter, but God is cool with that. It goes on and on until David is so freaking old that he has to cuddle a virgin at night. It's also a little strange how God is OK with pillaging c Mysogenistic hypocritical crap. I bought this book by accident, but read it anyway. God apparently talks to these people relentlessly--but only to the men. Bathsheba's married, but David is all, "God said you should have sex with me." Then he kills her husband. Later one of his sons by his harem of wives raped his daughter, but God is cool with that. It goes on and on until David is so freaking old that he has to cuddle a virgin at night. It's also a little strange how God is OK with pillaging cities and killing people so David can add to his crown collection. But hey, I'm just a stupid female, so WTF would I know?

  19. 4 out of 5

    Janine Warrington

    Like many others who have reviewed this work, I was excited to read a creative reimagining of Bathsheba's point of view during the incident with David. Sadly, Rivers does our foremother Bathsheba a great injustice in portraying her as someone who had any autonomy in the situation, as someone who willingly committed adultery, as someone whose sin was just as egregious as David's. In reality, she had no power while the king had immense power; Bathsheba had no say in the affair. She was assaulted, Like many others who have reviewed this work, I was excited to read a creative reimagining of Bathsheba's point of view during the incident with David. Sadly, Rivers does our foremother Bathsheba a great injustice in portraying her as someone who had any autonomy in the situation, as someone who willingly committed adultery, as someone whose sin was just as egregious as David's. In reality, she had no power while the king had immense power; Bathsheba had no say in the affair. She was assaulted, widowed, and abducted.

  20. 5 out of 5

    Kristen

    I loved this story about Bathsheba as told by Francine Rivers. Rivers brings the reader into the story and makes them believe so much more strongly in God and His unfailing love for us. I am going to try to read all of the books in this series about 5 women chosen by God, each for something special. I definitely recommend this book especially for anyone who believes that they have sinned and will not be forgiven...it shows God will always forgive you and will reward those who believe in Him.

  21. 5 out of 5

    Victoria

    Although her name is often Unspoken, God gave Bathsheba the privilege of bearing Solomon, the wisest man in the world; but more importantly, the privilege of being in the bloodline of Christ, truly the "lineage of grace"! "Cause we all fall short, and we all have sin, but when you let God's grace break in, it's beautiful, beautiful. Come as you are, surrender your heart, broken and beautiful." -Mark Schultz Although her name is often Unspoken, God gave Bathsheba the privilege of bearing Solomon, the wisest man in the world; but more importantly, the privilege of being in the bloodline of Christ, truly the "lineage of grace"! "Cause we all fall short, and we all have sin, but when you let God's grace break in, it's beautiful, beautiful. Come as you are, surrender your heart, broken and beautiful." -Mark Schultz

  22. 4 out of 5

    Sheila

    David is probably my favorite person in the Bible (besides Jesus), and so I was very interested to see how Francine Rivers would tell the tale of this portion of David's life. As usual, she did not disappoint. She used her words so wonderfully to show us how Bathsheba, and David, must have felt when all of that happened...and the consequences of sin. Oh, but the Mercy of our God! Such a beautiful story. David is probably my favorite person in the Bible (besides Jesus), and so I was very interested to see how Francine Rivers would tell the tale of this portion of David's life. As usual, she did not disappoint. She used her words so wonderfully to show us how Bathsheba, and David, must have felt when all of that happened...and the consequences of sin. Oh, but the Mercy of our God! Such a beautiful story.

  23. 5 out of 5

    Tiff (fictionaltiff)

    Incredible work done by Rivers again. Bathsheba is a difficult woman to write about, but she is such a great example of God's grace and how forgiving and accepting He is. If you want to learn more about biblical people but have a hard time reading the Bible, you need to pick up a Francine Rivers book. Incredible work done by Rivers again. Bathsheba is a difficult woman to write about, but she is such a great example of God's grace and how forgiving and accepting He is. If you want to learn more about biblical people but have a hard time reading the Bible, you need to pick up a Francine Rivers book.

  24. 5 out of 5

    Dalaina May

    Bathsheba was a victim of a power rape. She had no right to say no to King David's advances, and Scripture makes it clear that she was innocent. River's portrays her as in love in David and committing adultery with him. It's a pretty big deal that this real woman is painted as immoral when in reality she was a victim of rape and abuse of power. Bathsheba was a victim of a power rape. She had no right to say no to King David's advances, and Scripture makes it clear that she was innocent. River's portrays her as in love in David and committing adultery with him. It's a pretty big deal that this real woman is painted as immoral when in reality she was a victim of rape and abuse of power.

  25. 4 out of 5

    Jeanie

    It was a little difficult to read at first. The wording reminded me of the movie True Grit. It was a little disconnected. Once I got passed that I enjoyed the story and cleamed new information that I did have. It was more or less connecting the dots.

  26. 5 out of 5

    Abigail Schultz

    I liked this one because it brought up certain aspects that are not commonly considered when it comes to Bathsheba. The author describes what might have been the character's feelings in the case of her husband's murder and the life she led with King David. I loved the whole series. I liked this one because it brought up certain aspects that are not commonly considered when it comes to Bathsheba. The author describes what might have been the character's feelings in the case of her husband's murder and the life she led with King David. I loved the whole series.

  27. 4 out of 5

    Brooke

    The writing is so/so. This author chose to interpret the story in a way that faults both Bathsheba and David for the adultery committed. Bathsheba was in love with David from childhood; once David sees her grown-up beauty, he falls in love as well (in comparison to his other wives, for whom he apparently feels less strongly.) Once they are married, Bathsheba still loves David, and they are presented as each other's True Love, despite the fact that David ruined her life. She blames herself through The writing is so/so. This author chose to interpret the story in a way that faults both Bathsheba and David for the adultery committed. Bathsheba was in love with David from childhood; once David sees her grown-up beauty, he falls in love as well (in comparison to his other wives, for whom he apparently feels less strongly.) Once they are married, Bathsheba still loves David, and they are presented as each other's True Love, despite the fact that David ruined her life. She blames herself throughout the book for the consequences of the adultery, and this is a realistic reaction -- but never once is it rebuked. Though David tells her she has no fault (he also blames himself), one gets the sense that the author believes the blame to fall on both their shoulders. That is one way to interpret things. Personally, I would have liked to see a story in which Bathsheba was unwilling. Much would stay the same -- the way other characters shame her and blame her for the event -- but we would get to see a bit of how women's choices were not their own in that time. I also would have liked to see the vengeful and violent attitudes of men more problematized. David was presented as a man who hated violence, but he certainly had his moments. But it was also interesting to see the ways in which a kingship could not be held if certain violent measures were not taken. The last thing I wanted to see more of was Israelite/early Jewish culture. That would have been interesting to me, to see the applications in context of everyday life. However, given the path chosen for the story, there were certainly some important messages that came through. God's ability to show mercy and forgiveness and use the sinful human nature to create good was central. The consequences of sin were not glossed over. God shows mercy and forgiveness, but he will not erase the consequences of our actions, because we must still learn to do good, learn why wrong is wrong. Overall, it was okay. Though I was disappointed in some aspects, I do not regret the time I spent reading it.

  28. 5 out of 5

    Meghan

    This is the first in a series of short novellas about women who were in Christ's lineage. This fourth installment is about Bathsheba. Bathsheba lives in King David's kingdom. She attracts his notice when he sees her bathing on her roof. This causes David to make some bad decisions. He sends for Bathsheba and knows her (in the Biblical sense). Then he sends Bathsheba's husband, Uriah, to war and directs he be on the front lines. Uriah is killed and David takes Bathsheba to wife. I had never really This is the first in a series of short novellas about women who were in Christ's lineage. This fourth installment is about Bathsheba. Bathsheba lives in King David's kingdom. She attracts his notice when he sees her bathing on her roof. This causes David to make some bad decisions. He sends for Bathsheba and knows her (in the Biblical sense). Then he sends Bathsheba's husband, Uriah, to war and directs he be on the front lines. Uriah is killed and David takes Bathsheba to wife. I had never really considered what may have happened to Bathsheba after she is David's wife. But through this story some items were brought to my attention. First, people may have known David had been with Bathsheba while she was married to Uriah. In the customs of the time adultery was punished by stoning. David really put Bathsheba into an awkward situation and in the story her father and brothers will not have anything to do with her. She is utterly alone. Second, David may have favored Bathsheba over his other numerous wives. What was her life like in his hareem? Third, Bathsheba's sons were brought up to love God. Did Bathsheba learn lessons from her sin with David and repent? Her sons did not try to oust their father or cause rebellion. David and Bathsheba's son Solomon ended up being the next king.

  29. 4 out of 5

    Abigail Weh

    This book was interesting and it was fascinating to see a historical retelling which is only told of briefly in the Bible brought to life; however I had way too many issues with the writing and storyline to enjoy it fully. Three stars is a little generous in my opinion for that reason. It only received a higher rating than I might normally give this style of book because of its Biblical representation, and how many things you can learn from reading it. The problems I had: 1) It was slow... like This book was interesting and it was fascinating to see a historical retelling which is only told of briefly in the Bible brought to life; however I had way too many issues with the writing and storyline to enjoy it fully. Three stars is a little generous in my opinion for that reason. It only received a higher rating than I might normally give this style of book because of its Biblical representation, and how many things you can learn from reading it. The problems I had: 1) It was slow... like painfully slow. I just couldn’t get into it. I have felt more attached to the Bible’s version of the story than I did with Ms. River’s interpretation, though that isn’t saying much, I love the Bible. 2) There wasn’t much of a plot... it was just Bathsheba’s life and it wasn’t too interesting outside of her unfortunate sin with David and mothering King Solomon. I wish someone would take women’s stories from the Bible with a little more creative license if they are going to be rewriting the stories at all. 3) I didn’t feel attached to the “characters” at all. The real story in the Bible has made me feel more attached and cry over the people of the story. And 4) it was just very boring. No getting around it. However, this was a story of great sorrow and mistake, as well as redemption and forgiveness, for which I can appreciate the effort put into writing it.

  30. 5 out of 5

    Jeffrey

    In Unspoken Rivers tries to imagine a richly nuanced Bathsheba in a world our modern sensibilities can hardly conceive. Is romantic love a universal human need regardless of cultural context? If it is, did David and Bathsheba really love each other as we understand love? If they did, what would that look like in a culture that allows polygamy? Rivers tries to deal with this in a way that seems at least plausible, and mostly she succeeds. This is pretty good story telling really. On the other hand In Unspoken Rivers tries to imagine a richly nuanced Bathsheba in a world our modern sensibilities can hardly conceive. Is romantic love a universal human need regardless of cultural context? If it is, did David and Bathsheba really love each other as we understand love? If they did, what would that look like in a culture that allows polygamy? Rivers tries to deal with this in a way that seems at least plausible, and mostly she succeeds. This is pretty good story telling really. On the other hand, the universal spiritual insights are much more than pretty good. There is so much in this little book about repentance, grace, and consequences. One of the things I found most powerful is the extra-biblical episode when Bathsheba honestly addresses her son's questions about her relationship with David. It really makes me think about how important it is to own up to our own sinfulness. I also found it really moving as Bathsheba mourned for "Amnon because she knew God would judge him for what he did." It is so easy to be satisfied when someone that is truly evil gets their comeuppance, but as I read this book I was struck by how much we should mourn their pain even in understanding its necessity. There is a lot packed into this 175 pages.

Add a review

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

Loading...
We use cookies to give you the best online experience. By using our website you agree to our use of cookies in accordance with our cookie policy.