web site hit counter The Great Gatsby: A Graphic Novel Adaptation - Ebooks PDF Online
Hot Best Seller

The Great Gatsby: A Graphic Novel Adaptation

Availability: Ready to download

A sumptuously illustrated adaptation casts the powerful imagery of F. Scott Fitzgerald's great American novel in a vivid new format. From the green light across the bay to the billboard with spectacled eyes, F. Scott Fitzgerald's 1925 American masterpiece roars to life in Katharine Woodman-Maynard's exquisite graphic novel--among the first adaptations of the book in this g A sumptuously illustrated adaptation casts the powerful imagery of F. Scott Fitzgerald's great American novel in a vivid new format. From the green light across the bay to the billboard with spectacled eyes, F. Scott Fitzgerald's 1925 American masterpiece roars to life in Katharine Woodman-Maynard's exquisite graphic novel--among the first adaptations of the book in this genre. Painted in lush watercolors, the inventive interpretation emphasizes both the extravagance and mystery of the characters, as well as the fluidity of Nick Carraway's unreliable narration. Excerpts from the original text wend through the illustrations, and imagery and metaphors are taken to literal, and often whimsical, extremes, such as when a beautiful partygoer blooms into an orchid and Daisy Buchanan pushes Gatsby across the sky on a cloud. This faithful yet modern adaptation will appeal to fans with deep knowledge of the classic, while the graphic novel format makes it an ideal teaching tool to engage students. With its timeless critique of class, power, and obsession, The Great Gatsby Graphic Novel captures the energy of an era and the enduring resonance of one of the world's most beloved books.


Compare

A sumptuously illustrated adaptation casts the powerful imagery of F. Scott Fitzgerald's great American novel in a vivid new format. From the green light across the bay to the billboard with spectacled eyes, F. Scott Fitzgerald's 1925 American masterpiece roars to life in Katharine Woodman-Maynard's exquisite graphic novel--among the first adaptations of the book in this g A sumptuously illustrated adaptation casts the powerful imagery of F. Scott Fitzgerald's great American novel in a vivid new format. From the green light across the bay to the billboard with spectacled eyes, F. Scott Fitzgerald's 1925 American masterpiece roars to life in Katharine Woodman-Maynard's exquisite graphic novel--among the first adaptations of the book in this genre. Painted in lush watercolors, the inventive interpretation emphasizes both the extravagance and mystery of the characters, as well as the fluidity of Nick Carraway's unreliable narration. Excerpts from the original text wend through the illustrations, and imagery and metaphors are taken to literal, and often whimsical, extremes, such as when a beautiful partygoer blooms into an orchid and Daisy Buchanan pushes Gatsby across the sky on a cloud. This faithful yet modern adaptation will appeal to fans with deep knowledge of the classic, while the graphic novel format makes it an ideal teaching tool to engage students. With its timeless critique of class, power, and obsession, The Great Gatsby Graphic Novel captures the energy of an era and the enduring resonance of one of the world's most beloved books.

30 review for The Great Gatsby: A Graphic Novel Adaptation

  1. 4 out of 5

    Caroline

    This is a beautiful graphic-novel adaptation of The Great Gatsby that does justice to its source material and is a worthy companion. K. Woodman-Maynard's illustrations are exquisite, with a dreamy quality that evokes the elegance of the era and of Fitzgerald's rich setting. I especially liked how she reinforced the personalities of Daisy and Tom with the shape of their speech balloons. Daisy's are cloud-like, with wisps that wind and curl; in a part where she's drunk, the balloons are a little m This is a beautiful graphic-novel adaptation of The Great Gatsby that does justice to its source material and is a worthy companion. K. Woodman-Maynard's illustrations are exquisite, with a dreamy quality that evokes the elegance of the era and of Fitzgerald's rich setting. I especially liked how she reinforced the personalities of Daisy and Tom with the shape of their speech balloons. Daisy's are cloud-like, with wisps that wind and curl; in a part where she's drunk, the balloons are a little messier. By contrast, the speech bubbles of her domineering husband, Tom, are box-shaped, with sharp points. Dialogue is neatly printed and clear; there's never any mistaking who's talking. Woodman-Maynard printed the actual text in creative ways, such as along a driveway or vertically along drapes. Readers should take time to read the author's note at the end. Here, Woodman-Maynard talks of her impressive research, which ranged from studying cars to the fashion of the era. With this said, she didn't aim for exact verisimilitude; her illustrations pull from other eras and her own imagination. There's a careful continuity throughout, however, and had she not explained such creative liberties, I wouldn't have known. She also makes clear that this isn’t a literal interpretation of the novel. She speaks glowingly of The Great Gatsby, encouraging any readers who haven’t read the source material to do so. As much as the graphic-novel format works for this story, it did limit her and she was unable to highlight all of The Great Gatsby’s themes. As she says,My goal was to capture the mood of The Great Gatsby, and so there are a few areas where I took more artistic license than others. For example, I reordered certain scenes so that they better suit the pacing of the graphic novel . . . Maynard-Woodman also purposely omitted Nick’s anti-Semitic view of Meyer Wolfshiem:Nick’s depiction of Meyer Wolfshiem is especially difficult. Although both Wolfshiem and Gatsby engage in illegal activity and are essentially gangsters, Gatsby is described as a mythic and beautiful character while the depiction of Wolfshiem is an anti-Semitic caricature of a Jewish mobster.Maynard-Woodman resolved this challenge by illustrating Wolfshiem in such a way that his intimidating and mysterious personality remains intact; that he is Jewish isn’t emphasized. Some readers may object to the changes Woodman-Maynard made, but she achieved what I believe she set out to do: create a loving homage to a favorite novel. I could continue to praise this graphic novel, but I'll stop with some personal high praise: I’m not a fan of the source material, yet I, someone who very rarely rereads anything--and never anything I disliked--was intrigued enough by Woodman-Maynard’s creation that I’d take a second look at The Great Gatsby. NOTE: I received this as an advance reader copy from LibraryThing in September 2020. As always with ARCs, this didn't affect my rating and review.

  2. 4 out of 5

    Gerardine Betancourt

    I love this surreal interpretation of The Great Gatsby. It is an easy way to introduce us to this wonderful novel. It is not an exact representation of the novel but K. Woodman Maynard knew how to perfectly capture each of the characters in a beautiful way. 4.5 stars ⭐⭐⭐⭐💫 Thanks to netgalley and Candlewick Press for this Arc copy in exchange for a honest review

  3. 5 out of 5

    Rachael Fryman

    I MUCH prefer the original, but can see how some might enjoy this graphic novel version, especially those that find the original text too daunting. **Note: I received an advanced copy for review from the publisher via Netgalley.

  4. 5 out of 5

    Madara

    I love The Great Gatsby. I mean - it's been 7 years since I've read the book but I remember really enjoying it. This graphic novel adaptation was a bit off for me. The art is beautiful, I love the watercolor feel but the placement (and font) of the text was a bit off. Some of the quotes just seemed out of place or didn't make sense, I had to reread some of the pages a couple times to understand the context. Overall - it's pretty but I wouldn't keep it on my shelf... Review copy provided by the pub I love The Great Gatsby. I mean - it's been 7 years since I've read the book but I remember really enjoying it. This graphic novel adaptation was a bit off for me. The art is beautiful, I love the watercolor feel but the placement (and font) of the text was a bit off. Some of the quotes just seemed out of place or didn't make sense, I had to reread some of the pages a couple times to understand the context. Overall - it's pretty but I wouldn't keep it on my shelf... Review copy provided by the publisher and NetGalley in exchange for an honest review.

  5. 4 out of 5

    Kristen

    Every time I teach juniors, I always make sure to sign up for "The Great Gatsby," but it's not always the most accessible text for all students. The kids who can read it usually enjoy it greatly; those that struggle to read it, hate it greatly. Our department provides graphic novels as options for those kids to get the classics in a more digestible way. Graphic novel adaptations of the classics can be hit or miss, as most teachers can attest. But Woodman-Maynard's adaptation of "Gatsby" has a lo Every time I teach juniors, I always make sure to sign up for "The Great Gatsby," but it's not always the most accessible text for all students. The kids who can read it usually enjoy it greatly; those that struggle to read it, hate it greatly. Our department provides graphic novels as options for those kids to get the classics in a more digestible way. Graphic novel adaptations of the classics can be hit or miss, as most teachers can attest. But Woodman-Maynard's adaptation of "Gatsby" has a lot to offer the classroom teacher. The author sticks to the original text for the most part, obviously cutting some parts of the novel out. What has been added doesn't stray too far from the story. There were a few minor rearrangements of events, but nothing that took away from the author's (probable) original intent too much. The only issue I had was the omission of the description of T.J. Eckleburg, which is crucial for some of the main themes. The artistic portrayal of the billboard wouldn't make the themes and connections apparent to lower-level readers either. The author does mention that there were some themes that weren't as evident in the adaptation for the sake of the format, but this arguably could have added one more page (or even a small little panel or two when it first pops up). I will say that other than this, I couldn't find anything else that was cut that would have made it more difficult to teach this the way I teach the original novel. I was expecting some of the less "famous" quotes to be missing, but I was happily surprised. I enjoyed the watercolor artwork of this text, even though I wasn't completely mad about the character illustrations. The splash pages were especially noteworthy, and I think even if I don't adopt the whole novel for classroom instruction, I'll certainly buy it to use some of the full page illustrations for some scenes. There's also a few scenes that portray the self-confessed struggle Woodman-Maynard had in depicting the events of the original from the perspective of the unreliable narrator, Nick. I think those would be great discussion starters when teaching the original as well.

  6. 5 out of 5

    The Candid Cover (Olivia & Lori)

    Full Review on The Candid Cover 3.5 Stars The Great Gatsby adapted by K. Woodman-Maynard is a great way to make The Great Gatsby more accessible in a graphic novel format. I enjoyed the slight changes the author makes to the source material, and the art style makes elements such as mood and symbolism much easier to understand. However, I also felt as though the story is rushed, and the art also makes the text difficult to read at times. Despite this, I still appreciated what the book accomplishes Full Review on The Candid Cover 3.5 Stars The Great Gatsby adapted by K. Woodman-Maynard is a great way to make The Great Gatsby more accessible in a graphic novel format. I enjoyed the slight changes the author makes to the source material, and the art style makes elements such as mood and symbolism much easier to understand. However, I also felt as though the story is rushed, and the art also makes the text difficult to read at times. Despite this, I still appreciated what the book accomplishes in terms of making The Great Gatsby easier to digest. This book is a graphic novel adaptation of The Great Gatsby that makes the classic story more appealing for a modern audience. I always love to see classics being made more accessible, and the visual form of this book does a great job of this. This is an adaptation, so of course it is not identical to the source material, but I found it mostly faithful, and I liked the changes that the author did make. However, I also found the story a bit rushed, and the events happen so quickly that there is not much time to process them. The original novel is also quite short, which may have influenced this, but this makes the story hard to follow, and I’m not sure I would recommend this one for those who are unfamiliar with the original story. ❀ GORGEOUS ART The art style of this graphic novel is gorgeous, and I loved the use of watercolours. This style feels light, and it makes all the literary elements of the novel much clearer. I particularly enjoyed the way the colours reflect the mood of each scene and how the shapes of the text bubbles match each of the characters’ personalities. I also appreciated the use of quotes from the original that stand out. ❀ MUTED COLOURS That being said, I also think the art style can be considered a weakness. The placement of the quotes, while visually appealing, can be difficult to read because of their intricate shapes. These more eloquent quotes also contrast with the short, simple sentences in the dialogue, which breaks the flow of the story. I am also unsure if the use of watercolours really do Gatsby’s lavish parties justice, as the colours in this book are more muted. ❀ CONFUSING TO READ I appreciate the efforts of the graphic novel, The Great Gatsby by K. Woodman-Maynard, to make the original story more accessible to today’s audience. This adaptation follows the source material closely, and I enjoyed the moments where the author strayed from it. However, I am still unsure how I feel about this book as a whole. I enjoyed the art style’s ability to make literary elements more obvious, but at times, the story can be difficult to read and confusing. I would recommend this one to those who already know and love The Great Gatsby, as an addition to their collection.

  7. 4 out of 5

    Tanya Ball

    Thanks so much to Library Thing, Candlewick Press, and K. Woodman-Maynard for an advanced copy of this graphic novel! I loved it! I was worried that it would lose so much as I have seen happen with other book to GN adaptation. I would definitely recommend reading the original novel before the graphic novel so that you can fully enjoy the gorgeous language and other nuances. However, K. Woodman-Freeman has done a wonderful job in keeping the important as well as subtle points of the story so that Thanks so much to Library Thing, Candlewick Press, and K. Woodman-Maynard for an advanced copy of this graphic novel! I loved it! I was worried that it would lose so much as I have seen happen with other book to GN adaptation. I would definitely recommend reading the original novel before the graphic novel so that you can fully enjoy the gorgeous language and other nuances. However, K. Woodman-Freeman has done a wonderful job in keeping the important as well as subtle points of the story so that anyone can grasp it, first time or no. The art is GORGEOUS!! Woodman-Freeman has especially nailed what I always pictured Daisy to be. I loved seeing her interpretations of first meetings, of Eckleberg, of everything. My copy is in black and white, but Candlewick Press was gracious enough to include a pamphlet containing a few pages of the finished artwork. It is STUNNING!! The colors and style are PERFECT for the time and setting of the novel, and I am very tempted to pick up a copy when it comes out!

  8. 4 out of 5

    ℳacarena

    K. Woodman-Maynard's graphic adaptation of The Great Gatsby captures the essence of F. Scott Fitzgerald's masterpiece. The art reinforces some of the most notorious aspects of the story, the characters are nicely depicted and the adaptation of the original story is well summarised. It's been 8 years since I read The Great Gatsby, so when I saw this graphic novel adaptation I was quite curious to see how it was, and I'm glad I requested it. Thanks to Candlewick Press and NetGalley for providing me K. Woodman-Maynard's graphic adaptation of The Great Gatsby captures the essence of F. Scott Fitzgerald's masterpiece. The art reinforces some of the most notorious aspects of the story, the characters are nicely depicted and the adaptation of the original story is well summarised. It's been 8 years since I read The Great Gatsby, so when I saw this graphic novel adaptation I was quite curious to see how it was, and I'm glad I requested it. Thanks to Candlewick Press and NetGalley for providing me with this e-arc in exchange for my honest review.

  9. 4 out of 5

    Alex Almeida

    This is my first time writing a review for a graphic novel, so it should be known that my rating is for the presentation and artwork rather than the original source material of The Great Gatsby. The watercolors in this are absolutely beautiful. I've noticed that multiple graphic novels of The Great Gatsby are starting to be published, and I'm hoping that eventually, one will use the vibrant and extravagant artwork and colors that match with the facade Jay Gatsby puts on for everyone. This is not This is my first time writing a review for a graphic novel, so it should be known that my rating is for the presentation and artwork rather than the original source material of The Great Gatsby. The watercolors in this are absolutely beautiful. I've noticed that multiple graphic novels of The Great Gatsby are starting to be published, and I'm hoping that eventually, one will use the vibrant and extravagant artwork and colors that match with the facade Jay Gatsby puts on for everyone. This is not that novel, but I appreciated the colors and style all the same. Important quotes are presented in a unique way that helps them stand out on certain pages. Some of the symbolism and overall themes are presented in a way that could make them more accessible to struggling readers. I think some worthy analysis could be done of the color choices for the artwork in this text and how that matches the mood of certain scenes, as well. Chapter 7 with the scene of Tom finding out that Myrtle is going West was done well; it chooses quotes that I think would help students focus on the significance of that scene without getting caught up in all of the language, which some students often find difficult. I also felt that Chapter 9 with the flashback of Gatsby and Daisy was particularly beautiful, and possibly one of my favorite scenes in this version of the text. I think it's worth saying that this definitely isn't a replacement for the novel in a classroom setting. However, I do feel this would be a great supplemental text to have students compare to the original as well as other graphic novels of Gatsby. Truthfully, the author's note is what is most worth teaching. It is mentioned that Meyer Wolfshiem's depiction was changed to avoid the anti-Semitic caricature he is originally described as in the novel. This would be an easy way to help teachers discuss the problems of Fitzgerald's work. The author also explains their inspiration and reasoning for all of the artistic choices made, which could be valuable in showing young readers the choices that go into creating a novel or any work of art. Overall, if you still teach The Great Gatsby, I recommend checking out this version.

  10. 4 out of 5

    Alicia

    So I liked it and I disliked it all in the same breath and I'm okay with that. The mood was captured wholeheartedly which is a major positive for the storytelling but one of those elements wasn't as powerful and I don't know if it was it's placement or disconnection to the text itself but the additional narrative that was "written" on walls, doorways, floors to give readers a taste of the original fell flat. But it worked the intention. I don't know if it needed to be more apparent, more integra So I liked it and I disliked it all in the same breath and I'm okay with that. The mood was captured wholeheartedly which is a major positive for the storytelling but one of those elements wasn't as powerful and I don't know if it was it's placement or disconnection to the text itself but the additional narrative that was "written" on walls, doorways, floors to give readers a taste of the original fell flat. But it worked the intention. I don't know if it needed to be more apparent, more integrated with what was happening on the page, or just acknowledged differently. Yet, when it the ARC was finished, readers are right back understanding Fitzgerald's motivations for writing a story about illusions and introducing us to these flawed characters making huge mistakes but not seeming to learn from any of them. It's a sad sort of book and the illustrations do capture that well. I'll totally have a few copies in our HS library for sure, but it's not a super-love, hug it to my chest kind.

  11. 5 out of 5

    Jessica C Writes

    It's hard for me to properly write a review for this book. First off, it's my first graphic novel, so I do not have much to compare it to. I enjoyed the art style, and I think the color palette perfectly captured the atmosphere and mood of the original text. The metaphorical interpretations of some scenes were certainly fascinating, and it was a joy to watch the book come to life on the page. However, I do not think the flow of the story worked very well. There were a couple of instances where th It's hard for me to properly write a review for this book. First off, it's my first graphic novel, so I do not have much to compare it to. I enjoyed the art style, and I think the color palette perfectly captured the atmosphere and mood of the original text. The metaphorical interpretations of some scenes were certainly fascinating, and it was a joy to watch the book come to life on the page. However, I do not think the flow of the story worked very well. There were a couple of instances where the scene changed so abruptly, that I was getting lost (despite having read the book by Fitzgerald twice & seen the movie at least three times). I think the book needed at least another 10 or so pages to fill in some of those gaps, especially for those who are picking up the graphic novel without having ever read the original work. Overall, I think this first experience with graphic novels was an enjoyable one, and I will definitely be on the lookout for more works by this author!

  12. 5 out of 5

    Madeline (The Bookish Mutant)

    ⭐︎Thank you to Edelweiss and Candlewick Press for giving me this eARC in exchange for an honest review!⭐︎ This was an interesting adaptation of the classic novel! Personally, something about it didn’t quite live up to the glory of the source material, but it certainly came close. The art style was cute, simple and stylized, but not overtly so. The interpretations of the characters and their thoughts were certainly faithful. I especially liked how Daisy and Tom were drawn; Daisy was as dollish as s ⭐︎Thank you to Edelweiss and Candlewick Press for giving me this eARC in exchange for an honest review!⭐︎ This was an interesting adaptation of the classic novel! Personally, something about it didn’t quite live up to the glory of the source material, but it certainly came close. The art style was cute, simple and stylized, but not overtly so. The interpretations of the characters and their thoughts were certainly faithful. I especially liked how Daisy and Tom were drawn; Daisy was as dollish as she appears in the novel, and Tom is especially imposing and stubborn. Daisy even has her own style of speech balloons that curve out at the edges when she spoke, which was a detail I loved. I loved the watercolors that were used to color the graphic novel. The shifting color schemes were especially deft when it came to conveying the different moods of the scenes. However, with that being said, I don’t completely feel like it was the right art style to adapt The Great Gatsby. Although I loved the watercolor and simple style, it failed to depict some of the lavish imagery (ex. with Gatsby’s parties) as well as the novel did. A bit more coloring and definition might have done the trick. All in all, this was an inventive adaptation of The Great Gatsby. Though it wasn’t without its flaws, it was certainly enjoyable to read and explore. 3.5 stars! (I rated the original novel 4 stars.)

  13. 5 out of 5

    Travelling Bookworm

    The Great Gatsby has been a favorite of mine ever since I first cracked its cover open in high school. The melancholy tale of vainly clinging on to the past under the decadent opulence of the post-WWI modernism mesmerized me at the first read, and continues to do so with each reread and countless adaptations the story has merited since. Woodman-Maynard's adaptation takes this story known for its powerful imagery and fascinating characters, and makes it even more magnetic with beautiful water colo The Great Gatsby has been a favorite of mine ever since I first cracked its cover open in high school. The melancholy tale of vainly clinging on to the past under the decadent opulence of the post-WWI modernism mesmerized me at the first read, and continues to do so with each reread and countless adaptations the story has merited since. Woodman-Maynard's adaptation takes this story known for its powerful imagery and fascinating characters, and makes it even more magnetic with beautiful water color illustrations. At the end of the day, it is an adaptation, so don't expect an identical retelling of the novel, but the graphic novel has definitely succeeded in capturing the spirit of the story beautifully.

  14. 5 out of 5

    Kate

    Huge thanks to Candlewick Press and Edelweiss for an ARC of this graphic novel in exchange for an honest review. I, like every other high school, read the original Great Gatsby in my high school English class. It's since then turned into one of my favorite classics. I saw this graphic novel and had to get my hands on it. I loved the art in this one. It's whimsical and playful which fits perfect with the original symbolism in the story. The author captured the main parts of the story beautifully Huge thanks to Candlewick Press and Edelweiss for an ARC of this graphic novel in exchange for an honest review. I, like every other high school, read the original Great Gatsby in my high school English class. It's since then turned into one of my favorite classics. I saw this graphic novel and had to get my hands on it. I loved the art in this one. It's whimsical and playful which fits perfect with the original symbolism in the story. The author captured the main parts of the story beautifully while still sticking to the themes and plot of this story. My only gripe with this one is the fact that some of the text blended in with the background too much. Also, the text was written sideways which I felt made it hard to read in certain spots. Overall, I gave this three stars. This was a fun adaptation and a good read for those that love the Great Gatsby story.

  15. 5 out of 5

    Jenni

    I remember having to read Gatsby in high school and then I ended up teaching the novel later on when I became a teacher myself. It is a staple in the high school classroom. I would have done a lot better as a student if I'd had this graphic novel version. It takes the most important parts of the story and illustrates them beautifully. It even includes some of the most important quotes. A very well-done adaptation of this classic novel. I remember having to read Gatsby in high school and then I ended up teaching the novel later on when I became a teacher myself. It is a staple in the high school classroom. I would have done a lot better as a student if I'd had this graphic novel version. It takes the most important parts of the story and illustrates them beautifully. It even includes some of the most important quotes. A very well-done adaptation of this classic novel.

  16. 5 out of 5

    Vighnesh Muraly

    I didn’t really care for this book. I finished it in one sitting and it honestly did not do anything for me. I found it hard to follow and I think it’s because I haven’t The Great Gastby so I would suggest reading that first before picking this up. I wasn’t a huge fan of the art style either. It wasn’t for me and I honestly found the change in color a bit confusing too. Overall, this book just fell short of what I expected.

  17. 4 out of 5

    Sophie

    What I Liked - The art was beautiful. I loved the light and airy art style and the watercolour that brought the story to life. - In general, classics intimidate me. There is a reason why The Great Gatsby (original version) sat on my shelf untouched for many years! However I appreciate that this graphic novel adaptation told the story in a way that wasn’t as intimidating, which is motivation for me to read the original novel. - I liked that the graphic novel kept some of the lines from the original What I Liked - The art was beautiful. I loved the light and airy art style and the watercolour that brought the story to life. - In general, classics intimidate me. There is a reason why The Great Gatsby (original version) sat on my shelf untouched for many years! However I appreciate that this graphic novel adaptation told the story in a way that wasn’t as intimidating, which is motivation for me to read the original novel. - I liked that the graphic novel kept some of the lines from the original book, and merged them seamlessly with the narration in the story. To be absolutely honest, sometimes these quotes went over my head but it was great to sit and reflect on some of these famous lines in literature. What I Didn’t Like - Since I never read the original The Great Gatsby book, it was difficult to piece together what was exactly happening in the story for the first 20 pages or so. - Although I didn’t dislike the characters, I felt distant from them. I didn’t know if this was a limitation of the graphic novel format. The Bottom Line I enjoyed this graphic novel adaptation of The Great Gatsby, and I loved that this adaptation gave me a glimpse of a literary classic that I would be otherwise too intimidated to read. After reading this graphic novel, I feel more motivated to read the original to see how it would compare!

  18. 5 out of 5

    Caroline Craig David

    Obviously the book itself was great and I enjoyed the graphics a lot but I felt the color felt a little too upbeat for this book. I would've liked something with more neutrals. Obviously the book itself was great and I enjoyed the graphics a lot but I felt the color felt a little too upbeat for this book. I would've liked something with more neutrals.

  19. 4 out of 5

    Pauline

    3.75 stars I really liked this adaption of the story of Jay Gatsby. Now I want to rewatch the movie haha. I was not fan of the art style, it was not my style. Thank you to NetGalley for this e-arc.

  20. 4 out of 5

    Tabatha Shipley

    Thank you to the publisher for my ARC. What I Did Like: -The illustrations. They’re WONDERFUL. They have text hidden all over them, they bring the story to life in amazing ways, and the author chose to put metaphors into literal images. It’s remarkably well done and would foster incredible conversations. -The entire concept. I’m not a particular fan of The Great Gatsby so I had my reservations. But I honestly think this brings the story to life in a perfect way. I wouldn’t recommend reading this Thank you to the publisher for my ARC. What I Did Like: -The illustrations. They’re WONDERFUL. They have text hidden all over them, they bring the story to life in amazing ways, and the author chose to put metaphors into literal images. It’s remarkably well done and would foster incredible conversations. -The entire concept. I’m not a particular fan of The Great Gatsby so I had my reservations. But I honestly think this brings the story to life in a perfect way. I wouldn’t recommend reading this exclusively, but I think it could help people appreciate the original in new ways. Who Should Read This One: -Reluctant readers of Gatsby or people who maye didn’t love the book the first time around. This may give you new insight or appreciation for the classic. -Young readers trying to wade through Fitzergerald’s work for the first time. This format uses much of the same language but in a way that you may prefer. My Rating: 4 Stars. I think this set out to bring the novel to life in a graphic way and it does exactly that. I honestly think graphic novel readers will adore this adaptation. For full review (including what I didn’t like): https://youtu.be/IakhIHxSWto

  21. 4 out of 5

    Thindbooks

    *This graphic novel was given to me by the publisher to give an honest review* I enjoyed this little graphic novel which is a reimaged of The Great Gatsby as you can see by the title. This will be a short review as I only gotten the first part of the book. I enjoyed the artist’s watercolor drawing because it brought the whole book alive. The writer did an amazing job bringing the whole story since it is a reimagined of The Great Gatsby. I enjoyed the characters so far also the setting. I haven’t *This graphic novel was given to me by the publisher to give an honest review* I enjoyed this little graphic novel which is a reimaged of The Great Gatsby as you can see by the title. This will be a short review as I only gotten the first part of the book. I enjoyed the artist’s watercolor drawing because it brought the whole book alive. The writer did an amazing job bringing the whole story since it is a reimagined of The Great Gatsby. I enjoyed the characters so far also the setting. I haven’t read the original Great Gatsby but I know the main points and I think so far the book nailed it with those. I think this would be a great book to use for middle school children or even elementary kids. Since a lot of kids do love pictures in their book, I think this would help bring out the story more clearer for them. I enjoyed this graphic novel and recommend it to The Great Gatsby fans.

  22. 4 out of 5

    Mark Taylor

    On January 1, 2021, F. Scott Fitzgerald’s novel The Great Gatsby entered the public domain, meaning that anyone is now free to adapt the novel however they choose to do so, without getting approval from the Fitzgerald estate. One of the earliest new adaptations to be released is K. Woodman-Maynard’s graphic novel adaptation, published on January 5th by Candlewick Press. The Great Gatsby is Woodman-Maynard’s first graphic novel, and she does a fantastic job of translating Fitzgerald’s timeless nov On January 1, 2021, F. Scott Fitzgerald’s novel The Great Gatsby entered the public domain, meaning that anyone is now free to adapt the novel however they choose to do so, without getting approval from the Fitzgerald estate. One of the earliest new adaptations to be released is K. Woodman-Maynard’s graphic novel adaptation, published on January 5th by Candlewick Press. The Great Gatsby is Woodman-Maynard’s first graphic novel, and she does a fantastic job of translating Fitzgerald’s timeless novel into the graphic novel format. Gatsby is an excellent candidate for the graphic novel treatment, as Fitzgerald’s language throughout the book is full of colors. Of course, there’s the famous green light at the end of Daisy’s dock, as well as Gatsby’s pink suit, his yellow car, and the “yellow cocktail music” that plays at his parties. Woodman-Maynard’s medium for her Gatsby graphic novel is watercolor and digital media, and her vibrant colors pop off the page. Her version of Gatsby is a treat to look at. The attention to detail is superb—pay attention to the character’s speech bubbles, and you’ll see that everything Tom Buchanan says is in a square bubble, perfect for his tiny, square mind, while everything Daisy says has tendrils and curlicues that occasionally ensnare the other characters. It’s a perfect visual illustration of her seductiveness. Nick Carraway’s narration appears in creative ways throughout the book—on clouds, on the sides of buildings, stretching across a landscape. This is an elegant and visually stimulating way to present the novel’s narration without relying on huge blocks of text intruding into the book. Throughout the book are little “Easter eggs” for Gatsby fans to pore over. For example, the hood ornament on Gatsby’s car is a tiny gold top hat—a reference to Gatsby’s epigraph poem “The Gold-Hatted Lover.” While Woodman-Maynard’s use of color is bold, she makes the dramatic choice to show the hapless George Wilson without any color at all. It’s a great decision, and makes Wilson stand out from the other characters. I couldn’t help but compare Woodman-Maynard’s adaptation to the officially sanctioned Gatsby graphic novel, with illustrations by Aya Morton, adapted by Fred Fordham, that came out in June of 2020. Woodman-Maynard has made more dramatic editorial choices than Fordham did, and for that reason, I found Woodman-Maynard’s to be a more successful adaptation. In my original review of the Fordham/Morton version, I praised Fordham’s adaptation of the text. But now that I’ve read Woodman-Maynard’s, I think Fordham left in too much narration. I know, that sounds like heresy, considering how beautiful Fitzgerald’s prose is. But an adaptation will always be someone’s version of the original text—it will always be different from the source. If you want all the language of the novel, go read the novel. Woodman-Maynard succeeds in creating a graphic novel that has narrative drive that isn’t overly reliant on Fitzgerald’s narration. In doing so, she has made a tight narrative even tighter. Woodman-Maynard also succeeds in differentiating the characters more than Morton did. In Woodman-Maynard’s version, Tom Buchanan becomes the hulking person he’s described as in the novel, as he towers over all the other characters. Woodman-Maynard also chooses to make some of Fitzgerald’s metaphors literal—Daisy and Jordan are literally hovering in the air when we first see them. In Fitzgerald’s words, they “were buoyed up as though upon an anchored balloon.” For me, those moments were never distracting or intrusive, they just added to the atmosphere of the book. There’s something slightly unreal about Gatsby to begin with—this isn’t a novel that’s all about naturalism. If you’re looking for a new way to experience The Great Gatsby, pick up K. Woodman-Maynard’s graphic novel adaptation. Chances are you’ll find something new you’ve never noticed before.

  23. 5 out of 5

    Firdaus

    My sincere thanks to NetGalley and Candlewick, the publishers, for sending me this Advance Reader’s copy to read and review. Most avid readers, if not all, would have at some stage or the other read and admired Fitzgerald’s The Great Gatsby. To translate this novel into its present graphic form certainly requires much courage as it is not an easy task. However, the Woodman-Maynard edition does remain faithful to the original text, except for some alterations make for the purpose of clarity as exp My sincere thanks to NetGalley and Candlewick, the publishers, for sending me this Advance Reader’s copy to read and review. Most avid readers, if not all, would have at some stage or the other read and admired Fitzgerald’s The Great Gatsby. To translate this novel into its present graphic form certainly requires much courage as it is not an easy task. However, the Woodman-Maynard edition does remain faithful to the original text, except for some alterations make for the purpose of clarity as explained in the Afterword. The novel in its present format, has been well-edited and I feel that even first-time readers who are unfamiliar with the novel will be able to follow the plot. It would be unfair to be displeased if some of the reader’s favorite passages are missing. The main problem with converting the novel into a graphic format is the role of the narrator, Nick Carraway, a Yale University graduate who moves to New York. It is he who is probably the most important character in the novel and the entire saga is seen through his eyes. It is he who matures at the end of the novel, moving from relative protected innocence to an understanding of the true nature of society. Hence, narration forms an integral part of the novel. Though the beauty of Fitzgerald’s language is captured in the graphic form, much of the narration here tedious to read. Usually, the form of the graphic novel depends on action, embodied in the dialogue and lively interaction between the characters. The large chunks of narration take away from the enjoyment of the graphic form. Though the narrative bits are well melded into the images and the general background, they still seem a bit out of place in a graphic novel. The illustrations are very suggestive of the character of the persons in the novel. Tom Buchanan, hulking and insensitive is large with a rather unpleasant look on his face. Daisy Buchanan and Joanna Baker look sylphlike especially where they are seen to be floating in air. The owl eyes of Dr Eckleberg are large and penetrating, Myrtle Wilson seems flighty and George Wilson’s appearance shows his weak and indecisive character. But the colors are very muted throughout the novel. Even in the extravagant parties which Gatsby throws and that memorable scene when he scatters his shirts around the room, the colors though varied remain dull and could have been more vibrant and striking. It is certain that this version will be a great success with the lazy student who is reluctant to read the original version which is a pity.

  24. 5 out of 5

    joyce w. laudon

    The Great Gatsby is perhaps one of the greatest of American novels. It is one that is often read in high school but there is something to be said about rereading this book as an adult. This graphic version of the novel can be enjoyed both by those new to TGG and by those who are revisiting the novel. The essence of the story is here. The illustrations are clever and definitely complement and enhance the storyline. I liked that the text was creatively placed on the pages to best go with the drawin The Great Gatsby is perhaps one of the greatest of American novels. It is one that is often read in high school but there is something to be said about rereading this book as an adult. This graphic version of the novel can be enjoyed both by those new to TGG and by those who are revisiting the novel. The essence of the story is here. The illustrations are clever and definitely complement and enhance the storyline. I liked that the text was creatively placed on the pages to best go with the drawings and add additional meaning. Following the end of the novel, there is a good note by the author. It talks about how he came to work on the book. Many thanks to NetGalley and the publisher for this title. All opinions are my own. Below are some thoughts from the last time I read this book for a class. Chances are that you read The Great Gatsby when you were in high school. If some time has passed since your first reading of the novel, I urge you to read it again. I had read TGG when I was in college and had not thought about it too much since, except to recall that the paper I wrote on it got me my first A from a tough professor. Well, this was the last novel that we read in my summer Currents in the Modern Novel class and it was a stunner. Start with the title…was Jay Gatsby great? Is the title genuine or meant to be ironic? Lots of discussion on this in class. What makes someone great? Is it their accomplishments? Is it who someone is inherently? What does it mean to have money? Does it make a difference as to whether it is “old” or “new?” Is it okay to “carelessly” take the things that one wants in life? What does it mean to be a “careless” driver? How do we organize our lives around dreams? What does it mean as these play out? Are dreams illusions? There was also lots of discussion about capitalism in class. Is the novel an indictment of the capitalist system? Some critics say yes while others say Fitzgerald did not intend that. Your opinion? I was more moved by Jay Gatsby after I finished the novel this time. Will you be? spend time with Jay, Nick (is he an unreliable narrator?), Daisy, Tom and Jordan and then let me know.

  25. 5 out of 5

    Grace Williams

    Get ready for The Great Gatsby as you've never seen it before. This graphic novel adaptation is absolutely stunning, and brings justice to a story that the majority of all high school English classes have to read, yet not all students may understand. First and foremost, I want to champion this graphic novel as a possible alternative to the original book for students who may have difficulty interpreting text, and even in addition to the book for students in higher level courses. It really is that Get ready for The Great Gatsby as you've never seen it before. This graphic novel adaptation is absolutely stunning, and brings justice to a story that the majority of all high school English classes have to read, yet not all students may understand. First and foremost, I want to champion this graphic novel as a possible alternative to the original book for students who may have difficulty interpreting text, and even in addition to the book for students in higher level courses. It really is that good. Something I really admired about this book is the amount of work that went into it. I could tell that Woodman-Maynard did her research, and while she did take some creative license as is evidenced in the Author's Note, I didn't find a single thing in this graphic novel to fuss over. The adaptation was spot on, and I especially loved how Nick's narration was written creatively into the scenes. For example, narration could be written in a character's shadow or on some unused furniture. Another creative piece was text bubbles: while most characters had typical text bubbles, we do have a character or two that receive text bubbles more parallel to their personality. Something else I really loved were the color schemes in the story. Depending on the mood or situation occurring, the panels of the graphic novel would have one color overwhelming the rest and it was brilliant. I could go on and on about the artwork in this graphic novel, so I will leave all of this at it was simply fantastic. All of these things could be added into the conversation about the story this graphic novel adaptation is based on, and all of these elements and more helped make it absolutely wonderful and absolutely worth the read. **I received this as a free ebook from Netgalley and it's publisher in exchange for my honest review. Thank you to the publisher and Netgalley for this oppurtunity.

  26. 4 out of 5

    Amy Norton

    I am not a huge fan of the story the Great Gatsby. I find the story incredibly vapid which I understand is part of the point but don’t enjoy. So, I was incredibly excited to see that there was a graphic novel version, not only for myself but for my students. I feel like this story (with the outrageousness of the time and the fact that the characters are caricatures) naturally lends itself to the graphic novel format. I was excited for the subtleties I’d what’s going on in the background of panel I am not a huge fan of the story the Great Gatsby. I find the story incredibly vapid which I understand is part of the point but don’t enjoy. So, I was incredibly excited to see that there was a graphic novel version, not only for myself but for my students. I feel like this story (with the outrageousness of the time and the fact that the characters are caricatures) naturally lends itself to the graphic novel format. I was excited for the subtleties I’d what’s going on in the background of panels, and I was also pumped for being able to have my students visually track the metaphors. Unfortunately, none of that happened. This book fell far, far short of my expectations. The font was childish and somewhat difficult to read. Also, for the lavishness of the roaring 20s, this art was incredibly simple in terms of the fact that the colors were muted and there was no background action. Each page had one image and one small piece of the story. I would have liked the author to have multiple panels or maybe play with the space more so that we see the plot moved through background. The sentences seemed to be all short, simple sentences. Which made this rather boring to read except for the quotes pulled directly from the book. This made much of the dialogue stinted and awkward. I never felt like I got to know the characters as much as I did in the novel, and Nick’s unreliable narration doesn’t come through as much. A severe lack of transitions made the already airy, vapid, and mildly confusing story unfollowable. The book moves so fast as to hardly make sense. Perhaps this will be good for ELL students, but I will not be using it in my classroom. (I am thankful for the chance to give an honest review of this ARC copy.)

  27. 5 out of 5

    L.E. Fidler

    I am always on the hunt for a solid graphic novel adaptation of Gatsby. I found the illustrations (watercolors?) in this one to be gorgeous with excellent use of color washings of purples and blues. It felt hazy and surreal, the nostalgic glow of a tipsy summer of illicit love and the faded dreams of the past. One thing I was taken by was the stripping of Wolfsheim's anti-Semitic depiction. This is something we talk about in class when we read it - an acknowledgement of the horrors of the past i I am always on the hunt for a solid graphic novel adaptation of Gatsby. I found the illustrations (watercolors?) in this one to be gorgeous with excellent use of color washings of purples and blues. It felt hazy and surreal, the nostalgic glow of a tipsy summer of illicit love and the faded dreams of the past. One thing I was taken by was the stripping of Wolfsheim's anti-Semitic depiction. This is something we talk about in class when we read it - an acknowledgement of the horrors of the past in the liminal historical space between between the first and second world wars. This is a topic that Woodman-Maynard covers in her "about this adaptation" at the end and I understand her reasons for making the choice to not only remove some of the physical markers but also Wolf's distinctive accent; she's right - it doesn't move the story/narrative forward. But it opens up a much larger quandary for me about removing these unpleasant and racist details. ALSO, in that vein, I've read the scholarship which presents evidence that Gatsby is Black (a topic that was very compelling to one of my classes about 3 or 4 years ago and has grown in academic interest since). I've read several graphic novel adaptations of Gatsby but that one is the one I'm longing for. It makes Tom's racist reading habits and comments, Gatsby's social standings and his relationship with Daisy a much more potent social comment. But perhaps gives too much credit to Fitzgerald? I'm not sure yet. Still, graphic novels are spaces to help us imagine what is being said beneath the surface. Call me when that adaptation is ready for public consumption, please. 3.5 stars - beautiful, thoughtfully-interpreted, but something is perhaps a little lost in translation.

  28. 4 out of 5

    Penny Wright

    Adapting a classic and beloved novel into a graphic novel is no easy task, but K. Woodman-Maynard has done a fantastic job of adapting F. Scott Fitzgerald’s The Great Gatsby. The Great Gatsby is one of my favorite books of all time, so I went into this adaptation a little skeptical but wanting to love it. I needn’t have worried though – K. Woodman-Maynard stuck to the roots of the story while making it accessible to a new (and old) audience. The ARC I received from the publisher was in black and Adapting a classic and beloved novel into a graphic novel is no easy task, but K. Woodman-Maynard has done a fantastic job of adapting F. Scott Fitzgerald’s The Great Gatsby. The Great Gatsby is one of my favorite books of all time, so I went into this adaptation a little skeptical but wanting to love it. I needn’t have worried though – K. Woodman-Maynard stuck to the roots of the story while making it accessible to a new (and old) audience. The ARC I received from the publisher was in black and white, but the finished version, set to be released in early January 2021, will be in full color. I actually loved the black and white artwork, but I am eager to see the full-color version! The art is simple and fits this medium perfectly, and also manages to grasp the feelings of extravagance and yearning of the original story. While it’s impossible to adapt a novel such as The Great Gatsby without leaving some elements of the original story out, Woodman-Maynard kept all the important bits and everything needed to create the same atmosphere and themes of the original. I wouldn’t call The Great Gatsby a difficult classic novel by any means, but I remember not really “getting it” in high school – this may have been a much better medium for me to be introduced to the story. There’s no substitute for the original F. Scott Fitzgerald novel – there never will be. It’s one of the Great American Novels for a reason and I encourage you to read it if you never have. If it’s a story that you love, however, or if you find the original novel uninteresting (a concept I can’t understand!), picking up K. Woodman-Maynard’s adaptation is an absolute must. You can tell when a writer and artist loves the story that they’re working on, and Woodman-Maynard’s love of The Great Gatsby shines through clearly in her work. Thank you Candlewick Press for the free advanced copy for review.

  29. 5 out of 5

    Nina The Fussy Reader

    I enjoy the Great Gatsby story, and graphic novels, so this seemed like a win-win for me. It certainly tells the story in a pleasant, easy way and I think this could be a great alternative to the original book if someone doesn’t want to read the whole thing but still wants to experience the story. There were a few stylistic choices that didn’t gel with me though. One being the text style. Dialogue was fine, but Nick’s narration was hard to read. The writing too much became the environment. Whether I enjoy the Great Gatsby story, and graphic novels, so this seemed like a win-win for me. It certainly tells the story in a pleasant, easy way and I think this could be a great alternative to the original book if someone doesn’t want to read the whole thing but still wants to experience the story. There were a few stylistic choices that didn’t gel with me though. One being the text style. Dialogue was fine, but Nick’s narration was hard to read. The writing too much became the environment. Whether fading smaller up a road Star Wars style, or arcing over Nick’s head, it just made it difficult to read, especially when some of it was sideways. Secondly, though the art-syle was quite lovely and very unique, I’m not sure it was the right fit for a Gatsby adaptation. Maybe an art deco style would have been too cliché and obvious, but really, there’s a reason that aesthetic is always associated with Gatsby. It just works. It’s classic. The pastoral pallet used in this novel, though very pretty, just doesn’t quite capture the Gatsby vibes I love. Thirdly, the colour pallet felt a little inconsistent. Some pages would be painted in various shades of a single colour (blues, pinks, or greens), while others were a mix of many colours. It’s like the art-style couldn’t quite decided where it stood. However, this is an enjoyable book, and I’d recommend to anyone who enjoys the Great Gatsby, or anyone who wants to dip their toe before taking the plunge. Thank you Netgalley and Publishers for an ARC in exchange for an honest review.

  30. 4 out of 5

    Christine Hazel Murphy

    First of all, it's a little daunting trying to review a Gatsby adaptation--where do you start?! Woodman-Maynard takes on this challenge herself with beautiful splashes of water color. I love this medium for this particular graphic novel since it seems to match the green light across the bay imagery so well. I enjoyed the art, as it felt both ethereal, light, and serious when needed. I appreciate Woodman-Maynard's adaptation since it provides a new method of access to Fitzgerald's work to readers First of all, it's a little daunting trying to review a Gatsby adaptation--where do you start?! Woodman-Maynard takes on this challenge herself with beautiful splashes of water color. I love this medium for this particular graphic novel since it seems to match the green light across the bay imagery so well. I enjoyed the art, as it felt both ethereal, light, and serious when needed. I appreciate Woodman-Maynard's adaptation since it provides a new method of access to Fitzgerald's work to readers that may not be able to access it, with exception of the movie. For classroom use, a strong teacher would be able to pull out many themes (but not all) that match the original text. If you're looking for an exact replication, you won't find that in this graphic novel, and I don't say this as a criticism; Woodman-Maynard directly calls this an adaptation, so expecting it to be the same as the Fitzgerald would be crazy. At times I think Woodman-Maynard could've slowed down and spent a bit more time with aspects of the story--I didn't think we got a lot of Daisy and Gatsby; it seems they spent 2 or 3 afternoons together, even though at one point Gatsby does quickly mention that Daisy had been visiting. But overall, I thought this was a great, accessible introduction to a classic story. ⭐︎Thank you to Edelweiss and Candlewick Press and Netgalley for giving me this eARC in exchange for an honest review!⭐︎

Add a review

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

Loading...
We use cookies to give you the best online experience. By using our website you agree to our use of cookies in accordance with our cookie policy.