web site hit counter The Practice: Shipping Creative Work - Ebooks PDF Online
Hot Best Seller

The Practice: Shipping Creative Work

Availability: Ready to download

From the bestselling author of Linchpin, Tribes, and The Dip comes an elegant little book that will inspire artists, writers, and entrepreneurs to stretch and commit to putting their best work out into the world. Creative work doesn't come with a guarantee. But there is a pattern to who succeeds and who doesn't. And engaging in the consistent practice of its pursuit is the From the bestselling author of Linchpin, Tribes, and The Dip comes an elegant little book that will inspire artists, writers, and entrepreneurs to stretch and commit to putting their best work out into the world. Creative work doesn't come with a guarantee. But there is a pattern to who succeeds and who doesn't. And engaging in the consistent practice of its pursuit is the best way forward. Based on the breakthrough Akimbo workshop pioneered by legendary author Seth Godin, The Practice will help you get unstuck and find the courage to make and share creative work. Godin insists that writer's block is a myth, that consistency is far more important than authenticity, and that experiencing the imposter syndrome is a sign that you're a well-adjusted human. Most of all, he shows you what it takes to turn your passion from a private distraction to a productive contribution, the one you've been seeking to share all along. With this book as your guide, you'll learn to dance with your fear. To take the risks worth taking. And to embrace the empathy required to make work that contributes with authenticity and joy.


Compare

From the bestselling author of Linchpin, Tribes, and The Dip comes an elegant little book that will inspire artists, writers, and entrepreneurs to stretch and commit to putting their best work out into the world. Creative work doesn't come with a guarantee. But there is a pattern to who succeeds and who doesn't. And engaging in the consistent practice of its pursuit is the From the bestselling author of Linchpin, Tribes, and The Dip comes an elegant little book that will inspire artists, writers, and entrepreneurs to stretch and commit to putting their best work out into the world. Creative work doesn't come with a guarantee. But there is a pattern to who succeeds and who doesn't. And engaging in the consistent practice of its pursuit is the best way forward. Based on the breakthrough Akimbo workshop pioneered by legendary author Seth Godin, The Practice will help you get unstuck and find the courage to make and share creative work. Godin insists that writer's block is a myth, that consistency is far more important than authenticity, and that experiencing the imposter syndrome is a sign that you're a well-adjusted human. Most of all, he shows you what it takes to turn your passion from a private distraction to a productive contribution, the one you've been seeking to share all along. With this book as your guide, you'll learn to dance with your fear. To take the risks worth taking. And to embrace the empathy required to make work that contributes with authenticity and joy.

30 review for The Practice: Shipping Creative Work

  1. 4 out of 5

    Eric Hultgren

    The book I needed to read right this very second.

  2. 5 out of 5

    Diane Law

    A call to action. A road map. An essential read for freelancers. Go make a ruckus

  3. 5 out of 5

    Venky

    A cross between a change agent and a psychiatrist, acclaimed marketing Guru and best-selling author Seth Godin’s latest work, “The Practice” is a small book of powerful affirmations. Mr. Godin urges his aspiring readers to abandon the outcome of their passionate calling and instead develop an unrelenting focus on the practice/process. “There’s a practice available to each of us—the practice of embracing the process of creation in service of better. The practice is not the means to the output, th A cross between a change agent and a psychiatrist, acclaimed marketing Guru and best-selling author Seth Godin’s latest work, “The Practice” is a small book of powerful affirmations. Mr. Godin urges his aspiring readers to abandon the outcome of their passionate calling and instead develop an unrelenting focus on the practice/process. “There’s a practice available to each of us—the practice of embracing the process of creation in service of better. The practice is not the means to the output, the practice is the output, because the practice is all we can control.” Doing so would make the practioner a ‘creative’. The creative, by shipping her work to the wider world has the opportunity to make a difference and thereby effect incremental positive changes. ‘Shipping’ here refers to the dissemination of the work by a painter, writer etc to the general populace. Mr. Godin exhorts the artist to just trust her process, go about her work with generosity and purpose, and, to accept both positive and negative outcomes with a measure of equanimity. The unmissable elements of Rudyard Kipling’s “If” may be detected in this lofty philosophy. It is not just Kipling whose seems to inspire Mr. Godin and his outlook. “The Practice” resonates with the teachings of the immortal Indian epic, Bhagavadgita, as the wisdom propounded by it permeates the pages of the book. Urging the individual to be agnostic about the outcome of her activities, and instead bestow the highest degree of concentration and respect on and to the process forms the bedrock of the Bhagavad Gita philosophy. Mr. Godin seems to wholeheartedly agree: “That’s because working in anticipation of what we’ll get in return takes us out of the world of self-trust and back into the never-ending search for reassurance and the perfect outcome. We believe that we need a guarantee, and that the only way to get that guarantee is with external feedback and results. It draws our eye to the mirror instead of the work.” Elsa Freytag-Loringhoven, a Baroness and a formidable Dadaist, was a woman way ahead of her times. Revolutionizing the world of performing arts and lending a new dimension to painting, she was fanatical ‘practioner.’ Her relentless focus was on her art and practice and she cared a jot for ether recognition or reward. When she once procured a ceramic urinal at an industrial supply house, her friend Marcel Duchamp entered it into an art exhibit. This not only upended the domain of art but also signaled the beginning of an insidious trait on the part of Duchamp. As the art world began making progress or a transition from handmade works to the machine produced, Duchamp, exploited a benevolent opportunity magnanimously accorded to him by usurping credit for many a work of Elsa Freytag-Loringhoven. To the extent, that the world now recognises Duchamp as a pioneering figure, whereas Elsa Freytag remains a personality in obscurity. But as Mr. Godin rightly points out, it was a choice made by her. A choice to “live a life in art, to explore the penumbra, the spots just outside of the existing wisdom.” The practice of an art has to be a perpetual, permanent and a perennial virtuous cycle. This is because the ultimate aim of practice is just that, more practice. An irreverent approach towards the outcome, not in a manner of arrogance or an irascible outlook, fuels an artist’s ability to keep going in the face of adversity. This is simply because she does not treat her results as adverse any more so than she judges her practice as absolutely necessary. As James Carse the author writes in his incredibly complicated but seminal work, “Infinite Games”, the objective of the play is only to remain in the play. The game has no end and there emerge neither winners not losers. “The infinite game is a catch in the backyard with your four-year-old son. You’re not trying to win catch; you’re simply playing catch. The most important parts of our lives are games that we can’t imagine winning. The process is infinite, if we trust it to be. We don’t do this work hoping that we will win, and the game will be over.” How does one build up such a virtuous and uncompromising habit? How does one vigorously keep up the habit and yet not dilute her efforts? Mr. Godin offers his readers a few “tricks” in this regard: “Build streaks. Do the work every single day. Blog daily. Write daily. Ship daily. Show up daily. Find your streak and maintain it. Talk about your streaks to keep honest. Seek the smallest viable audience. Make it for someone, not everyone. Avoid shortcuts. Seek the most direct path instead. Find and embrace genre. Seek out desirable difficulty. Don’t talk about your dreams with people who want to protect you from heartache.” For all those who are perturbed by criticism in general and vicious criticism in particular, and because of which shy away from sharing or shipping their work, Mr. Godin offers some invaluable advice and instills hope. Worst of all, criticism reminds us of the outcomes, not the process. He warns us not to reduce or dilute our commitment to the practice on account of an unkind remark or vitriolic comment. In the digital era that we find ourselves in, a proliferation of social media outlets ensures not only accessibility and voice, but also an avenue for venting out trenchant views and unpolished diatribes. However, most of the criticism “shared in the internet age is useless, or worse, harmful. It’s useless because it often personalizes the criticism to be about the creator, not the work. And it’s useless because most critics are unskilled and ungenerous.” Mr. Godin also emphatically states that received wisdom pertaining to ‘states’ of impediment such as ‘suffering from a writer’s block’; ‘deserted by the muse’; etc are convenient myths and excuses that require busting. The lack of output is a direct effect of a shortage of practice. These are also tried and tested methodologies to hide ourselves from the vehemence of the critics. This is precisely what makes us sacrifice our identity at the altar of stereotype. We choose to discard our own voice and instead opt to make the noise of the herd. “Everyone has a voice in their head, and every one of those voices is different. Our experiences and dreams and fears are unique, and we shape the discourse by allowing those ideas to be shared. It might not work. But only you have your distinct voice, and hoarding it is toxic. Of course, you’re allowed to sound like you. Everyone else is taken.” Mr. Godin also offers a ready list of role models to emulate if one wishes to keep the flame of practice ever alight within her. This impressive list includes, among others, Patricia Barber, Zaha Hadid, Joel Spolsky, Yo-Yo Ma, Tom Peters, Frida Kahlo, Banksy, Ruth Bader Ginsburg, Bryan Stevenson, Liz Jackson, Simone Giertz, Jonas Salk, Rosanne Cash, John Wooden etc. Seth Godin is the author of 19 best seller works and the owner of one of the most popular blogs in the world. “The Practice” in more ways than one might be the most unique and impactful of books that he has authored – ‘yet’!

  4. 4 out of 5

    Chris

    Not so much a book - rather a set of 200+ blog posts. My advice is that you don't do as I did and try to sit down and read this as a complete work. It will benefit you more if you decide on a passage a day. Like The Daily Stoic - a series of meditations on creativity. As always, the wisdom is insightful and contemporary. Godin makes us think. Not so much a book - rather a set of 200+ blog posts. My advice is that you don't do as I did and try to sit down and read this as a complete work. It will benefit you more if you decide on a passage a day. Like The Daily Stoic - a series of meditations on creativity. As always, the wisdom is insightful and contemporary. Godin makes us think.

  5. 4 out of 5

    Richard Hugessen

    You have a unique contribution to make - work that only you can do, work that matters for people who need you. Think about all the artists - writers, moviemakers, entrepreneurs - who produce work that you love, work that you would miss if it were gone. That work is their gift, a generous contribution to our culture. Making change, by definition, means doing something that has never been done before, so it’s not guaranteed to work. Doesn’t matter; do it anyway - take the leap and embrace the prac You have a unique contribution to make - work that only you can do, work that matters for people who need you. Think about all the artists - writers, moviemakers, entrepreneurs - who produce work that you love, work that you would miss if it were gone. That work is their gift, a generous contribution to our culture. Making change, by definition, means doing something that has never been done before, so it’s not guaranteed to work. Doesn’t matter; do it anyway - take the leap and embrace the practice, not the outcome. Do your work for someone, not everyone, because that will unlock you to do work that is opinionated and particular, not generic and average. Everyone has something truly special to contribute. There is no “creative genius” - the magic is that there is no magic. The creative genius will show up when you do the work, not the other way around. So get to it! Produce tons of terrible work - it’s “practice” for a reason - and eventually the good work can’t help but show up. We need you. Letting fear stop you is selfish and it deprives us all of the work you are capable of.

  6. 4 out of 5

    Emma Sea

    Oof, gritting my teeth while I write this review because while I have enjoyed a lot of Godin's other books, not so much with this one. There's just not a lot of substance and it reads as a collection of his daily short blog posts, broadly grouped thematically. 10/10 on the core message, 5/10 on the delivery. I got more from the many, many podcasts and interviews Godin did for the release, as that's when he reduces the book to the key points. There's also a low-level up-sell to his Creative's Wor Oof, gritting my teeth while I write this review because while I have enjoyed a lot of Godin's other books, not so much with this one. There's just not a lot of substance and it reads as a collection of his daily short blog posts, broadly grouped thematically. 10/10 on the core message, 5/10 on the delivery. I got more from the many, many podcasts and interviews Godin did for the release, as that's when he reduces the book to the key points. There's also a low-level up-sell to his Creative's Workshop online learning package at US$795. 2.5 stars Recommended to check out from your library before buying.

  7. 5 out of 5

    Caroline

    Succinct in reframing how to approach the creative process in a realistic, sustainable, and fulfilling way. Impactful reading for getting out of creative ruts and establishing a system for long-term progress.

  8. 5 out of 5

    Steve Long

    Felt a little like the non fiction self help version of the movie Being John Malkovich or Momento. It's the kind of book that you finish and think, what the heck did I just read. Let me think about it for a while. I need to flip back through and see if I missed the plot. Was there a plot, or a point? Were there too many points? It seemed to bounce arround like a stream of consciousness leaving me to wonder what it was all about. I'll be reading one page, flip to the next, and wonder if I accide Felt a little like the non fiction self help version of the movie Being John Malkovich or Momento. It's the kind of book that you finish and think, what the heck did I just read. Let me think about it for a while. I need to flip back through and see if I missed the plot. Was there a plot, or a point? Were there too many points? It seemed to bounce arround like a stream of consciousness leaving me to wonder what it was all about. I'll be reading one page, flip to the next, and wonder if I accidentally turned two pages. Nope, he just decided to move on to a new thread. I read it all the way through in a couple days thinking that the first 90% was some elaborate set up for the major aha moment. Yet it never really came for me, leaving me to ponder it's existence. There were plenty of great one liners and ideas worth sharing, but it all seemed so disconnected. Kind of felt like reading his daily blog. I finished the book, so that typically means 3 stars for me, but since I would struggle to recommend it to someone, I think I'll drop to 2 stars. But I will give it this... The book inspired me to get off my ass, and finish a certain something that I let languish. It's time to ship it. To sum up takeaways, to the best of my recollection: - Everyone is born with a talent for something, but we can all develop skills... "many people have talent, but only a few care enough to show up fully, to earn their skill. Skill is rarer than talent. Skill is earned. Skill is available to anyone who cares enough." - Everyone has a story or "art" to share, and it's selfish not to "ship" it (put it out there) - know your audience. But narrow it. You can't make something that pleases everyone, or you'll please nobody. Have empathy. - "the first thing is making exactly what you want, for you. And the second thing is making something for those you seek to connect and change. Pursuing either is fine. Pursuing both is a recipe for unhappiness, because what you're actually doing is insisting that other people want what you want and see what you see." - focus on the process, not the outcome. - just start going, the the details of the outcome will emerge. But have intent. Understand what's it for. - be proud of your work... "Because most of the time you won't go viral, it's worth producing work you're proud of, even if you don't have a hit in the end." - "if we choose to do work for generous reasons, and not for reciprocity or a long con but simply because we can, we stop believing that we are owed by others." - "Gratitude isn't a problem. But believing were owed gratitude is a trap." - don't worry so much... "The time we spend worrying is actually time we're spending trying to control something that is out of our control" - intent matters... As part of your work or art, what change so you seek to make.... "If there's no intent, it's likely that there's no change either. If there's no intent, it's unlikely that things will get better." - "all we can do is choose the right people, bring them the right work in the right way with the right intent, and then leave it to them to shift their emotional states." - use "what's it for" to validate the why and discover the intent. Everything has a "what's it for", the goal is to align your effort around that. - excuses are not in the vocabulary of people that make a difference.... "The truth: if a reason doesn't stop everyone, it's an excuse, not an actual roadblock." - Struggling is necessary to level up... "Desirable difficulty is the hard work of doing hard work. Setting up for things that cause a struggle, because we know after the struggle, we'll be at a new level." - "you are in charge of how you spend your time. In charge of the questions you ask. In charge of the insight that you produce. In the powerful, horizontal organization, each of us decides what to learn next, who to talk with next, and what to move up in the agenda. This new freedom requires us to find a habit that will lead us to share our voices, even when it's inconvenient or frightening." - don't let others decide for you... "Mostly: you are in charge of the change you make in the world. Who else should be? Who else could be?" - Concludes with a cool list of where ideas come from... "Ideas rarely come from watching television. Ideas sometimes come from listening to a lecture. Ideas often come while reading a book. Good ideas come from bad ideas, but only if there are enough of them. Ideas hate conference rooms, particularly conference rooms where there is a history of criticism, personal attacks, or boredom. Ideas occur when dissimilar universes collide...."

  9. 5 out of 5

    Mustafa

    One hour in... and yet to hear any content? Seth Godin is one of my favourite authors — Tribes was hugely influential for me. This book... was just meh. After one hour of listening I had to turn it off. I'm not quite sure what the point of the book was? Just seemed like random ramblings and fluff. One hour in... and yet to hear any content? Seth Godin is one of my favourite authors — Tribes was hugely influential for me. This book... was just meh. After one hour of listening I had to turn it off. I'm not quite sure what the point of the book was? Just seemed like random ramblings and fluff.

  10. 4 out of 5

    Bernie Anderson

    Maybe Seth’s best yet. I not only liked this book — I needed this book. It will be one I re-read and refer to multiple times.

  11. 4 out of 5

    Filipa Canelas

    I can't recall the number of times I've judged, harshly, what I created. Meaning, judging the output. It's easy to judge what is easy to see — a published blog post, a published photography, a published song. I could have been more clear in this paragraph. I could have increased the contrast. I could have improved the lyrics. It's great to analyze previous work and draw lessons for future improvements. Being critical of our own work helps us grow and tweak the process. But is it productive to be I can't recall the number of times I've judged, harshly, what I created. Meaning, judging the output. It's easy to judge what is easy to see — a published blog post, a published photography, a published song. I could have been more clear in this paragraph. I could have increased the contrast. I could have improved the lyrics. It's great to analyze previous work and draw lessons for future improvements. Being critical of our own work helps us grow and tweak the process. But is it productive to be so harshly critical, we fear the "share" button? Maybe we should be more critical towards the present hours that are not being dedicated to the practice — writing, photographing, playing. Tomorrow I will do it. When I have more time. When I learn this new thing. When the new year starts. Next Monday. When there are no more excuses. For the times I harshly criticize the work I made — at least is published. Are you publishing enough? Read more here: https://www.filipacanelas.com/blog/pu...

  12. 5 out of 5

    Eric Johnson

    I didn't actually finish this book. I got about half way through and I just kind of gave up. It's not that its a bad book. It's just that its not really a book. It's shaped like a book. It looks like a book. It's printed like a book. But it's not actually a book. It's just a concatenation of various blog posts from him. Then those pages got organized into chapters. And then it got a cover. So now its a book. Yay! My issue with reading the book is that when I would stop for the day, and then return I didn't actually finish this book. I got about half way through and I just kind of gave up. It's not that its a bad book. It's just that its not really a book. It's shaped like a book. It looks like a book. It's printed like a book. But it's not actually a book. It's just a concatenation of various blog posts from him. Then those pages got organized into chapters. And then it got a cover. So now its a book. Yay! My issue with reading the book is that when I would stop for the day, and then return another day, it wasn't like I was returning to a specific point. I could have returned anywhere in the book and not missed anything of the previous pages. You could print other versions of this book where the sequence is completely random and it wouldn't change anything. Those two separate readers could talk about the book and never know that they read something in an entirely different sequence. I like Seth. I really do. But this book.. meh. Just read his blog every so often.

  13. 4 out of 5

    Dana

    A book I meant to love. Instead, it struck me as close kin to "The War of Art". Pressfield got page time and offered a blub on the back. I did not like "The War of Art", a text that had all the thinly veiled "try harder" energy of a cis her white man who hasn't been to therapy. A one note carelessness about internal experience, a reduction in possible explanations for "resistance". Godin offers 200+ blog post vignettes on making creative work. And seems to miss that not all art is made for the s A book I meant to love. Instead, it struck me as close kin to "The War of Art". Pressfield got page time and offered a blub on the back. I did not like "The War of Art", a text that had all the thinly veiled "try harder" energy of a cis her white man who hasn't been to therapy. A one note carelessness about internal experience, a reduction in possible explanations for "resistance". Godin offers 200+ blog post vignettes on making creative work. And seems to miss that not all art is made for the same ends or by similar processes. More work, more "shipping", is not how we navigate the fluctuations of life. Seasons matter as much for output and regularity as "merely do it". Also. You can't go critiquing Shelley for a view of poetry you suggest is lazy when that view resulted in work that's lasted according to the parameters of value you've set out.

  14. 4 out of 5

    Merina

    This is a strong 4 out of 5. I know I've rated lots of business books with 4, but this is a strong 4. I wasn't asked by anyone to read it, but I feel like this spoke to me after a year of focusing on habits instead of targets and that in a nutshell is what 'the practice' is all about. In the world of Tech and Product, we're told to focus on outcomes instead of outputs, but this book zooms out from that detail and suggests that if we focus on the 'the practice' we will derive the outputs we're af This is a strong 4 out of 5. I know I've rated lots of business books with 4, but this is a strong 4. I wasn't asked by anyone to read it, but I feel like this spoke to me after a year of focusing on habits instead of targets and that in a nutshell is what 'the practice' is all about. In the world of Tech and Product, we're told to focus on outcomes instead of outputs, but this book zooms out from that detail and suggests that if we focus on the 'the practice' we will derive the outputs we're after. Conceptually, this doesn't of course just apply to our day jobs, but in all of the creative 'magic' we create - from running to cooking to writing and anything we share to be of service to others. Being on the hook means you put yourself out there, as uncomfortable as it may be, and know that we won't be appreciated by everyone but we do it anyway if we're bringing value to someone. People pleasing approaches on the other hand don't require you to put yourself out there; you just need to echo what the masses are preaching, but such approaches are indistinct and forgettable and seldom bring value to anyone. There's so much more to this book but a hearty thank you to the publishers, Penguin Random House, who were generous with font size and line spacing in this book. After a year of Zoom, we all need to be kind to our eyes, so this is highly appreciated!

  15. 4 out of 5

    Lyndie Blevins

    I was attracted to this book because… I’m always challenged and inspired by Seth Godin’s writing. I know my practice of the work I want to do is failing. Common sense suggestion that lead you to believe in yourself and take responsibility for your own magic. This book was about It breaks down into three calls to action. 1. ‘Shipping - your efforts don’t count if you don’t share it.’ 2. Create because you are working toward making things better by producing a new way forward. ‘Creativity is a choi I was attracted to this book because… I’m always challenged and inspired by Seth Godin’s writing. I know my practice of the work I want to do is failing. Common sense suggestion that lead you to believe in yourself and take responsibility for your own magic. This book was about It breaks down into three calls to action. 1. ‘Shipping - your efforts don’t count if you don’t share it.’ 2. Create because you are working toward making things better by producing a new way forward. ‘Creativity is a choice.’ 3. Work - isn’t a hobby, it’s a practice that requires commitment. Things I liked about this book I’m always amazed at Godin’s ability to speak truth in few words. Reading anything he writes is never a waste of time. Why you should read this book If your work is lagging, especially if you are a creative. If you are waiting for the next great inspiration. If you are struggling with finding the time to fo your passion. If you are experiencing any of those things, this book will pick you up out of the dust that has surrounded you and turned you around to a more satisfying outlook on your practice, This book lived up to the back cover copy -The recommendations on the back cover resonated with my experience in reading the book. From the inside cover - “If you’re ready to make a difference with your ideas and your craft, what are you waiting for? Because we’re waiting for you.”

  16. 4 out of 5

    Nathan

    The successful people learn to enjoy the journey as much as the destination. That's what Godin has in mind when he refers to the Practice. Success comes from consistency, from committing to the Practice. If you've read all of Godin's books (as I just about have) and his blog (which I do regularly), there's not much here that will be new or unfamiliar. But if you haven't read him before, you'll love this quick read. The successful people learn to enjoy the journey as much as the destination. That's what Godin has in mind when he refers to the Practice. Success comes from consistency, from committing to the Practice. If you've read all of Godin's books (as I just about have) and his blog (which I do regularly), there's not much here that will be new or unfamiliar. But if you haven't read him before, you'll love this quick read.

  17. 4 out of 5

    Ivan

    I’m not the biggest fan of Godin’s style of writing nor his overuse of “impact” (especially in this book), but I quite enjoyed this book. One sign of a good book is how often you’re left pondering long after you’ve put it down, and this book did just that time and again.

  18. 4 out of 5

    Adam Ashton

    Felt like a bit of “best of Seth”, blending linchpin + your turn + the dip into something new

  19. 4 out of 5

    Kyle

    If you are a creative person you need to read this book. This book along with @ThisIsSethsBlog's other books I've read have reshaped how I think about my creative work. If you are a creative person you need to read this book. This book along with @ThisIsSethsBlog's other books I've read have reshaped how I think about my creative work.

  20. 5 out of 5

    Ian Mccausland

    Seth has a way of expelling ideas that I've read elsewhere in a easy digestible way. Seth has a way of expelling ideas that I've read elsewhere in a easy digestible way.

  21. 4 out of 5

    Marion Hill

    Seth Godin is becoming one of my favorite public thinkers. I read his blog daily and listen to his podcast, Akimbo, as often I can.  Also, I have read several of his books like Tribes, Permission Marketing, and This Is Marketing.  He's had a pulse on the business world for over three decades. His latest book, The Practice: Shipping Creative Work tackles how creatives can trust themselves to ship their work to the public. Also, the theme of the book is how artists should focus on the process more Seth Godin is becoming one of my favorite public thinkers. I read his blog daily and listen to his podcast, Akimbo, as often I can.  Also, I have read several of his books like Tribes, Permission Marketing, and This Is Marketing.  He's had a pulse on the business world for over three decades. His latest book, The Practice: Shipping Creative Work tackles how creatives can trust themselves to ship their work to the public. Also, the theme of the book is how artists should focus on the process more than the outcome. We focus more on the outcome and if our creative work does not become "a hit" with the public right away it is seen a failure.  Godin is making a strong case to creatives to change that mindset.  And this quote early in the book hits home: "Focusing solely on outcomes forces us to make choices that are banal, short-term, or selfish. It takes our focus away from the journey and encourages us to give up too early. Focusing on outcomes at the expense of process is a shortcut that will destroy your work." Amen Seth.  However, we live in outcome-oriented world and people latch onto what we have deemed successful by the culture. Godin drives home the point throughout the book that the outcome is beyond our control, and finding joy in the work is the real satisfaction. The Practice is broken into eight sections with headings: Trust Your Self, Generous, The Professional, Intent, No Such Thing As Writer's Block, Make Assertions, Earn Your Skills, & Seek Out Constraints.  Each section drills home that particular subtitle through blog post style entries.  Nothing complicated, but I found a lot of wisdom throughout the book.  I will admit that some of it gets repetitive. I would recommend The Practice to anyone who desired to be creative and have let resistance and the opinions of others keep them from writing that book, drawing that painting, or playing that musical instrument. Godin's words will comfort and challenge you to pursue that creative project that you have been always wanting to do.

  22. 5 out of 5

    Alejandro Sanoja

    This is a great book for anyone who wants to increase their creative output. If you want to make change happen with your creations, this is the perfect book for you. If you want to get in touch with the Muse, this is your map. Flow: 5/5 Actionability: 4/5 Mindset: 4/5 Some of My Highlights: "Work, because it's not a hobby. You might not get paid for it, not today, but you approach it as a professional." "The practice demands that we approach our process with commitment." "The important work, the work This is a great book for anyone who wants to increase their creative output. If you want to make change happen with your creations, this is the perfect book for you. If you want to get in touch with the Muse, this is your map. Flow: 5/5 Actionability: 4/5 Mindset: 4/5 Some of My Highlights: "Work, because it's not a hobby. You might not get paid for it, not today, but you approach it as a professional." "The practice demands that we approach our process with commitment." "The important work, the work we really want to do, doesn't come with a recipe. It follows a different pattern." "The practice is a journey without an external boss." "The Bhagavad-Gita says, 'It is better to follow your own path, however imperfectly, that to follow someone else's perfectly.'" "Art is something we get to do for other people." "If you get good enough at throwing, the catching takes care of itself." "For the work we'd like to do, the reward comes from the fact that there is no guarantee, that the path isn't well lit, that we cannot possibly be sure it's going to work." "Art is what we call it when we're able to create something new that changes someone." "Art is the generous act of making things better by doing something that might not work." "If you want to change your story, change your actions first." "We become what we do." "If we condition ourselves to work without flow, it's more likely to arrive." "The trap is this: only after we do the difficult work does it become our calling. Only after we trust the process does it become our passion." "That's because my best work involves doing things I've never done before." "Yes, you're an imposter. But you're an imposter acting in service of generosity, seeking to make things better." "Before you are a 'bestselling author', you're an author, and authors write." "Because creative people create." "'So far' and 'not yet' are the foundation of every successful journey." "Trust earns you patience, because once you trust yourself, you can stick with a practice that most people can't handle." "Our world is long on noise and short on meaningful connections and positive leadership." "Here's an easy test for manipulation: if the people you're interacting with discover what you already know, will they be glad that they did what you asked them to?"

  23. 4 out of 5

    Alexander Chin

    "Do the work." There. That's the book. If you're looking for specific how-tos and note-taking advice, shift your expectations. Non-fiction readers often burn through books with focus on finding the next insight, however it would do the book a disservice to do that. This is written entirely of small digestible entries as seen with a few of his other books but is entirely appropriate for the content. This book's aim is to shift your mindset (along with associated habits). Burn through this book in "Do the work." There. That's the book. If you're looking for specific how-tos and note-taking advice, shift your expectations. Non-fiction readers often burn through books with focus on finding the next insight, however it would do the book a disservice to do that. This is written entirely of small digestible entries as seen with a few of his other books but is entirely appropriate for the content. This book's aim is to shift your mindset (along with associated habits). Burn through this book in a day/sitting and it'll be a check mark on another book completed, fine. But read a few pages with your morning coffee or before bed and you have a daily visitation with the ideas of the book, and it's by adding marination time to these themes that this book shines. Most of this book will be straight forward reading with fun stories or tidbits to ponder, but it's written in a way that covers the full gambit of excuses that come with art production. Based on your own situation, this means that you'll eventually hit upon an entry or two that absolutely drives home the message in a way that you will incite action on your end - and it's those few pages that make this book worthwhile. It's like when someone tells you to work out, and you know it's good advice, but it just remains advice, until one day it becomes action. This book is a shotgun of various anecdotes to get you to 'do the work' hoping one sticks, and I guarantee you one will.

  24. 5 out of 5

    Moh. Nasiri

    Everyone has something truly special to contribute. There is no “creative genius” - the magic is that there is no magic. "We become what we do." The Bhagavad-Gita says, 'It is better to follow your own path, however imperfectly, that to follow someone else's perfectly.'" Before you are a 'bestselling author', you're an author, and authors write." "For the work we'd like to do, the reward comes from the fact that there is no guarantee, that the path isn't well lit, that we cannot possibly be sure Everyone has something truly special to contribute. There is no “creative genius” - the magic is that there is no magic. "We become what we do." The Bhagavad-Gita says, 'It is better to follow your own path, however imperfectly, that to follow someone else's perfectly.'" Before you are a 'bestselling author', you're an author, and authors write." "For the work we'd like to do, the reward comes from the fact that there is no guarantee, that the path isn't well lit, that we cannot possibly be sure it's going to work." "Art is what we call it when we're able to create something new that changes someone.""Because creative people create." Avoid Impostor syndrome (also known as impostor phenomenon, impostorism):It is a psychological pattern in which an individual doubts their skills, talents or accomplishments and has a persistent internalized fear of being exposed as a "fraud". .... The solo marathon The usual marathons, the popular ones, are done in a group. They have a start time. A finish line. A way to qualify. A route. A crowd. And a date announced a year in advance. Mostly, they have excitement, energy and peer pressure. The other kind of marathon is one that anyone can run, any day of the year. Put on your sneakers, run out the door and come back 26 miles later. These are rare. It’s worth noting

  25. 5 out of 5

    Tim Gayton

    Insightful book filled with methodologies to aid in following a practice in your pursuit Whether as a creative, or to help build and implement ideas in your work environment, there are some useful considerations for implementation. I enjoyed some of the most simplest considerations, that Seth aids in illustrating and reminding, and his beautifully crafted way Seth’s book, ‘This is marketing’ was my first introduction to his writing and I was very appealed by his teachings and writing style. So m Insightful book filled with methodologies to aid in following a practice in your pursuit Whether as a creative, or to help build and implement ideas in your work environment, there are some useful considerations for implementation. I enjoyed some of the most simplest considerations, that Seth aids in illustrating and reminding, and his beautifully crafted way Seth’s book, ‘This is marketing’ was my first introduction to his writing and I was very appealed by his teachings and writing style. So much so I subscribed as a first purchaser of the Practice. A pleasant and informative read, some of my favourite insights: ‘Our world is long on noise and short on meaningful connections and positive leadership’ ‘Only you have your distinct voice, and hoarding it is toxic.’ ‘You don’t need to be a toddler to design toys, or a cancer survivor to be an oncologist. Part of the work involves leaving the safety of your own perfectly correct narrative and intentionally entering someone else’s.’ ‘famous colleges need to enforce the regime of compliance and scarcity, so they seek our cooperation and belief to build their reputation. They’re only famous because we want them to be famous.’ ‘when you’re surrounded by respected peers, it’s more likely you’ll do the work you set out to do.’

  26. 5 out of 5

    David

    This is a contender for the best self-help book I've ever read, and I've read quite a few! Seth Godin is a brilliant mind I've known for a while. His book Purple Cow: Transform Your Business by Being Remarkable was my introduction to his way of thinking. As good as that was, and as good as his blogs and podcasts are, this is a tremendous collection in the spirit of other similar thinkers such as Stephen Pressfield and Cal Newton. The main point of the book: Focus on the practice and audacity of This is a contender for the best self-help book I've ever read, and I've read quite a few! Seth Godin is a brilliant mind I've known for a while. His book Purple Cow: Transform Your Business by Being Remarkable was my introduction to his way of thinking. As good as that was, and as good as his blogs and podcasts are, this is a tremendous collection in the spirit of other similar thinkers such as Stephen Pressfield and Cal Newton. The main point of the book: Focus on the practice and audacity of your art, not the outcome. However, if you want to call yourself a professional, the art you create is never for yourself but others. If you create it for yourself, it's a hobby. So how to be the most creative and far from the mean and still be making it for others is a wonderful balancing act but very doable. This book is organized into 200-something short chapters that serve almost like daily nuggets. Add this to the short list of books I've borrowed from the library that I will certainly be buying for regular re-read.

  27. 5 out of 5

    Peter Knox

    I haven't read many of Godin's books, but this feels VERY much like a Godin book as I'd expect them. The effect of 200+ very short 'chapters' is that of a sermon on the mount collection of stories, fables, motivations, and preaching on the holy art of creating and delivering creative work. That work is never defined, so as to still suit all matter of industry and format, but it's very important that you ship it. Amateurs sit around waiting for the muse. The professionals wake up, go to work, and I haven't read many of Godin's books, but this feels VERY much like a Godin book as I'd expect them. The effect of 200+ very short 'chapters' is that of a sermon on the mount collection of stories, fables, motivations, and preaching on the holy art of creating and delivering creative work. That work is never defined, so as to still suit all matter of industry and format, but it's very important that you ship it. Amateurs sit around waiting for the muse. The professionals wake up, go to work, and trust the process because that's all they have - the work has to be done. The book itself is relatively light, rather ambiguous, often repetitive, and at time motivating and inspiring. I was looking for words to convey 'a process culture' to coworkers and clients and found many here. Godin is king of 'creative culture' because he talks to creatives and about creatives and creative work. That is all on display here. Worth it if you want a cheerleader for creatives, but not a lot of deep insight help behind it. If you want prescriptive advice on building process and doing the work read Run Studio Run by Eli Altman.

  28. 4 out of 5

    Y.S. Stephen

    The Practice is an exhortation to all creators to focus on the process of work rather than the outcome of work. The book prioritises routine over inspiration when it comes to mastery of any craft. WHY I LOVE THE BOOK The book is written in a blogpost style, similar to what the author usually writes on his website. It is easy to digest and insightful. This book contains nothing new, however, it offers a twist to what we understand about creativity, inspiration, and consistency. In myriads of ways as The Practice is an exhortation to all creators to focus on the process of work rather than the outcome of work. The book prioritises routine over inspiration when it comes to mastery of any craft. WHY I LOVE THE BOOK The book is written in a blogpost style, similar to what the author usually writes on his website. It is easy to digest and insightful. This book contains nothing new, however, it offers a twist to what we understand about creativity, inspiration, and consistency. In myriads of ways as well as using memorable anecdotes, the author tells us to stop waiting for inspiration to strike. He encourages us to find our practice, our routine, something we can do over and over and over again in the ultimate service of others. DISLIKES None. WHO IS IT FOR Every young adult or adult seeking self-knowledge as well as looking to improve their craft. Many thanks to Portfolio for a review copy.

  29. 5 out of 5

    Matt

    Like other people have already said, this isn't a book, just a bunch of random paragraphs slapped into a book, but if you want to be a writer you need to write says he, and he did, and he got my money, so I guess he wins this time. This book has the odd feeling of something an AI would write, the words all seem to make sense, but when you put the words together they somewhat fall flat most of the time. Also most of the examples I read didn't even make sense like: "Creating Jazz music is the same Like other people have already said, this isn't a book, just a bunch of random paragraphs slapped into a book, but if you want to be a writer you need to write says he, and he did, and he got my money, so I guess he wins this time. This book has the odd feeling of something an AI would write, the words all seem to make sense, but when you put the words together they somewhat fall flat most of the time. Also most of the examples I read didn't even make sense like: "Creating Jazz music is the same as going to the DMV, you just have to put in the time" but that's not really true and shows a real lack of the creative process; The person that is creating jazz is willing to try new things and fail over and over until they get to a place they are happy, the person that the DMV just stands in a line. Again, this book just feels like it was written by an AI that doesn't really understand anything about creativity, but is able to build sentences about it.

  30. 5 out of 5

    Tyson Etri

    This book dispels the mythology that creativity is a mysterious dance with the muse only performed by the artistic elect. Seth insists on a simpler formula: consistency, experimentation and intention. He makes a provocative point about authenticity and how being yourself, constantly in flux and full of doubt, paralyses the change you want to make. "The audience doesn't want your authentic voice. They want your consistent voice." p147 You will find yourself thinking "That's exactly what I tell myse This book dispels the mythology that creativity is a mysterious dance with the muse only performed by the artistic elect. Seth insists on a simpler formula: consistency, experimentation and intention. He makes a provocative point about authenticity and how being yourself, constantly in flux and full of doubt, paralyses the change you want to make. "The audience doesn't want your authentic voice. They want your consistent voice." p147 You will find yourself thinking "That's exactly what I tell myself!" and when you hit those points, slow down and pay attention. That feeling is an excellent diagnostic tool to find where you're really stuck. Divided into 219 bite sized bits, The Practice is a smooth and insightful read, very helpful in reframing the process of creativity for makers in art, business and life.

Add a review

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

Loading...
We use cookies to give you the best online experience. By using our website you agree to our use of cookies in accordance with our cookie policy.