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Can We Talk About Consent?: A book about freedom, choices, and agreement

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What exactly is consent? Why does it matter? How can you negotiate your place in the world while respecting other people’s boundaries, and have them respect yours?  Can We Talk About Consent? breaks down the basics of how to have healthy relationships in every aspect of life for readers aged 14 years and older. Consent is a powerful word, but not everyone understands exactl What exactly is consent? Why does it matter? How can you negotiate your place in the world while respecting other people’s boundaries, and have them respect yours?  Can We Talk About Consent? breaks down the basics of how to have healthy relationships in every aspect of life for readers aged 14 years and older. Consent is a powerful word, but not everyone understands exactly what it means. This clearly written, stylishly illustrated guide explains clearly what consent means and why it matters—for all of us. With honest explanations by experienced sex and relationships educator Justin Hancock, children will learn how consent is a vital part of how we connect with ourselves and our self-esteem, the people close to us and the wider world. Readers will uncover how to develop and maintain relationships, how to manage and avoid negative relationships, and will learn more about equality and respect. Covers a broad range of topics, including: how we greet each other; how to choose things for ourselves; how we say no to things we don't want to do; communicating and respecting choices in sexual relationships; the factors that can affect a person's ability to choose; and how to empower other people by giving them consent.  Colorful, striking illustrations by Fuchsia MacAree help children relate what they read to the world around them. This guide to consent will set young people on the path to a lifetime of healthy relationships.


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What exactly is consent? Why does it matter? How can you negotiate your place in the world while respecting other people’s boundaries, and have them respect yours?  Can We Talk About Consent? breaks down the basics of how to have healthy relationships in every aspect of life for readers aged 14 years and older. Consent is a powerful word, but not everyone understands exactl What exactly is consent? Why does it matter? How can you negotiate your place in the world while respecting other people’s boundaries, and have them respect yours?  Can We Talk About Consent? breaks down the basics of how to have healthy relationships in every aspect of life for readers aged 14 years and older. Consent is a powerful word, but not everyone understands exactly what it means. This clearly written, stylishly illustrated guide explains clearly what consent means and why it matters—for all of us. With honest explanations by experienced sex and relationships educator Justin Hancock, children will learn how consent is a vital part of how we connect with ourselves and our self-esteem, the people close to us and the wider world. Readers will uncover how to develop and maintain relationships, how to manage and avoid negative relationships, and will learn more about equality and respect. Covers a broad range of topics, including: how we greet each other; how to choose things for ourselves; how we say no to things we don't want to do; communicating and respecting choices in sexual relationships; the factors that can affect a person's ability to choose; and how to empower other people by giving them consent.  Colorful, striking illustrations by Fuchsia MacAree help children relate what they read to the world around them. This guide to consent will set young people on the path to a lifetime of healthy relationships.

30 review for Can We Talk About Consent?: A book about freedom, choices, and agreement

  1. 4 out of 5

    Jessica Haider

    Important stuff! Can We Talk About Consent? is a mutli-chapter guide to consent and agency loaded with bright illustrations. The guide talks about consent generally AND consent around sex. the book is full of tips about how to ask someone for consent and also how to say no AND (also very important) what to do if you tell someone no and they don't listen to you. I think it is very important to teach kids about consent starting at a young age. This book is targeted at people high school aged and ol Important stuff! Can We Talk About Consent? is a mutli-chapter guide to consent and agency loaded with bright illustrations. The guide talks about consent generally AND consent around sex. the book is full of tips about how to ask someone for consent and also how to say no AND (also very important) what to do if you tell someone no and they don't listen to you. I think it is very important to teach kids about consent starting at a young age. This book is targeted at people high school aged and older. It is a little dense for the younger set, but you can definitely read it and pull out some important stuff to share with younger kids. That is what I plan to do! My kids are in elementary school and I plan to discuss the asking and saying no tips with them. Also, accepting a no from someone else without continuing to pester them about it. Thank you to the publisher for the review copy!

  2. 4 out of 5

    RoshReviews

    Consent is such an ambiguous issue that it is not a surprise to see an entire book dedicated to it, targeting the age group of 14+. If you look at this book in terms of its content alone, the book has done a great job. Right from the start, it builds up on the idea of consent, how it means different things to different people, how we can recognise consent through body language. I loved the idea of "should story". Even concept in the book is explained through practical examples from daily life th Consent is such an ambiguous issue that it is not a surprise to see an entire book dedicated to it, targeting the age group of 14+. If you look at this book in terms of its content alone, the book has done a great job. Right from the start, it builds up on the idea of consent, how it means different things to different people, how we can recognise consent through body language. I loved the idea of "should story". Even concept in the book is explained through practical examples from daily life that make the application of the concept that much easier. At the same time, I can't help feeling that the book would have had greater impact as a talk rather than a book. The language is very much as used in informative sessions and doesn't lend itself that well to writing. Further, there is a mismatch between the content and the illustrations. The content target a mature reader with even sex included as a topic (and it does go very much in detail into sex, thereby restricting the minimum target age group of the book.) But the illustrations seem a bit childish in comparison. I'm not taking away anything from the quality of the illustrations; they are truly fabulous and the artist's efforts are commendable. But looking at the sketches gives an idea that this book is meant for younger audiences, while reading it clarifies that it is not for anyone below 15. Overall, an informative read that could have been better structured and presented. I received an advance review copy of the book for free from NetGalley, and I am leaving this review voluntarily. ************************************* Join me on the Facebook group, Readers Forever! , for more reviews, book-related discussions and fun.

  3. 5 out of 5

    Jules

    Hot damn! A perfectly written and illustrated book about consent for young adults that taught me a few really interesting things as well. Consent has become about so much more than "Can I sex this person nao y/n?". It's become an entire system to give people the respect & autonomy that they deserve. Autonomy over their bodies, their emotions, their health & safety concerns, their pronouns, their life and their privacy. I love it! Three interesting things about this book: Right on top of the bat it Hot damn! A perfectly written and illustrated book about consent for young adults that taught me a few really interesting things as well. Consent has become about so much more than "Can I sex this person nao y/n?". It's become an entire system to give people the respect & autonomy that they deserve. Autonomy over their bodies, their emotions, their health & safety concerns, their pronouns, their life and their privacy. I love it! Three interesting things about this book: Right on top of the bat it explains that it's important to develop the skill of knowing what you do and don't want. It also explains this isn't some natural thing you just magically know, but that it's a muscle and practice that you DO. Second awesome thing. It points out that "Would you like me to do x with you, yes or no?" doesn't offer a lot of agency as opposed to more open-ended questions or offering a variety of choices. "How would you like to be greeted?" gives a lot more room than "Would you like a hug?". Third awesome thing! It offers a variable scale (scales!) of consent, so you can be a -7, -2, +1 or a +8 to something - which is a great improvement over the tired old "Hell Yes or No!" that doesn't take asexuality, aromanticism, anxiety and neurodiversity into account. Oh, and it also tackles intersectionality along the way, like any good consent book should. (Gha, secret fourth awesome thing!). I'm a fan!

  4. 5 out of 5

    booking our new escape ♡

    It's short, thought-provoking, and very informative - I feel like I've learned a lot while reading this book. The topics presented can feel hard to tackle in a face-to-face conversation. Instead, here they are presented in a simple way, with fun analogies and a bit of humor to keep you entertained. The author somehow manages to make the book appealing to a broader audience than his target one. I would recommend this book to anyone. Arc kindly provided by NetGalley in exchange for an honest review It's short, thought-provoking, and very informative - I feel like I've learned a lot while reading this book. The topics presented can feel hard to tackle in a face-to-face conversation. Instead, here they are presented in a simple way, with fun analogies and a bit of humor to keep you entertained. The author somehow manages to make the book appealing to a broader audience than his target one. I would recommend this book to anyone. Arc kindly provided by NetGalley in exchange for an honest review.

  5. 5 out of 5

    Athena

    The publisher kindly offered me a reader copy via NetGalley. Yet, this is an honest review of the book expressing my own opinion. I absolutely loved this book. As a future English teacher, I want to have this book in my hands in every classroom and work with it and the kids. This is noted a Children's nonfiction, but it would be extremely beneficial for adults. Adults may need more background information and such, but the author delves into things that I--an adult-- haven't thought about. What I l The publisher kindly offered me a reader copy via NetGalley. Yet, this is an honest review of the book expressing my own opinion. I absolutely loved this book. As a future English teacher, I want to have this book in my hands in every classroom and work with it and the kids. This is noted a Children's nonfiction, but it would be extremely beneficial for adults. Adults may need more background information and such, but the author delves into things that I--an adult-- haven't thought about. What I loved the most was that the author talks about power dynamics and interesectionality. Consent is about being able and free to choose, and that has resonated with me. Why do we say yes? To please ourselves or someone else? Is is the same for others who haven't had the same privilege and freedom? The author also talks about nonconsensual actions and provides a list of people to talk to. It was delicately done. But I felt like it was too delicately as in the author could have delved into it more. The more discourse happens beforehand, the more it can prevent from bad things to happen. The illustrations were too distracting and took too much space in my e-ARC. It is Children's Nonfiction, but I found the illustrations took much from the actual words, and the words were too important to miss. Furthermore, the author has a chapter about "isms" which I found well done and necessary. I really liked that it was included. But in my opinion, it was a miss not to include Islamophobia and discrimination against people with a different religion. Not when women who wear hijab or niqab can get verbally or physically assaulted for wearing hijab or niqab. Not when there's such antisemitism in political parties in the author's country. It was a very important miss. Alas, no book can be perfect, and in my opinion, dialog about consent is of utmost importance, and this book can be easily used by educators and parents for their children, but fellow adults, don't dismiss it too soon. I think you'll learn something, too, if you read it. But it's up to YOU. 4 stars – ⭐⭐⭐⭐ Author: Justin Hancock Publisher: Quarto Publishing Group – Frances Lincoln Children's Books

  6. 4 out of 5

    Amy Walker - Trans-Scribe Reviews

    Consent is an incredibly important topic, and one that should be taught to all people, especially in schools where children and teens develop interpersonal skills that will stick with them for the rest of their lives. Unfortunately, I can't remember consent ever really being talked about when I was in school. Yes, there was the basics like 'rape is bad', but that's really just the tip of the iceberg when it comes to consent, and doesn't really cover how broad and important an issue it is. This i Consent is an incredibly important topic, and one that should be taught to all people, especially in schools where children and teens develop interpersonal skills that will stick with them for the rest of their lives. Unfortunately, I can't remember consent ever really being talked about when I was in school. Yes, there was the basics like 'rape is bad', but that's really just the tip of the iceberg when it comes to consent, and doesn't really cover how broad and important an issue it is. This is something that Can We Talk About Consent? is trying to address. The book is aimed at the teen and young adult market, having been marked as suitable for 15+, and its written in such a way that it feels really easy to pick up and understand, and seems like the kind of book that would fit well in any classroom or school library.  Justin Hancock has tried to make the topic as easy to understand as he can, and one of the ways that's been done is to relate consent to everyday scenarios and situations that young people will recognise. Not only does this help to make consent easier to talk about, as it's often included in conversations about sex, but also illustrates how consent matters in situations that don't have anything to do with sex. There's examples in the book how things as simple as greeting people ties into consent, and how the choice of shaking someones hand, giving them a hug, or not touching them at all falls into the conversation about consent, and how simple everyday interactions can force people into scenarios that they don't feel comfortable in. The book acknowledges these situations in a number of ways, and often shows readers 'should stories', showing how things should be, but how that doesn't always line up with peoples lived experiences. These are incredibly useful moments, and helps to break down what could be something of an intimidating subject. One of the things about the book that doesn't quite work for me, however, was the illustrations that accompanied the text. Now, there was nothing wrong with the quality of the artwork, and it was very well done, but the bright. bold, and sometimes simplistic images sometimes made the book feel like it was being aimed at a much younger audience than teens. There were times where the images bordered of humerus, and whilst this might make some people feel more relaxed about the subject they did sometimes make me feel like not enough weight was being given over to what's an incredibly important issue. And sadly I can't help but feel that the illustrations will put adult readers off the book, an audience who probably never had consent covered with them when they were the age of the book's target audience, and who could really benefit from this book too. Despite these few small issues I found the book to be incredibly well informed, and it make a big and sometimes intimidating topic easy to understand. Like I said before, I can easily see this book being used as a teaching resource, and I think that that's where it will excel for sure.

  7. 4 out of 5

    Caroline David

    I got to read this on the plane coming back from a trip and it took me less than 30 minutes (as an adult). I think the illustrations were maybe too young for a 14 year old. I think this is definitely more middle grade in both content and in looks. The content itself is amazing and important. I was really excited to see that this book is coming out because it't s a great segue for conversations with your kids that can sometimes be difficult. I got to read this on the plane coming back from a trip and it took me less than 30 minutes (as an adult). I think the illustrations were maybe too young for a 14 year old. I think this is definitely more middle grade in both content and in looks. The content itself is amazing and important. I was really excited to see that this book is coming out because it't s a great segue for conversations with your kids that can sometimes be difficult.

  8. 4 out of 5

    Dee

    I received a copy of this from the publisher Frances Lincoln Children’s Books, and Netgalley in return for an honest review. I requested this one when a friend of mine told me about it when we were having a conversation about consent and how to bring up the subject with my 12 year old daughter. I’m glad she showed me this book as it is quite good.The book is not only about sexual consent but consent in all different manner of things. It starts asking you if you are happy to continue the book, whi I received a copy of this from the publisher Frances Lincoln Children’s Books, and Netgalley in return for an honest review. I requested this one when a friend of mine told me about it when we were having a conversation about consent and how to bring up the subject with my 12 year old daughter. I’m glad she showed me this book as it is quite good.The book is not only about sexual consent but consent in all different manner of things. It starts asking you if you are happy to continue the book, which at first I laughed at but then the more the book goes on, I realised it’s actually a great way to get any young person who is reading the book, to understand consent is around so much in our everyday lives. There is a section on sexual consent, and it does warn you beforehand so you know whether you want to continue on, or skip that chapter. The author has written this book well, and uses pizza a lot as a reference, having to house from all the different pizzas on a menu etc. It sounds weird but makes sense when you read it! I’d recommend this to people looking to understand consent, or even like me, just wondering on how to talk about it with a child.

  9. 4 out of 5

    CardamomFives

    Fantastic book for teenagers. Very knowledgeable and well written with fantastic illustrations. I got a few things out of it too and I am very much not a teenager anymore!

  10. 4 out of 5

    Sarah Faichney

    "Can We Talk About Consent?" is an extremely valuable resource aimed at young people aged 14 and over. I loved everything about it! The language is accessible, for starters. Justin Hancock kicks us off with a legal definition of consent before presenting different scenarios and analogies. He also explicitly invites the reader to decide for themself whether to continue reading. Hancock uses plain language to discuss tricky issues such as individual and collective agency, power and privilege and p "Can We Talk About Consent?" is an extremely valuable resource aimed at young people aged 14 and over. I loved everything about it! The language is accessible, for starters. Justin Hancock kicks us off with a legal definition of consent before presenting different scenarios and analogies. He also explicitly invites the reader to decide for themself whether to continue reading. Hancock uses plain language to discuss tricky issues such as individual and collective agency, power and privilege and provides a catalyst for young people to have conversations about consent.  Although this is a book about so much more than consent alone. It's about our ability to make choices and how to be assertive, whilst acknowledging that everyone has different preferences, sexually and otherwise. For me, the section on "Negotiating A Greeting" normalises what would often be viewed as an ASD response and I found the concept of bringing that into the mainstream refreshing. Hancock also explores peer pressure, drugs and alcohol, activism and politics. It is made clear throughout that the section on sex can be skipped if desired.  I thought that the Toni Morrison quote was beautifully utilised. Towards the end there are several practical activities which lay out the framework for decision-making in a simple (but not patronising) format. Just when you think it can't possibly get any better, there is a Glossary, Resources section plus signposting for various national services. Justin Hancock really has thought of everything! A particular highlight for me was the inclusion of Should Stories as I hadn't heard the term before but it makes such perfect sense.  Fuchsia MacAree's illustrations throughout the book are vibrant, colourful and diverse bringing the text to life brilliantly. 

  11. 4 out of 5

    Shauna Morrison

    Thank you NetGalley and Quarto Publishing Group – Frances Lincoln Children's Books for the digital advance reading copy of this book. This book has a lot of great information and explains consent in an easy to understand format with fun analogies like the pizza shop (you will understand this when you read it). I would have given this book a higher score but the printing on the colored backgrounds is really hard to read even if you aren't color blind. My husband walked in while I was reading this b Thank you NetGalley and Quarto Publishing Group – Frances Lincoln Children's Books for the digital advance reading copy of this book. This book has a lot of great information and explains consent in an easy to understand format with fun analogies like the pizza shop (you will understand this when you read it). I would have given this book a higher score but the printing on the colored backgrounds is really hard to read even if you aren't color blind. My husband walked in while I was reading this book on the computer and he nearly puked. In case you couldn't guess he is color blind and having printing on a colored background, and multiples colors featured so prominently on each page, is torture to his eyes.

  12. 4 out of 5

    Maru

    I want to express my gratitude to Netgalley and Frances Lincoln Children's Books for giving me the chance to read this book in exchange for an honest review. Something in the title, cover and synopsis said to me that this could be an amazing reading and it was. At the beggining, I thought that the book was about sex, an aproximation to young people without more expectations. Yet, I started reading and this was totally different. Justin Hancock is a wonderful writer, in addition it has a magic and c I want to express my gratitude to Netgalley and Frances Lincoln Children's Books for giving me the chance to read this book in exchange for an honest review. Something in the title, cover and synopsis said to me that this could be an amazing reading and it was. At the beggining, I thought that the book was about sex, an aproximation to young people without more expectations. Yet, I started reading and this was totally different. Justin Hancock is a wonderful writer, in addition it has a magic and close way to talk about consent, besides "serious" topics. This book not only has with sex as reference, but also it talking about all the situations that you can find day a day in with you have to take a decision. Additionally the text has a perfect companion, the illustrations. Fuchsia Macaree choosed splendidly the drawings to all the pages. I thought that it is an awesome reading to all the ages, maybe it could have a huge impact on teens (14 and above). To sum up, a perfect and modern reading to open your mind, as well as know more about something esencial, consent.

  13. 5 out of 5

    Amna Ikhlaq

    Thank you to NetGalley & the Quarto Publishing Group for sending me a digital ARC for review. A wonderful book! The author has managed to highlight such an important and vast topic in very simple and accessible terms. As a 20-something person reading this, it warms my heart to know that a resource such as this exists that can be used to start the conversation about self-agency with younger people, unlike the lack of opportunities I myself faced as a teenager or even now as an adult. A person from Thank you to NetGalley & the Quarto Publishing Group for sending me a digital ARC for review. A wonderful book! The author has managed to highlight such an important and vast topic in very simple and accessible terms. As a 20-something person reading this, it warms my heart to know that a resource such as this exists that can be used to start the conversation about self-agency with younger people, unlike the lack of opportunities I myself faced as a teenager or even now as an adult. A person from any age group could read this and they would find that it is a pretty good way to cover the basics regarding consent that we all wish we knew more about. The illustrations really enhance the reading experience and I was very impressed with the breakdown of topics (agency, greetings, sex) which helped convey the author's messages much more conveniently. The 'activity' section at the end was something I felt would be super helpful for the younger target audience of the book. Definitely a recommended read!

  14. 5 out of 5

    Barbara Band

    For many, talking about consent implies physical relationships but Hancock takes a wider, holistic approach and considers decisions we all have to make in everyday life as well as within non-physical relationships. The book looks at various aspects such as how we greet each other, how we choose things and what affects our ability to say no. It covers how power dynamics impact on relationships, peer pressure and the different ways people have of indicating negativity, such as via body language. I For many, talking about consent implies physical relationships but Hancock takes a wider, holistic approach and considers decisions we all have to make in everyday life as well as within non-physical relationships. The book looks at various aspects such as how we greet each other, how we choose things and what affects our ability to say no. It covers how power dynamics impact on relationships, peer pressure and the different ways people have of indicating negativity, such as via body language. It also links self-esteem and empowerment to the ability to give consent. There are some important messages in this book such as “an absence of a no does not mean a yes” and “you should only have to say no once”. The book makes good use of font sizes and styles, and the pages are filled with bright colourful illustrations and practical examples. However, despite its slightly cartoonish nature, it is aimed at 14+ years as the chapter on sex is quite detailed.

  15. 5 out of 5

    Pam

    I received an electronic ARC from Quarto Publishing Group – Frances Lincoln Children's Books through NetGalley. An all in one guide to explaining consent and agency and why it's important to know about both. Hancock uses clear analogies to define terms and explain choices. Though this is written for middle school and young adults, adults of all ages would benefit from a review of this information. The pizza and movie analogies work because they provide humor to the underlying seriousness of the ac I received an electronic ARC from Quarto Publishing Group – Frances Lincoln Children's Books through NetGalley. An all in one guide to explaining consent and agency and why it's important to know about both. Hancock uses clear analogies to define terms and explain choices. Though this is written for middle school and young adults, adults of all ages would benefit from a review of this information. The pizza and movie analogies work because they provide humor to the underlying seriousness of the actual topics being covered. The shorter chapter style lets readers move through the material quickly and revisit the topics as needed. I appreciate that Hancock covers far broader topics than sexual consent. Sex is a critical consent/choice/agency area but it is not the only place young people need to feel empowered to state their choices and feel safe in doing so. One I recommend every family purchase to inspire dialogue on these critical topics.

  16. 5 out of 5

    Erin Nigh

    “A person consents if [they] agree by choice, and has the freedom and capacity to make that choice.” This book was wonderfully inclusive both in the text and illustrations, representing people of different identities, abilities, sexualities, and races, with an emphasis on how some people have more freedom to choose than others. It made me see consent differently, that it doesn’t just apply in relationship with others, but in relationship with ourselves and our own choices, and how social factors “A person consents if [they] agree by choice, and has the freedom and capacity to make that choice.” This book was wonderfully inclusive both in the text and illustrations, representing people of different identities, abilities, sexualities, and races, with an emphasis on how some people have more freedom to choose than others. It made me see consent differently, that it doesn’t just apply in relationship with others, but in relationship with ourselves and our own choices, and how social factors mean some people find it easier to ask for what they want or get that freedom. It included tips on how we can exercise our own agency and work to leave room for others to do the same. The ARC of this book was provided by the publisher via NetGalley in exchange for an honest review.

  17. 4 out of 5

    The Silvan Reverie | Sarah Street

    An in-depth and age-appropriate look at consent that goes well beyond the obvious. Information is presented meaningful alongside engaging illustrations. Great for young adults--an important and unforgettable read. This book is forward-thinking and appropriate for today: for example, language is never couched in gendered terms which kids this age might only be hearing from educators or parents. I appreciate that many angles of consent are covered. This would be great for a classroom or small grou An in-depth and age-appropriate look at consent that goes well beyond the obvious. Information is presented meaningful alongside engaging illustrations. Great for young adults--an important and unforgettable read. This book is forward-thinking and appropriate for today: for example, language is never couched in gendered terms which kids this age might only be hearing from educators or parents. I appreciate that many angles of consent are covered. This would be great for a classroom or small group to discuss through together. Note: I was given a review copy of this book from Quarto Kids. Opinions are my own.

  18. 5 out of 5

    Kate Henderson

    As a secondary school teacher I was very interested in reading this book as its a topic that we cover time and time again. I feel like the illustrations are dated - very 1970's. I don't think they would appeal to young people in 2020. This book has a lot of detail - I feel like it's a bit too in-depth at times. I just can't see a teenager or young person reading through the entirety of this book. It's a shame as its good - but I think it would have been more beneficial to the 'target audience' if As a secondary school teacher I was very interested in reading this book as its a topic that we cover time and time again. I feel like the illustrations are dated - very 1970's. I don't think they would appeal to young people in 2020. This book has a lot of detail - I feel like it's a bit too in-depth at times. I just can't see a teenager or young person reading through the entirety of this book. It's a shame as its good - but I think it would have been more beneficial to the 'target audience' if it was more concise and to the point.

  19. 5 out of 5

    Emma

    This is a great book about consent from Justin Hancock, who is behind the sex education website Bish UK. I really like how it doesn't just deal with consent in terms of sex, but puts sexual consent into context as just one of many ways consent is important. It also gives a brief overview of how various "isms" (such as sexism, racism and homophobia) affect people's lives and choices. It's well laid out and the artwork is really great. It has a light hearted tone throughout (with a lot of cheesy p This is a great book about consent from Justin Hancock, who is behind the sex education website Bish UK. I really like how it doesn't just deal with consent in terms of sex, but puts sexual consent into context as just one of many ways consent is important. It also gives a brief overview of how various "isms" (such as sexism, racism and homophobia) affect people's lives and choices. It's well laid out and the artwork is really great. It has a light hearted tone throughout (with a lot of cheesy pizza jokes), but without making light of serious topics. [Free ARC from NetGalley]

  20. 5 out of 5

    Emma

    Thank you to NetGalley for providing me with an advanced reader copy in exchange for an honest review. Wow! What a powerful, educational book! This needs to be read by all people, and taught in schools. The book covered so many more important topics not just consent. I loved the illustrations and also the analogies using pizza and movies - I think this kept the book lighthearted despite the topics being of a very serious important nature, which I think will help younger readers to engage. Defini Thank you to NetGalley for providing me with an advanced reader copy in exchange for an honest review. Wow! What a powerful, educational book! This needs to be read by all people, and taught in schools. The book covered so many more important topics not just consent. I loved the illustrations and also the analogies using pizza and movies - I think this kept the book lighthearted despite the topics being of a very serious important nature, which I think will help younger readers to engage. Definitely recommend!

  21. 4 out of 5

    Cathy

    This was an extremely accessible and timely book concerning consent for children and young adults. It handles the issue both lightly and with sensitivity, considering a wide range of situations where we need to consider consent, not just sex, but in our everyday relationships. It's well written, engaging and very informative with plenty to both think about and discuss. My thanks to NetGalley for the ARC in return for an honest review. This was an extremely accessible and timely book concerning consent for children and young adults. It handles the issue both lightly and with sensitivity, considering a wide range of situations where we need to consider consent, not just sex, but in our everyday relationships. It's well written, engaging and very informative with plenty to both think about and discuss. My thanks to NetGalley for the ARC in return for an honest review.

  22. 4 out of 5

    Alicia

    I enjoyed reading this book. The version I received has pictures and artwork along with the text so I enjoyed that aspect of reading. This book broke down how to get consent, what to watch for, and how to define consent. I recommend this for college students, the working class, teenagers, and even couples. No one is exempt of this information and it is a topic that is not widely discussed.

  23. 5 out of 5

    Marki

    a very important and cool book, i only wish the author went more in depth about certain concepts or topics (like self consent) instead of devoting so much time to greetings, even though i understand why he did that hoping for a follow up book ♥

  24. 4 out of 5

    Bex mummyisreading

    See post on my Instagram

  25. 4 out of 5

    Libros Happy Sany

    Desde mi punto de vista, Can We Talk About Consent? es un libro muy útil y que puede ser de mucha ayuda tanto a niños y jóvenes como a sus tutores a la hora de comprender y explicar qué es el consentimiento. Muy recomendable. Reseña completa en: https://libroshappy.org/can-we-talk-a... Desde mi punto de vista, Can We Talk About Consent? es un libro muy útil y que puede ser de mucha ayuda tanto a niños y jóvenes como a sus tutores a la hora de comprender y explicar qué es el consentimiento. Muy recomendable. Reseña completa en: https://libroshappy.org/can-we-talk-a...

  26. 5 out of 5

    Deanna

  27. 5 out of 5

    Zoe Alicia

  28. 4 out of 5

    Emma

  29. 5 out of 5

    Sarah Chapman-Suire

  30. 5 out of 5

    Svea Trenknker

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