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The Invisible Woman

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"An extraordinary profile of immense courage and daring."--Chanel Cleeton, New York Times bestselling author of Before We Left Cuba "If you only read one WWII book this year, make it this one."--Natasha Lester, New York Times bestselling author of The Paris Orphans In the depths of war, she would defy the odds to help liberate a nation...a gripping historical novel "An extraordinary profile of immense courage and daring."--Chanel Cleeton, New York Times bestselling author of Before We Left Cuba "If you only read one WWII book this year, make it this one."--Natasha Lester, New York Times bestselling author of The Paris Orphans In the depths of war, she would defy the odds to help liberate a nation...a gripping historical novel based on the remarkable true story of World War II heroine Virginia Hall, from the bestselling author of Hemingway's Girl France, March 1944. Virginia Hall wasn't like the other young society women back home in Baltimore--she never wanted the debutante ball or silk gloves. Instead, she traded a safe life for adventure in Europe, and when her beloved second home is thrust into the dark days of war, she leaps in headfirst. Once she's recruited as an Allied spy, subverting the Nazis becomes her calling. But even the most cunning agent can be bested, and in wartime trusting the wrong person can prove fatal. Virginia is haunted every day by the betrayal that ravaged her first operation, and will do everything in her power to avenge the brave people she lost. While her future is anything but certain, this time more than ever Virginia knows that failure is not an option. Especially when she discovers what--and whom--she's truly protecting.


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"An extraordinary profile of immense courage and daring."--Chanel Cleeton, New York Times bestselling author of Before We Left Cuba "If you only read one WWII book this year, make it this one."--Natasha Lester, New York Times bestselling author of The Paris Orphans In the depths of war, she would defy the odds to help liberate a nation...a gripping historical novel "An extraordinary profile of immense courage and daring."--Chanel Cleeton, New York Times bestselling author of Before We Left Cuba "If you only read one WWII book this year, make it this one."--Natasha Lester, New York Times bestselling author of The Paris Orphans In the depths of war, she would defy the odds to help liberate a nation...a gripping historical novel based on the remarkable true story of World War II heroine Virginia Hall, from the bestselling author of Hemingway's Girl France, March 1944. Virginia Hall wasn't like the other young society women back home in Baltimore--she never wanted the debutante ball or silk gloves. Instead, she traded a safe life for adventure in Europe, and when her beloved second home is thrust into the dark days of war, she leaps in headfirst. Once she's recruited as an Allied spy, subverting the Nazis becomes her calling. But even the most cunning agent can be bested, and in wartime trusting the wrong person can prove fatal. Virginia is haunted every day by the betrayal that ravaged her first operation, and will do everything in her power to avenge the brave people she lost. While her future is anything but certain, this time more than ever Virginia knows that failure is not an option. Especially when she discovers what--and whom--she's truly protecting.

30 review for The Invisible Woman

  1. 4 out of 5

    Dorie - Cats&Books :)

    3 ½ rounded up to 4 I’ve read several books about women spies during WWII but was glad that this one featured an American working with the French resistance. Virginia Hall was an American who was residing in France and became part of the United Kingdom's Special Operations Executive. I found Virginia Hall’s background story to be very interesting but wish that it was laid out beforehand rather than interspersed within the story. I found that stopped the flow of the novel at times. The fact that M 3 ½ rounded up to 4 I’ve read several books about women spies during WWII but was glad that this one featured an American working with the French resistance. Virginia Hall was an American who was residing in France and became part of the United Kingdom's Special Operations Executive. I found Virginia Hall’s background story to be very interesting but wish that it was laid out beforehand rather than interspersed within the story. I found that stopped the flow of the novel at times. The fact that Ms. Hall was even allowed to do her work while having a prosthetic leg, is a testament to her strength, determination and bravery. I found that some parts pf the novel grew repetitive. Finding an appropriate place for a drop site, then getting the people to believe that the Allies were REALLY GOING TO HELP THIS TIME!! Many of these people had been promised that the Allies were coming many times. She then has to set up the drop site with HQ and wait for the right weather to deliver the supplies.All of this depends also on her ability to transmit from just the right place. The part of the story that really touched my heart were the people of the town that helped hide Jewish children, literally thousands of them! I loved this description of the French liberation “Liberation does not happen all at once. It’s many small swells leading up to the crest of a wave breaking on the shore of freedom. Then it retreats and builds again, crashing over and over”. Beautiful prose. The Epilogue showcases the trial of Robert Alesch which detailed his “hideous war crimes, the mistresses he keeps, and the wealth he accumulated from turning over Resistance members to the Nazis for money”. “Once the resistors were arrested, Alesch would break into their apartments and steal their belongings, including thousands of francs’ worth of furniture, art, and jewels. The Afterword by the author reveals a wealth of information and details including which facts and people are real and which were fiction based on true events. I agree with the blurb for this book, if you read only one more book about WWII this year, it should be this one. This is the story of a true American heroine and her name needs to be known! I received an ARC of this novel from the publisher through NetGalley.

  2. 4 out of 5

    Erika Robuck

    Dear Reader, I've long been writing about American authors and the women in the shadows of their success. While researching my next forgotten wife, an editor asked, "Instead of writing another 'wife-of-famous-man' book, why not write about a woman who is remarkable on her own?" That stopped me in my tracks. Around that time, Virginia Hall entered my radar in a way I can’t pinpoint, and she’s been haunting me ever since. Virginia is not only a remarkable woman from history who grew up where I did ( Dear Reader, I've long been writing about American authors and the women in the shadows of their success. While researching my next forgotten wife, an editor asked, "Instead of writing another 'wife-of-famous-man' book, why not write about a woman who is remarkable on her own?" That stopped me in my tracks. Around that time, Virginia Hall entered my radar in a way I can’t pinpoint, and she’s been haunting me ever since. Virginia is not only a remarkable woman from history who grew up where I did (we are both from Maryland), but she is so extraordinary—in her own right—she could launch a subgenre of “husband-of-famous-woman” books. I can't wait for you to read about her unimaginable courage and bravery. Sincerely, Erika Robuck

  3. 5 out of 5

    Debra (having surgery will be back in a few days)

    I love books about real people and events. I love learning things from them that I never knew before. Prior to reading this book, I had no idea who Virginia Hall was or that she was a pioneering agent of the United Kingdom's Special Operations Executive. She was an American who became the first female agent to take up residence in France. A young woman from Baltimore who found her calling as an Allied Spy working to stop the Nazis. The Invisible Woman tells her story and those she worked with. Sh I love books about real people and events. I love learning things from them that I never knew before. Prior to reading this book, I had no idea who Virginia Hall was or that she was a pioneering agent of the United Kingdom's Special Operations Executive. She was an American who became the first female agent to take up residence in France. A young woman from Baltimore who found her calling as an Allied Spy working to stop the Nazis. The Invisible Woman tells her story and those she worked with. She was brave and took many risks. She was incredible brave and cunning. The research that went into the writing was extensive and impressive. The reader will come away both educated and enlightened. Virginia Hall is yet another example of a person rising above shining. She was an ordinary person doing the extraordinary. Reading about her had me wondering, would I have been that brave? Could I have been a spy? Where does someone find it inside of them, to look danger in the face and keep going. Fans of historical fiction and war books will enjoy this book. Thank you to Berkley Publishing Group and NetGalley who provided me with a copy of this book in exchange for an honest review. All the thoughts and opinions are my own.

  4. 4 out of 5

    Javier

    Review published in: https://diagnosisbookaholic.blogspot.... 3,5 ⭐️ Historical fiction is not my usual go to genre but once in a while I read one that makes me wonder why I don't read more of these. A few years back I became quite saturated with WWII novels as they all seemed to be told from the same perspective. "The invisible woman" is also a WWII novel, but in this case the focus is all set in an amazing character I had never heard about, Virginia Hall, an American who worked with the United Review published in: https://diagnosisbookaholic.blogspot.... 3,5 ⭐️ Historical fiction is not my usual go to genre but once in a while I read one that makes me wonder why I don't read more of these. A few years back I became quite saturated with WWII novels as they all seemed to be told from the same perspective. "The invisible woman" is also a WWII novel, but in this case the focus is all set in an amazing character I had never heard about, Virginia Hall, an American who worked with the United Kingdom's clandestine Special Operations Executive and the American Office of Strategic Services in France during nazi occupation. Her mission was to ally with Resistance groups, the Maquis, and supply them with weapons, equipment and training. I was quite impressed with the level of research this novel entailed. Not only is Virginia a real character, but most of the characters and situations were drawn from real life too. You never realize the tremendous amount of research the author did till one reads the author's note, where she tells about all these people's fates. The story was riveting, the prose style really strong and Virginia's character really came to life throughout the novel. Her bravery and courage permeated every page. She was portrayed as strong and daring, but also a bit cold and unemotional. I understand she must have to be cold and detached in her situation, but I missed to see more of her emotional side. My favorite moments were when she showed emotion especially with all the women she met during her time in France. I was moved to tears in some moments. Although the book held my attention for the whole time there were a couple of cons that made me downgrade my whole rating. On one side there was way too many characters that made it a bit difficult to keep track of all the names; and on the other I missed for the story to have more of a plot. All the parts repeated the same structure (Virginia arriving in a new group and working along them) so some scenes were a bit repetitive (we witness how they prepare and receive several drops), while the plot lines that hinted at her past and would have required more continuity were quickly resolved in the last pages (with one of them not being resolved until the author's note). All in all, a very interesting historical fiction novel that will help readers to discover a fascinating female figure. Thanks to NetGalley and Berkley for providing an eARC in exchange for an honest review.

  5. 4 out of 5

    Holly B

    3.5 STARS Virginia Hall ( a real life WWII agent) was such a courageous woman and spy working to bring down the Nazi's. It is her second operation to help arm the French Resistance. She took many risks and there were moments in the novel that felt like I was beside her (holding my breath) as she put herself in dangerous situations, amongst the enemy. Who do you trust? You can't make mistakes as a spy, it could be deadly. Overall, I really enjoyed the book and details of her missions and heroism. Th 3.5 STARS Virginia Hall ( a real life WWII agent) was such a courageous woman and spy working to bring down the Nazi's. It is her second operation to help arm the French Resistance. She took many risks and there were moments in the novel that felt like I was beside her (holding my breath) as she put herself in dangerous situations, amongst the enemy. Who do you trust? You can't make mistakes as a spy, it could be deadly. Overall, I really enjoyed the book and details of her missions and heroism. The pacing wasn't consistent throughout the story and some of the flashbacks were distracting to me, but well worth the read! Thanks NG for my advanced copy. Book is OUT on February 9, 2021

  6. 5 out of 5

    Berit☀️✨

    A riveting story about a remarkable woman. The strength, resilience and compassion of people never fails to amaze me. This is the fictional story of a real lif hero Virginia Hall. Virginia was an American working for the UK as an ally spy at the end of WWII. Working behind enemy lines in France helping get supplies and weapons to the French resistance. The story was informative, compelling, and heartbreaking. The bravery and tenacity of the French people was commendable. Whenever I read a story A riveting story about a remarkable woman. The strength, resilience and compassion of people never fails to amaze me. This is the fictional story of a real lif hero Virginia Hall. Virginia was an American working for the UK as an ally spy at the end of WWII. Working behind enemy lines in France helping get supplies and weapons to the French resistance. The story was informative, compelling, and heartbreaking. The bravery and tenacity of the French people was commendable. Whenever I read a story like this I always question how I would behave in the same situation. Would I have the same strength and resilience as the characters in this book? Virginia lived a comfortable life in Baltimore, what drove her to sacrifice her life for the French people? She knew going in the average lifespan of an ally spy in France was six weeks., And yet that did not deter her. Virginia was hard to get to know both by the reader and those around her. She took her job extremely seriously as I would imagine was necessary for survival. She never let anyone too close and never showed anything in the way of emotion. And yet you just knew she had a big heart by the way she connected with the other characters in the story, especially the other women and the children. If you are like me and a little burned out on WWII stories I strongly recommend you pick this one up. I learned so much I did not previously know and appreciated that not only Virginia but most of the other characters were based on real life people. Well researched and well told. *** Big thank you to Berkley for my gifted copy of this book. All opinions are my own. ***

  7. 4 out of 5

    CYIReadBooks (Claire)

    Who was Virginia Hall? Well, once you read The Invisible Woman, you will never forget her name. Virginia, code name Diane was the most formidable force within the Special Operation Executive (SOE) organization. Tasked with conducting espionage, sabotage, and reconnaissance in Nazi infested France, Virginia became an expert in organizing resistance movements. Virginia’s unfaltering courage and self sacrifice will be remembered once you finish the novel. A heavy hitter of historical fiction, The In Who was Virginia Hall? Well, once you read The Invisible Woman, you will never forget her name. Virginia, code name Diane was the most formidable force within the Special Operation Executive (SOE) organization. Tasked with conducting espionage, sabotage, and reconnaissance in Nazi infested France, Virginia became an expert in organizing resistance movements. Virginia’s unfaltering courage and self sacrifice will be remembered once you finish the novel. A heavy hitter of historical fiction, The Invisible Woman took me a while to get through to the finish. There were so many characters with real names along with code names, so that slowed my reading somewhat. However, it is that depth of characters that really tied the narrative together. The Invisible Woman kept me on the edge of my seat, with impending doom around every corner. I still have goosebumps just thinking about Virginia’s trials, tribulations, and grief from the loss of some of her comrades. I experienced tears of joy and sadness while reading the book and I just cannot imagine how she overcame all of the obstacles that faced her. The author, Erica Robuck, has done a fantastic job of researching the life and times of Virginia Hall and compiling all of that research into an exceptional historical fiction. An unforgettable read, The Invisible Woman will leave a lasting impression on its readers. Five stars. Extraordinary. I received a digital ARC of The Invisible Woman from Berkley Publishing Group through NetGalley. The review herein is completely my own and contains my honest thoughts and opinions.

  8. 4 out of 5

    Natasha Lester

    In The Invisible Woman, Erika Robuck shows us exactly how biographical fiction should be written: with respect for the historical record, a deep understanding of the subject, and the empathy to allow the character at the heart of the novel to shine through. Virginia Hall was a true hero and she comes to extraordinary life in this book. I loved everything about it, from Virginia’s bravery to her frailties, to the enthralling evocation of life with the French Resistance during WWII, to the incredi In The Invisible Woman, Erika Robuck shows us exactly how biographical fiction should be written: with respect for the historical record, a deep understanding of the subject, and the empathy to allow the character at the heart of the novel to shine through. Virginia Hall was a true hero and she comes to extraordinary life in this book. I loved everything about it, from Virginia’s bravery to her frailties, to the enthralling evocation of life with the French Resistance during WWII, to the incredible courage of the ordinary people who fought for freedom and who are honoured here. If you only read one WWII book this year, make it this one.

  9. 4 out of 5

    Paul

    Thank you to netgalley and the publisher for a copy of this book. I am grateful for a chance to review it, although review may be a generous descriptor. More like a plea for someone to adapt this into a Netflix movie or series. Breaking down this novel I can break it down into technical details such as prose style and characters in which it is very strong. And plotting and sheer storytelling, where it is also strong The invisible woman is a historical biographical novel which sounds almost as dau Thank you to netgalley and the publisher for a copy of this book. I am grateful for a chance to review it, although review may be a generous descriptor. More like a plea for someone to adapt this into a Netflix movie or series. Breaking down this novel I can break it down into technical details such as prose style and characters in which it is very strong. And plotting and sheer storytelling, where it is also strong The invisible woman is a historical biographical novel which sounds almost as daunting a read as it might be to produce. Yet Erika Robuck does an exceptional job setting the scene, introducing the characters and including some emotion into the narrative without making it sickly saccharine and forced. Overall a really good novel I highly recommend to read and hopefully watch one day.

  10. 4 out of 5

    Pam Jenoff

    Master historical fiction writer Erika Robuck is back with this epic story, inspired by true events, of Virginia Hall, the American woman who overcame great odds to serve as an Allied spy during World War II.

  11. 5 out of 5

    Robin Loves Reading

    One thing I have learned about reading historical fiction. That is I learn about situations and people that I never once heard about while in school. In the case of this book, The Invisible Woman, I am honored to have met Viginia Hall Goillot. How one of America's most important spies during World War II has only just become to be recognized is difficult to believe. To jump ahead in her career years after the war, she became an agent for the CIA and she is recognized in their annals, but not so One thing I have learned about reading historical fiction. That is I learn about situations and people that I never once heard about while in school. In the case of this book, The Invisible Woman, I am honored to have met Viginia Hall Goillot. How one of America's most important spies during World War II has only just become to be recognized is difficult to believe. To jump ahead in her career years after the war, she became an agent for the CIA and she is recognized in their annals, but not so for the general public. Who was Virginia Hall and how did she become a fearless spy at a time hiding would have been a better option? Actually, she was an American, safe from Hitler and his annihilation of millions. A bit more about Virginia. In a hunting accident, she shot off her foot. So, how did an American woman, at a time when prosthetic devices were still rather crude, end up working vigorously with the French Resistance? Virginia was a brilliant woman who went to two colleges and became quite adept at language. Eventually she went to study in Paris and chose to become a diplomat. It was rare for a woman to become a diplomat at that time and her application for the job was rejected time and again. Then World War II broke out and the Nazis invaded France. Although Virginia was forced to flee France, and ended up in Britain, she met a spy and her life forever changed. Posing as a reporter, Virginia took on many different appearances and worked with a network that fought against the Nazi regime. This job was incredibly dangerous and many agents lost their lives. The Nazis were onto her and tried to capture her. The danger she faced never once let up. Safe houses along the way, along with many loyal people, kept her alive. Virginia kept working towards the goal of D Day. She knew if that day were ever to happen, then Hitler and his cronies could finally be put to a stop. What an incredible story! Not only did I inhale this book by Erika Robuck, but I read whatever I could find about this amazing woman. There are other books being produced and even a feature film is being planned. I will be there for all of it. This is the kind of history that keeps me coming back to historical fiction. What makes this work of fiction work for me is the fact that the author did exhaustive research in order to pen this story. Quite naturally literary license had to be taken, but the book was written with intelligence and integrity. I feel the readers are getting a very good story with this book and it most certainly comes highly recommended from me. Reading the Afterword in this book gave me great appreciation for all of the effort that was put into writing such an well-written story. Many thanks to Berkley Books and to NetGalley for this ARC for review. This is my honest opinion.

  12. 5 out of 5

    Dianne

    A powerful and moving tale of strength against the odds, loyalty and dedication, Erika Robuck’s THE INVISIBLE WOMAN is a tale of courage, honor and daring. Based on a real life heroine during WWII as she becomes an Allied spy dedicating her life to fight the Nazis and avenge the deaths that haunt her from her first mission. It takes a rare breed of person to do what Virginia Hall did and as such, she was one of many unsung heroes who made a difference in one of humanity’s darkest times. Brilliant A powerful and moving tale of strength against the odds, loyalty and dedication, Erika Robuck’s THE INVISIBLE WOMAN is a tale of courage, honor and daring. Based on a real life heroine during WWII as she becomes an Allied spy dedicating her life to fight the Nazis and avenge the deaths that haunt her from her first mission. It takes a rare breed of person to do what Virginia Hall did and as such, she was one of many unsung heroes who made a difference in one of humanity’s darkest times. Brilliantly told, this story comes to life and readers are cast back into history, living life in the shadows, trusting instinct and strangers. A gripping read that is both emotional and gritty, not a glamorized version of life during war. I received a complimentary ARC edition from Berkley Books! This is my honest and voluntary review. Publisher : Berkley (February 9, 2021) Publication date : February 9, 2021 Genre: Historical Fiction Print length : 365 pages Available from: Amazon | Barnes & Noble For Reviews, Giveaways, Fabulous Book News, follow: http://tometender.blogspot.com

  13. 5 out of 5

    Misha (Heartsfullofreads)

    "Was that killing justice, or did it add to the scale heavy with humanity's sins in this war? Will there ever be enough good deeds to balance the sin?" This book wasted no time getting started. Instead of explaining what life was like before the war, this book started during the war. That helped quite a bit with pacing. Virginia was an amazing woman. She was selfless, strong, and determined. She may have come off as cold-hearted, but her job was not to be liked. What her and her friends did was "Was that killing justice, or did it add to the scale heavy with humanity's sins in this war? Will there ever be enough good deeds to balance the sin?" This book wasted no time getting started. Instead of explaining what life was like before the war, this book started during the war. That helped quite a bit with pacing. Virginia was an amazing woman. She was selfless, strong, and determined. She may have come off as cold-hearted, but her job was not to be liked. What her and her friends did was not light. It weighed heavily on them and the author did a great job portraying that. I love the way the characters were fleshed out in this story. I felt like I knew all of them and my stress was high with each risk. Erika Robuck did so much research to write this beautiful book. It paid off because this book was a stunning story.

  14. 4 out of 5

    Juli

    This book is based on the true story of Virigina Hall, a woman recruited as an allied spy in World War II. I love reading stories about history that are about (or based on) the lives of real people. Before I read this book, I had never heard of Virginia Hall. So glad I read this book! Hall was a remarkable woman who was strong in the face of overwhelming violence and terror. I've read several books about female spies during the war and the French resistance, but this one definitely ranks at the This book is based on the true story of Virigina Hall, a woman recruited as an allied spy in World War II. I love reading stories about history that are about (or based on) the lives of real people. Before I read this book, I had never heard of Virginia Hall. So glad I read this book! Hall was a remarkable woman who was strong in the face of overwhelming violence and terror. I've read several books about female spies during the war and the French resistance, but this one definitely ranks at the top. I can't even imagine how much courage it took to do what she did. What a great story! Every time I read a story about the bravery of people in war time, I always wonder if I could be that brave myself. None of us really know how we will act when faced with danger until we are actually in that moment. Any little mistake....trusting the wrong person....saying the wrong words...could be disastrous. Can you imagine living years under that sort of fear every day? I think that's why I'm drawn to stories like this -- people thrown into very dangerous situations who learn to do wonderful, scary things to protect others. Wonderful book! This is the first book by Erika Robuck that I've read. I'm definitely going to be reading more -- especially Hemingway's Girl and The House of Hawthorne! Great book about a great lady! Very enjoyable! **I voluntarily read a review copy of this book from Berkley. All opinions expressed are entirely my own.**

  15. 5 out of 5

    Carol lowkey.bookish

    I thoroughly enjoyed this historical fiction novel. I have read many WWII stories, but this one covered a part of the war I didn't know much about. I couldn't help but admire the main character, Virginia Hall, who was a Baltimore socialite turned Allied spy. Her story is riveting and the tension builds when she continues to put herself in danger preparing the French resistance for D-Day. Virginia was betrayed on a previous mission and this haunts her in the form of numerous flashbacks. The flashb I thoroughly enjoyed this historical fiction novel. I have read many WWII stories, but this one covered a part of the war I didn't know much about. I couldn't help but admire the main character, Virginia Hall, who was a Baltimore socialite turned Allied spy. Her story is riveting and the tension builds when she continues to put herself in danger preparing the French resistance for D-Day. Virginia was betrayed on a previous mission and this haunts her in the form of numerous flashbacks. The flashbacks were a little distracting for me. Overall, this was a fascinating story about a courageous spy during WWII. I recommend this book to historical fiction fans who enjoy strong female characters. 4.5/5 I received a free e-ARC from the publisher in exchange for an honest review. All thoughts and opinions are my own.

  16. 4 out of 5

    Deanne Patterson

    Through the authors intense and thorough research we are able to attain a bit of an understanding of the life of a woman who basically hid in plain sight. Based on true historical facts in the life of Baltimore native Virginia Hall she is an amazing woman. From her spy uniform of dyed gray hair and baggy clothing to being an infirm elderly woman this American woman in France, an Allied spy, worked with the Resistance to take back France from the Nazis. Spies behind Nazi lines were not expected to Through the authors intense and thorough research we are able to attain a bit of an understanding of the life of a woman who basically hid in plain sight. Based on true historical facts in the life of Baltimore native Virginia Hall she is an amazing woman. From her spy uniform of dyed gray hair and baggy clothing to being an infirm elderly woman this American woman in France, an Allied spy, worked with the Resistance to take back France from the Nazis. Spies behind Nazi lines were not expected to last even six weeks doing a dangerous mission but this was a risk she was willing to take. Very well developed characters and the pacing of the story drew me in making me need to continue reading the story right to the end . The story was full of high tension as you are holding your breath thinking she'll make it through but not completely sure until the end. The author is just incredible in her retelling of this time in history . I can so admire Virginia with all the struggles she went through she is a very strong female character. I will be doing my own research now to learn more about this unforgettable woman. Pub Date: 09 Feb 2021 I was given a complimentary copy of this book. Thank you. All opinions expressed are my own.

  17. 4 out of 5

    Darla

    Who is Virginia Hall? Or rather, where is she? Disguised as an old woman, she moves undetected through France assisting multiple groups of the Maquis. She is a 'pianist'. Communicating with HQ to set up drops of supplies under the full moon. She is a mentor for hundreds of young men who need direction. She is waiting for D-Day and the opportunity to overthrow the Nazis and liberate France. She is also a woman who cannot serve in the armed forces alongside her trainees. She is a woman with a limp Who is Virginia Hall? Or rather, where is she? Disguised as an old woman, she moves undetected through France assisting multiple groups of the Maquis. She is a 'pianist'. Communicating with HQ to set up drops of supplies under the full moon. She is a mentor for hundreds of young men who need direction. She is waiting for D-Day and the opportunity to overthrow the Nazis and liberate France. She is also a woman who cannot serve in the armed forces alongside her trainees. She is a woman with a limp--accomplishing amazing amounts of spycraft with a prosthetic leg. This is her story. Erika Robuck focuses on her movements and accomplishments during 1944, a pivotal year in France's history of WW II. We are also given glimpses of her time in foreign embassies, her hunting accident resulting in the loss of part of her leg, and her future. You may have read about her in her biography, 'A Woman of No Importance.' Here is another opportunity to spend time in Virginia's world. Perfect for fans of Pam Jenoff, 'The Book of Lost Names,' and 'Code Name Helene.' Thank you to Berkley and NetGalley for a DRC in exchange for an honest review.

  18. 4 out of 5

    Cindy Burnett

    Robuck brings real-life American heroine Virginia Hall to life, highlighting her immense bravery as an Allied spy in German-occupied France during World War 2. She vividly depicts Hall’s extraordinary heroism amid the horror of the Nazi atrocities while also shining a light on the thousands of regular people who bravely joined the Resistance (and put their lives on the line) to ensure that their country would not fall to the Nazis. I read this one in less than 24 hours and absolutely loved it. I Robuck brings real-life American heroine Virginia Hall to life, highlighting her immense bravery as an Allied spy in German-occupied France during World War 2. She vividly depicts Hall’s extraordinary heroism amid the horror of the Nazi atrocities while also shining a light on the thousands of regular people who bravely joined the Resistance (and put their lives on the line) to ensure that their country would not fall to the Nazis. I read this one in less than 24 hours and absolutely loved it. It will be one of my favorite reads of the year.

  19. 4 out of 5

    Jillian Doherty

    On the heals of A Woman of No Importance - if you enjoyed the bio it for exposing Virginia Hall's incredible and harrowing true story, then you'll love this too! Robuck has a keen way of framing incredible heroins throughout history, offered in a poignant and powerful way. She creates gritty realities and fully vetted characters that resonate with you long after you finish reading about them. Here we get to meet Virginia before she became a legend, when she was a relatable yearning young woman. W On the heals of A Woman of No Importance - if you enjoyed the bio it for exposing Virginia Hall's incredible and harrowing true story, then you'll love this too! Robuck has a keen way of framing incredible heroins throughout history, offered in a poignant and powerful way. She creates gritty realities and fully vetted characters that resonate with you long after you finish reading about them. Here we get to meet Virginia before she became a legend, when she was a relatable yearning young woman. We grow with her as she takes small steps toward her greater destiny. This page-turning adventure story gives light to a person and delightfully untapped themes; it's refreshing narrative for any historical reader. Galley borrowed from the publisher.

  20. 5 out of 5

    Yesha- Books Teacup and Reviews

    *** Many thanks to Stephanie @Berkley for providing review copy of this book via NetGalley in exchange for an honest review. *** The Invisible Woman was brilliant biographical historical fiction that was based on a real and very famous American woman who played heroical role in history. It was about war, how people and agents worked for liberation, getting back what was taken by enemy, courage, resilience, survivor guilt, PTSD, redemption, getting over guilt, justice, keeping faith, and finding h *** Many thanks to Stephanie @Berkley for providing review copy of this book via NetGalley in exchange for an honest review. *** The Invisible Woman was brilliant biographical historical fiction that was based on a real and very famous American woman who played heroical role in history. It was about war, how people and agents worked for liberation, getting back what was taken by enemy, courage, resilience, survivor guilt, PTSD, redemption, getting over guilt, justice, keeping faith, and finding hope and light even after facing and seeing endless darkness. Writing was emotive, engaging, vivid and steady paced. It was third person narrative from Virginia’s perspective, set during the WWII that started with Virginia’s third mission as American spy in France that covered most important journey of Virginia Hall’s life. All the descriptions of characters, Nazi infested France, horrors of war, human capacity for evil, and how people worked in big or even smallest way for resistance and kept the faith and hope was truly great throughout the book. Best thing about the book was, it wasn’t just about liberation of France but, in a way, it was Virginia’s own liberation- freedom of getting her identity back, romancing France without fear, redemption from guilt, and learning to live life once again. But throughout the book what didn’t change in Virginia was her love for France which was another best thing. Overall, The Invisible Woman was inspiring, emotional, raw, gritty, well researched and well written biographical historical fiction about extraordinary American spy of the history. Read full review by following this link- https://booksteacupnreviews.com/2021/...

  21. 5 out of 5

    Shelley

    *Source* NetGalley *Genre* Historical / Contemporary Women *Rating* 4.0 *Thoughts* The Invisible Woman, by author Erika Robuck, is the story about one of America's best female spies: Virginia Hall. This is the first time anyone has written a novel about Virginia Hall, the Baltimore woman first rejected from the US Foreign service because an injury left her with one leg, who went on to become a secret agent who helped change the course of the war. This story takes place between 1926 and 1948. Virgini *Source* NetGalley *Genre* Historical / Contemporary Women *Rating* 4.0 *Thoughts* The Invisible Woman, by author Erika Robuck, is the story about one of America's best female spies: Virginia Hall. This is the first time anyone has written a novel about Virginia Hall, the Baltimore woman first rejected from the US Foreign service because an injury left her with one leg, who went on to become a secret agent who helped change the course of the war. This story takes place between 1926 and 1948. Virginia Hall was a true hero who was credited with doing extraordinary things during her career. Virginia was a brilliant woman who became quite adept at being a spy. *Full Review @ Gizmos Reviews* https://gizmosreviews.blogspot.com/20...

  22. 5 out of 5

    debra

    Maybe 3 + because I just read a WWII one that was AWFUL

  23. 4 out of 5

    Barbara Powell

    This was an incredible story of an unbelievably strong and resilient American woman, who was well educated and went to study in Paris before world war 2 broke out and the nazis invaded France. When she was younger, she had an accident which left her with a prosthetic leg in a time when they were cumbersome and complicated but she never let that hold her back. She was forced to flee France and went to Britain where she met a spy and took on different jobs and appearances in order to protect herse This was an incredible story of an unbelievably strong and resilient American woman, who was well educated and went to study in Paris before world war 2 broke out and the nazis invaded France. When she was younger, she had an accident which left her with a prosthetic leg in a time when they were cumbersome and complicated but she never let that hold her back. She was forced to flee France and went to Britain where she met a spy and took on different jobs and appearances in order to protect herself and those she was working with in order to fight the nazi regime. She worked with and protected many men and women, using safe houses and a communication system made from a bicycle all the way up until the liberation at D Day. This was a fascinating version and although it is fictional, the author really did her research into Virginia Hall and her life. Thanks to netgalley for this arc in exchange for my review.

  24. 4 out of 5

    Julia Kelly

    A gripping, tense book that shows the courage and steel of real-life spy Virginia Hall. I couldn't put this book down! A gripping, tense book that shows the courage and steel of real-life spy Virginia Hall. I couldn't put this book down!

  25. 4 out of 5

    Stacie

    Virginia Hall, the invisible woman in this story, saved countless lives and helped the Allies take over her beloved France. Erika Robuck follows Hall’s story as much as possible while altering details at times to keep the story moving forward. This fictional account of Hall’s life during World War II is so descriptive and emotional, readers will feel like they are sitting in the safe house or waiting for the parachute drops right with Virginia and the men. Virginia Hall was an American spy who wo Virginia Hall, the invisible woman in this story, saved countless lives and helped the Allies take over her beloved France. Erika Robuck follows Hall’s story as much as possible while altering details at times to keep the story moving forward. This fictional account of Hall’s life during World War II is so descriptive and emotional, readers will feel like they are sitting in the safe house or waiting for the parachute drops right with Virginia and the men. Virginia Hall was an American spy who worked for the Resistance. Robuck tells her story after suffering great losses and just escaping her captors to continue to fight for the resistance in France. Under the guise of an old woman, she continued to stay “invisible” and help guide missions to increase the Allies’ movements. Besides being a woman, her skills were also amazing due to her prosthetic leg after suffering from a hunting accident. She didn’t only have to hide her face from those who wanted to kill her, but also her limp that would have made her stand and be even more recognizable. Robuck’s attention to detail puts readers in the middle of the war in France after Virginia Hall’s escape and treacherous climb to safety through the Pyrenees Mountains. When there is little to research about a spy, Robuck dug deep and even met with Virginia Hall’s niece to learn as much about Virginia the person to be able to write her as the spy. "It’s not the fists alone that win the fight." Virginia Hall was a tough, intelligent, and adventurous woman. She knew that her life was a ticking time-bomb and knew the danger that she lived in daily. She never took life for granted and was grateful to all the men and women who were part of her missions. I have to admit, that I knew very little about Virginia Hall when I began reading and guiltily admit that I googled her to make sure I knew she made it out of the war alive. It eased my anxiety a bit reading, but not knowing the outcome of the people who selfishly took her into their homes, signed up to work on her teams, or allowed her to use her wireless from their barns was a bit difficult. I appreciated how Robuck wrote Virginia as a cold, hard-working woman, but then in her private moments reminded us that she had emotions and empathy for the people she was meeting through her operations. Robuck described Virginia as: "…a cold burned-out bulb in a string of vibrant lights, but this is how it must be." As Virginia meets her future husband once the war is coming to an end, the reader sees a whole new side of Virginia. We are left hoping that she is able to put some of these memories behind her and find joy in a life away from the horrors of war. "Sometimes all we have is to begin again. But that’s a beautiful gift." Every single World War II story that I read leaves me feeling astonished at the sacrifices, endurance, and perseverance of those fighting the war and living in it. This perspective from the inside of the Resistance is one that fans of historical fiction will truly appreciate. Robuck also includes a bibliography for readers that reveal more about the elusive Virginia Hall for those that want to learn more.

  26. 5 out of 5

    Linda

    This was my first book by Erika Robuck and will not be my last. I look forward to many more. My favorite line from this book is: "My name is Virginia Hall." WOW! This book was so good. I've not read a historical fiction book like this before. It has enough truth in it to make it great and enough fiction to work its magic. Though it is very sad in parts it's also very inspiring. The main character, Virginia, is a very strong female. She takes nothing from anyone if she can help it. She's fierce and This was my first book by Erika Robuck and will not be my last. I look forward to many more. My favorite line from this book is: "My name is Virginia Hall." WOW! This book was so good. I've not read a historical fiction book like this before. It has enough truth in it to make it great and enough fiction to work its magic. Though it is very sad in parts it's also very inspiring. The main character, Virginia, is a very strong female. She takes nothing from anyone if she can help it. She's fierce and a force in the job she does. She demands respect and gets it. She radiates strength. Even with one leg.... This book starts out with a group of young women about to start college. It is light hearted and grabs you. It then jumps to the war and all that is happening in the country Virginia loves. Though she is from America, she loves France. She considers it her home. Her heart. She will and does do anything and everything she can to make it safe again. As a resistance fighter, Virginia becomes a fast and strong woman. She fights for what she believes in and takes not prisoners so to speak. She goes through a lot and does all she can to help the people in her care. From each place she is sent she makes friends. She is well respected and loved by these people she is leading to freedom. Bringing them supplies and teaching them so much. I admire this woman and what she goes through. This book brought me to tears in many places. It also added a few chuckles along the way. But most of all it had me in awe. I was fully in awe of the resistance fighters in this story. What they did to help. The many ways they fought to bring the Nazis down. This book just made me see things that I forgot about learning in school. The sadness in hearing about the many people who were almost dead from starvation. From being kept in prison camps. Though this book did not go into that a lot it did touch on it and it's awful what happened. I hope people learned from this war. I hope they won't ever let this history be repeated. From the towns and streets of Paris to the hidden areas in the middle of a wooded area you will find out things that happened. How people banned together to stop a group of horrible Nazis. This story is told in a way that will keep you turning the pages long into the night. One you will not want to put down. The "afterword" and the "What became of Virginia's Network" are very interesting also. Be sure and read that at the end. So much is told in those few paragraphs. Some of it made me break down again as I felt like I knew these people. They became like friends in many ways. Relatable and real. The descriptions are so well written that you will have many feelings. Such a good book!! Thank you to #NetGalley, #ErikaRobuck, #BerkleyPublishingGroup, #PenguinRandomHouse, #TheInvisibleWoman for this ARC... These are my own true thoughts about this book. 5/5 huge stars and a very high recommendation.

  27. 4 out of 5

    Nancy

    The publishing world seems saturated by WWII novels. And yet there always seems to be one more story to be told, a story unlike the others we have read. The Invisible Woman offers readers a character so amazing that it is hard to believe she is based on a real woman. In The Invisible Woman, Erika Robuck brings to life Virginia Hall Goillot who went into occupied France as a "pianist," coordinating and supplying the Marquis as they sabotaged the Nazis. She was the only civilian woman to be award The publishing world seems saturated by WWII novels. And yet there always seems to be one more story to be told, a story unlike the others we have read. The Invisible Woman offers readers a character so amazing that it is hard to believe she is based on a real woman. In The Invisible Woman, Erika Robuck brings to life Virginia Hall Goillot who went into occupied France as a "pianist," coordinating and supplying the Marquis as they sabotaged the Nazis. She was the only civilian woman to be award the U. S. Distinguished Service Cross, and one of the first women to work for the C.I.A. It is a riveting read. The average lifespan of a pianist was six weeks. "You will receive no praise or accolades for your service," Virginia was warned, "Without military uniform, if captured, you will not fall under Geneva protection." She would starve. She would feel guilt over the deaths of those involved in her work. She could be jailed, raped, tortured, or put to death. Virginia accepted the challenge. She had a debt to pay. Virginia wore a prosthetic leg but it did not stop her from her work. Masquerading as an elderly woman, she rode a bicycle for hours, trekked through deep mountain snow, endured danger and grief, gained the trust of the boys and men she worked with, and was aided by women and children. The "nameless and faceless" army of common folks were true heros, enduring suffering and loss unfalteringly. A village of pacifist Christians hid thousands of evacuated Jewish children. Virginia struggles with what she has seen. How do men become monsters? Is humanity redeemable? Can small acts overpower it? Was resisting worth dying for? Will her humanity be another victim of the war? Readers will be gratified by the ending. I received a free egalley from the publisher through NetGalley. My review is fair and unbiased.

  28. 4 out of 5

    Deborah

    I received a gifted galley of THE INVISIBLE WOMAN by Erika Robuck for an honest review. Thank you to Berkley Publishing Group and Netgalley for the opportunity to read and review! THE INVISIBLE WOMAN is historical fiction based on the very real Virginia Hall. Virginia was an American woman who fell in love with France as a young woman. In the midst of World War II, she is determined to do everything she can to help the French resistance drive out the Nazi occupation. With the expectation that she I received a gifted galley of THE INVISIBLE WOMAN by Erika Robuck for an honest review. Thank you to Berkley Publishing Group and Netgalley for the opportunity to read and review! THE INVISIBLE WOMAN is historical fiction based on the very real Virginia Hall. Virginia was an American woman who fell in love with France as a young woman. In the midst of World War II, she is determined to do everything she can to help the French resistance drive out the Nazi occupation. With the expectation that she’ll likely only have six weeks to live under cover as an Allied spy, she heads into France to do the work that needs doing. I didn’t know a lot about this one going into it, but I was quickly hooked and flying through it much faster than I expected. Knowing that Virginia was based on an actual woman history who accomplished so much made the story even more engaging! Virginia meets a colorful cast of characters in her work and I loved that the author even included notes in the end about the original people she based the characters on. This isn’t Virgina’s first mission and her past mission did not end well. We get to see the impact of PTSD on Virgina’s life and on the lives of the people around her, both Allied spies and French resistance. Virginia also has a prosthetic leg named Cuthbert, something that is a challenge at times (including the fact that the Nazis are on the look out for a limping spy) but also occasionally a benefit in the way she shows her resilience. I appreciated the layers of disability rep in the story! Writing a story centered around a woman who was good at keeping herself and her life secret was no doubt a challenging project, but the author really pulled together an engaging story! Look for this one when it is out on 2/9/2021!

  29. 5 out of 5

    Rebecca

    Set in France during World War II, 37 year old Virginia Hall is determined to join the Special Operations Executive (SOE). First, however, she must prove she has not only the grit needed, but also that her prosthetic leg won't slow her down. At last, Virginia is granted a position as a secret agent coordinating supply drops to arm, feed, and organize the Resistance. Along with each and every drop, she also provides them with much needed HOPE. "It's not the fists alone that win the fight." Once pla Set in France during World War II, 37 year old Virginia Hall is determined to join the Special Operations Executive (SOE). First, however, she must prove she has not only the grit needed, but also that her prosthetic leg won't slow her down. At last, Virginia is granted a position as a secret agent coordinating supply drops to arm, feed, and organize the Resistance. Along with each and every drop, she also provides them with much needed HOPE. "It's not the fists alone that win the fight." Once planted in the field, agents of her caliber typically only have six weeks before they are captured or killed. Will Virginia (nicknamed the "limping lady" for her distinctive gait) outlive and outlast the odds? Even though this story was often heavy, I much appreciated the brief one-liners of humor that made me laugh out loud while also bringing much-needed levity to the serious and tense situations. Every time I read a new WWII book, I am amazed by how many different stories there are to share. Yes, this was similar in some ways to many Resistance-themed books I've read (too many to name) and yes, I've read about female spies in The Alice Network (4 stars) by Kate Quinn, but yet, this one still managed to bring so many new elements into the mix. Lastly, the fact that it's based on the real heroine Virginia Hall who really did have a prosthetic leg makes me love it even more. What a brave, courageous, and TOUGH woman... and a beautiful, unforgettable story! "You're still in there, she thinks. But, for now, you must remain invisible." Location: 1944 France I received an advance copy of this book. All opinions are my own.

  30. 5 out of 5

    Connie Saunders

    La Dame Qui Boite--The Lady Who Limps, Most Dangerous of Allied Spies Imagine seeing your own face staring back at you from a wanted poster as you try to slip past Nazis who are swarming the busy hub of a French train station. Will they see past the gray dye that hides your auburn hair, the wrinkles drawn on your forehead and cheeks, the fake eyeglasses, and the layers of clothing that make you look so much heavier? Will they recognize that you are the 'limping lady' who has become a thorn in the La Dame Qui Boite--The Lady Who Limps, Most Dangerous of Allied Spies Imagine seeing your own face staring back at you from a wanted poster as you try to slip past Nazis who are swarming the busy hub of a French train station. Will they see past the gray dye that hides your auburn hair, the wrinkles drawn on your forehead and cheeks, the fake eyeglasses, and the layers of clothing that make you look so much heavier? Will they recognize that you are the 'limping lady' who has become a thorn in their flesh, the dangerous lady spy that they are determined to capture and eliminate? This scene near the beginning of The Invisible Woman sets the stage for a thrill-packed story that often took my breath away. Author Erika Robuck weaves fictional details with historical facts and the resulting story is one that I won't soon forget. As I read the amazing feats of OSS agent Virginia Hall, I concluded that she could have also been called a wonder woman as she feverishly worked to aid the war effort while wearing a prosthetic leg she had named Cuthbert. Hall was the ultimate spy and freedom fighter, the only civilian woman to ever be given the United States Distinguished Service Cross., and a CIA operative after the end of WWII. I love a book that entertains as it enlightens and this book certainly delivers. Robuck stirred my emotions as I was plunged into a world of spies, war, and the uncertainties of justice versus revenge. The Invisible Woman is exceptional historical fiction! I received a copy of this book from the publisher. There was no obligation for a positive review. These are my own thoughts.

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