web site hit counter Hype : How Scammers, Grifters, and Con Artists Are Taking Over the Internet—and Why We're Following - Ebooks PDF Online
Hot Best Seller

Hype : How Scammers, Grifters, and Con Artists Are Taking Over the Internet—and Why We're Following

Availability: Ready to download

Drawing from scientific research, marketing campaigns, and exclusive documents and interviews, Vice reporter Gabrielle Bluestone delves into the irresistible hype that fuels our social media ecosystem, whether it’s from the trusted influencers that peddled Fyre or the consumer reviews that sold Juicero. A cultural examination that is as revelatory as it is relevant, Hype! Drawing from scientific research, marketing campaigns, and exclusive documents and interviews, Vice reporter Gabrielle Bluestone delves into the irresistible hype that fuels our social media ecosystem, whether it’s from the trusted influencers that peddled Fyre or the consumer reviews that sold Juicero. A cultural examination that is as revelatory as it is relevant, Hype! pulls back the curtain on the manipulation game behind the never-ending scam season—and how we as consumers can stop getting played.


Compare

Drawing from scientific research, marketing campaigns, and exclusive documents and interviews, Vice reporter Gabrielle Bluestone delves into the irresistible hype that fuels our social media ecosystem, whether it’s from the trusted influencers that peddled Fyre or the consumer reviews that sold Juicero. A cultural examination that is as revelatory as it is relevant, Hype! Drawing from scientific research, marketing campaigns, and exclusive documents and interviews, Vice reporter Gabrielle Bluestone delves into the irresistible hype that fuels our social media ecosystem, whether it’s from the trusted influencers that peddled Fyre or the consumer reviews that sold Juicero. A cultural examination that is as revelatory as it is relevant, Hype! pulls back the curtain on the manipulation game behind the never-ending scam season—and how we as consumers can stop getting played.

30 review for Hype : How Scammers, Grifters, and Con Artists Are Taking Over the Internet—and Why We're Following

  1. 4 out of 5

    Lirazel

    I received an ARC from the publisher in exchange for a fair review. I guess I'm the odd one out: I thought this book was a great premise pretty badly (or maybe just mediocre-ly) executed. We need to have more discussions about how social media is screwing with our heads, our post-truth society, the phenomenon of influencers and our obsession with "authenticity" as a commodity. We are living in a world of grifters, of intentional blindness to facts, of obsession with surface instead of substance, I received an ARC from the publisher in exchange for a fair review. I guess I'm the odd one out: I thought this book was a great premise pretty badly (or maybe just mediocre-ly) executed. We need to have more discussions about how social media is screwing with our heads, our post-truth society, the phenomenon of influencers and our obsession with "authenticity" as a commodity. We are living in a world of grifters, of intentional blindness to facts, of obsession with surface instead of substance, of performative "living." This book promised to explore that world--and explain why it's so very addictive. So I was so ready to love it. But I really didn't, and I'm unsure of whether that's because this is an ARC and there's still a lot of editing to be done before it's published or if it's just a weakness of Bluestone's writing. My enjoyment of the book was probably about a 2, but because it’s an ARC, it only feels fair to round up. The book uses the frame of the Fyre Festival debacle to explore the whole world of internet hype--an approach that could have worked. But I was unimpressed by the writing. I don't know if the book just hasn't been line-edited yet or what, but the prose lacked clarity. I felt like the narrative jumped back and forth through time, buried the lede, didn't explain things in enough detail, and jumped abruptly from one topic to another. I really struggled with it on a paragraph level sometimes. These felt like things that should have been fixed before the book got to the ARC stage. And I don't think that it actually does explain why "we're following" as the title claims--but that is probably the fault of the publisher for choosing that title and making that claim. It's like a bad headline that doesn't match the article that was actually written. A few things that really bugged me that I am almost certain will be fixed before publication. 1. The lack of foot/endnotes; at several points, references were made to "studies" or "research" that had me going, "Okay, I need a citation and I need to read the original source to make sure it really said what Bluestone says it said because I'm skeptical. I guess I'll have to borrow the published edition from my local library so I can follow up on sources. 2. The conclusion, which addresses the Covid pandemic, felt incomplete. It's entirely possible that it is incomplete--that more will be added to it before publication. If so, I rescind these criticisms. It's less clear to me whether the other thing that really irked me will be fixed: Bluestone would reference something--an event, a person--and not explain or give context. I mean, I know who Elizabeth Holmes is because I am the kind of person who listens to podcasts about that sort of thing. But there are many, many people who would have no idea who she is, and yet Bluestone references her and then doesn't actually explain who she is until a later chapter. Or she makes several references to Caroline Calloway throughout the book, but again doesn't explain who that is until one of the last chapters. That sort of thing happens multiple times throughout the book, and it left me reeling. On the positive side: Bluestone is clearly extremely knowledgeable about all the details of the Fyre Festival debacle. I am truly impressed with her investigation and information-gathering. She spoke to an impressive number of insiders and seems to have tracked down every detail of Fyre Festival operator Billy McFarland's (many) schemes and scams. Frankly, I think she should have just written a forensic breakdown of McFarland's crimes instead of trying to say larger things about the internet as a whole. Basically, the edition I read felt like a first draft. If someone handed me this manuscript, I would say, "There's probably a really solid book in there somewhere once you get it cleaned up." And maybe it will be vastly cleaned up before it's actually published! Maybe missing segues will be inserted so that it doesn't abruptly pivot from one topic to another. Maybe the conclusion is going to be expanded and fleshed-out. Maybe greater context will be provided. Of course the technical issues (which I'm not even addressing here) will be addressed by the copy editor. But the book as I experienced it was lackluster and undermined by a lack of editorial attention. Clearly most of the other people who have read it and written reviews found it a lot more worthwhile than I did. I'm not discouraging anyone from reading it. In fact, I really may check it out from my library and see if I misjudged it. I would love to pick up the published edition, scan through it, and see that it's actually a good book. We'll see!

  2. 5 out of 5

    Sandra

    I can’t give this book a rating. It had some really good and interesting parts, and is probably an important and good book for many people to read, but i think I’m not really one of them. This book talks about why “we” follow influencers. But I don’t. I thought this would help me understand why people do, or better yet, expose some more subtle and deeper subterfuge that happens online. For the most part, it did neither. It focused too much on Billy McFarland (of fyre festival fame) and things tha I can’t give this book a rating. It had some really good and interesting parts, and is probably an important and good book for many people to read, but i think I’m not really one of them. This book talks about why “we” follow influencers. But I don’t. I thought this would help me understand why people do, or better yet, expose some more subtle and deeper subterfuge that happens online. For the most part, it did neither. It focused too much on Billy McFarland (of fyre festival fame) and things that I don’t desire. It made me even more disgusted and incredulous at the things people apparently want, and the level of dishonesty and money floating around for that, but didn’t really make me understand it any more. I think for some people, this book might expose things they don’t realize or want to think about (just how very fake those things you see from the kardashians and others are, how actually bad and targeted the whole thing is, and just what it is they’re seeking by following them). But I don’t know. This book did give me one thing: I often worry about my level of social media use, knowing it can be bad for mental health and perception of reality (I’m on fb and Twitter, and here in goodreads. I also have an Instagram account that I check every couple of months or so). Reading “Hype” let me know I’m probably ok. (Edited to add: I would recommend certain sections of this book to a lot of people. Pages 175-205 (the second half of chapter 4) has some great tidbits about social media addiction and pre-social media influencers, and the last 2 chapters are mostly interesting branching out into why this is a wider problem than fashion and money. There are also good bits scattered throughout, so a skim or fast-read of the whole thing is likely to reveal something interesting or new to just about anyone).

  3. 4 out of 5

    Janet

    Date reviewed/posted: December 30, 2020 Publication date: February 2, 2021 When life for the entire universe and planet has turned on its end, you are continuing to #maskup to be in #COVID19 #socialisolation as the #secondwave is upon us, AND the worst sciatica attack in your life means you MIGHT sleep 3 hours a night, superspeed readers like me can read 300+ pages/hour, so yes, I have read the book … and many more today. I requested and received a temporary digital Advance Reader Copy of this book Date reviewed/posted: December 30, 2020 Publication date: February 2, 2021 When life for the entire universe and planet has turned on its end, you are continuing to #maskup to be in #COVID19 #socialisolation as the #secondwave is upon us, AND the worst sciatica attack in your life means you MIGHT sleep 3 hours a night, superspeed readers like me can read 300+ pages/hour, so yes, I have read the book … and many more today. I requested and received a temporary digital Advance Reader Copy of this book from #NetGalley, the publisher and the author in exchange for an honest review. From the publisher, as I do not repeat the contents or story of books in reviews, I let them do it as they do it better than I do 😸. From Vice journalist and executive producer of hit Netflix documentary Fyre comes an eye-opening look at the con artists, grifters and snake oil salesmen of the digital age—and why we can’t stop falling for them. We live in an age where scams are the new normal. A charismatic entrepreneur sells thousands of tickets to a festival that never happened. Respected investors pour millions into a start-up centred around fake blood tests. Reviewers and celebrities flock to London’s top-rated restaurant that’s little more than a backyard shed. These unsettling stories of today’s viral grifters have risen to fame and hit the front-page headlines, yet the curious conundrum remains: Why do these scams happen? Drawing from scientific research, marketing campaigns, and exclusive documents and interviews, Vice reporter Gabrielle Bluestone delves into the irresistible hype that fuels our social media ecosystem, whether it’s from the trusted influencers that peddled Fyre or the consumer reviews that sold Juicero. A cultural examination that is as revelatory as it is relevant, Hype! pulls back the curtain on the manipulation game behind the never-ending scam season—and how we as consumers can stop getting played. Okay, as I was reading and reviewing this book, I heard on my husband's beloved AM radio how people are selling FAKE Covid19 vaccine online, as well as clinic selling access to them for $10,000 - online of course. Scams have gone beyond the "Nigerian Prince" scams - my spam folder overflows every single day with scams and people wanting my money. I also DO NOT TRUST any product or brand being hyped by Kardashians and so-called "influencers" on Instagram or their insipid podcasts - I mean, who doesn't have a podcast these days?? I can think of about 1000 of them off the top of my head - Sugar bear vitamins for hair, Fab Fit Fun --- use my code for $15 off, etc. etc. etc. This was a fascinating read - and one I will recommend to friends, patrons and book clubs alike --- I have patrons ask if the FREE $100 Walmart gift card is real as well as the "you won a $2000 iPhone" - no they are not real offers and honest people are getting scammed out of their money. (p.s. the government will never take iTunes or prepaid credit cards to pay off your supposed taxes owed..lat year I supposedly owed $5000 MORE than I actually made in 2019 back taxes to one internet scammer pretending to be Revenue Canada ... how many people fall for this? This book may be the best investment of your life - BUY IT and READ IT. As always, I try to find a reason to not rate with stars as I simply adore emojis (outside of their incessant use by "🙏-ed Social Influencer Millennials/#BachelorNation survivors/Tik-Tok and YouTube Millionaires/snowflakes / literally-like-overusers etc. " on Instagram and Twitter... Get a real job, people!) so let's give it 💰💰💰💰💰 (it will save you bags of money!!!!)

  4. 4 out of 5

    Matthew Cory

    A fascinating insight into millennial/Gen Z culture. This book reads like an anthropological study of a strange tribe, but references the very real Homo Sapiens known as the modern 20-something. These are creatures that are on their cellphones from waking until sleep (I don't even own a cellphone). They know who celebrities like Ja Rule and Kyrie Jenner are (I've heard the names, but couldn't pick them out of a lineup or tell you what they're famous for). And apparently, they are extremely suscep A fascinating insight into millennial/Gen Z culture. This book reads like an anthropological study of a strange tribe, but references the very real Homo Sapiens known as the modern 20-something. These are creatures that are on their cellphones from waking until sleep (I don't even own a cellphone). They know who celebrities like Ja Rule and Kyrie Jenner are (I've heard the names, but couldn't pick them out of a lineup or tell you what they're famous for). And apparently, they are extremely susceptible to "influencers," who, strange as this sounds, are non-famous people they've never met but will go broke trying to emulate. If you love to read Ernest Hemingway and John Steinbeck because it helps you see how real people lived one hundred years ago, this book is fantastic, because it helps you see how a large segment of the country is living RIGHT NOW. It's both insightful and depressing. On the plus side, when my young co-workers mention something arcane like Fyre Festival or Instragram, I now have a frame of reference instead of staring at them blankly blinking. On the minus side, I may now have to engage them in conversation. Five stars for helping me get hip to this intriguing subculture.

  5. 5 out of 5

    Jen

    Hype is the nonfiction for anyone who's browsed and/or bought something simply because an influencer or algorithm told you that you would like it. In a world where social media marketing is everything, author Gabrielle Bluestone has taken readers behind the scenes of some of recent history's biggest online scams. From music festivals that didn't really happen to app ideas that made their developers rich before they even developed anything, Hype combs through statistics, marketing data, and interv Hype is the nonfiction for anyone who's browsed and/or bought something simply because an influencer or algorithm told you that you would like it. In a world where social media marketing is everything, author Gabrielle Bluestone has taken readers behind the scenes of some of recent history's biggest online scams. From music festivals that didn't really happen to app ideas that made their developers rich before they even developed anything, Hype combs through statistics, marketing data, and interviews to get down to the real reason we fall for so much online. Although I honestly didn't follow the Fyre Festival catastrophe as it unfolded and hadn't even heard of some of the scam apps mentioned in this book, I found Hype to be an engrossing look into the harrowing world of social media marketing. Bluestone lays out data and references interviews with a finesse that grabs you and makes you thankful for having steered clear of the Fyre Fest influencer campaign on Instagram. With easy to understand language and a wide range of sources, Hype is an excellent foray into social media marketing scams for audiences both new to the subject as well as those who have read about it before.

  6. 5 out of 5

    Kaytlin

    I received a temporary digital Advance Reader Copy of this book from #NetGalley, the publisher and the author in exchange for an honest review. This juicy, compulsively-readable book satisfied my thirst for white collar crime stories while challenging me to examine contemporary issues around digital media, identity, and truth. The book takes a look at bad actors’ use of the Internet and why so many have fallen victim to their ploys. Those who loved the Netflix documentary on the Fyre Festival wi I received a temporary digital Advance Reader Copy of this book from #NetGalley, the publisher and the author in exchange for an honest review. This juicy, compulsively-readable book satisfied my thirst for white collar crime stories while challenging me to examine contemporary issues around digital media, identity, and truth. The book takes a look at bad actors’ use of the Internet and why so many have fallen victim to their ploys. Those who loved the Netflix documentary on the Fyre Festival will enjoy this book, as it is written by the doc’s executive producer. Each chapter weaves the Fyre story with stories of Mike Bloomberg, Donald Trump, Instragram influencers, and others. The author tackles the complicated, nuanced stories with firsthand accounts and documents. The book read more like a novel format. Skimmers - I urge you to read this book in its entirety. The stories are not broken down into sections with easily definable breaks, you will miss important juicy bits. Trust me, despite that factor, it is complusively-readable - I had it finished in a day.

  7. 4 out of 5

    Joe Meyers

    Gabrielle Bluestone who broke the Fyre Festival story for Vice expands on her reporting in this engrossing look at the way PR and advertising have changed in the era of social media. Sizzle has replaced steak in a time when promotional fantasies dominate the Internet. The Fyre Festival took advantage of this situation - hyping the would be music festival right up to the time it crashed and burned, leaving ticket holders stranded on a miserable island with no music, no lodgings and none of the sup Gabrielle Bluestone who broke the Fyre Festival story for Vice expands on her reporting in this engrossing look at the way PR and advertising have changed in the era of social media. Sizzle has replaced steak in a time when promotional fantasies dominate the Internet. The Fyre Festival took advantage of this situation - hyping the would be music festival right up to the time it crashed and burned, leaving ticket holders stranded on a miserable island with no music, no lodgings and none of the supermodels who had flogged the project. Bluestone uses this disaster as a jumping off point for a revealing deep dive into other areas of social media hype where Instagram ‘influencers’ with large followings are paid anywhere from $250,000 to one million dollars for a single post. Readers will come away with a reinforced skepticism of some of today’s most dubious marketing methods. (An advance electronic ARC was provided by Edelweiss.)

  8. 4 out of 5

    Alex

    This is really thoroughly reported and has some fascinating behind-the-scenes details about the internet's biggest scammers. It's largely focused around the story of Billy McFarland and the Fyre Festival, and if you watched either of the documentaries about that you may be interested in the additional details of how it all went down. That said, Bluestone organizes the book thematically instead of chronologically, and given how many companies, people and places were involved with Fyre, it gets co This is really thoroughly reported and has some fascinating behind-the-scenes details about the internet's biggest scammers. It's largely focused around the story of Billy McFarland and the Fyre Festival, and if you watched either of the documentaries about that you may be interested in the additional details of how it all went down. That said, Bluestone organizes the book thematically instead of chronologically, and given how many companies, people and places were involved with Fyre, it gets confusing really fast. I craved some diagrams! There are some other worthwhile detours, such as the chapter about Caroline Calloway. Overall, I thought it was an interesting book but I was hoping for some deeper insights into why and how scammers scam so successfully, but I felt like Bluestone focused on some pretty surface-level components - like how we're all addicted to our phones - and left some other avenues unexplored. Overall, an interesting read if you're into internet culture.

  9. 5 out of 5

    Brandon Butts

    Expected to get more “How” from “How Scammers, Grifters, and Con Artists are Taking Over the Internet- and Why We’re Following.” I’m fascinated by the Fyre Festival story, but there’s only so much about the Trump protected, the privileged, and willful oblivion before I’m tapped out. The book mainly contains stories of these people getting over on whoever they could and what happened, not truly how the system was created or how we started being followers. There is just so much potential for a sto Expected to get more “How” from “How Scammers, Grifters, and Con Artists are Taking Over the Internet- and Why We’re Following.” I’m fascinated by the Fyre Festival story, but there’s only so much about the Trump protected, the privileged, and willful oblivion before I’m tapped out. The book mainly contains stories of these people getting over on whoever they could and what happened, not truly how the system was created or how we started being followers. There is just so much potential for a story like Fyre Festival to be a platform for conversation around the real problems here. Also didn’t care for how George Floyd’s death was haphazardly tossed in at the end for comparison/progressives sake. Where’s the book that talks about how Con Artists, Grifters and Scammers got the best of a less financially wealthy country and its resources? I’m interested in that. Glad I finished the book. It took a while. Not for me.

  10. 4 out of 5

    Belle Gearhart

    rounding up, 3.7. this focused a lot on Fyre festival which is fine but it was never a scam that really interested me. sometimes it jumped around too much and did some transitional things that i didn’t love but eventually i fell into the format. the information is really fascinating and well researched. i would have loved even more deep dives into some of these influencer scandals tbh. the danielle bernstein and caroline calloway ones were really well written and did a good job of laying out wha rounding up, 3.7. this focused a lot on Fyre festival which is fine but it was never a scam that really interested me. sometimes it jumped around too much and did some transitional things that i didn’t love but eventually i fell into the format. the information is really fascinating and well researched. i would have loved even more deep dives into some of these influencer scandals tbh. the danielle bernstein and caroline calloway ones were really well written and did a good job of laying out what happened. i also really enjoyed the parts about supreme. i will def read more by this author, she’s a great reporter and writer. i think my rating plays more into the fact that billy mcfarland is not that interesting and doesn’t deserve more press lol i would have given this more stars if the book had maybe one chapter on him as opposed to being the main story all the other stories meandered around.

  11. 5 out of 5

    Chelsea

    This was a really timely read for me, and the author’s presence and voice pulled me along. I say timely because I’ve been watching/reading a lot about a) social media’s effect on and presence in modern life, b) financial crimes, and c) con artists. This book also added a layer about influencers which expanded my understanding since I purposefully try to avoid following most influencers, for these very reasons. I don’t think it sounds fun to obsessively consume yourself for profit and clearly the This was a really timely read for me, and the author’s presence and voice pulled me along. I say timely because I’ve been watching/reading a lot about a) social media’s effect on and presence in modern life, b) financial crimes, and c) con artists. This book also added a layer about influencers which expanded my understanding since I purposefully try to avoid following most influencers, for these very reasons. I don’t think it sounds fun to obsessively consume yourself for profit and clearly there are lots of people out there using the power they gain from that influence in thoughtless and morally/ethically ambiguous fashion. Read this if you liked the Fyre documentaries (there’s a lot rehashed here but additional interviews and context added, as well as enmeshing what happened in the broader context) or HBO’s excellent Generation Hustle series I just watched, or just if you’d like to step back and consider what’s happening on the internet these days.

  12. 5 out of 5

    Whitney

    Gabrielle Bluestone has written a fascinating take on influencer culture as a whole, particularly the ways that they convince us our lives are lacking. Why do we buy products that we see on Instagram? And why did thousands of people buy tickets to Fyre Festival? Social media, and influencers, have turned out eyes increasingly outward. We are apt to compare ourselves in those whose lives are incredibly different and Bluestone explores the why. She also examines how fraudsters like Billy McFarland Gabrielle Bluestone has written a fascinating take on influencer culture as a whole, particularly the ways that they convince us our lives are lacking. Why do we buy products that we see on Instagram? And why did thousands of people buy tickets to Fyre Festival? Social media, and influencers, have turned out eyes increasingly outward. We are apt to compare ourselves in those whose lives are incredibly different and Bluestone explores the why. She also examines how fraudsters like Billy McFarland and Danielle Bernstein convince the masses to buy into their marketing and images. The book is overall heavy on Fyre Festival coverage, a topic that Bluestone has covered on several previous capacities. If you’re not interested in how Fyre (didn’t) go down, this might not be the book for you.

  13. 4 out of 5

    Silvia C.

    Rating 3.25 The premise was interesting, and there were a lot anecdotal stories that I had not previously heard of, like the Fyre Festival, which I had not even heard of before (yes, I've been living under a rock). In the end, I don't think it really delivered on the promise of why, and the how is mostly examples, so you need to draw your own conclusions. Also I don't fully agree with some examples/comparisons. I recognize how they are hyped, but I don't think they are scammers, since they are del Rating 3.25 The premise was interesting, and there were a lot anecdotal stories that I had not previously heard of, like the Fyre Festival, which I had not even heard of before (yes, I've been living under a rock). In the end, I don't think it really delivered on the promise of why, and the how is mostly examples, so you need to draw your own conclusions. Also I don't fully agree with some examples/comparisons. I recognize how they are hyped, but I don't think they are scammers, since they are delivering tangible products that meet the advertised tangibles. That said, it still gave me the perspective and incentive to increase my critical thinking a notch when considering something on the Internet, since it's the main channel that advertisement reaches me.  

  14. 5 out of 5

    Andrew Breza

    I lucked into getting an advance copy of Hype, which is scheduled for release next month (thanks Goodreads giveaways!). The Fyre Festival forms the backbone of the book, which isn't surprising given that the author was the executive producer of the documentary Fyre. Bluestone uses the failed music festival as a jumping off point for both specific case studies of overhyped influencers (Caroline Calloway, Danielle Bernstein, the Kardashian family) as well as scholarly conversations with professors I lucked into getting an advance copy of Hype, which is scheduled for release next month (thanks Goodreads giveaways!). The Fyre Festival forms the backbone of the book, which isn't surprising given that the author was the executive producer of the documentary Fyre. Bluestone uses the failed music festival as a jumping off point for both specific case studies of overhyped influencers (Caroline Calloway, Danielle Bernstein, the Kardashian family) as well as scholarly conversations with professors. It has a good balance of salacious details of scams and "why it matters" context. Overall, Hype is interesting, relevant, and informative.

  15. 5 out of 5

    Kelly Lynn Thomas

    A fascinating look into the world of scammers who use social media to gain followers, clout, and money. This isn't a book about mundane scams from broke "Nigerian princes", but rather people like influencers and business owners who make big promises and fall short, sometimes spectacularly (as in the Fyre Festival). Bill McFarland and the Fyre Festival forms the core of this book, with the author's astute reporting on the festival beginning to end setting the stage for her exploration of other in A fascinating look into the world of scammers who use social media to gain followers, clout, and money. This isn't a book about mundane scams from broke "Nigerian princes", but rather people like influencers and business owners who make big promises and fall short, sometimes spectacularly (as in the Fyre Festival). Bill McFarland and the Fyre Festival forms the core of this book, with the author's astute reporting on the festival beginning to end setting the stage for her exploration of other internet scammers. A fascinating book that will have you rethinking who you follow on Instagram and why.

  16. 4 out of 5

    Hannah Nagle

    This was really interesting! I thought it had some really great points and also enjoyed the telling of the Fyre Festival. I was also delighted to see the inclusion of Caroline Calloway, because I had a great time following her "workshops" back in the day. I thought there were some issues with flow throughout the book, I often felt we were settling into a new section and then it abruptly switched to a new topic. I found it difficult to follow along and would often zone out a bit before coming bac This was really interesting! I thought it had some really great points and also enjoyed the telling of the Fyre Festival. I was also delighted to see the inclusion of Caroline Calloway, because I had a great time following her "workshops" back in the day. I thought there were some issues with flow throughout the book, I often felt we were settling into a new section and then it abruptly switched to a new topic. I found it difficult to follow along and would often zone out a bit before coming back and having to back track. Overall I found it really interesting and enjoyed the information provided by the author!

  17. 5 out of 5

    Savanna

    DNF at 24%. I wanted to like this book. I've read all its predecessors and am well versed in my Theranos and my Anna Delveys and Caroline Calloways. But this book needed both a tighter structure and a more aggressive editor. It rambles on and bounces around like a toddler telling me about their day. The thesis is not "why do scammer scam" but rather "why do we love scammers?" and the answer is... ? Two chapters in and all I have in the way of an answer is anecdotes from scam-ees shrugging and co DNF at 24%. I wanted to like this book. I've read all its predecessors and am well versed in my Theranos and my Anna Delveys and Caroline Calloways. But this book needed both a tighter structure and a more aggressive editor. It rambles on and bounces around like a toddler telling me about their day. The thesis is not "why do scammer scam" but rather "why do we love scammers?" and the answer is... ? Two chapters in and all I have in the way of an answer is anecdotes from scam-ees shrugging and comparing the Fyre fest guy to a cult leader.

  18. 4 out of 5

    Brandi

    Millennial grifters and scammers?? INJECT THIS INTO MY VEINS!! I’ve been looking forward to this book for a while. It had a lot of really interesting information that goes beyond the Fyre Fest documentaries, adding in stories of other grifters along the way. I feel like it just didn’t come together in the end. The “why” we follow them wasn’t answered. However, I ripped through this and liked it a lot overall!

  19. 4 out of 5

    Peter Fenton

    Everyone's aware they'll be assaulted by con artists and grifters when shuffling down a dusty carnival midway. Hype shows that you need not leave the comforts of your laptop in order to be treated like a mark or rube. In case after colorful case, the author illustrates that scammers lurk on all corners of the internet, eager to empty your virtual wallet. I enjoyed the book as entertainment and a series of cautionary tales. Everyone's aware they'll be assaulted by con artists and grifters when shuffling down a dusty carnival midway. Hype shows that you need not leave the comforts of your laptop in order to be treated like a mark or rube. In case after colorful case, the author illustrates that scammers lurk on all corners of the internet, eager to empty your virtual wallet. I enjoyed the book as entertainment and a series of cautionary tales.

  20. 5 out of 5

    Avid

    The only parts of this book worth reading were the parts that i’d already seen in the fyre documentary on Netflix. The rest of it is just gossipy drivel. Disappointingly, it does not provide the answer to its own subtitle: “how scammers, grifters, and con-artists are taking over the internet —- and why we’re following.” Seriously, i’m still completely in the dark about that. Americans are idiots.

  21. 5 out of 5

    Rose Hriz

    This is a very interesting book. It looks as how we are fooled into believing something we see on the internet while ignoring all the facts. Influencers appear to have wonderful lives that we would like to live. However, are these lives real or is everything faked. This is an eye opening book. I would recommend reading this book. Thank you to #goodreads, @HanoverSquarePress, and @Gabrielle Bluestone for a copy of this book.

  22. 4 out of 5

    Bea

    The book didn't really cover how con artists are taking over the internet per se. Mostly it was about the Fyre Festival scam, a little about Elon Musk and repeated examples of what she thinks of Donald Trump. There were snippets of other people and internet sites. It was kind of interesting but had way too much about the Fyre Festival scam and should have been titled as such. The book didn't really cover how con artists are taking over the internet per se. Mostly it was about the Fyre Festival scam, a little about Elon Musk and repeated examples of what she thinks of Donald Trump. There were snippets of other people and internet sites. It was kind of interesting but had way too much about the Fyre Festival scam and should have been titled as such.

  23. 5 out of 5

    Jenny Hogg

    This book takes a deep dive into the disastrous Fyre festival, to the near exclusion of other scams, with precious little of the WHY answered. Unfortunately, it reads like a gossip column, unorganized, and hard to follow the endless name drops of celebrities I'm sure I should know. This book is extremely dated, and its shelf life is sure to be short. This book takes a deep dive into the disastrous Fyre festival, to the near exclusion of other scams, with precious little of the WHY answered. Unfortunately, it reads like a gossip column, unorganized, and hard to follow the endless name drops of celebrities I'm sure I should know. This book is extremely dated, and its shelf life is sure to be short.

  24. 5 out of 5

    Karly

    I thought this book was very interesting. Included a lot of background on Billy McFarland and the Fyre Festival that the documentaries did not. It made me feel pretty dumb for buying Supreme for my son. It lost a little focus at the end and the whole discussion about COVID didn’t really fit for me, but other than that I was informed and entertained.

  25. 4 out of 5

    Joanne Duffy

    This was exactly the Fyre Festival long-read I wanted it to be while also taking me down the path of other hype-men (and women) like Elizabeth Holmes, Caroline Calloway and touches of WeWork (can’t wait for the books on that!). If you’re interested in how something like Fyre or Theranos could possible happen, you’ll love this book.

  26. 4 out of 5

    Riccardo Lo Monaco

    Why the words “Fyre Festival” don’t appear in the title of this book is beyond me. At times, I caught myself asking why this author is so personally upset with McFarland - it’s like he hurt her. The book is good, just not as advertised. Still... the book is good.

  27. 4 out of 5

    Kevin Reape

    Not a lot of “how” and “why” for a book with those words in the title, but a good overview of some lesser known internet scam stories. I’ll be going out of my way to never hear about the Fyre Festival again, though.

  28. 4 out of 5

    Tressa

    Some of this is a bit of a rehash from the Fyre Festival documentaries, with Billy McFarland at the center of most chapters. However, the author does mention other fraudsters and social media "influencers" which kept me turning the pages pretty quickly. Some of this is a bit of a rehash from the Fyre Festival documentaries, with Billy McFarland at the center of most chapters. However, the author does mention other fraudsters and social media "influencers" which kept me turning the pages pretty quickly.

  29. 5 out of 5

    Ietrio

    From the heights of a click bait farm, Bluestone is here to tell you which links you should click and which ones you should not.

  30. 4 out of 5

    Krista O'Connell

    There are interesting stories and relevant takeaways re: social media, fake news, and the lies told online, but ultimately the book felt disorganized and unrefined.

Add a review

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

Loading...
We use cookies to give you the best online experience. By using our website you agree to our use of cookies in accordance with our cookie policy.