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Death Comes to the Rectory

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Murder casts a dark shadow over the christening of Lady Lucy and Major Sir Robert Kurland's daughter Elizabeth--even more so when Lucy's own father, the rector, falls under suspicion for the crime... Lucy and Robert's joy in christening their new daughter, surrounded by extended family and loved ones who have gathered in the village of Kurland St. Mary, is only enhanced whe Murder casts a dark shadow over the christening of Lady Lucy and Major Sir Robert Kurland's daughter Elizabeth--even more so when Lucy's own father, the rector, falls under suspicion for the crime... Lucy and Robert's joy in christening their new daughter, surrounded by extended family and loved ones who have gathered in the village of Kurland St. Mary, is only enhanced when Robert's aunt Rose--now the second wife of Lucy's father Ambrose--announces that she is with child. However, not everyone is happy about the news, in particular Rose's adult daughter Henrietta and her husband, who fear for their inheritance. Following the christening, Rose's disagreeable son-in-law Basil Northam threatens to turn afternoon tea in the rectory into an unsightly brawl. The next morning, he is found in the rector's study, stabbed through the heart with an antique letter opener, clutching a note that appears to implicate the rector himself. As the local justice of the peace, Robert has an obligation to remain unbiased in his investigation of the ghastly crime, even though his prime suspect is a man of the cloth and his wife's father. But Lucy is under no such obligation. As snow traps the members of the christening party in Kurland St. Mary, she vows to clear her father's name and bring the cold-blooded culprit to justice. Someone had better start saying their prayers...


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Murder casts a dark shadow over the christening of Lady Lucy and Major Sir Robert Kurland's daughter Elizabeth--even more so when Lucy's own father, the rector, falls under suspicion for the crime... Lucy and Robert's joy in christening their new daughter, surrounded by extended family and loved ones who have gathered in the village of Kurland St. Mary, is only enhanced whe Murder casts a dark shadow over the christening of Lady Lucy and Major Sir Robert Kurland's daughter Elizabeth--even more so when Lucy's own father, the rector, falls under suspicion for the crime... Lucy and Robert's joy in christening their new daughter, surrounded by extended family and loved ones who have gathered in the village of Kurland St. Mary, is only enhanced when Robert's aunt Rose--now the second wife of Lucy's father Ambrose--announces that she is with child. However, not everyone is happy about the news, in particular Rose's adult daughter Henrietta and her husband, who fear for their inheritance. Following the christening, Rose's disagreeable son-in-law Basil Northam threatens to turn afternoon tea in the rectory into an unsightly brawl. The next morning, he is found in the rector's study, stabbed through the heart with an antique letter opener, clutching a note that appears to implicate the rector himself. As the local justice of the peace, Robert has an obligation to remain unbiased in his investigation of the ghastly crime, even though his prime suspect is a man of the cloth and his wife's father. But Lucy is under no such obligation. As snow traps the members of the christening party in Kurland St. Mary, she vows to clear her father's name and bring the cold-blooded culprit to justice. Someone had better start saying their prayers...

30 review for Death Comes to the Rectory

  1. 5 out of 5

    JoAn

    Death Comes to the Rectory by Catherine Lloyd brings the Kurland St. Mary cozy series to close. I'm sorry that I will have no more adventures with Sir Robert and Lady Lucy. The story moved smoothly with the murder of a despicable nobleman in the Kurland St. Mary rectory. The suspects are numerous and all staying at Kurland Hall. To complicate matters it is snowing and the guests are beginning to become restless. There are family secrets both in Lucy's family and in Robert's and there is tension b Death Comes to the Rectory by Catherine Lloyd brings the Kurland St. Mary cozy series to close. I'm sorry that I will have no more adventures with Sir Robert and Lady Lucy. The story moved smoothly with the murder of a despicable nobleman in the Kurland St. Mary rectory. The suspects are numerous and all staying at Kurland Hall. To complicate matters it is snowing and the guests are beginning to become restless. There are family secrets both in Lucy's family and in Robert's and there is tension between Robert and Lucy during the investigation. A captivating read that kept me turning the pages. I voluntarily reviewed an Advance Reader Copy of this book from Kensington via NetGalley. All of the above opinions are my own.

  2. 4 out of 5

    Barbara Rogers

    Series: Kurland St. Mary Mystery #8 Publication: 1/26/21 Number of Pages: 304 *** 3.5 Stars Rounded Up *** I really struggled with what rating to give this book. If it was a book in the middle of a series, I’d give it 5-stars easily because the mystery is well-written, well-plotted, and well-executed. Usually, I figure out within the first chapter or two who the murderer is – but I wasn’t sure with this one. I had suspicions – but definitely wasn’t sure. However, this book isn’t in the middle of a s Series: Kurland St. Mary Mystery #8 Publication: 1/26/21 Number of Pages: 304 *** 3.5 Stars Rounded Up *** I really struggled with what rating to give this book. If it was a book in the middle of a series, I’d give it 5-stars easily because the mystery is well-written, well-plotted, and well-executed. Usually, I figure out within the first chapter or two who the murderer is – but I wasn’t sure with this one. I had suspicions – but definitely wasn’t sure. However, this book isn’t in the middle of a series, it is the wrap-up for a series and, as such, it just wasn’t satisfying to me. The author has said she might write some additional short stories for this series in the future, but, to this reader, that doesn’t make up for what is lacking in this final book. As a series ender, I did not want to see a family left splintered and in turmoil. I wanted to know what the future held for the Harrington’s – especially the twins and Anna – Oh, and Rose’s baby. Yet, Anna was hardly even mentioned in the story and she wasn’t at her niece’s christening. So, if you read the book for the mystery, you’ll enjoy it – but if you read it for both the mystery and the wrap-up to a much-loved series, you’ll end up a bit disappointed. All of that disappointment could have so easily been avoided with just an additional chapter or an epilogue showing the family in their happy lives at some future point. I’m not exactly sorry I read the book – but I’m not exactly jumping for joy either. Lady Lucy and Sir Robert Kurland are preparing to celebrate the christening of their baby daughter, Elizabeth Jane Sarah, who was named after her deceased grandmothers and her great-aunt. They’ve invited friends and family and have filled both the rectory and the manor with guests. In the middle of all of the guest's arrival, there is an unexpected, uninvited, and unwanted couple who appears. Robert asks them to leave, but since the woman, Henrietta, is Robert’s cousin – and the step-daughter of Lucy’s father – they can hardly remove them bodily. You’ll never see a nastier set of people than Henrietta and her husband Lord Northam. Robert makes it very plain to both of them that they WILL NOT disturb the christening services. This is his much-loved, and much-doted-upon daughter's big day and he will not have it spoiled. Just after the services, the body of Basil, Lord Northam, is discovered in the rector’s office – with the rector’s letter opener. That immediately makes the rector, Lucy’s father, the prime suspect. Lucy doesn’t believe her father is guilty – but Robert thinks he could be. As the magistrate for the area, it is Robert’s duty to investigate and determine the guilty party – even if that means hurting his wife. It seems everyone has a reason to want Lord Northam dead – he was mutually hated by all who knew him. As the investigation continues, more and more secrets come to light along with more and more reasons someone would want to kill Lord Northam. Yet, all of the evidence keeps coming back to the rector. Henrietta insists that the rector is the guilty party and she makes that loud and clear to any and all who will listen. Can Robert and Lucy work through all of the secrets and lies to get to the truth? That truth will surprise you! I did enjoy the mystery, but the overall feel of the book left me wanting. I thought Lucy was much too sanguine about her father being accused of murder and much too accepting of Robert’s need to pursue her father as a suspect. The ending was also dissatisfying because there was no real wrap-up. The family was left fractured with more wounds than could be easily repaired. If you love the series, I hope you won’t be as disappointed as I was in the final book. If you aren’t invested in the series – you should find the mystery very enjoyable. I voluntarily read and reviewed an Advanced Reader Copy of this book. All thoughts and opinions are my own.

  3. 4 out of 5

    Judy Lesley

    This final book in the Kurland St. Mary series will be a bittersweet read for fans of the series because the writing, plotting and character development are all so good. I did not even come close to working out who had committed the murder at the rectory so my compliments to Catherine Lloyd for a very good puzzle. All the clues were there but I just whizzed right by them. Family and friends are gathering at Kurland Hall for the christening of baby Elizabeth. It should have been such a joyous occ This final book in the Kurland St. Mary series will be a bittersweet read for fans of the series because the writing, plotting and character development are all so good. I did not even come close to working out who had committed the murder at the rectory so my compliments to Catherine Lloyd for a very good puzzle. All the clues were there but I just whizzed right by them. Family and friends are gathering at Kurland Hall for the christening of baby Elizabeth. It should have been such a joyous occasion but murder intruded when a body was discovered in the rectory soon after the baptism ceremony was over. As it turned out there were plenty of people in the vicinity who didn't mind seeing the victim dead, but who actually did the murder? As the local magistrate Sir Robert has to investigate a crime when he should have been playing host to the guests visiting Kurland St. Mary for his daughter's special day. No matter where the evidence takes him Sir Robert must try to bring someone to justice. I enjoyed this story very much and I think fans will be quite satisfied with the quality of this novel. Thank you to NetGalley and Kensington Books for an e-galley of this novel.

  4. 4 out of 5

    Lauren

    Death Comes to the Rectory 3 Stars In this final installment, Lucy and Sir Robert investigate the murder of the obnoxious Basil Northam, who was, unfortunately, stabbed in the rectory making Lucy's father, the rector, the prime suspect. While I have enjoyed this series immensely and count Lucy as one of my all-time favorite historical mystery heroines, this particular addition is not of the same caliber as the previous books. To begin with, the mystery itself is rather uninspired. The victim is co Death Comes to the Rectory 3 Stars In this final installment, Lucy and Sir Robert investigate the murder of the obnoxious Basil Northam, who was, unfortunately, stabbed in the rectory making Lucy's father, the rector, the prime suspect. While I have enjoyed this series immensely and count Lucy as one of my all-time favorite historical mystery heroines, this particular addition is not of the same caliber as the previous books. To begin with, the mystery itself is rather uninspired. The victim is completely deserving of his fate; the suspects lie incessantly, and the investigation is tedious and repetitive. By the time the culprit is revealed, it is difficult to care one way or the other, especially considering the (view spoiler)[selfish nature of her motive (hide spoiler)] . Lucy and Robert's interactions are also missing the wit and spark that has characterized their relationship thus far. Moreover, the book ends rather abruptly, and it could have done with an epilogue to provide closure for the Kurlands and their friends. Overall, it seems that Lloyd has run out of steam with regard to this series, so perhaps it is for the best that it has come to an end.

  5. 5 out of 5

    QNPoohBear

    Lucy and Robert are pleased to be planning a christening party for their new daughter Elizabeth. Sure, their son Ned is jealous of his new sister but that's nothing they can't handle. While visiting Lucy's father and his new wife, Robert's Aunt Rose, the family gets a few shocks. First, Lucy's father is in debt to the local miller who confront the Rector at home. Next, another angry person descends upon the Rectory; Aunt Rose's daughter Henrietta arrives unexpectedly looking for her mother. Her Lucy and Robert are pleased to be planning a christening party for their new daughter Elizabeth. Sure, their son Ned is jealous of his new sister but that's nothing they can't handle. While visiting Lucy's father and his new wife, Robert's Aunt Rose, the family gets a few shocks. First, Lucy's father is in debt to the local miller who confront the Rector at home. Next, another angry person descends upon the Rectory; Aunt Rose's daughter Henrietta arrives unexpectedly looking for her mother. Her angry demeanor makes Aunt Rose feel unwell. She makes a huge announcement - she's pregnant! Henrietta is furious and her husband, Lord Northam, appears to inform everyone Lucy's father is intending to rob Aunt Rose of her money and leave nothing to Henrietta and Basil! Robert knows his cousins have already tried to bleed his aunt dry as Northam is a profligate spender. There's no love lost between Robert and his cousins and while he is not fond of his father-in-law either, he knows the Rector doesn't need Rose's money. (Or does he?) As the guests arrive at the church for the christening, Lucy's father is late to arrive. When he returns, he discovers a horrific sight: Lord Northam stabbed to death in the Rectory study. Henrietta insists the Rector killer her beloved husband. As Magistrate, Robert is in charge of the case. With both his family and Lucy's wanting him to prove the Rector either did or didn't murder Lord Northam, he has his work cut out for him. This mystery was super tight. I never guessed who the murderer was, not even when the murderer confessed at the end. Since there were so many suspects, the murderer was kind of obvious but the timeline didn't quite work out for any of my main suspects. However, I believe this mystery would work better in the 1920s if the snow was heavy enough to block train tracks and knock out telephone and telegraph wires. It's a classic Christieesque plot with everyone snowed in but the history just doesn't work for the Regency period. Married women, even widows, were not legal entities. Aunt Rose can not legally make or change her will without her husband's consent. Her money went to him upon her marriage except for what had been set aside for her. Henrietta likely received a dowry to buy Lord Northam as her husband and maybe some extra money because they're industrial money not landed gentry money but women just didn't inherit like that. This issue is even discussed several times in regards to Henrietta so why does the author ignore it with Rose? Is there some loophole to the law I didn't find online? Also, Rose wouldn't use the word "pregnant" or announce it in front of everyone. I'm certain the author knows this and jettisoned good history for a good story. I normally love Lucy and Robert's relationship but in this book they're sort of fighting because he's the magistrate who has to prove her father is guilty or not guilty of murder. This story lacks the warmth and humor I enjoy in their relationship. He still stands up for her to her horrid father and tries to protect her from the worst of her father's faults but Robert's military bearing comes out in this novel and he's back to being bossy and grouchy. If he let Lucy investigate with him, they would have solved the murder much sooner. She does a little bit of investigating but she fears someone in her family is guilty. It has to be someone close to either Lucy or Robert, someone from their own family or circle of friends and she doesn't really want to know. Lord Northam was a truly awful, horrible man. He was a narcissist who manipulated Henrietta and twisted the truth to suit his narrative of events. He may have been a card sharp and cheat and was unfaithful to his marriage vows. If anyone in this book deserved to be murdered, it was he. Too bad Robert has such a strong sense of honor and too bad Henrietta screeches the house down wanting justice for her husband. This murder would be better off unsolved. Any way it goes, the murderer is someone close to Robert and/or Lucy. At first I wanted to feel sorry for Harriet. She must have married quite young to be so besotted with a scoundrel. Harriet is so truly horrid and bratty, especially to her mother. What happened there? What are her siblings like? Why is Harriet so selfish? She reminded me (probably on purpose) of Lydia Bennet, but Lydia is only 15! If she was Lydia's age, her selfishness and temper tantrums would make sense. I guess it takes one narcissist to love another? I think she must be mentally unhinged from her husband's frequent misbehavior. If Harriet is under 25 then I give her some leeway in not fully understanding what she was doing and clinging to her mistaken love for her man. Lord Northam smarter than Mr. Wickham and knows how to cover his misdeeds better. How many children do they have? She says children and son alternately. I take it one son and maybe one or more daughters? Harriet makes Penelope seem nice. Lucy's family is still awful- all of them. The twins are the only good ones and they're just home from school for Christmastide. Lucy's father is still really horrible. He's selfish and sexist and still doesn't value Lucy as he should. He only values Anna because she's demure and doesn't argue with him. However, I don't believe the Rector would commit murder, either voluntarily or in a rage. He does have a temper but he's a man of the cloth. I believe if he accidentally stabbed someone he wouldn't just calmly go about his duty and baptize his granddaughter. He would be freaked out and then try to get Robert to cover it up. The Earl of Harrington's son Max is the next suspect on the list. Lucy's young cousin is a young man about town. He enjoys gambling and has run up significant debts, much to his father's dismay. He currently owes Lord Northam a hefty sum and has made no pretense of enjoying the baby's celebration. Max was MIA and acts suspicious. Hmm ... Well I don't think Max did it either but he might know more about the timeline of events than he lets on. Max has a hasty temper, he's sensitive about his honor, as young men are and angsty because Papa keeps him on a short leash. I CAN see Max lashing out in anger and stabbing someone but that scenario would be more likely to happen in London and more realistically, be in the form of a duel. If Max believes Lord Northam cheated, why isn't the boy moving heaven and earth to find witnesses to bring down Northam? Are all the men scared to speak up or is Max just angry he lost? The Earl of Harrington may not be as despicable as Lord Northam or as rude to Lucy as his brother but he sure is selfish, manipulative and awful. Yes Lucy, I do believe he could be a murderer and willing to throw his brother under the carriage in order to protect his family reputation. Max is the heir, the presumed next Earl! Lucy's father is sadly expendable. I suspect Lucy's Aunt Jane, the Countess of Harrington, could and would commit murder to protect her son. I was surprised no one considered her. She's busy worrying about her daughter's broken engagement and upcoming trip abroad. You know what "abroad" means. It takes Lucy forever to spell that out for Robert! I wonder whether Julia's fiancé was involved in Lord Northam's business in some way and she found out and broke off the engagement? Or the Earl of Harrington was involved, lost money and that's why he refuses to pay Max's debts and blames his brother for getting him involved in a Ponzi scheme. I think it could be one of these people who killed Lord Northam. A dark horse is Aunt Rose. She's so lovely and sweet but she isn't feeling well. Harriet and Lord Northam's arrival has put too much stress on her shoulders and it's taking a toll on her body. I think she's worrying about something. Is she afraid her husband is the murderer or worried it was her daughter? Is she just worried about Harriet or did she make the ultimate sacrifice for her daughter and set her daughter free by killing Lord Northam? I hope she isn't a murderer but Lucy needs a mother. Like Lucy, I find her announcement squicky. Doesn't her father have enough children to support? There's still the 3 boys and Anna, even though Anthony has a job, we know what his career path looks like from Joshua's comments. Captain Joshua Coles, a former Hussar, loved his career in the army but must give it up as it is no longer profitable and his father needs him on the estate. I don't really feel sorry for him at all. These people are so whiny! They have everything, while the Miller undoubtedly needs the money to support his family! Joshua seems nice enough but there's something I can't put my finger on that I don't like about him. He seems secretive and while he's helpful in running errands, it places him in the right spots for some of the events that occur. If he is Lord Northam's murderer, why do it on the day of your godchild's christening? Why frame her grandfather? That's just downright unacceptable. I do understand his anger towards the Rector but honestly, he needed to have brought that up with Robert ahead of time! Mr. Penarth, the moneylender (thankfully not Jewish but a pious Christian), arrives in Kurland St. Mary looking for his money. He seems very nice and he respects Robert. Mr. Penarth answers all the questions and is honest with Robert. However, other reports of him are vastly different. I don't trust Northam and Henrietta's word, but given his occupation, he would want his money back... how badly does he want that money? Would he use any means necessary to get it? He claims to be a devout Christian so I don't think he would actually get his hands dirty and do the deed himself. Could he have hired someone? Perhaps young Max? Maybe Joshua? What about the Miller? If he hired anyone, I think it would be someone lower class and the Miller already has a beef with the Rector. I wonder if Mr. Penarth bribed the Miller by paying Mr. Harrington's debts and promising revenge? That's a bit of a stretch but it is a murder mystery! Mr. Barry, Mr. Penarth's secretary, seems like a nice man. He acts a little nervous. Maybe he's suspicious? Was he really in London the whole time or in a nearby village inn waiting to be summoned by his employer? Luke and Michael, the twins, are still schoolboys but growing up fast. They're eager to be doing something and having adventures. I think Lucy has done a good job raising them and they'll grow up nicely. Robert and Lucy's son, Ned, is a spoiled brat already at 4. I know they waited a long time for him to arrive and probably thought he'd be an only child, but his grandfather indulges him. (My parents do that too!) He's still very young and I'm sure with the guidance of a younger Mr. Fletcher as tutor, he'll grow up better. Elizabeth is only three months old and already her personality is showing. She has a sunny temper like her mother but I don't see Lucy as sunny. Anna, yes, Lucy, no. I think Elizabeth will be sweet and lovely like Anna. I am sad to say goodbye to Lucy and Robert as this is the final book in the series. It needs an epilogue to tell us how Aunt Rose fares through her confinement and whether Lucy has a new sister or brother. Will Anthony come home? What careers will the twins have? Also, where is Anna? She's not in this story at all. We need to know what happens to her. I would have gladly read another book even if the history is not 100% correct. I'll try to let go of my historian side but it's not easy!

  6. 5 out of 5

    Susan in NC

    3.5 stars for this latest in a Regency-set series, which started out strong, with a thoroughly unlikable character killed during a family celebration - Sir Robert, as magistrate, must investigate, even though the victim was married to his nasty cousin, and his pompous father-in-law is a suspect. The investigation went on too long, though, and became repetitive, with Sir Robert and Lucy trudging back and forth through the snow, interviewing suspects, and in between, dealing with a few nasty relat 3.5 stars for this latest in a Regency-set series, which started out strong, with a thoroughly unlikable character killed during a family celebration - Sir Robert, as magistrate, must investigate, even though the victim was married to his nasty cousin, and his pompous father-in-law is a suspect. The investigation went on too long, though, and became repetitive, with Sir Robert and Lucy trudging back and forth through the snow, interviewing suspects, and in between, dealing with a few nasty relatives (suspects). By the end, Robert is fed up with all their guests, who came for their daughter’s christening, but freezing winter weather and snow, along with the murder investigation, have kept them at his estate. They all lie to him at some point, and hamper his investigation as he tries to piece together who murdered the unsavory swindler Basil, Lord Northam. His widow, Henrietta, is Robert’s cousin, and a thoroughly selfish and nasty woman. There is a financial swindle at the heart of the murder, and Lloyd serves up a very clever twist of an ending as she unmasks the killer - I really thought she was going to take the easy way out, and make it someone outside the immediate family circle, considering the layers of relationships and perceived loyalties. The killer is a surprise, and it takes too long to get there, but it makes sense and is well done.

  7. 4 out of 5

    Nancy Haddock

    I adore this series, and this book was excellent! I love the main characters, their family and friends, and the setting. The book is wonderfully written, moves along at a good pace, and I managed to keep everyone straight. Ditto for the other books in this series! I had to wait a good while to get this book from the library, and it was well worth the wait! You can read the books in any order, but as with most series, starting at the beginning makes each installment more fun!

  8. 5 out of 5

    Janet

    Murder casts a dark shadow over the christening of Lady Lucy and Major Sir Robert Kurland's daughter Elizabeth—even more so when Lucy's own father, the rector, falls under suspicion for the crime. Lucy and Robert’s joy in christening their new daughter, surrounded by extended family and loved ones who have gathered in the village of Kurland St. Mary, is only enhanced when Robert’s aunt Rose—now the second wife of Lucy’s father Ambrose—announces that she is with child. However, not everyone is ha Murder casts a dark shadow over the christening of Lady Lucy and Major Sir Robert Kurland's daughter Elizabeth—even more so when Lucy's own father, the rector, falls under suspicion for the crime. Lucy and Robert’s joy in christening their new daughter, surrounded by extended family and loved ones who have gathered in the village of Kurland St. Mary, is only enhanced when Robert’s aunt Rose—now the second wife of Lucy’s father Ambrose—announces that she is with child. However, not everyone is happy about the news, in particular Rose's adult daughter Henrietta and her husband, who fear for their inheritance. Following the christening, Rose’s disagreeable son-in-law Basil Northam threatens to turn afternoon tea in the rectory into an unsightly brawl. The next morning, he is found in the rector’s study, stabbed through the heart with an antique letter opener, clutching a note that appears to implicate the rector himself. As the local justice of the peace, Robert has an obligation to remain unbiased in his investigation of the ghastly crime, even though his prime suspect is a man of the cloth and his wife’s father. But Lucy is under no such obligation. As snow traps the members of the christening party in Kurland St. Mary, she vows to clear her father’s name and bring the cold-blooded culprit to justice. Someone had better start saying their prayers This is the eighth & final book in this brilliant series & I'm sad to see it end especially as I felt there were lots of loose ends, I would have loved an epilogue. However as always the book is well written & the mystery engrossing. I wasn’t sure who the murderer was until nearly the end. Strong characters & a fast paced plot plus plenty of red herrings & twists & turns held my interest all the way through My honest review is for a special copy I voluntarily read

  9. 5 out of 5

    Cathy Geha

    Death Comes to the Rectory by Catherine Lloyd Kurland St. Mary Mystery #8 Coming in on the last book of a series is probably not the wisest way to read a series but this book did manage to stand alone, introduce the characters easily and give enough background to follow the story without difficulty. What I liked: * The story felt of the time period * There were plenty of potential murderers * I didn’t mind that the person who died was killed because he was reprehensible * The relationship between Rob Death Comes to the Rectory by Catherine Lloyd Kurland St. Mary Mystery #8 Coming in on the last book of a series is probably not the wisest way to read a series but this book did manage to stand alone, introduce the characters easily and give enough background to follow the story without difficulty. What I liked: * The story felt of the time period * There were plenty of potential murderers * I didn’t mind that the person who died was killed because he was reprehensible * The relationship between Robert and Lucy seemed well established and healthy * That the rector and his new bride seemed to care about one another – and were expecting a baby though older * The twists and turns * The way the clues were eked out * That the murderer and motivation were eventually determined What I didn’t like: * Many of the characters: Northam, Henrietta, the Earl…and others * Not sure it is a dislike but I am curious enough to find out what the sentence would be for the person who admitted to murder to see if google might tell me. Did I enjoy this book? Yes Would I have enjoyed it more if I had read the entire series? Probably Would I read more books by this author? Yes Thank you to NetGalley and Kensington Books for the ARC – This is my honest review. 3-4 Stars

  10. 4 out of 5

    Eden

    2021 bk 22. Lucy and Robert have put off their infant daughter's christening long enough - to make sure she will be healthy for it. Summoning wanted family, their is dismay when one couple appears and makes themselves at home. The husband, a scam artist and wicked man, proceeds to blackmail most of the mail members of the part, having previously scammed them out of their funds. The christening goes off well, until it is discovered that murder has occurred. Another well done Kurland St. Mary's my 2021 bk 22. Lucy and Robert have put off their infant daughter's christening long enough - to make sure she will be healthy for it. Summoning wanted family, their is dismay when one couple appears and makes themselves at home. The husband, a scam artist and wicked man, proceeds to blackmail most of the mail members of the part, having previously scammed them out of their funds. The christening goes off well, until it is discovered that murder has occurred. Another well done Kurland St. Mary's mystery.

  11. 5 out of 5

    Anna Fox

    I love this series and am glad to see that my library has the previous books. I just need to find time to read them! The characters are interesting and the husband and wife have a good marriage without it being over the top perfect. The mystery kept me guessing. Thank you to the author, publisher and NetGalley for my eARC in exchange for an honest review.

  12. 5 out of 5

    Elizabeth

    Haiku: Nathan or Lucas? Elizabeth must choose! We choose to tune out...

  13. 5 out of 5

    Sarah

    Death Comes to the Rectory is my first Catherine Lloyd book. Even though I jumped in the series at Book 8, it stood perfectly fine on its own and I followed along well with no confusion. It was certainly a different type of story than what I typically read but I enjoyed the experience. An engaging storyline and well-developed characters drew me in from the start. ARC received via NetGalley.

  14. 5 out of 5

    Janelle

    4.5 * It is always hard to say goodbye to a much-loved series. Catherine Lloyd made it a little bit easier by finishing with an amazingly complex mystery that tested the loyalty and commitment to justice of her fantastic detective duo. Death Comes to the Rectory is the 8th and final book in a historical mystery series set during the Regency in England. The story opens with preparations for the christening of Lucy and Robert's daughter Elizabeth. Robert's Aunt Jane is married to Lucy's father, the 4.5 * It is always hard to say goodbye to a much-loved series. Catherine Lloyd made it a little bit easier by finishing with an amazingly complex mystery that tested the loyalty and commitment to justice of her fantastic detective duo. Death Comes to the Rectory is the 8th and final book in a historical mystery series set during the Regency in England. The story opens with preparations for the christening of Lucy and Robert's daughter Elizabeth. Robert's Aunt Jane is married to Lucy's father, the rector. Jane's daughter and horrible husband, Lord Northam, show up unexpectedly and are not welcomed by anybody. Poor weather however means that Robert and Lucy must extend their hospitality despite an already full house. Lord Northam is found dead in the rectory study on the day of the christening. Lucy's father appears to be guilty. This was a complex mystery with plenty of suspects, red herrings, lies, motives, and complicated family connections. I loved watching Lucy and Robert try to solve the case while trying to protect family members (some more worthy of protection than others). The conflicts between Lucy and Robert, Robert and his father-in-law, and all the other various family and close friends gave the story an added level of tension. A financial scheme plays a big part in the plot and I had a bit of a hard time with the money/numbers but it never overshadowed my enjoyment of the story as a whole. I really enjoyed this book and plan to re-read the series in the very near future. I received an advance review copy for free, and I am leaving this review voluntarily.

  15. 5 out of 5

    Homerun2

    3.5 stars Evidently this is the end of the well-done Kurland St. Mary series, featuring the mostly formerly irascible Sir Robert and his wife Lucy. The pair have been interesting to watch in various adventures as they joust and battle for equity. Their intelligence and mutual high regard and affection make this an enjoyable pastime. This time out, their friends and family are gathered for their new daughter's christening. But between Robert and Lucy, they have more than their share of truly odious 3.5 stars Evidently this is the end of the well-done Kurland St. Mary series, featuring the mostly formerly irascible Sir Robert and his wife Lucy. The pair have been interesting to watch in various adventures as they joust and battle for equity. Their intelligence and mutual high regard and affection make this an enjoyable pastime. This time out, their friends and family are gathered for their new daughter's christening. But between Robert and Lucy, they have more than their share of truly odious, self-centered, narcissistic and venal relatives. Various undercurrents are circulating: financial straits, family disgrace, parent-child disagreements, and disputes over a future will. It all comes to a head when the most awful of their relations (and that is saying something) is found murdered in Lucy's father's study. This man was heartily disliked by everyone and had further estranged himself by embroiling several of those present in a deceitful investment scam. The murder victim is married to Robert's cousin, Lucy's father is the prime suspect, and her aristocratic uncle and his son also are behaving suspiciously. As Robert investigates the death of the man that no one mourns, Lucy also is naturally upset at her father's predicament. And Robert soon discovers that all those involved have something to hide and will lie to protect it. I will be sorry to see this series end. Thanks to the publisher and to Net Galley for providing me with an ARC in exchange for my honest review.

  16. 5 out of 5

    Laura

    I received an ARC of this title from NetGalley in exchange for an honest review. Death comes to Kurland St. Mary for the final time in "Death Comes to the Rectory". As Robert and Lucy Kurland prepare for their infant daughter's christening, they receive two unexpected surprises, one welcome and the other decidedly not. Robert's Aunt Rose and Lucy's rector father are expecting a baby--a welcome surprise though most definitely unexpected given their ages. The other unexpected surprise? Rose's daught I received an ARC of this title from NetGalley in exchange for an honest review. Death comes to Kurland St. Mary for the final time in "Death Comes to the Rectory". As Robert and Lucy Kurland prepare for their infant daughter's christening, they receive two unexpected surprises, one welcome and the other decidedly not. Robert's Aunt Rose and Lucy's rector father are expecting a baby--a welcome surprise though most definitely unexpected given their ages. The other unexpected surprise? Rose's daughter from her first marriage and her terrible husband, Lord Northam--and they are furious to learn that Rose is having another child, one that will take money away from them. But no one expected that such a joyous occasion would be marred when Lord Northam is found murdered in the rector's study--and Lucy's father quickly becomes suspect number one. But plenty members of the party has means and motivation to want the philandering Lord Northam dead--especially when it comes to light that he was the instigator of a fraudulent shipping scheme that has made quite a lot of people considerably poorer. With all fingers pointing at the rector, will Robert and Lucy be able to find the real killer? In the last "Kurland St. Mary" mystery, Lloyd pulls out all the punches. Multiple suspects, missing money, scams, wayward sons, and Robert and Lucy divided between facts and morals as they face their toughest case yet. Readers will bid a fond farewell to the familiar characters and charming country village as they interview suspects, search for clues, and formulate their own suspicions as to who-dunnit that will keep them guessing until the very end!

  17. 4 out of 5

    Helen Howerton

    Many thanks to NetGalley and the publisher, Kensington Book for this Advanced Reader Copy and the opportunity to review Death Comes to the Rectory. All opinions are my own. Alas, this is the last book in the Kurland St. Mary series, so ‘tis sure all ends will be tidied and our two protagonists, Robert and Lucy Kurland, will find themselves at a satisfactory (happy) end for followers of the series. First, of course, they have one final mystery to solve. Everyone has gathered for the christening of Many thanks to NetGalley and the publisher, Kensington Book for this Advanced Reader Copy and the opportunity to review Death Comes to the Rectory. All opinions are my own. Alas, this is the last book in the Kurland St. Mary series, so ‘tis sure all ends will be tidied and our two protagonists, Robert and Lucy Kurland, will find themselves at a satisfactory (happy) end for followers of the series. First, of course, they have one final mystery to solve. Everyone has gathered for the christening of the Kurland’s baby daughter. It’s quickly established that not everyone likes each other. There’s the daughter and son-in-law of Lucy’s stepmother, for instance, who antagonizes everybody. And it doesn’t help that Lucy’s father the vicar and his wife announce that they are “expecting a blessed event.” Well, that means less money for the greedy pair, and they’re incensed. Then the husband, Lord Northam, turns up dead, and his widow immediately accuses her father in law of the dirty deed, to get her mother’s money completely. It’s up to Robert as the local magistrate to investigate. It’s rather a sticky situation, but since “police” are rather thin on the ground, it being only 1826, he’s the only one around that can do the job. And there are other matters happening in this book. Broken engagements, unhappy heirs, money troubles all around. We think we’ve got problems. Pity these poor English gentry as they wade through all their troubles. But such matters could mean ostracism from society; and the murdered man had involved others in some very dubious and illegal schemes. Certainly, enough to be killed over. Defrauding people does tend to make them angry. Another suspect is looked at, but it’s obvious that Robert’s uncle the earl thinks they will get away with murder, if need be. The author makes it clear that this society’s rules meant that the rich are indeed different. She has a firm grasp on her understanding of time and place in her writing. And then a man from London dies – one that our first dead man owed a lot of money to. Things are getting complicated, indeed. Everyone is doubting Robert, even his wife. Catherine Lloyd is certainly giving us a lot to work with here, emotion-wise, stringing us along. Finally, we have a drawing room scene, but that’s how you get someone to confess, and since we have a lot of characters, it’s the easiest way. We also find out just how despicable a figure our Lord Northam really was. Good riddance to bad rubbish. I’m sorry to see the last of Robert and Lucy, and their family and friends, but the series ends on a high note. Catherine Lloyd has always captured her Georgian world very well, especially in dialog and setting, and Death Comes to the Rectory is no exception.

  18. 4 out of 5

    Laurie

    Family and friends are gathering in Kurland St. Mary to observe the christening of Sir Robert Kurland and Lady Lucy's daughter Elizabeth. But the celebration is marred when Robert’s cousin Henrietta, and her reprobate husband, Lord Basil Northam arrive. They goal, to challenge Henrietta mother, Rose over changes she has made to her will. Rose has married Lucy’s father, the rector, and has just revealed that she is with child, potentially leaving Henrietta cut out of a fortune. So, when Northam i Family and friends are gathering in Kurland St. Mary to observe the christening of Sir Robert Kurland and Lady Lucy's daughter Elizabeth. But the celebration is marred when Robert’s cousin Henrietta, and her reprobate husband, Lord Basil Northam arrive. They goal, to challenge Henrietta mother, Rose over changes she has made to her will. Rose has married Lucy’s father, the rector, and has just revealed that she is with child, potentially leaving Henrietta cut out of a fortune. So, when Northam is found murdered in the rector’s study, Lucy’s father becomes the prime suspect. As the local magistrate, it is Robert’s obligation to investigate—no matter where the evidence leads. I began reading the Kurland St. Mary Mysteries beginning with the very first one Death Comes to the Village, and have enjoyed each and every one—including this—the last in the series. As usual, Lloyd has written a well plotted story filled with family secrets, all of which impact the mystery and threaten Robert and Lucy’s relationship. There are quite a number of suspects, as well as some very well-placed red herrings, for the reader to grapple with before the solution is revealed. To complicate matters it is snowing and the guests are beginning to become restless. An engaging read and a marvelous end to one of my favorite historical mystery series. I look forward to seeing what Lloyd has in store for us next. Source: Review copy - Kensington Books via NetGalley Pub Date: 26 Jan 2021

  19. 4 out of 5

    Ann

    This was a good period piece. The characters were well written but most are not very likeable. Murder casts a dark shadow over the christening of Lady Lucy and Major Sir Robert Kurland's daughter Elizabeth--even more so when Lucy's own father, the rector, falls under suspicion for the crime... Lucy and Robert's joy in christening their new daughter, surrounded by extended family and loved ones who have gathered in the village of Kurland St. Mary, is only enhanced when Robert's aunt Rose--now the s This was a good period piece. The characters were well written but most are not very likeable. Murder casts a dark shadow over the christening of Lady Lucy and Major Sir Robert Kurland's daughter Elizabeth--even more so when Lucy's own father, the rector, falls under suspicion for the crime... Lucy and Robert's joy in christening their new daughter, surrounded by extended family and loved ones who have gathered in the village of Kurland St. Mary, is only enhanced when Robert's aunt Rose--now the second wife of Lucy's father Ambrose--announces that she is with child. However, not everyone is happy about the news, in particular Rose's adult daughter Henrietta and her husband, who fear for their inheritance. Following the christening, Rose's disagreeable son-in-law Basil Northam threatens to turn afternoon tea in the rectory into an unsightly brawl. The next morning, he is found in the rector's study, stabbed through the heart with an antique letter opener, clutching a note that appears to implicate the rector himself. As the local justice of the peace, Robert has an obligation to remain unbiased in his investigation of the ghastly crime, even though his prime suspect is a man of the cloth and his wife's father. But Lucy is under no such obligation. As snow traps the members of the christening party in Kurland St. Mary, she vows to clear her father's name and bring the cold-blooded culprit to justice. Someone had better start saying their prayers..

  20. 5 out of 5

    Susan

    It's hard for a reader to say goodbye to a favorite series but here we are, time to say those words. Because of that and the fact that the ending didn't wrap up the threads as I felt it should have, this gets only 4 stars. Having said that, the mystery itself was excellent The victim was disliked by everyone. The main event was a happy occasion - the christening of Lady Lucy and Sir Robert's daughter Elizabeth. The setting of the Rectory and Kurland Hall becoming rather a locked room due to snow It's hard for a reader to say goodbye to a favorite series but here we are, time to say those words. Because of that and the fact that the ending didn't wrap up the threads as I felt it should have, this gets only 4 stars. Having said that, the mystery itself was excellent The victim was disliked by everyone. The main event was a happy occasion - the christening of Lady Lucy and Sir Robert's daughter Elizabeth. The setting of the Rectory and Kurland Hall becoming rather a locked room due to snow adds to the suspense. The list of possible motives and killer is long but it's a shock when the victim, Basil Northam, stabbed in the heart, in the rectory study with an antique letter opener owned by Lucy's father - well that just cannot be...or can it? Lucy can't believe her father, the rector, capable of murder and Robert, as the investigator, knows it may very well be possible. Not the way to mark such a happy event. I have enjoyed every book in in this series, spending time with Lady Lucy and Sir Robert. Each mystery engaged me and kept me guessing to the final reveal. That's the mark of a well crafted mystery series. My thanks to the publisher Kensington and to NetGalley for giving me an advance copy in exchange for my honest review.

  21. 5 out of 5

    Gardener0126

    This is another excellent entry in the Kurland-St. Mary series, featuring Lucy, the “taken for granted” spinster daughter of the local rector, and Sir Robert Kurland, who returned from military service with an injury to his leg, and a rather sour outlook on life. He and Lucy met in the book one of the series and eventually fell in love and married. Sadly, this book, in which their baby daughter is christened is the last book in this delightful series. The christening, which should have been an o This is another excellent entry in the Kurland-St. Mary series, featuring Lucy, the “taken for granted” spinster daughter of the local rector, and Sir Robert Kurland, who returned from military service with an injury to his leg, and a rather sour outlook on life. He and Lucy met in the book one of the series and eventually fell in love and married. Sadly, this book, in which their baby daughter is christened is the last book in this delightful series. The christening, which should have been an occasion of peace and joy is marred by family squabbles, unwelcome house guests, and ultimately a murder. Sir Robert and Lady Lucy are anxious to solve this one, because Lucy’s father is implicated. Never the less, there are a great many potential suspects, because the murder victim was disliked and quite a few people would have liked to see him dead. Clues and red herrings abound, and yet another death occurs, but the Kurlands are up to the task, despite some strain in their relationship. I very much enjoyed this series and I am sorry to see it come to an end. Highly recommended,, not only is it a good mystery, but it is also a picture of class and society in Regency England.

  22. 5 out of 5

    Amanda Lavelle

    Thank you to NetGalley and Kensington Books for kindly providing me with a digital copy of this book for review. This book is I learn, the last in a well established cozy mystery series set in the Regency period. I had not heard of this series before, and therefore obviously not read any of the other books in this series. To be honest I haven’t read too many cozy mysteries set in the Regency period if I’m honest- although I have found a few to try on doing some research. Nonetheless I found this Thank you to NetGalley and Kensington Books for kindly providing me with a digital copy of this book for review. This book is I learn, the last in a well established cozy mystery series set in the Regency period. I had not heard of this series before, and therefore obviously not read any of the other books in this series. To be honest I haven’t read too many cozy mysteries set in the Regency period if I’m honest- although I have found a few to try on doing some research. Nonetheless I found this setting quite refreshing and provided quite a change for me. I didn’t feel that I suffered coming in right at the end of the series- I think this book read well as a stand-alone, although I do feel I would like to go back to the beginning and track the development of our main character’s relationship. This book had lots of family drama and falling outs, the awkward moment when you start investigating your father in law for murder- ouch! I thoroughly enjoyed this book and found the snowy setting perfect for reading at this current time in January. Definitely recommend.

  23. 4 out of 5

    Kathleen Gray

    The christening of Robert and Lucy's daughter goes sideways when her step sister Henrietta snd her husband Basil show up. Lucy's father, the rector, has recently married Robert's aunt Rose, who finds she is pregnant, setting off concern by Henrietta and Basil about her inheritance. Then it starts to snow. When Basil is found murdered, the Rector is a prime suspect. Set in a delightful village (although we don't see much of it due to the snow) in the 1820s, this is a fun cozy mystery that will ke The christening of Robert and Lucy's daughter goes sideways when her step sister Henrietta snd her husband Basil show up. Lucy's father, the rector, has recently married Robert's aunt Rose, who finds she is pregnant, setting off concern by Henrietta and Basil about her inheritance. Then it starts to snow. When Basil is found murdered, the Rector is a prime suspect. Set in a delightful village (although we don't see much of it due to the snow) in the 1820s, this is a fun cozy mystery that will keep you guessing. Robert is the official investigator, but Lucy, well, she knows her father didn't do it. As is typical to the genre, there were several people who wanted Basil gone and it's interesting to watch how this plays out. I admit to being a fan of this series but think you will be fine with this as as standalone because Lloyd gives good backstory. The characters are well formed and if it plays a little loose with Regency mores etc,, it's still a cracking good read. Thanks to Netgalley for the ARC. zI'm looking forward to the next one.

  24. 5 out of 5

    Jenny

    Needed a decent editor Or better writing. Characters contradict themselves from page to page. This is the last book in the series, I guess she just wanted to get it over with. Audiobook narrator sounds almost like an Computer generated voice she pauses in the wrong places which gives weird emphasis to the wrong parts of the sentence. Alexa did a better job. ———————————————— My star ratings are genre specific. A 4 star cozy mystery isn't equal to a 4 star in general lit, or memoir. I'm saying that i Needed a decent editor Or better writing. Characters contradict themselves from page to page. This is the last book in the series, I guess she just wanted to get it over with. Audiobook narrator sounds almost like an Computer generated voice she pauses in the wrong places which gives weird emphasis to the wrong parts of the sentence. Alexa did a better job. ———————————————— My star ratings are genre specific. A 4 star cozy mystery isn't equal to a 4 star in general lit, or memoir. I'm saying that it is good for what it is. ⭐️ This book was so bad that I gave up and skipped to the end, or just flat out stopped. Life is too short to read crap books ⭐️⭐️This book was not very good, unless I've read something better by the same author I'll be avoiding him or her in future . ⭐️⭐️⭐️ The book was fine, an enjoyable read.. I may or may not read more from the author. ⭐️⭐️⭐️⭐️ I really liked the book. I'll be looking for other books by this author and definitely read the rest of the series & would recommend the book to people who like whatever genre it is. ⭐️⭐️⭐️⭐️⭐️ I love this book! It's one I would reread in the future, if it was a library book I might even purchase it so I have my own copy. And I'll be recommending it to everyone.

  25. 4 out of 5

    Gail

    I have been a huge fan of this series since the beginning and was disappointed to see that this will be the last book in the series. I will miss my adventures with Sir Robert and Lucy and their supporting cast of friends and family. Death Comes to the Rectory revolves around the stabbing murder of a scoundrel whom many have reason to kill, including Lucy's father and other assorted relatives. This investigation brings tension between Lucy and Sir Robert as his duties as the justice of the peace c I have been a huge fan of this series since the beginning and was disappointed to see that this will be the last book in the series. I will miss my adventures with Sir Robert and Lucy and their supporting cast of friends and family. Death Comes to the Rectory revolves around the stabbing murder of a scoundrel whom many have reason to kill, including Lucy's father and other assorted relatives. This investigation brings tension between Lucy and Sir Robert as his duties as the justice of the peace come up against her desire to protect her family. The investigation is nicely paced and deftly plotted, and, as details of the investigation emerge, the finger of suspicion is pointed to a number of likely suspects. Verdict: An enjoyable and absorbing read--Here's hoping this is not truly the end of Lucy and Sir Robert's story. Full Disclosure--NetGalley and the publisher provided me with a digital ARC of this book. This is my honest review.

  26. 5 out of 5

    Nikki

    Death Comes to the Rectory (Kurland St. Mary Mystery #8) by Catherine Lloyd Publisher: Kensington Books Genre: Historical Fiction | Mystery & Thrillers Release Date: January 26, 2021 Death Comes to the Rectory is the eighth and final book in the Kurland St. Mary Mystery series by Catherine Lloyd. This is the only book in the series that I have read and it works really well as a standalone book. I really enjoyed this story. I'm not typically a fan of historical fiction, but this one really worked wel Death Comes to the Rectory (Kurland St. Mary Mystery #8) by Catherine Lloyd Publisher: Kensington Books Genre: Historical Fiction | Mystery & Thrillers Release Date: January 26, 2021 Death Comes to the Rectory is the eighth and final book in the Kurland St. Mary Mystery series by Catherine Lloyd. This is the only book in the series that I have read and it works really well as a standalone book. I really enjoyed this story. I'm not typically a fan of historical fiction, but this one really worked well for me. I found the author's writing style to be very comfortable to read. My favorite part of the book was the mystery! I really enjoyed trying to figure out who the killer was! This was well done and kept me guessing until the very end! If you enjoy mysteries, especially period pieces, you should read this book! I'm so grateful to Catherine Lloyd, Kensington Books, and NetGalley for providing me with a free copy of this ARC ebook in exchange for my honest review.

  27. 5 out of 5

    Kim

    I recently finished Alyssa Maxwell’s latest “A Lady and Lady’s Maid Mystery” installment which was set in the early part of the twentieth century. Told with wit and a bit of hilarity it was a fun and quick romp. I had hoped Catherine Lloyd’s last installment in the Kurland St. Mary mysteries would be equally enjoyable. Catherine Lloyd has set her story approximately one hundred years earlier, 1826 to be precise, and whether it is the time or this author’s style I had some difficulty getting throu I recently finished Alyssa Maxwell’s latest “A Lady and Lady’s Maid Mystery” installment which was set in the early part of the twentieth century. Told with wit and a bit of hilarity it was a fun and quick romp. I had hoped Catherine Lloyd’s last installment in the Kurland St. Mary mysteries would be equally enjoyable. Catherine Lloyd has set her story approximately one hundred years earlier, 1826 to be precise, and whether it is the time or this author’s style I had some difficulty getting through “Death Comes to the Rectory.” The mystery is well crafted and interesting if just a little predictable; the characters were appropriately stuffy and stodgy and mainly dislikable; the detailed descriptions of just about everything were just a tad tedious. Thank you NetGalley and Kensington for a copy.

  28. 4 out of 5

    Lalla

    While I looked forward to reading this book and was excited when the library sent an email that it was my turn, I also was sad that this was the last book in this series. The plot is complicated by many familiar and not so familiar players and is exciting to the last few pages. I always enjoy the description of life among the landed gentry of this period. The children are secure in the nursery with nursemaids and parents visit them during the day. Robert and Lucy discuss hiring a tutor for their While I looked forward to reading this book and was excited when the library sent an email that it was my turn, I also was sad that this was the last book in this series. The plot is complicated by many familiar and not so familiar players and is exciting to the last few pages. I always enjoy the description of life among the landed gentry of this period. The children are secure in the nursery with nursemaids and parents visit them during the day. Robert and Lucy discuss hiring a tutor for their oldest child. These are the touches that bring Downton Abbey to mind often while reading this series. Readers will find the plot dealing with finances and scams parallel to current news events I was not aware that this was prevalent in this historical period. This book does not disappoint and I hope Lucy and Robert continue to thrive on their estate surrounded by their families.

  29. 4 out of 5

    Kathleen

    #DeathComestotheRectory #NetGalley Thanks to Kensington Books and the author. A fine job and I am really hoping that the series goes on, having read and reviewed all eight of them now! "In Catherine Lloyd's eighth Regency-set Kurland St. Mary Mystery, murder casts a dark shadow over the christening of Major Sir Robert Kurland and Lady Lucy's daughter Elizabeth--even more so when Lucy's own father, the rector, falls under suspicion for the crime..." Publisher's blog- The list of suspects ebbed a #DeathComestotheRectory #NetGalley Thanks to Kensington Books and the author. A fine job and I am really hoping that the series goes on, having read and reviewed all eight of them now! "In Catherine Lloyd's eighth Regency-set Kurland St. Mary Mystery, murder casts a dark shadow over the christening of Major Sir Robert Kurland and Lady Lucy's daughter Elizabeth--even more so when Lucy's own father, the rector, falls under suspicion for the crime..." Publisher's blog- The list of suspects ebbed and flowed about who killed Lord Northam, a man that many felt they would LIKE to have done that deed. In fact suspicion fell on several members of Lucy and Robert's combined families. It was a surprising turn of events and a fun ending.

  30. 4 out of 5

    Kathy

    Another amazing entry into a top-notch series! If you're into mysteries or regency romances or Jane Austen, I've been recommending this series for years now and the latest is the high quality story I've come to expect from Lloyd. I was especially interested that she decided to center her latest in Kurland St. Mary which let her focus on many of the characters we have come to know and love. Definitely worth reading, but for the maximum impact, start with Death Comes to the Village . Another amazing entry into a top-notch series! If you're into mysteries or regency romances or Jane Austen, I've been recommending this series for years now and the latest is the high quality story I've come to expect from Lloyd. I was especially interested that she decided to center her latest in Kurland St. Mary which let her focus on many of the characters we have come to know and love. Definitely worth reading, but for the maximum impact, start with Death Comes to the Village .

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