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Love in English

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Sixteen-year-old Ana has just moved to New Jersey from Argentina for her Junior year of high school. She’s a poet and a lover of language—except that now, she can barely understand what’s going on around her, let alone find the words to express how she feels in the language she’s expected to speak. All Ana wants to do is go home—until she meets Harrison, the very cute, very Sixteen-year-old Ana has just moved to New Jersey from Argentina for her Junior year of high school. She’s a poet and a lover of language—except that now, she can barely understand what’s going on around her, let alone find the words to express how she feels in the language she’s expected to speak. All Ana wants to do is go home—until she meets Harrison, the very cute, very American boy in her math class. And then there’s her new friend Neo, the Greek boy she’s partnered up with in ESL class, who she bonds with over the 80s teen movies they are assigned to watch for class (but later keep watching together for fun), and Altagracia, her artistic and Instagram-fabulous friend, who thankfully is fluent in Spanish and able to help her settle into American high school. But is it possible that she’s becoming too American—as her father accuses—and what does it mean when her feelings for Harrison and Neo start to change? Ana will spend her year learning that the rules of English may be confounding, but there are no rules when it comes to love. With playful and poetic breakouts exploring the idiosyncrasies of the English language, Love in English tells a story that is simultaneously charming and romantic, while articulating a deeper story about what it means to become “American.”


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Sixteen-year-old Ana has just moved to New Jersey from Argentina for her Junior year of high school. She’s a poet and a lover of language—except that now, she can barely understand what’s going on around her, let alone find the words to express how she feels in the language she’s expected to speak. All Ana wants to do is go home—until she meets Harrison, the very cute, very Sixteen-year-old Ana has just moved to New Jersey from Argentina for her Junior year of high school. She’s a poet and a lover of language—except that now, she can barely understand what’s going on around her, let alone find the words to express how she feels in the language she’s expected to speak. All Ana wants to do is go home—until she meets Harrison, the very cute, very American boy in her math class. And then there’s her new friend Neo, the Greek boy she’s partnered up with in ESL class, who she bonds with over the 80s teen movies they are assigned to watch for class (but later keep watching together for fun), and Altagracia, her artistic and Instagram-fabulous friend, who thankfully is fluent in Spanish and able to help her settle into American high school. But is it possible that she’s becoming too American—as her father accuses—and what does it mean when her feelings for Harrison and Neo start to change? Ana will spend her year learning that the rules of English may be confounding, but there are no rules when it comes to love. With playful and poetic breakouts exploring the idiosyncrasies of the English language, Love in English tells a story that is simultaneously charming and romantic, while articulating a deeper story about what it means to become “American.”

30 review for Love in English

  1. 5 out of 5

    Lia Carstairs

    Huh. I never thought English could be so complicated in the eyes of others. Maybe I shouldn't make fun of my mom for her English😂 who am i kidding? it's hilarious This book really did a good job in showing how much people struggle moving to a new country and being forced to learn a new language in order to try blending in. Ana is a 16 year old high schooler whose just moved from Argentina to New Jersey, U.S. which is the result of her father who she hasn't seen in 3 years. Considering she's been s Huh. I never thought English could be so complicated in the eyes of others. Maybe I shouldn't make fun of my mom for her English😂 who am i kidding? it's hilarious This book really did a good job in showing how much people struggle moving to a new country and being forced to learn a new language in order to try blending in. Ana is a 16 year old high schooler whose just moved from Argentina to New Jersey, U.S. which is the result of her father who she hasn't seen in 3 years. Considering she's been speaking Spanish her whole life and has only started learning English for a few years, she of course isn't used to it, so Ana is put into ESL. From there she's able to connect/relate more to the others because they also are in the same situation she's in and so she meets Neo, a boy from Greece. Of course they bond well together. But then she also meets Harrison, ~le americane boy~, and instantly has a crush on him...can you see where I'm going? aye, it's the horrid love triangle. But the good thing is that it didn't really play a huge part in the story, or maybe it didn't feel like that to me, since this was short anyways. It was mostly just Ana trying to understand whether she was in love or not and what really is love. I could tell that the author was putting in her own experiences into this book and I liked how she did it. I would say I can't imagine how humiliating it is to not understand what others are saying while they laugh at you, but ahahahaha it's happened a few times *war flashbacks* cant say i didn't deserve it tho lol In the end I didn't hate it, but I didn't love it either, hence the rating of 3 stars. I couldn't really care much for the characters but that's probably just me. I think for those who can really relate Ana, they'd love her and her growth throughout the novel. ----- Thank you Harper Collins Canada for sending me this ARC in exchange for an honest review!!

  2. 4 out of 5

    Claude's Bookzone

    3.5 Stars Well that was some lovely writing! I loved Ana's journey and thought she was a relatable character. In my opinion, the author did a very good job of portraying the experience of being in a country where the language predominantly spoken around you, is not your own. I lived in Japan for a year and it really is like you are moving in a 'bubble of silence'. My husband won't be impressed I am going to write this, but all these years later it still amuses me, so sorry mate, I'm telling it. Be 3.5 Stars Well that was some lovely writing! I loved Ana's journey and thought she was a relatable character. In my opinion, the author did a very good job of portraying the experience of being in a country where the language predominantly spoken around you, is not your own. I lived in Japan for a year and it really is like you are moving in a 'bubble of silence'. My husband won't be impressed I am going to write this, but all these years later it still amuses me, so sorry mate, I'm telling it. Before we went to live in Japan I dutifully learnt some useful phrases e.g. "Do you speak English?" and "Where is the ___?" among many others. My husband was less studious. He was trying to buy something or get directions one day and had a huge amount of trouble getting his message across. He came home and was telling me about the experience. He told me he had been asking if they spoke English. When he told me what he had been saying in Japanese, I cracked up and informed him he had been repeatedly asking 'Where is the English? Where is the English? W h e r e i s t h e E n g l i s h?' He said the lovely people he had approached were so patient and sincere in their attempts to help my floundering husband as he tried to make himself understood with careful pronunciation of a completely bizarre question. We experienced nothing but kindness and generosity, and our experience of living in Japan will remain one of the most wonderful experiences of my life. The point is, I could relate to Ana as she struggled to make sense of new and tricky language. Maria has some lovely ways of expressing feelings and I found myself literally saying, "how lovely", at various points throughout the novel. I really wish there hadn't been a love triangle but it wasn't hideously offensive. A nice heartwarming story about finding your place. I am aware that there might be some ownvoice issues but I do not know the particulars so it might pay to read some other reviews to get some clarity around this.

  3. 4 out of 5

    Emer (A Little Haze)

    When a book opens with a giant disclaimer as this does, one has to wonder if there’s been some sort of controversy in the lead up to its publication. I requested an ARC of this book based on the blurb alone; in fact I’d never heard of the author nor the book until I read the Harper360 YA newsletter that gets sent out to bloggers. And I loved the blurb so made my request... But before I discuss the book let’s get to that big old disclaimer. In it the author discusses how the main character of Love When a book opens with a giant disclaimer as this does, one has to wonder if there’s been some sort of controversy in the lead up to its publication. I requested an ARC of this book based on the blurb alone; in fact I’d never heard of the author nor the book until I read the Harper360 YA newsletter that gets sent out to bloggers. And I loved the blurb so made my request... But before I discuss the book let’s get to that big old disclaimer. In it the author discusses how the main character of Love in English shares a similar backstory to her life... but the main character of Love in English has a much simplified backstory. According to the author her parents moved from Spain to Argentina when they were both toddlers and thusly grew up in Argentina along with the extended families of both. Her parents moved to the USA during her mother’s pregnancy but the author happened to be born in Spain because her mother was visiting there for a number of weeks while pregnant. Soon after her birth she moved to the USA with her mum (with a visitor’s visa rather than full documentation) and aged 6 the author visited Argentina with her mum for a funeral but could not get back to the USA. Two years later at the age of 8 the author crossed the US-Mexican border as an undocumented immigrant with her mother and they rejoined her father. According to her she had no English at the time and it is this lack of understanding of the English language that informs this book. So while this book is seemingly informed by a genuine life experience of being undocumented and having to learn a whole new language in a foreign country, this author does mention that they have white privilege which is no doubt why there is some discussion (that I have subsequently seen in other early reviews) about this book and questions surrounding the nationality of the main character versus the nationality of the author, i.e. issues surrounding own voices narratives of Latinx experiences. The book itself focuses on the story of teenage Ana who moves from Argentina to the USA with her mother. Her father has been living and working in the USA for a number of years and is now able to send for them as they have the correct documentation. The plot follows Ana as she struggles to learn English and navigate the waters of high school with this great language block. One of the things I very much enjoyed in this book was the use of Spanish throughout the novel. As someone who doesn’t understand a word of Spanish it really helped me to empathise with Ana’s plight where she could only understand half sentences and follow things in a broken fashion. I very much enjoyed Ana’s attempts to get to know her new schoolmates. It was interesting to see how some of them (the Americans) had certain preconceptions about her because they filled in the gaps themselves of what they thought Ana was trying to say. And then to compare that with the other students who like Ana were also non-native English speakers that were trying to navigate high school for themselves. I would have liked to have had more interactions with Ana’s new friend Altagracia as I found it very difficult to get a true sense of why these two became friends. I personally felt that a little too much time was spent on the love triangle between Ana and the two boys, Harrison and Neo, and would love to have seem a greater emphasis on female friendship and the value of that to a teenage girl. One aspect I did quite like was the strained relationship between Ana and her father. It was very distressing showing how they didn’t seem to know each other after living so many years apart and to me really emphasised the greatest sadness of people who have to make the choice to leave their families behind just so they can create better opportunities for that same family in the future. Overall this was a very quick and enjoyable read but one that I wish could have delved a little deeper into some more of the emotions behind the characters. Three stars. *An e-copy was kindly provided to me by the publisher via Edelweiss+ for honest review* Publishing 4th February 2021, Balzer + Bray (Harper Collins) For more reviews and book related chat check out my blog Follow me on Twitter Friend me on Goodreads

  4. 4 out of 5

    Mizu

    To claim to be Argentinian-American when your bio actually says "She was born in Spain, lived in Argentina for two years, and crossed the Mexican border into the U.S. at the age of eight", you gotta have a lot of nerve. This book is not ownvoices, but if you want to support one, you can add Once Upon a Quinceañera by Monica Gomez-Hira to your list. To claim to be Argentinian-American when your bio actually says "She was born in Spain, lived in Argentina for two years, and crossed the Mexican border into the U.S. at the age of eight", you gotta have a lot of nerve. This book is not ownvoices, but if you want to support one, you can add Once Upon a Quinceañera by Monica Gomez-Hira to your list.

  5. 5 out of 5

    Susan's Reviews

    Love in English is about the words we use and misuse - understand and misunderstand; and the words we use to shield ourselves from the truth. When Ana's father won the immigration lottery and they moved to New Jersey, Ana had to leave her old way of life and all of her friends and extended family behind. In Argentina, she was a model student and had a full and happy life. Ana had watched American movies in Argentina, but the reality of America left her bewildered, lonely and homesick. Ana is a po Love in English is about the words we use and misuse - understand and misunderstand; and the words we use to shield ourselves from the truth. When Ana's father won the immigration lottery and they moved to New Jersey, Ana had to leave her old way of life and all of her friends and extended family behind. In Argentina, she was a model student and had a full and happy life. Ana had watched American movies in Argentina, but the reality of America left her bewildered, lonely and homesick. Ana is a poet. Words are important to her, but in America, she is an outsider, no longer able to communicate. The author vividly conveys the frustration and isolation that new immigrants feel because of the language barrier. All those hashtags in place of the words Ana could not understand were very effective. Ana's father put a lot of pressure on Ana to assimilate and she is irritated by her father's insistence on "English only" at the dinner table. The result? Conversation all but ceases. She feels guilty for thinking: We don't have to do it this way. We don't have to make it so hard. We don't have to erase everything about us. At least not all at once. I thought deeply about Ana's plight as I drove to the bank or the grocery store, realizing how much I took for granted. I thought back to how difficult it was to learn to physically SPEAK French, although I had studied it all of my life, and I already knew how to speak another Latin-based language (Portuguese) somewhat fluently. Memorizing reams of words and sentences are not enough. You literally have to spend hours and hours, putting your hesitant, rotten pronunciation out there for the world to ridicule, in order to fully master and fluently speak a new language. Poor Ana and the rest of her classmates had to attend regular classes at the same time that they were trying to learn the English language. I agree with their off-the-wall ESL teacher, Mr. T., that these students exhibited great courage and stamina. I watched with interest the relationship between Ana, Harrison and Neo. What in those relationships was stardust, movies, and teen drama, versus real life? The Author's Note beautifully sums up this very well-written, thought provoking novel: "This is a story of wanting to find yourself, of feeling excluded, or worrying whether you're enough. It is also about how the people we meet and love and need on the journey mean everything. There is no language and every language for that. ...... We find many ways to say the things we feel. But what's important is not what separates us, or the particulars of how you say a thing or how I do. What's important is that in our similarly beating hearts, love sounds like love without any words." I really enjoyed this novel, and took my time reading it, savoring each well-chosen word. This is not a light, frothy YA novel - far from it! I highly, highly, highly recommend this novel. As the Bard said: All's well that ends well.....!"

  6. 4 out of 5

    rayne ♥ [ IG: rayne.reads ]

    I can really relate to the topic at hand so I can't wait for this one! instagram | blog | goodreads I can really relate to the topic at hand so I can't wait for this one! instagram | blog | goodreads

  7. 5 out of 5

    Alex

    This was wonderful! Love In English follows Ana after moving to the US and realizing that her English classes back home really didn't prepare her for a world where everyone else speaks it natively. I loved the way language was used in storytelling and really loved watching the way Ana's understanding growing overtime was physically portrayed in the book. I speak about the same amount of Spanish as Ana probably spoke English at the beginning of this so I also really liked how Andreu uses a fully This was wonderful! Love In English follows Ana after moving to the US and realizing that her English classes back home really didn't prepare her for a world where everyone else speaks it natively. I loved the way language was used in storytelling and really loved watching the way Ana's understanding growing overtime was physically portrayed in the book. I speak about the same amount of Spanish as Ana probably spoke English at the beginning of this so I also really liked how Andreu uses a fully Spanish opener to disorient non-Spanish readers in the same way Ana is. A highlight for me was definitely the looks into Ana's poem (mostly relying on the messiness of human grammar for metaphor which was absolutely delightful to read). I did find the ending of this a bit rushed. A lot comes to a head very quickly after a fairly slow building plot. Other than that, I loved this.

  8. 4 out of 5

    AdiosAdri

    I'm very excited for this! A book that lets immigrant kids fall in love the way that other character gets to feels like what I have always wanted for myself and to read to my children. My bilingual brain ADORES that there will be excerpts in Spanish. I feel like this book mirrrors so much about the author's life that i'll get to know a sliver of her life with every chapter. Cannot wait. I'm very excited for this! A book that lets immigrant kids fall in love the way that other character gets to feels like what I have always wanted for myself and to read to my children. My bilingual brain ADORES that there will be excerpts in Spanish. I feel like this book mirrrors so much about the author's life that i'll get to know a sliver of her life with every chapter. Cannot wait.

  9. 5 out of 5

    Shoaib

    I'm trying to read more stories about language and belonging, those are near and dear to me! Very excited for the book, I'll be back after the release. I'm trying to read more stories about language and belonging, those are near and dear to me! Very excited for the book, I'll be back after the release.

  10. 4 out of 5

    Christi Flaker

    16 year old Ana just immigrated to New Jersey from Argentina. She has been studying English back home to prepare for the move, but is feeling overwhelmed and underprepared for being fully immersed in the language and new surroundings. We are taken through her days at home and at school as she adjusts to her new home and a new language. In addition she must also re-adjust to living with her father who has been in the US for a few years, leaving her life as a girl and re-entering as she becomes a 16 year old Ana just immigrated to New Jersey from Argentina. She has been studying English back home to prepare for the move, but is feeling overwhelmed and underprepared for being fully immersed in the language and new surroundings. We are taken through her days at home and at school as she adjusts to her new home and a new language. In addition she must also re-adjust to living with her father who has been in the US for a few years, leaving her life as a girl and re-entering as she becomes a woman. She also must adjust to a new version of her mother in this new place. We feel her struggle in classes at school as the teachers start off speaking mostly like Charlie Brown's teacher (wha-wha-wha) to her ears. She starts her first day of school in math class which is a strong subject for her so she is confident. However, trouble arises when she misunderstands what the teacher is asking of her and ends up being laughed at by her peers. Her next class is ESL for which she is excited as it means others who will also speak her language, or so she thinks. When she gets there she finds several different languages represented and no one else, even the teacher, speaks Spanish. Through it all she starts to form friendships and crushes as she begins to find common ground with those around her. She finds herself crushing on the All-American nice boy in math class, Harrison. She is befriended by Altagracia who is fluent in Spanish and has roots in the DR. Through her we see one common struggle for many students with "different" backgrounds as Altagracia has to go by Gracie to those at school as her name is "too hard for them to pronounce". She also makes a friend in the kind Greek speaking boy, Neo, from Cyprus in ESL. Together Ana and Neo navigate the waters of learning a new and complex language while learning how to belong to more than one place. As a high school teacher I appreciated this book for putting into words the experience that my ELL students may go through. While every student and story is different this book really made you empathize with some of the situations the students may face. This book helped me to reflect on my own experiences with students and think about what I have done well and where I can improve. Thank you to Libro.fm for an ALC of this book in exchange for an honest review. This books narration is wonderfully done by Frankie Corzo and I definitely recommend the audio version of this book for those who enjoy audiobooks.

  11. 4 out of 5

    The Candid Cover (Olivia & Lori)

    Full Review on The Candid Cover 4.5 Stars Love in English by Maria E. Andreu is a book all about finding your voice when you might not have the words to express yourself. This is such a touching story, tinged with humour, and the main character is easy to connect with. The style of the book, allowing the reader to share Ana’s confusion, is also one of its strengths. Those looking for a sweet and thought-provoking contemporary will love this one. This book follows Ana, a girl who has just moved to t Full Review on The Candid Cover 4.5 Stars Love in English by Maria E. Andreu is a book all about finding your voice when you might not have the words to express yourself. This is such a touching story, tinged with humour, and the main character is easy to connect with. The style of the book, allowing the reader to share Ana’s confusion, is also one of its strengths. Those looking for a sweet and thought-provoking contemporary will love this one. This book follows Ana, a girl who has just moved to the United States from Argentina and doesn’t speak much English. The reader tags along as she adjusts to life in a new high school and tries to find ways to express herself while dealing with a language barrier. I loved the themes of belonging and finding your voice, and there are some interesting discussions about identity as Ana struggles to figure out who she is and wonders if she is becoming too “American,” as her father says. The only aspect I didn’t enjoy was the love triangle, but this was something I was willing to overlooking because it has been a long time since a book has genuinely made me smile. ❀ LIKEABLE MAIN CHARACTER Ana is a likeable main character, and I loved her voice. She is a poet, and I enjoyed how she uses poetry to express herself in ways she might not be able to verbally. Ana is also a relatable character, and it is easy to connect with her as she navigates first love and finding her identity. The side characters are enjoyable, as well. Ana’s ESL teacher may be inexperienced, but his commitment to teaching his students English in an engaging way and making them feel comfortable is heartwarming. Neo is another wholesome character, and the movie watching parties he and Ana share were my favourite scenes. ❀ THE BOOK’S STYLE IS A BIG STRENGTH The book’s style is one of its biggest strengths. The use of hashtags that block out words and phrases Ana doesn’t understand is particularly effective, and it provides a small glimpse into what it’s like not being able to understand everyone around you. Sharing Ana’s frustration and confusion makes it even easier to identify with her. I also loved the short poems between chapters where Ana plays with language. She draws attention to the idiosyncrasies of the English language, and this was a detail that I appreciated. ❀ AN UPLIFTING NOVEL Love in English by Maria E. Andreu is an uplifting novel about finding your voice. The main character is relatable, and the side characters enhance the story. I especially enjoyed the way the author invites us to share Ana’s confusion at times through the book’s style. I would definitely recommend this one, especially to those looking for a cute and heartfelt contemporary.

  12. 5 out of 5

    Nicole Welsh

    I rarely write a review, but this was JUST SO CUTE. Any of my students on here — you’ll love this one! Can’t wait to talk about this with you! ❤️❤️

  13. 5 out of 5

    Pablo

    Disclaimer: This is my sister's book, so I'm biased, but being biased doesn't make me wrong. "Love in English" is an inspiring story. There are so many immigrant stories rife with tragedy and heartache. While those stories are true and necessary, it's also important to tell the immigrant stories full of joy and hope. That's what "Love in English" does. "Love in English" is a love story, a love letter to the English language, and a story about fitting in. It explores the quirks of the English lan Disclaimer: This is my sister's book, so I'm biased, but being biased doesn't make me wrong. "Love in English" is an inspiring story. There are so many immigrant stories rife with tragedy and heartache. While those stories are true and necessary, it's also important to tell the immigrant stories full of joy and hope. That's what "Love in English" does. "Love in English" is a love story, a love letter to the English language, and a story about fitting in. It explores the quirks of the English language with humor and humanity, and reflects on the constantly shifting immigrant experience with reverence and wistfulness. "Love in English" shows that there is always something lost when people move to a new country, but that there is also something new to be gained. It is sometimes sad and hard, but it is beautiful.

  14. 4 out of 5

    Paige (pagebypaigebooks)

    *Thank you to HCC Frenzy for sending me a copy in exchange for an honest review!* Before reading this book I had never read from the perspective of someone who was learning a new language in another country. We get to watch Ana as she learns English and the struggles she faces at school while she is learning. One thing that was very interesting was that whenever a person spoke a word Ana didn't know, it was replaced with '#####'. This really sent home the feeling of being confused and not underst *Thank you to HCC Frenzy for sending me a copy in exchange for an honest review!* Before reading this book I had never read from the perspective of someone who was learning a new language in another country. We get to watch Ana as she learns English and the struggles she faces at school while she is learning. One thing that was very interesting was that whenever a person spoke a word Ana didn't know, it was replaced with '#####'. This really sent home the feeling of being confused and not understanding what is going on. I enjoyed seeing Ana progress throughout the book and her development as a character. However I wish that we got to see more of her emotions and feelings, which I think would have created a deeper connection to her. The romance was sweet and propelled you through the story. Seeing English from a non-fluent person's perspective was incredibly eye opening. There is so many aspects of it that are truly confusing for someone who didn't grow up speaking it, such as the difference between allowed and aloud even though they are pronounced the same. The ending was sweet and wrapped up nicely.

  15. 5 out of 5

    Jessica

    This was lovely. 10/10 recommend listening to the audiobook.

  16. 4 out of 5

    ♡AbbyBooks♡

    3 stars. The Pros: I like how we can see which words she knew in English and which words she didnt. The ESL class. The teacher of ESL way of teaching. Her family dynamic. Showing the realistic of been white Latino/Hispanic vs tan or dark Latino/Hispanic. The Cons. The Netflix mentions. The love triangle. Her friendship with Gracie. It was a nice story but it could have been better.

  17. 4 out of 5

    Yce Paulino

    This book enters to my list of favorite reads of the year. I loved the characters and the story line. I could see myself ion Ana’s position because Im a Spanish speaker and i lived the same situations as her, with almost no understanding to understand English. The way the book is written is really smooth and you don’t want to easily to read. I felt the same frustration as Ana when people were speaking to her, you need to speak Spanish to understand this book, but if you speak more than one langua This book enters to my list of favorite reads of the year. I loved the characters and the story line. I could see myself ion Ana’s position because Im a Spanish speaker and i lived the same situations as her, with almost no understanding to understand English. The way the book is written is really smooth and you don’t want to easily to read. I felt the same frustration as Ana when people were speaking to her, you need to speak Spanish to understand this book, but if you speak more than one language this is the representation you were looking for. Love in English is a funny and retable story, perfect to read if you want to learn more about other cultures —Argentina— and kinda of to understand how people that come to America without speaking the language struggle with. Also the love story is really interesting I love how the characters develop their relationship and I’m happy with who she ended up with. I’ll be buying this book when it comes out and I’ll tell everyone about it. ⭐️⭐️⭐️⭐️⭐️

  18. 5 out of 5

    bia

    It's so unfair that a white spaniard gets a gigantic deal to write about latinx characters but actual latinx authors get shafted. will the spanish ever stop colonizing us It's so unfair that a white spaniard gets a gigantic deal to write about latinx characters but actual latinx authors get shafted. will the spanish ever stop colonizing us

  19. 4 out of 5

    Esta Montano

    Love In English is the story of Ana, a high school student who has just arrived to NJ from Argentina, where she and her mother join her father after not having seen him for 4 years. The novel features Ana's difficulties in navigating a US school, and more than anything else, her journey to learn English. As a former ESL teacher, I found Ana's experiences to be authentic, which not only include the many examples provided as to the idiosyncrasies of English, but the disorientation felt by so many y Love In English is the story of Ana, a high school student who has just arrived to NJ from Argentina, where she and her mother join her father after not having seen him for 4 years. The novel features Ana's difficulties in navigating a US school, and more than anything else, her journey to learn English. As a former ESL teacher, I found Ana's experiences to be authentic, which not only include the many examples provided as to the idiosyncrasies of English, but the disorientation felt by so many young immigrants as they struggle to understand cultural nuances in their new home. As the book is YA, it prominently features Ana's love interests, complete with parental disapproval based on "old ways." We watch Ana sneak out and lie to her parents as she explores who she now is and must be. Ana is a talented poet and a sincere young woman who struggles but appears to succeed in integrating herself into teenage life in the US. Ana's father insists that the family speak to each other only in English, under the incorrect notion that it will help them all improve their skills in this new language; although this phenomenon does occur, and is sometimes even (and unfortunately) suggested or encouraged by teachers, this is a practice that should be discouraged for a number of reasons not germane to this review. Ana's ESL teacher is inexperienced, but he he is creative, caring, and affirming, and provides his students many opportunities to learn English. I enjoyed how he had his students watch old movies such as "The Breakfast Club" so that they could better understand cultural referents. I listened to this book and appreciated the narrator's interpretation. I recommend this book highly to high school students, both students who are learning English so that they might see themselves reflected on the pages, and mainstream students, who would benefit by learning more about the challenges that immigrant youth face. It is also recommended to high school teachers who would like to learn more about their emergent bilingual students.

  20. 5 out of 5

    Emily Hirst

    Full review at https://bookswithraven.wordpress.com/... This book is loosely based on the authors experiences of moving to an English speaking country. Anas journey show many struggles and it is clear to see how many people struggle when moving countries. I loved how the author blocked out some of the sentences because Ana doesn't know or understand the words. It made me feel like I was living this journey with Ana. This makes like difficult for someone line Ana, because it leaves them guessing w Full review at https://bookswithraven.wordpress.com/... This book is loosely based on the authors experiences of moving to an English speaking country. Anas journey show many struggles and it is clear to see how many people struggle when moving countries. I loved how the author blocked out some of the sentences because Ana doesn't know or understand the words. It made me feel like I was living this journey with Ana. This makes like difficult for someone line Ana, because it leaves them guessing what the other person said and leaves them confused. It was also lovely to see the inclusion of Spanish in this book. It made me feel like how Ana feels when she doesn't know what someone is saying. It was nice to read about the relationships Ana made with both Harrison and Neo. It was also interesting to see how she built relationships with her other classmates. I understand it must have been hard for Ana being a non native language speaker but also coming into high school when other people have already made friends. It would have been nice to read more about her relationship with Altagracia, they seemed to be good friends and she seemed to get along with Anas family. The strained relationship between Ana and her father was heartbreaking to read. Being apart for so long meant they did not really know each other any more. Many families must go through the same difficulties as parents would leave the family home to seek better opportunities for their family. I received this book from Harper360 after requesting a copy from their newsletter. I am leaving this review voluntarily. I loved reading this book and it was a fast but meaningful read.

  21. 5 out of 5

    Jennifer MacMullin

    Thank you to HCC Frenzy for sending me an ARC Love in English follows Ana, a 16 year old girl who has just moved from Argentina to New Jersey. This is a story about learning a new language, immigration, love, and friendship. As Ana navigates the waters of high school, friendship, and love in a different country, she really struggles to find the words to express herself in English. Then she meets a cute American boy named Harrison in her math class, and discovers the universal language of racing he Thank you to HCC Frenzy for sending me an ARC Love in English follows Ana, a 16 year old girl who has just moved from Argentina to New Jersey. This is a story about learning a new language, immigration, love, and friendship. As Ana navigates the waters of high school, friendship, and love in a different country, she really struggles to find the words to express herself in English. Then she meets a cute American boy named Harrison in her math class, and discovers the universal language of racing hearts. But there’s also Neo, a Greek boy from her ESL class, who she’s agrees to watch American movies with in an attempt to help them with their English. When it seems like both boys are interested in her, Ana is left wondering how figuring out what her heart wants can be harder than learning English grammar. I really enjoyed this one! It was a quick and easy read, but it was also really compelling. I loved how the author omitted certain words in the things that people said to Ana, so that we could really get a sense of what it feels like when you can only partially understand what everyone is saying. I’m not really a fan of love triangles, but I can deal with it because I liked the story so much! If I had to pick something that I wanted more of, it would’ve been Altagracia and her friendship with Ana. I would’ve loved a bit stronger focus on strong female friendship. This releases on February 2, 2021, so add it to your tbrs!

  22. 5 out of 5

    Samantha (WLABB)

    After being separated from her father for several years, Ana returns to the United States. Faced with a new home, a new school, and new friendships, Ana must navigate it all, while sometimes not being able to find the words to express herself. But, will she have to give up pieces of herself in order to fit into this new life? This book was so flipping sweet! I swear, this was me at the end of it: Though her worries were similar to those of many teens - grades, parents, crushes, Ana also had a lang After being separated from her father for several years, Ana returns to the United States. Faced with a new home, a new school, and new friendships, Ana must navigate it all, while sometimes not being able to find the words to express herself. But, will she have to give up pieces of herself in order to fit into this new life? This book was so flipping sweet! I swear, this was me at the end of it: Though her worries were similar to those of many teens - grades, parents, crushes, Ana also had a language barrier to deal with. I really appreciated the way Andreu told this story of Ana's love/hate relationship with words. She did a great job capturing the frustration of not always understanding what people were saying, as well as not always having the words to be able to express your thoughts properly. Ana's musings about the mystifying nature of the English language amused me too. Homophones, letters with multiple sounds, and idioms vex me, and I'm a native speaker. I could only imagine it being even more baffling for a non-native speaker. The poetry exploring these linguistic oddities were highlights for me, and I loved seeing Ana's poetry evolve as her command of the language improved as well. The poems were also where Ana really expressed herself, and it was beautiful seeing her find her voice. I enjoyed watching Ana crush on boys and make new friends, but what I saw as the strength of this novel, was allowing us to gain a bit of perspective into the challenges new comers to our country face. There were times Andreu replaced whole words with symbols in dialogs, and it was such an effective way to help one understand what it was like for Ana. These gaps, where words should be, and the expectation that you could fully understand without all the words made me share their struggle. Overall, I found this to be a very delightful and touching story of fitting in and finding your voice. It was filled with humor and warmth, and the ending had me shedding a multitude of happy tears. A very feel-good story. *ARC provided in exchange for an honest review. BLOG | INSTAGRAM |TWITTER | BLOGLOVIN | FRIEND ME ON GOODREADS

  23. 5 out of 5

    Kate

    Full disclosure - I read this adorable book in one day. Maria E. Andreu does a wonderful job of capturing the feeling of "otherness" felt by new immigrants and the immense barrier language creates. Our sweet main character Ana exhibits immeasurable courage and perseverance as she struggles to acclimatize to a foreign country all while only understanding about 50% of what is said to her.  With the help of her ESL teacher, some good friends and the beautiful poetry she writes, she soon finds her w Full disclosure - I read this adorable book in one day. Maria E. Andreu does a wonderful job of capturing the feeling of "otherness" felt by new immigrants and the immense barrier language creates. Our sweet main character Ana exhibits immeasurable courage and perseverance as she struggles to acclimatize to a foreign country all while only understanding about 50% of what is said to her.  With the help of her ESL teacher, some good friends and the beautiful poetry she writes, she soon finds her way. ⠀ ⠀ The author liberally sprinkles Spanish throughout the book which as a predominantly English speaker/reader created moments for me of very real empathy for Ana. She also uses "xxxxx" to blank out parts of conversations Ana has with her peers, family and others in her community to visually represent how much information is lost in translation. I thought this was a really creative, effective visual to drive home again how big of a roadblock language can be. There is a sweet love story intertwined throughout however it played more like one of many aspects of Ana's life rather than the sole purpose of the story which was refreshing. I adored the ending and the whole book left me with lovely warm fuzzies. ⠀ ⠀ I do wish the story had gone a little more in-depth into Ana's family history. Why they wanted to immigrate. What was Ana's mother's experience as she would have been having similar struggles alongside her daughter? A little more richness around Ana's home life and culture would have added much more depth and been even more rewarding.⠀ ⠀ Side note: Can we please have a spin off book about Ana's ESL teacher? I'd take an adult Rom Com. This guy was the sweetest, most dedicated teacher and I maybe had a little crush on him (don't tell my husband).⠀ ⭐⭐⭐/5⠀

  24. 5 out of 5

    Karlie Schaefer

    "I love these unexpected gifts, these moments you just can't plan for, a shiny penny in your path." Love In English is a story about learning a new language and learning to fit into a new place. Author Maria E. Andreu bases a lot of the story on her own life, moving from Argentina to the United States when she was still a child. The main character, Ana, struggles to understand the culture and what everyone is saying, and through omission, the reader also experiences a bit of the confusion Ana is "I love these unexpected gifts, these moments you just can't plan for, a shiny penny in your path." Love In English is a story about learning a new language and learning to fit into a new place. Author Maria E. Andreu bases a lot of the story on her own life, moving from Argentina to the United States when she was still a child. The main character, Ana, struggles to understand the culture and what everyone is saying, and through omission, the reader also experiences a bit of the confusion Ana is feeling. Part coming of age story, part immigration story, Love in English enthralls the reader with it's poetry, heart, and moments of humor. I'm not someone who reads romance often, but I really enjoyed this one. Disclaimer: The quoted text is from an advanced reader copy I received from Epic Reads in exchange for my honest review.

  25. 5 out of 5

    Kristin

    I appreciated that there was so much Spanish in this book that made it feel more authentic. I listened to it via an Educator ALC through libro.fm which was good since I don't speak Spanish. For me, having a narrator use correct pronunciations and accents made the story more realistic. I also really appreciated the ESL focus of the story. When Anna couldn't understand what someone was saying to her, the text read wah wah wah, sounding similar to the adults in Charlie Brown. As an educator, this r I appreciated that there was so much Spanish in this book that made it feel more authentic. I listened to it via an Educator ALC through libro.fm which was good since I don't speak Spanish. For me, having a narrator use correct pronunciations and accents made the story more realistic. I also really appreciated the ESL focus of the story. When Anna couldn't understand what someone was saying to her, the text read wah wah wah, sounding similar to the adults in Charlie Brown. As an educator, this really made me think what it must have been like for some of our middle school students who joined our school having spoke little to no English. All of the relationships in the story could have been developed more in my opinion but I still thought it was a great story on the power of language, self discovery, and acceptance.

  26. 5 out of 5

    Andrew

    Everyone has been telling sixteen-year old Ana how lucky she is that she gets to move from Argentina to the United States, but picking up everything and relocating to a new country is a lot harder than it looks-- especially if you aren't fluent in the most common language of your new home. Thankfully, she quickly finds herself among friends, and in between two love interests-- Harrison, the adorable and captivating boy in math class that looks like a Netflix movie star, and Neo, a sweet and kind Everyone has been telling sixteen-year old Ana how lucky she is that she gets to move from Argentina to the United States, but picking up everything and relocating to a new country is a lot harder than it looks-- especially if you aren't fluent in the most common language of your new home. Thankfully, she quickly finds herself among friends, and in between two love interests-- Harrison, the adorable and captivating boy in math class that looks like a Netflix movie star, and Neo, a sweet and kind boy in her ESL class that came from Greece. Along the way, Ana learns a lot about what love can mean and the beauty of words in languages all across the board.

  27. 4 out of 5

    Beth Wang

    Astute, clever & tender description of the common, yet harrowing, experience of moving to a new culture surrounded in a new language. Ana has moved to the US from Argentina and the story unfolds as she navigates high school, ESL class, family changes, friendship all while uncovering the nuances of English, and discovering the power of language itself. Ana is a poet and the the writing is infused with a beautiful lyricism, at times giving space directly for Ana’s poems. I’ve lived overseas, exper Astute, clever & tender description of the common, yet harrowing, experience of moving to a new culture surrounded in a new language. Ana has moved to the US from Argentina and the story unfolds as she navigates high school, ESL class, family changes, friendship all while uncovering the nuances of English, and discovering the power of language itself. Ana is a poet and the the writing is infused with a beautiful lyricism, at times giving space directly for Ana’s poems. I’ve lived overseas, experiencing the noisy silence of not being able to communicate with anybody, and I’ve taught ESL - Andreu has nailed the experience of being the “other” with sweetness and clarity.

  28. 5 out of 5

    Maryann

    Heart-warming romance that effectively immerses the reader in the world of an ESL teen. Review will be published in an upcoming SLC

  29. 4 out of 5

    Storm Remmenga

    2.5 stars. Did nothing new or remarkable. Cute little story.

  30. 4 out of 5

    allison a

    this was such a sweet story! i loved the romance itself. the love triangle kind of irked me, but it was fine. it had a very sweet ending! a good read!

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