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The New York Times-bestselling author of Find Me and Call Me by Your Name returns to the essay form with his collection of thoughts on time, the creative mind, and great lives and works Irrealis moods are a category of verbal moods that indicate that certain events have not happened, may never happen, or should or must or are indeed desired to happen, but for which there i The New York Times-bestselling author of Find Me and Call Me by Your Name returns to the essay form with his collection of thoughts on time, the creative mind, and great lives and works Irrealis moods are a category of verbal moods that indicate that certain events have not happened, may never happen, or should or must or are indeed desired to happen, but for which there is no indication that they will ever happen. Irrealis moods are also known as counterfactual moods and include the conditional, the subjunctive, the optative, and the imperative--all best expressed in this book as the might-be and the might-have-been. One of the great prose stylists of his generation, Andr� Aciman returns to the essay form in Homo Irrealis to explore what time means to artists who cannot grasp life in the present. Irrealis moods are not about the present or the past or the future; they are about what might have been but never was but could in theory still happen. From meditations on subway poetry and the temporal resonances of an empty Italian street to considerations of the lives and work of Sigmund Freud, C. P. Cavafy, W. G. Sebald, John Sloan, �ric Rohmer, Marcel Proust, and Fernando Pessoa and portraits of cities such as Alexandria and St. Petersburg, Homo Irrealis is a deep reflection on the imagination's power to forge a zone outside of time's intractable hold.


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The New York Times-bestselling author of Find Me and Call Me by Your Name returns to the essay form with his collection of thoughts on time, the creative mind, and great lives and works Irrealis moods are a category of verbal moods that indicate that certain events have not happened, may never happen, or should or must or are indeed desired to happen, but for which there i The New York Times-bestselling author of Find Me and Call Me by Your Name returns to the essay form with his collection of thoughts on time, the creative mind, and great lives and works Irrealis moods are a category of verbal moods that indicate that certain events have not happened, may never happen, or should or must or are indeed desired to happen, but for which there is no indication that they will ever happen. Irrealis moods are also known as counterfactual moods and include the conditional, the subjunctive, the optative, and the imperative--all best expressed in this book as the might-be and the might-have-been. One of the great prose stylists of his generation, Andr� Aciman returns to the essay form in Homo Irrealis to explore what time means to artists who cannot grasp life in the present. Irrealis moods are not about the present or the past or the future; they are about what might have been but never was but could in theory still happen. From meditations on subway poetry and the temporal resonances of an empty Italian street to considerations of the lives and work of Sigmund Freud, C. P. Cavafy, W. G. Sebald, John Sloan, �ric Rohmer, Marcel Proust, and Fernando Pessoa and portraits of cities such as Alexandria and St. Petersburg, Homo Irrealis is a deep reflection on the imagination's power to forge a zone outside of time's intractable hold.

30 review for Homo Irrealis: Essays

  1. 4 out of 5

    Diane S ☔

    Irrealism is a term that has been used by various writers in the fields of philosophy, literature, and art to denote specific modes of unreality and/or the problems in concretely defining reality. These essays were quite literary and covered the range of art, literature, cinema and memoir. Place and time. Enjoyed some, some I felt lost in, like I was being consumed by the irrealis. His life in Egypt, France walking through Rome, St Petersburg. Enjoyed the part on Sebald and enjoyed the authors ent Irrealism is a term that has been used by various writers in the fields of philosophy, literature, and art to denote specific modes of unreality and/or the problems in concretely defining reality. These essays were quite literary and covered the range of art, literature, cinema and memoir. Place and time. Enjoyed some, some I felt lost in, like I was being consumed by the irrealis. His life in Egypt, France walking through Rome, St Petersburg. Enjoyed the part on Sebald and enjoyed the authors enthusiasm for each subject whether a painting, a poem, watching a movie in the cinema. I took this slow, there is much to consume, ponder. A mixed read for me but an interesting one. ARC from Netgalley

  2. 5 out of 5

    Gerhard

    Well, André Aciman’s latest essay collection is certainly more intellectually bracing than his fiction, especially the rather tepid ‘Find Me’. Whether or not this will appeal to the average reader of ‘Call Me By Your Name’ remains to be seen. ‘Homo Irrealis’ is a play on the linguistics term ‘irrealis’, which Aciman defines as per its Wikipedia entry, “because the Oxford English Dictionary does not house the word.” He explains that “the irrealis mood knows no boundaries between what is and what i Well, André Aciman’s latest essay collection is certainly more intellectually bracing than his fiction, especially the rather tepid ‘Find Me’. Whether or not this will appeal to the average reader of ‘Call Me By Your Name’ remains to be seen. ‘Homo Irrealis’ is a play on the linguistics term ‘irrealis’, which Aciman defines as per its Wikipedia entry, “because the Oxford English Dictionary does not house the word.” He explains that “the irrealis mood knows no boundaries between what is and what isn’t, between what happened and what won’t.” As an example, Aciman references his ‘many worlds’ immigrant experience: What happened to the person I was actually working on becoming but didn’t know I was about to become, because one never quite knows that one is indeed working on becoming anyone? If this sounds far more complicated than it should be, Aciman does relax a bit as the essays progress. Probably the best is the candid ‘In Freud’s Shadow, Part 2’, where he recounts as a schoolboy frequenting a large remainders bookstore on the Piazza di San Silvestro in Rome, ferreting out a copy of ‘Psychopathia Sexualis’ by Richard von Krafft-Ebing. One would think that haunting bookshops to get a glimpse of salacious reading is practically a guarantee of sexual dysfunction later in life. Well, some critics have frowned at the age difference in ‘Call Me By Your Name’, as well as at the old man/young woman section in ‘Find Me’. However, is this a surefire indication of pathology, or just wishful thinking on the part of cancel culture? One afternoon after leaving the bookstore, Aciman as a schoolboy takes the 85 bus. This is crowded, which results in a young man being pushed up against him from behind and grabbing his upper arms as well to steady himself. The encounter is almost unbearably erotic to the lonely Aciman, and becomes a mental lacuna that he spends his entire life excavating and refilling, like sand in an hourglass: Now, whenever I come to Rome, I promise to take the 85 bus at more or less the same time in the evening to try to turn the clock back to relive that evening and see who I was and what I craved in those days. That is the ‘irrealis mood’ at its most plangent. If you think this is an early indication of homosexual tendencies in Aciman, the reality is far more complicated. He subsumes his erotic fantasies of the young man on the 85 bus with his lustful pining after Gina, who “smelled of incense and chamomile, of ancient wooden drawers and unwashed hair…” This results in a kind of polymorphous frenzy that must have driven the young Aciman wild with unrequited desire: Night after night, I would drift from him to her, back to him and then her, each feeding off the other and, like Roman buildings of all ages snuggling into, on top of, under, and against each other, body parts stripped from his body were given over to hers and then back to his with body parts from hers. One wonders how encounters such as these must have fed into Aciman’s literary imagination, becoming grist for novels like ‘Call Me By Your Name’, which is practically brimming over with the irrealis mood. I am also reminded of ‘The Motion of Light in Water’, wherein Samuel R. Delany writes powerfully about the refractive effect of memory. Aciman certainly can’t quite summon the same playful, transgressive and libidinous tone of Delany in full linguistic flight. Indeed, there is something almost strained about ‘In Freud’s Shadow, Part 2’. The author is on far more familiar ground when he waxes lyrical about art, cities and famous writers. This seems to give him the necessary distance in which to examine both his thoughts and desires with the necessary dispassion. An example is Aciman’s postcard of the Apollo Sauroktonos statue in the Vatican Museum, which is like a message from a younger to an older self: All I had at home was my picture of the Sauroktonos. Chaste and chastening, the ultimate androgyne, obscene because he lets you cradle the filthiest thoughts but won’t approve or consent to them and makes you feel dirty for even nursing them. The picture was the next best thing to the young man on the bus. I treasured it and used it as a bookmark.

  3. 4 out of 5

    Soula Kosti

    I would give this 4.5 stars just because some essays I enjoyed more than others, but I'm overall thankful for having encountered this book that gave a voice to some inner thoughts. In retrospection, "I have always felt as if I had no place in reality, as if I were not there at all." And if you've ever felt the same, you should read this book. In this essay collection, André Aciman uses various forms of art - cinema, literature, poetry, painting, sculpture, architecture - to examine the concept of I would give this 4.5 stars just because some essays I enjoyed more than others, but I'm overall thankful for having encountered this book that gave a voice to some inner thoughts. In retrospection, "I have always felt as if I had no place in reality, as if I were not there at all." And if you've ever felt the same, you should read this book. In this essay collection, André Aciman uses various forms of art - cinema, literature, poetry, painting, sculpture, architecture - to examine the concept of the irrealis mood. Here are two attempts to explain the irrealis mood by using the author's words: 1) "It's not about what did not, will not occur, but about what could still but might never occur" and 2) "might-have-beens that haven't really happened but aren't unreal for not happening and might still happen, though we hope - and fear - they both will and never will happen." This book reads as the midnight thoughts that creep in our minds uninvited, making us question everything - our place in the world, our path, our interpretation of our life, the concept of time. "If time exists at all, it operates on several planes simultaneously, where foresight and hindsight, prospection and retrospection are continuously coincident," explains Aciman. As humans we often wonder if we live the life we should, if we took the right path. "So many of us don't really belong here - not in the present, or the past, or the future - but all of us seek a life that exists elsewhere in time, or elsewhere on-screen, and that, not being able to find it, we have all learned to make do with what life throws are way." But even though we make do with what we have, we never really forget the life we imagined we should have. "The life we're still owed and cannot live transcends and outlasts everything, because it is part yearned for, part remembered, and part imagined, and it cannot die and it cannot go away because it never, ever really was." This book will also make you consider how much time alters memories. "Whatever it is I am trying to preserve may not be entirely real, but it isn't altogether false." That in actuality "we remember best what never happened" and that "the feelings that hurt the most, the emotions that sting most, are those that are absurd: the longing for the impossible things, precisely because they are impossible; nostalgia for what never was; the desire for what could have been; regret over not being someone else, dissatisfaction with the world's existence."

  4. 4 out of 5

    Bagus

    This collection of essays by André Aciman is highly intriguing that I spent my entire weekend digesting his thoughts of the irrealis form of thinking that most of us possess, and sometimes we express unconsciously. In linguistics, “irrealis” moods are the set of grammatical moods that indicate that something is not actually the case or that a certain situation or action is not known to have happened at the moment the speaker is talking. (Loc. 45) What the author transcribes as irrealis is how This collection of essays by André Aciman is highly intriguing that I spent my entire weekend digesting his thoughts of the irrealis form of thinking that most of us possess, and sometimes we express unconsciously. In linguistics, “irrealis” moods are the set of grammatical moods that indicate that something is not actually the case or that a certain situation or action is not known to have happened at the moment the speaker is talking. (Loc. 45) What the author transcribes as irrealis is how we often think in the form of “what should we have done” and the kind of longing for the alternate universe that might accompany us were we put that choice up instead of the choice that we finally ended up making. There are many ways irrealis moods could influence us, and it’s the author’s gift for having lived in various places around the globe, reading many classical books, as well as watching countless films that enable this thought to transpire in him. It all begins in his quest of searching for the real Alexandria, the place which rejected him due to his Jewish heritage, and the fact that he longed for that Alexandria which never was by the time he moved to Rome. The irrealis mood knows no boundaries between what is and what isn’t, between what happened and what won’t. In more ways than one, the essays about the artists, writers, and great minds gathered in this volume may have nothing to do with who I am, or who they were, and my reading of them may be entirely erroneous. But I misread them the better to read myself. (Loc. 130) From the start of the volume, the author has warned the readers about the implications of reading through the lens of irrealis mood. What we call reality, experience, or senses, they might as well disappear in face of the irrealis mood. And there’s no better way to get in touch with irrealis mood besides facing it inside works of art. In this volume besides from his own personal experiences, the author also provides us to the irrealis mood that he "thinks” present inside Freud’s sojourn to Rome, three French New Wave films directed by Eric Rohmer (My Night at Maud’s, Claire’s Knee and Chloe in the Afternoon), paintings by the Impressionists, as well as Proust’s novel. His reading through those works never failed to impress me on how the irrealis mood is pretty much present in many art forms. By the time I reached the last essay, it gives me an impression that we as humans have never truly lived in the present. There are many ways we reject reality by thinking of “what could possibly happen if…” and present ourselves with so many alternative cases. And that’s why we ended up inventing words such as 'remorse' and 'regret' to cope up with the daunting irrealis mood. Much more so, André Aciman uses many of his personal experiences that seem at times coherent with my own in the way that I interpret them as so. Perhaps we all have become slaves to probability. This volume will be really engaging if you are a fan of art and literary essays, and have a general understanding of New Wave French cinema which occupies almost half of the volume. Through this volume, the author takes me into a journey to see that our lives might have been guided through so many random occurrences and serendipities more than what we realise. === I received the Advance Reader Copy from Farrar, Straus and Giroux through NetGalley in exchange for an honest review.

  5. 5 out of 5

    Aida ☾

    i don't know how i feel about this. some of the essays made me feel stupid, but andré aciman's style is very pretty. i enjoyed reading it even if i barely understood anything. i don't know how i feel about this. some of the essays made me feel stupid, but andré aciman's style is very pretty. i enjoyed reading it even if i barely understood anything.

  6. 4 out of 5

    Claudia

    "I like the ambiguity, I like the fluidity between hard fact and speculation, and I may like interpretation more than action, which might explain why I prefer a psychological novel to a straight-forward page turner." Andre Aciman's Homo Irrealis gives beautiful insight's into a great writer's mind. In his essays he talks about Irrealis moods, moods around events that "have not happened, may never happen, or should or must or are indeed desired to happen, but for which there is no indication that "I like the ambiguity, I like the fluidity between hard fact and speculation, and I may like interpretation more than action, which might explain why I prefer a psychological novel to a straight-forward page turner." Andre Aciman's Homo Irrealis gives beautiful insight's into a great writer's mind. In his essays he talks about Irrealis moods, moods around events that "have not happened, may never happen, or should or must or are indeed desired to happen, but for which there is no indication that they will ever happen." Especially in the times we're currently living in I found the description of these moods that many of us have experienced at some point in our lives but might not have been able to verbalise enormously touching. Aciman's writing is as beautiful as ever, and if anything this collection of essays has provided subtext to his novels, provided a deeper understanding of his writing, explained the sense of longing that is so evident in many of them, and made me want to re-read his work again. Aciman, for me, is one of those rare authors that touch me to the core, and isn't it the most beautiful thing to find an author like that. As he puts it himself: "All great art invariably lets us say the same thing: This was really about me."

  7. 5 out of 5

    Grace W

    (c/p from my review on TheStoryGraph) I can't tell if it is the themes of this book that I don't like or if it is the writing or the fact that I cannot handle this much serious reflection on Freud, a man I dislike with a deep intensity. It's a shame because the introduction had me really interested but the essays themselves didn't hit at all. They could have, the bones were there, but somehow none of them worked as well as I sort of hoped they would. Instead I was either bored or annoyed or both (c/p from my review on TheStoryGraph) I can't tell if it is the themes of this book that I don't like or if it is the writing or the fact that I cannot handle this much serious reflection on Freud, a man I dislike with a deep intensity. It's a shame because the introduction had me really interested but the essays themselves didn't hit at all. They could have, the bones were there, but somehow none of them worked as well as I sort of hoped they would. Instead I was either bored or annoyed or both. I think at this point Call Me By Your Name is easily this authors best work. I don't know why the rest of his works don't hit except maybe there is an almost aggressive intellectualism if that makes sense. There is an idea that the reader understands everything the author is referencing and knows all the historical and cultural beats. I remember in Find Me being annoyed that he would use other languages as if the readers all speak Italian and French. There is a "if you don't get it you shouldn't be reading this" vibe to his later work that doesn't sit with me. I don't know how much more of a try I'm gonna give this author. Which is a shame because his prose can be extremely lovely.

  8. 5 out of 5

    Merve Yazicioglu

    Thank you to NetGalley and Farrar, Straus and Giroux for allowing me to read this book. Homo Irrealis is a collection of essays written by André Irrealis. These essays are surrounded by the irrealis moods “a certain situation or action is not known to have happened at the moment the speaker is talking”. In this collection, Aciman explores the themes of time and the hypothetical situation in which everything exists and does not all together regardless of what happens and did happen. Throughout this Thank you to NetGalley and Farrar, Straus and Giroux for allowing me to read this book. Homo Irrealis is a collection of essays written by André Irrealis. These essays are surrounded by the irrealis moods “a certain situation or action is not known to have happened at the moment the speaker is talking”. In this collection, Aciman explores the themes of time and the hypothetical situation in which everything exists and does not all together regardless of what happens and did happen. Throughout this collection, the theme of exile emerges from the mind of Aciman regardless of what topic the author focuses on. There seems to be a place in which the author is stuck between the realities or perhaps yearning for a reality that has never happened or might have happened. This resembles being an exile, immigrant, and migrant; being stuck between worlds yearning for the past but also the future. Nostalgia is a major part of a migrant’s identity: the inexplainable yearning for a home and past, that is no longer available to the exile: “Perhaps I wanted the scene to exist outside of time, with no real indication of where, when, or in which decade the picture was taken”. It is not longing for that specific period of time, country, or place, it merely is longing for something that does not exist within time or space. Moving from place to place forms an identity that no longer belongs to the person. There is not just one identity anymore but multiple ones serving for adaptability. Now in that subject, alienation comes to mind to explain why one person seeks another identity or a new country. It has multiple answers but in a general sense the difficulties of a providing better opportunities for certain living style pushes its citizen out or those people are pushed out of their country in horrible circumstances. As it is in case here, André Aciman did not feel welcomed in Egypt due to his family being Sephardic Jews. Therefore, once being alienated it is easy to fantasise for a new reality, that may or may not be real. It is explained so well by Aciman in this quotation: "But once in France I soon realized that France was not the friendly and welcoming France I had dreamed of in Egypt. That particular France had been, after all, merely a myth that allowed us to live with the loss of Egypt. Yet, three years later, once I left France and moved to the Unites States, the old, imagined, dreamed-of France suddenly rose up from its ashes, and nowadays, as an American citizen living in New York, I look back and catch myself longing once more for a France that never existed and couldn’t exist but is still out there, somewhere in the transit between Alexandria and Paris and New York, though I can’t quite put my finger on its location, because it has no location. It is a fantasy France, and fantasies—anticipated, imagined, or remembered—don’t necessarily disappear simply because they are unreal." Homo Irrealis had a personal touch for me as I have had similar experiences of being in a transcendental position, being in between two worlds. Yearning for a home or the past life, that is never existent in reality as we know it. But it exist beyond our mind and time, it stands still in a place, where we can only reach in our mind. When you leave a place, it will never be the same when you get back to it. Just like it is for Giovanni in Giovanni’s Room and Raif Efendi in Madonna in a Fur Coat: they yearn for the past but also the future in present time but they only exist in their minds.

  9. 4 out of 5

    Tina

    Aciman's writing has rescued me on several occassions, but this was not it. It's not so much the language but the content. These essays are of great personal significance to Aciman (Jewish diaspora, immigration, displacement, feeling of belonging), but it is so meticulously anecdotal that it didn't hold any appeal to me. Yes, I am selfish in that I am only able to immerse in writing I can "relate" to. Or at least have a "general message" (of greater political/social impact) so I can marvel to so Aciman's writing has rescued me on several occassions, but this was not it. It's not so much the language but the content. These essays are of great personal significance to Aciman (Jewish diaspora, immigration, displacement, feeling of belonging), but it is so meticulously anecdotal that it didn't hold any appeal to me. Yes, I am selfish in that I am only able to immerse in writing I can "relate" to. Or at least have a "general message" (of greater political/social impact) so I can marvel to someone "did you know that ?...." I am glad, at least, that Aciman is still writing. His style and narrative remain one of my favorites of 21st century fiction authors. I look forward to more contemporary fiction by him.

  10. 5 out of 5

    Sandra

    I love, love André Aciman.

  11. 5 out of 5

    GONZA

    I like Aciman's books ALMOST as much as I like this collection of short essays, in which the author describes some cities (including Rome and Alexandria), the director Rohmer and other famous poets and books, which gave me the opportunity to extend my already endless list of books to read. Unfortunately, in some cases, I found the chapters a bit repetitive, so I recommend not reading the whole book in a row. I libri di Aciman mi piacciono quasi quanto questa raccolta di brevi saggi, in cui l'auto I like Aciman's books ALMOST as much as I like this collection of short essays, in which the author describes some cities (including Rome and Alexandria), the director Rohmer and other famous poets and books, which gave me the opportunity to extend my already endless list of books to read. Unfortunately, in some cases, I found the chapters a bit repetitive, so I recommend not reading the whole book in a row. I libri di Aciman mi piacciono quasi quanto questa raccolta di brevi saggi, in cui l'autore descrive alcune cittá (tra cui Roma e Alessandria), il regista Rohmer e altri poeti e libri famosi, che mi hanno dato l'opportunitá di allungare la mia giá infinita lista di libri da leggere. Purtroppo peró in alcuni casi, ho trovato i capitoli un po' ripetitivi e quindi consiglio di non leggere il libro tutto di seguito.

  12. 5 out of 5

    Simoné Eloff

    Never read a collection of essays in my life, but when I saw this available to "Read Now" on Netgalley, I figured, why not broaden my horizons a bit? Never read a collection of essays in my life, but when I saw this available to "Read Now" on Netgalley, I figured, why not broaden my horizons a bit?

  13. 5 out of 5

    Christopher Louderback

    I wanted, from the outset, to savor every line of this book. And I didn’t know it then, but I wanted, too, to be able to savor the moment of looking back to before I’d read each line, to be able to feel nostalgia for the moment of wanting to be able to savor each sentence — and further even still, looking forward to this moment of longing to go back to the moment I first read about Aciman’s upcoming collection, Homo Irrealis, or even further to when I hoped soon to hear of a new book by Aciman, I wanted, from the outset, to savor every line of this book. And I didn’t know it then, but I wanted, too, to be able to savor the moment of looking back to before I’d read each line, to be able to feel nostalgia for the moment of wanting to be able to savor each sentence — and further even still, looking forward to this moment of longing to go back to the moment I first read about Aciman’s upcoming collection, Homo Irrealis, or even further to when I hoped soon to hear of a new book by Aciman, and further to when I read Call Me By Your Name and wanted, at once, to be able to move backwards in time to anticipate reading it for the first time. Again. And now, I’m puzzling through so many thoughts spiraled with memory layered over memory so that I am, myself, sort of lost in time and out of time. I am who I am now, looking back to who I thought I was, wondering about who I might someday be but never quite became but still could become — and I’m already thinking about some moment in the future when I’ll look back at this moment and long, again, to know who I am now, writing this in anticipation of who I’ll be then, looking back.

  14. 4 out of 5

    Paul "Axl" Hurman

    Part personal writing, part travel writing, part criticism, this is an intriguing mish mash that doesn’t quite work overall. The parts where he’s writing about himself are really engaging and interesting, the travel writing parts are okay, but the critical writing is dull and at times incredibly patronising and/or arrogant, while at the same time not being as intelligent as it thinks it is. Still, it was a solid three out of five overall, until the final five essays which were, frankly, awful.

  15. 5 out of 5

    Richard

    Wow

  16. 5 out of 5

    Kurt Anderson

    Some great, some just ok, all worth a read.

  17. 5 out of 5

    John Sinclair

    Frankly Aciman’s essays went into my head and ended up in a word stew — a misfire for me not him. I’m going to reread this later and rate it then. I’m not sure why I chose it now, except that it’s new and I love his novels; a rationale insufficient to the cause as it turns out. #bibliophile #book #bookish #booklover #books #books2021 #booksofinstagram #bookstagram #bookworm #goodreads #instabook #instabooks #reader #readers #reading #readingroom #readersofinstagram #bookreview

  18. 4 out of 5

    3 Things About This Book

    📕Happy #Pubday to this series of essays which are bunch of love letters to Alexandria, Paris, New York and all memories that comes with them. Love letters to all shoulda, woulda and couldas - 📗Aciman takes you to his childhood and opens you up the times that he wouldn’t think that exists. He takes you from cinema to cinema to show you different films where he reflects on different moods (or as he calls irrealis moods) that might or might not happened in his real life - 📘Some essays left me thinking 📕Happy #Pubday to this series of essays which are bunch of love letters to Alexandria, Paris, New York and all memories that comes with them. Love letters to all shoulda, woulda and couldas - 📗Aciman takes you to his childhood and opens you up the times that he wouldn’t think that exists. He takes you from cinema to cinema to show you different films where he reflects on different moods (or as he calls irrealis moods) that might or might not happened in his real life - 📘Some essays left me thinking did I understand what actually happened here while some others made perfect sense. Based on your mood and level of imagination that you can incorporate into these essays change how much you’ll enjoy it. I’d say give it shot; you might find something that sticks with you

  19. 5 out of 5

    Michelle

  20. 5 out of 5

    SL

  21. 5 out of 5

    Dominic Mccaffrey

  22. 5 out of 5

    Sara

  23. 4 out of 5

    Brandi Hart

  24. 5 out of 5

    Linda Liukas

  25. 4 out of 5

    Mark

  26. 4 out of 5

    Verónica Fleitas Solich

  27. 4 out of 5

    Samuel Sivertson

  28. 4 out of 5

    Sophie

  29. 5 out of 5

    Lindsey

  30. 4 out of 5

    Daniel Dao

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