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Athens After Empire: A History from Alexander the Great to the Emperor Hadrian

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A major new history of Athens' remarkably long and influential life after the collapse of its empire To many the history of post-Classical Athens is one of decline. True, Athens hardly commanded the number of allies it had when hegemon of its fifth-century Delian League or even its fourth-century Naval Confederacy, and its navy was but a shadow of its former self. But Athen A major new history of Athens' remarkably long and influential life after the collapse of its empire To many the history of post-Classical Athens is one of decline. True, Athens hardly commanded the number of allies it had when hegemon of its fifth-century Delian League or even its fourth-century Naval Confederacy, and its navy was but a shadow of its former self. But Athens recovered from its perilous position in the closing quarter of the fourth century and became once again a player in Greek affairs, even during the Roman occupation. Athenian democracy survived and evolved, even through its dealings with Hellenistic Kings, its military clashes with Macedonia, and its alliance with Rome. Famous Romans, including Julius Caesar and Mark Antony, saw Athens as much more than an isolated center for philosophy. Athens After Empire offers a new narrative history of post-Classical Athens, extending the period down to the aftermath of Hadrian's reign.


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A major new history of Athens' remarkably long and influential life after the collapse of its empire To many the history of post-Classical Athens is one of decline. True, Athens hardly commanded the number of allies it had when hegemon of its fifth-century Delian League or even its fourth-century Naval Confederacy, and its navy was but a shadow of its former self. But Athen A major new history of Athens' remarkably long and influential life after the collapse of its empire To many the history of post-Classical Athens is one of decline. True, Athens hardly commanded the number of allies it had when hegemon of its fifth-century Delian League or even its fourth-century Naval Confederacy, and its navy was but a shadow of its former self. But Athens recovered from its perilous position in the closing quarter of the fourth century and became once again a player in Greek affairs, even during the Roman occupation. Athenian democracy survived and evolved, even through its dealings with Hellenistic Kings, its military clashes with Macedonia, and its alliance with Rome. Famous Romans, including Julius Caesar and Mark Antony, saw Athens as much more than an isolated center for philosophy. Athens After Empire offers a new narrative history of post-Classical Athens, extending the period down to the aftermath of Hadrian's reign.

30 review for Athens After Empire: A History from Alexander the Great to the Emperor Hadrian

  1. 5 out of 5

    Ernest Spoon

    Well, this book is a nice introduction to what I always considered a hole in my readings of ancient Mediterranean history, the Hellenistic Era, from the death of Alexander the Great to the Roman conquest of Greece in the Third and Second Centuries BCE. I had no idea that Athens remained something of a military power throughout the age of Alexander's Successors. Quite often the city found itself on the losing side, but its citizens were always able to pick themselves up and reinvent their polis. Well, this book is a nice introduction to what I always considered a hole in my readings of ancient Mediterranean history, the Hellenistic Era, from the death of Alexander the Great to the Roman conquest of Greece in the Third and Second Centuries BCE. I had no idea that Athens remained something of a military power throughout the age of Alexander's Successors. Quite often the city found itself on the losing side, but its citizens were always able to pick themselves up and reinvent their polis. Athens even had the temerity to stand up to the Roman war machine during the First Mithridatic War! Fortunately for Athens, and Professor Worthington, and we readers, Rome never meted out a punishment for its naughtiness like it did to Corinth in 148 BCE. Though Sulla, whom I consider one of the true bastards of Roman history, came close. Until I read this, even though I knew the emperor Hadrian was a philhellene, I always assumed Athens was something like a sleepy university town with great tourist attractions during the Roman period. Hooboy, was I wrong! Especially under Hadrian the city experienced a renaissance, interestingly enough, in political influence, therefore we can assume artistically and intellectually also. Alas, so much is lost. Thank you, Christians and Muslims.

  2. 5 out of 5

    Katie_la_geek

  3. 4 out of 5

    p.mac

  4. 5 out of 5

    Dawn

  5. 5 out of 5

    Mickslibrarian

  6. 5 out of 5

    Emrys

  7. 5 out of 5

    James Harrison

  8. 5 out of 5

    Jake Sylvestre

  9. 4 out of 5

    Melanie

  10. 5 out of 5

    Jw

  11. 5 out of 5

    Ian

  12. 5 out of 5

    Grady

  13. 5 out of 5

    Rachel

  14. 5 out of 5

    Dean

  15. 4 out of 5

    Michael Kovan

  16. 5 out of 5

    Ivana Lepojev Kulešević

  17. 5 out of 5

    Leslie Smith

  18. 5 out of 5

    Alex Kuefler

  19. 4 out of 5

    Jaron

  20. 5 out of 5

    Michelle

  21. 5 out of 5

    Simon

  22. 5 out of 5

    Calypso ♡

  23. 5 out of 5

    Noah

  24. 4 out of 5

    Kathleen Bianchi

  25. 4 out of 5

    Simen

  26. 4 out of 5

    Mike

  27. 4 out of 5

    Theo

  28. 5 out of 5

    Efi

  29. 4 out of 5

    Kyli

  30. 4 out of 5

    A Young Philosopher

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